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Why Internet Explorer Still Dominates South Korea.

timothy posted about 6 months ago | from the stuck-in-a-rut dept.

Internet Explorer 218

New submitter bmurray7 writes "You might think that the country that has the fastest average home internet speeds would be a first adapter of modern browsers. Instead, as the Washington Post reports, a payment processing security standard forces most South Koreans to rely upon Internet Explorer for online shopping. Since the standard uses a unique encryption algorithm, an ActiveX control is required to complete online purchases. As a result, many internet users are in the habit of approving all AtivceX control prompts, potentially exposing them to malware."

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218 comments

Timmay! (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45335355)

AtivceX? Go, Timmay! You're a kickass editor!

Re:Timmay! (2)

TangoMargarine (1617195) | about 6 months ago | (#45335599)

I think 'editor' is entirely too charitable a term if they can't even proof-read the summary (or, last week, THE HEADLINE). 'Blind rubber-stampers' has a nice ring to it.

Re:Timmay! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45335615)

No one has ever accused Timmay of being literate.

Re:Timmay! (3, Informative)

sribe (304414) | about 6 months ago | (#45335915)

AtivceX? Go, Timmay! You're a kickass editor!

You too, since you missed the chance to pick on him for:

- "first adapter"

- "South Korean's"

This is actually the most illiterate post in a few weeks!

Macs? Linux? (4, Interesting)

MightyYar (622222) | about 6 months ago | (#45335363)

From TFA:

But those with Apple computers — for which IE isn’t available — have it harder. Some go to Internet cafes. Some rely on their office desktops. Some dash into hotel business centers. Some hold on to their old computers and boot them up when it’s time to make purchases. Still others depend on a secret weapon called Boot Camp, a software program that allows a Mac to run Windows.

Holy crap!

Re:Macs? Linux? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45335725)

Macs and Linux? Those *are* a tiny minority, especially Linux. Your main problem is: the *extremely* common Android doesn't support ActiveX, neither do common iOS devices, the Metro version of IE (Windows is very common too obviously) and the only version of IE for WinRT/Phone/Mobile/CE don't support it as well (although very uncommon). Oh, and not the x64 version of desktop IE. It also doesn't work in very common web browsers like Firefox, Chrome and Safari (anything besides IE). And it won't work on anything that doesn't have a x86 CPU. Relying on ActiveX in 2013 is insane.

Taiwan does it too (4, Funny)

rebelwarlock (1319465) | about 6 months ago | (#45335383)

Banks here make you login to your online account by using a card reader with your ATM card. And of course, that requires an ActiveX control. The Cathay Bank site itself looks like it hasn't changed design since 1996.

Re:Taiwan does it too (2)

jonbryce (703250) | about 6 months ago | (#45335447)

Some banks in the UK do that as well, but it requires you to type an 8 digit number from the card reader into a text box on the website.

Re:Taiwan does it too (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45335859)

In Finland we have random user account id, password that is selected by the user and a list of single use random pin codes. Everything works with any browser and basicly only way one can hack into it is to use social engineering, and even then it is hard, because you will need two pin codes to make a money transfer and if the transfer is unlike the ones before, the system will send a message to your cell phone which is used to give access to the money transfer.

It is quite easy to use (obviously a little extra work if you need to read your text messages) and pretty hard to break. Did I mention that everything works with any browser? Same system is used to buy online and even to identify people.

Only thing that we still lack is micro payments.

Re:Taiwan does it too (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45335903)

I'm the same AC as before. I forgot to mention that my mother (who is not very good with computers) got a virus to her computer and soon after that she received one of those verification text messages. Even she is not good with computers, she realized that something is wrong, contacted the bank and they closed her account to prevent any future damage. So the system works pretty well.

Re:Taiwan does it too (5, Informative)

jones_supa (887896) | about 6 months ago | (#45336085)

I should also add that no Java or ActiveX is required to do online banking in Finland. If you want to see how a nice, clean and secure bank website is created, Finns are not a bad choice to consult.

Re:Taiwan does it too (1)

St.Creed (853824) | about 6 months ago | (#45336293)

The same system is in use in The Netherlands with most banks. Some banks use their own remote cardreaders though. The Dutch banks were helped by the fact that they automated a looooong time ago.

