Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Amazon Offers Cut of Ebook Sales To Book Stores Selling Kindle

Unknown Lamer posted about a year ago | from the here-destroy-your-own-business dept.

Books 80

nk497 writes with this excerpt from PC Pro "Amazon plans to give independent booksellers 10% of the takings from ebooks bought on Kindles they sell, the online giant has revealed. The new Amazon Source program aims to encourage independent bookstores and small retailers to sell Kindle readers by offering commission for the first two years of the device's life. As an alternative to the 10% kickback from book sales, retailers opting into the Amazon Source program can choose instead to receive a larger discount up front when buying the devices for resale."

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

lifespan? (1)

bob_super (3391281) | about a year ago | (#45346769)

What's the typical lifespan of a kindle?
That sounds like a good deal if people do change HW every couple years, not sure what the fineprint says (I can't RTFA).

Re:lifespan? (1)

tapi0 (2805569) | about a year ago | (#45346883)

Dunno about typical but I and many people I know have had one for around 3yrs. tbh, unless the screen is damaged I can see it going on for some time yet

Re:lifespan? (1)

0123456 (636235) | about a year ago | (#45347067)

Dunno about typical but I and many people I know have had one for around 3yrs. tbh, unless the screen is damaged I can see it going on for some time yet

I think mine is about three years now and has one black spot on the screen where something poked it. The two killers will be the screen, as you said, or the battery; I don't think it's replaceable.

Re:lifespan? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45347097)

I got one of the first Kindle's available in Canada, so that was a few years ago. Still going strong, but the battery doesn't seem to last weeks like it used to.

Granted, I'm not the heaviest user of it, and only read a half-dozen books a year with it.

Re:lifespan? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45347725)

Granted, I'm not the heaviest user of it, and only read a half-dozen books a year with it.

Considering the grocer's apostrophe in your first sentence, I say you're a liar. Anyone who reads half a dozen books a year knows how an apostrophe works (and when it doesn't). I doubt you've read a single book in your life that you weren't forced to.

Re: lifespan? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45349153)

Could be worse: he could be a wanker, like you are.

Re:lifespan? (1)

Lumpy (12016) | about a year ago | (#45349883)

Dud, sod off. He is Canadian, they dont use the apostrophe up there.

Re:lifespan? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45349311)

You left out the thing that belongs to the kindle.

Re:lifespan? (1)

X0563511 (793323) | about a year ago | (#45347439)

If you're careful you can open the unit to replace the battery, they have a connector on them. You have to get your hands on a replacement, though - it's not exactly a AAA battery. When my first (I'm still on the second) kindle "died" (i had an oopsie) I salvaged to 4-way stick switch, battery, and SIM - each easily replaceable if you have the part handy.

Re:lifespan? (1)

wagnerrp (1305589) | about a year ago | (#45349685)

I don't think the percentage of the market willing to crack open a Kindle to replace the battery is large enough to bother considering in forecasting.

Re:lifespan? (1)

colesw (951825) | about a year ago | (#45348029)

I'm also just over the three year mark on my original kindle. No plans on replacing it unless the screen messed up, or I can't read for at least a week without charging.

Re:lifespan? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45346929)

not sure what the fineprint says (I can't RTFA).

This is slashdot. We wouldn't expect you to.

Re:lifespan? (3, Funny)

jsrjsr (658966) | about a year ago | (#45346991)

First one -- two months. Second one -- eight months so far. Learn not to leave it laying on seating areas and it will last longer. ;^)

Re:lifespan? (2)

Salgak1 (20136) | about a year ago | (#45347357)

Can't speak to LIFESPAN of Kindles, but recently bought a lot of 80 re-conditioned Kindle 3G's, and am finding about a 