Re:Taiwan does it too (1)

gl4ss (559668) | about 6 months ago | (#45336517)

the same system can be used for paying pizza orders from 423423 pizza places in finland as well(it just links to the bank and then back).

though I still wish my finnish bank went back 13 years, because their design back then was better(the fucks by the way changed for couple of years in 2009 or so to using a java plugin for typing in the pin for no security benefit whatsoever! they stopped it now though... ).

but local association monopolies who are in good terms with each other tend to go for stupid standards - because they can agree on it. if the banks in s korea hadn't agreed on the crypto then it wouldn't be a standard.. someone is getting a shitload of money from the arrangement though from every bank.

Re:Taiwan does it too - Funny (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45336069)

??

Re:Taiwan does it too (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45336073)

Same with the government. While most public websites conform to standards, many internal systems require IE6, whether they use activeX or not.

SEED in Flash, Java, JS, NPAPI, or PPAPI (3, Interesting)

tepples (727027) | about 6 months ago | (#45335391)

Why hasn't the SEED cipher (RFC 4269) been reimplemented in Flash, Java, JavaScript, native code using an NPAPI plug-in (Netscape's counterpart to ActiveX, now used by Firefox), or native code using a PPAPI plug-in (Chrome's counterpart to ActiveX)? Without any chance of support for ActiveX on mobile phones or ARM-powered tablets, I'd guess it'd have to be.

Re:SEED in Flash, Java, JS, NPAPI, or PPAPI (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45335583)

Well, according to the Wikipedia article linked in the summary, it is is supported in NSS, and hence in Firefox (since version 3.5.4).

As for whether or not there is something else required as well as the cipher itself, dunno.

Re:SEED in Flash, Java, JS, NPAPI, or PPAPI (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 6 months ago | (#45335757)

I'd be inclined to wonder if the issue isn't the cypher itself; but maldesigned websites that won't talk to anything except IE with the expected ActiveX plugin... Unless it is unbelievably arcane, or proprietary and legally encumbered, hacking out at least a bad implementation shouldn't be a particularly gargantuan task. You wouldn't necessarily want to trust an enthusiastic-novice interpretation of anything crypto related; but if you just want 'implements the protocol, doesn't scream horribly' rather than 'doesn't make any subtle cryptographic mistakes', that's a much lower bar to clear.

Re:SEED in Flash, Java, JS, NPAPI, or PPAPI (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45336189)

Why hasn't the SEED cipher (RFC 4269) been reimplemented in Flash, Java, JavaScript, native code using an NPAPI plug-in (Netscape's counterpart to ActiveX, now used by Firefox), or native code using a PPAPI plug-in (Chrome's counterpart to ActiveX)? Without any chance of support for ActiveX on mobile phones or ARM-powered tablets, I'd guess it'd have to be.

Because Korea is a tiny country, so there is no demand (and thus, no financial incentive) for anyone except the Korean government to implement SEED. And the Korean government says, well, MSIE works fine, 99% of Koreans use MSIE (since that's the only thing that works), what more do you want?

ActiveX controls (4, Informative)

noobermin (1950642) | about 6 months ago | (#45335393)

I know too much about this. I'm a Korea-phile, so last year I applied to a graduate school in South Korea and they required me to download like 2 or so add-ons to IE to even complete the online application.

Re:ActiveX controls (2)

NatasRevol (731260) | about 6 months ago | (#45335539)

Is there an IE for non-Microsoft phones? Or do they just not buy anything from their phones/tablets?

Re:ActiveX controls (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 6 months ago | (#45335871)

Is there an IE for non-Microsoft phones? Or do they just not buy anything from their phones/tablets?

Even if there were, it probably wouldn't help. 'ActiveX', in practice, is really woven more into Windows(and x86 Windows specifically, especially for the ActiveX controls that are basically just a dangerously easy way of executing native win32 code) than it is into IE, IE is just the transmission vector where you run into it.

IE for Mac never supported it in any meaningful way, and even Windows Phone and WinRT either don't support it at all, or support only the architecture agnostic bits, which precludes most real-world use. (Does the 'metro' mode IE in Win8 even support it, for anything except possibly MS-blessed components?)

My guess is 'lots of shitty apps that are nothing but wrappers to websites, just like in the US, only mandatory because the equivalent of SSL doesn't work on your phone, sucker!'.

Re:ActiveX controls (2)

RaceProUK (1137575) | about 6 months ago | (#45336147)

Metro IE doesn't even support Silverlight, let alone ActiveX (which MS have been trying to kill for the last decade).

Re:ActiveX controls (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45335723)

You knew about this and only now you are telling people about it... Disgrace!

Re:ActiveX controls (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45336171)

I'm a Korea-phile

aka a pedophile, because even their 20 year olds look 12. There is no other redeeming reason to visit that nasty peninsula, they're culturally devoid.

Strange classification (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45335401)

So IE 11 isn't a "modern browser"?

Re:Strange classification (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45335745)

That's correct.

Re:Strange classification (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45336007)

lol DAE hate IE and MS???

Re:Strange classification (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45335787)

Web developer here. Way better than earlier IE versions. Modern? No its not.

Years upon years of problems (3, Insightful)

TWX (665546) | about 6 months ago | (#45335409)

I've seen similar issues all over the place, someone designs some proprietary-yet-essential service to use a proprietary plugin or other technology that's very platform and version specific. One just ends up using two web browsers, the old one that's required in order to make the stupid proprietary thing work, and the new one for one's normal browsing. It SUCKS from a support perspective as both browsers fight to be default, and users can't keep track of what pages load with what browser, etc, and that's not even beginning to address the security problems.

Re:Years upon years of problems (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 6 months ago | (#45335931)

It doesn't help you if the antique browser insists on getting grabby; but situations like that usually make me resort to 'encapsulating' the oh-so-necessary-whatever-it-is behind a wrapper script that summons it in the antique browser (with as many features that might induce the user to navigate to another page, navigation bar, etc. as possible hidden or restricted) and hiding every other sign of the older browser's existence.

If that isn't good enough, we keep a stash of assorted antique VMs in the freezer, ready to be fired up (with persistence of any state changes during operation disabled) when needed and then shoved back in cold storage where they belong. Some of those things will probably still be run, from time to time, after I'm dead.

WTF? (4, Funny)

yeshuawatso (1774190) | about 6 months ago | (#45335411)

Even Microsoft is looking at SK and saying: "WTF? We don't even use ActiveX anymore."

Re:WTF? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45335575)

Even Microsoft is looking at SK and saying: "WTF? We don't even use ActiveX anymore."

Microsoft has a long history of producing shitty, proprietary technology and then abandoning it later.

Likely the cost to replace these technologies once Microsoft decides to abandon them leave lost of places stuck in the lurch or using older systems.

Anybody who deploys anything on a Microsoft proprietary technology is just asking for it. But they've become like IBM used to be, and nobody got fired for going with IBM back in the day.

COM, Silverlight, OLE, ActiveX ... I've lost track of the number of things which have become entrenched only to have MS realize it was shitty technology all along and stop supporting it. But the wake they leave behind them only serves to hurt the people who bought it from in the first place.

Which means most Microsoft customers are too short sighted to realize just how much it will cost them to extricate themselves from it. It can cost far far more to give up a technology than to adopt it.

Re:WTF? (1)

St.Creed (853824) | about 6 months ago | (#45336363)

But they've become like IBM used to be, and nobody got fired for going with IBM back in the day.

Microsoft is not *that* IBM. By a very large margin.

Don't get me wrong: I like a number of MS products. But comparing Microsoft to IBM on this point is incorrect IMO.

Re:WTF? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45336399)

Except that MS still supports ActiveX and their creation/consumption from their development tools. And what makes ActiveX shitty? Security issues? They have no more than NPAPI does, or any plugin interface that allows a browser to run native code from a third-party.

Really, the only issue with ActiveX isn't the technology but the decision to have the plugin engine for Internet Explorer load and use plain ActiveX controls which exposed a very large potential surface area. If they had required that all said plugins implement a special interface or otherwise opt-in to being browser plugin from the get-go then it really wouldn't have been any different. That and the decision around prompted download/installation of the libraries rather than requiring that the user perform both explicitly led to the easy dissemination of malware built on ActiveX. But neither of these have nothing to do with the underlying technology which is really just a common and language agnostic exported interface for embeddable user interface components.

Re:WTF? (4, Funny)

simonbp (412489) | about 6 months ago | (#45335665)

Don't get on too high of a horse; Microsoft is also looking at Netflix and saying "WTF? Even we don't use Silverlight anymore."

Re:WTF? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45335783)

Don't get on too high of a horse; Microsoft is also looking at Netflix and saying "WTF? Even we don't use Silverlight anymore."

I believe you've just proven my point, and cited yet another example of Microsoft stuff which they've now abandoned.

That Silverlight had an even shorter lifespan highlights the fact that when it comes to something proprietary and Microsoft, you're taking a big gamble your investment won't become sunk cost.

Re:WTF? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45335675)

"But thanks for the cash!"

Whatever it takes.

Re:WTF? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45335817)

They look at SK and say: "It worked as planned."

...and it's bullshit, too. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45335419)

The country is addicted to red tape. If you want to do online banking here, you need to get three different plugins working along with digital certificates and keyfobs and a bunch of nonsense -- many points of security, perhaps, but also many points of potential user failure, with webpages and applications that won't properly render Korean writing, changes in interface, etc.

It's endemic to the culture. Want to be a teacher here? The hoops you have to jump through are ridiculous. Up-to-date Criminal Records checks are fine and to be expected, but transcripts in duplicate or triplicate? A new notarized copy of your degree? EACH TIME you need to get a new visa? Is the stuff they take and put on file somehow burned after two weeks and they can't reference it?

I don't know if it's incompetence or corruption or a healthy dose of both, but at times it's a colossal pain in the ass just to get something done.

"Super Size Me" says innocent Koreans to M$ (4, Interesting)

globaljustin (574257) | about 6 months ago | (#45336091)

You're wrong about Korean culture...

Well, partially wrong. They built their IT infrastructure based on the *best* available at the time: Microsoft

Blame Microsoft for making shitty products that lock-in users (and whole countries) to an inefficient half-assed software system.

caveat emptor? sure...but at some point you have to acknowledge that they culpability can't rest only on the consumer....M$ parasitic system design was/is truly evil

If you want to fault Korean culture, fault them for being too trusting of the USA in general....poor people actually take what we say at face value.

I lived there for 1 year...I know the ass-backwards way they sometimes adapt new technology...but this isn't that...the aren't inherently inefficient as a culture...they showed us what happens when a country actually does what M$ suggests...

Sort of like a 'Super Size Me' kind of project only with IT infrastructure for a whole country not fast food

typos (again) (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45335425)

No proofreading ever on posts.
AtivceX

Everybody clicks "YES" anyways. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45335505)

My company's Online Computer Security Training site uses a self-signed SSL key. The instructions actually say to click "Accept" on the security warning.

Facepalm.

Nobody else even cares.

Re:Everybody clicks "YES" anyways. (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 6 months ago | (#45335587)

Why does your company not import their CA cert into your machines?

That way no one gets the error and they can self sign all they like.

I can relate... (3, Informative)

Creepy (93888) | about 6 months ago | (#45335511)

My work's HR system requires an ActiveX control with our smart card system. To make things worse, this system barely supports IE7 (apparently IE8 in compatibility mode works, as well, but IE9+ absolutely does not) and they only upgraded it to support 7 because Microsoft stopped supporting IE6. I actually created a VM explicitly so I can log into the HR system (because I HAVE to have IE9 or higher for my other work, since I work in html 5 and need to test on most major browsers). My ops group thought it was odd that I requested key card software installed on a VM, but when I explained my situation they did it (in fact, they set up a lab machine specifically for others with similar circumstances).

Incidentally, nobody really uses IE except for the HR system, and everybody has an old version also because of the HR system. I believe the HR issue is money related and more related to SAP upgrade costs than key card (and I believe we paid SAP to integrate our key card access).

Re:I can relate... (2)

SJHillman (1966756) | about 6 months ago | (#45335601)

IE incompatibilities is the only reason we use XP Mode on any of our work PCs - some websites require 6, some requires 8 or newer. For us, it's mostly healthcare/insurance companies that we have to interface with that have the strictest (worst) compatibility requirements.

Re:I can relate... (1)

r_jensen11 (598210) | about 6 months ago | (#45336151)

I believe the HR issue is money related and more related to SAP upgrade costs than key card (and I believe we paid SAP to integrate our key card access).

Aha! So that's why Elon builds his own IT [slashdot.org] backend system!

Re:I can relate... (1)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | about 6 months ago | (#45336259)

My work's HR system requires an ActiveX control with our smart card system.

I think our university uses that same damn system. There's been a few instances when the doors wouldn't work because the the card controller got infected with some virus.

Hooray for the USA! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45335529)

There's something having to do with the Internet and mobile computing where we're not dead last among upper tier economies!

BootCamp is free (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45335545)

One [washingtonpost.com] of the linked articles says BootCamp costs $70. That's wrong. BootCamp in Mac OS X is free.

Maybe the author was thinking of the discounted cost of "The Healthy Nut Bootcamp" fitness club sessions.

Bad summary (1, Insightful)

21mhz (443080) | about 6 months ago | (#45335555)

The writeup assumes that no version of Internet Explorer can be thought of as a modern browser. This is not true for IE 10 and 11.

That said, a countrywide de-facto standard forcing vendor lock-in is bad.

Re:Bad summary (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45335647)

>This is not true for IE 10 and 11.
Hahahahahah ahahahahahahahahah ahahahahahahahahahahahahah ahahahahahahahahahahah ahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha hahahahahahahahahahahaahahahahahahaha hahahahahahah ahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahah ahahahahahahahahahahahahaha hahahahahahahahahaha hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha, yes it is.

Re:Bad summary (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45336035)

The longer your "Hahaha", the more credible you get. Keep going.

Re:Bad summary (1, Interesting)

ahabswhale (1189519) | about 6 months ago | (#45335911)

"Modern browsers" have real developer tools. IE 10 does not. Therefore, only IE 11 could possibly be considered modern. Since it represents less than 1% of all IE web traffic, it's probably fair to just lump them all together for the purpose of their argument.

Re:Bad summary (1, Troll)

Ark42 (522144) | about 6 months ago | (#45336241)

Press F12.

Personally, IE10+ has surpassed Chrome with regard to being a modern HTML 5 browser.

Re:Bad summary (0)

cyber-vandal (148830) | about 6 months ago | (#45336469)

I pressed F12 and they still suck. A bit less than the IE9 ones which sucked a bit less than the IE8 ones. The real problem is that we have to wait an eternity for an update to them whereas the Chrome and Firefox ones are being improved all the time.

Re:Bad summary (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45336017)

The writeup assumes that no version of Internet Explorer can be thought of as a modern browser. This is not true for IE 10 and 11.

No version of IE can be thought of as an open browser, and modern events reinforce the foolishness of trusting things developed in secret.

Re:Bad summary (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45336459)

It is exactly as microsoft intended. Richard Stallman might have mentioned something about this once (but just the one time I think). If they had adapted open standards, they wouldn't be 'stuck' with old technology (that the company may not support anymore, they only support it while they are making money, and once the money is gone, so is the support). Open software is supported by organizations and foundations that goes beyond money. Those who think proprietary software is the best model should look at this situation. Its their situation too.

Crisis averted (5, Funny)

unapersson (38207) | about 6 months ago | (#45335579)

It's like a microcosm of what might have happened worldwide had ActiveX been as popular as they'd wanted to be.

Proprietary Formats Too! (1)

fredrickleo (711335) | about 6 months ago | (#45335597)

The best is their official government forms that can only be downloaded in the proprietary Hancom Word format ^^

North Korea is Best Korea. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45335657)

I bet North Korea doesn't use IE.

IETab (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45335681)

Use IETab for purchase websites:
https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/ie-tab-2-ff-36/

That's what I would do.

Re:IETab (2)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 6 months ago | (#45335985)

You do realize that(while it has its uses, for convenience sake) IETab is just a convenient wrapper for IE components from the underlying Windows system, not some kind of re-implementation of IE for Firefox. It's just more convenient than clicking on the E yourself. Doesn't do a thing on any platform where IE isn't.

Like netbanking in the early 2000s (1)

YoungManKlaus (2773165) | about 6 months ago | (#45335691)

I remember my netbanking _required_ a hidden java plugin until around 5 or so years ago, probably for the same reason.

Re:Like netbanking in the early 2000s (1)

Pope (17780) | about 6 months ago | (#45335965)

Damm, I remember when Pizza Pizza had one of the first online food ordering systems in Canada, and it required Windows, Netscape, AND Java!

Re:Like netbanking in the early 2000s (1)

gstoddart (321705) | about 6 months ago | (#45336533)

Yeah, but it was Pizza Pizza, so by giving you lousy technology they spared you from eating the lousy pizza. ;-)

Internet Explorer IS a modern browser (1)

wonkey_monkey (2592601) | about 6 months ago | (#45335799)

You might think that the country that has the fastest average home internet speeds would be a first adapter of modern browsers. Instead...

Disingenuous. Just because you don't like it, doesn't mean you can seriously consider IE not to be a modern browser.

Re:Internet Explorer IS a modern browser (1)

tibit (1762298) | about 6 months ago | (#45335909)

Yeah, it's modern because of release dates.

Re:Internet Explorer IS a modern browser (1)

wonkey_monkey (2592601) | about 6 months ago | (#45336067)

Why don't you list some reasons for regarding IE to be behind the times instead of only snidely implying it to be so?

Re:Internet Explorer IS a modern browser (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45336497)

Why don't you list some reasons for regarding IE to be behind the times instead of only snidely implying it to be so?
Because he doesn't feed trolls, and I don't either. I just flip them the bird when they stare up at me as I drive over the bridge.
There, there ya go.

Active fucking X?! (1)

tibit (1762298) | about 6 months ago | (#45335881)

What the fucking fuck? You can run 3D game engines [unrealengine.com] completely in JavaScript, yet those bozos couldn't be bothered just to emscripten their fucking encryption code to let it run in the browser without using MS-specific technology? Sigh.

IT work in South Korea (4, Informative)

agressiv (145582) | about 6 months ago | (#45335945)

As someone who did IT work in South Korea this year for couple of weeks, I never felt so defeated trying to upgrade 15 computers from XP to Windows 7. We basically had to give everyone admin rights just for them to do their job. Bank sites that had 11 (!) ActiveX plugins with 3-factor security (password, token, plus USB key with a cert) just for them to log in - and they routinely "update" their controls, which of course, require Admin rights.

The branch manager didn't understand at first why we were having so much difficulty. I had to explain to him that if we adhered by our security standards, we'd have to close the branch because there wasn't a single operation they did which would otherwise be allowed.

I'd rather stay off the net (1)

water-and-sewer (612923) | about 6 months ago | (#45335987)

I'd read about this before ... last year, I think. It's not exactly news.

Having had to do some normal things in IE8 this week, I'm reminded that if I were forced to use that browser I'd probably spend a lot less time on the Internet (maybe that would be a good way to kick the addiction?) I find IE to be a stunningly unusable piece of software, that perfect nexus of slow, not helpful, and capable of choking on a website like a box of dicks.

They don't know any better... (2)

globaljustin (574257) | about 6 months ago | (#45335999)

M$ has made most of its profits from gov't contracts and users who don't know to expect better from a computing experience.

I taught ESL in South Korea in 2001/2002...it was right after 9/11 and during the World Cup. The country was burgeoning as a bankable international business player...competiting with **Japan** with companies like Samsung...no coincidence that they co-hosted with Japan that year ;)

Korea was **all about it**...they wanted the best of what was available...to them, the USA was the best at computer tech...so obviously they went with the most *popular* Operating System, and they **made sure** to buy **ALL** the expansion packs and do exactly as M$ suggested...

Which means they've been on a never-ending nightmare Mobeius strip of a ride to user hell.....that, b/c of their trusting nature has painted them into an IT Engineering corner...which was M$ plan all along!

Korean internet purchasing is very backwards (4, Informative)

iONiUM (530420) | about 6 months ago | (#45336249)

The summary is slightly miss-leading. There isn't 1 standard for ActiveX control, every single goddamn site uses their one ActiveX or Java applet, and you have to install it. I have never seen a more backwards methodology than what Korea has for online purchasing.

The strange thing is, if you use a phone, things are much simpler (generally there is an app). In addition, because of Naver's dominance in the country, almost all sites are integrated with it, and at least offer ways of finding information through it (but not purchasing).

Re:Korean internet purchasing is very backwards (1)

CCarrot (1562079) | about 6 months ago | (#45336429)

The summary is slightly miss-leading.

And where is it leading this hapless miss? To a handy haystack, perhaps? :o)

ActiveX? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#45336397)

i haven't heard about ActiveX since the days when Windows 98 was popular. I did not know that online stores in South Korea used ActiveX controls. I learned something new.

Sounds legit (1)

CCarrot (1562079) | about 6 months ago | (#45336407)

users are in the habit of approving all AtivceX control prompts

Sure! What could possibly go wrong!?

Now, where did I put the remote for my genuine Sorny television again...ah, here we go, right beside the Magnetbox stereo!

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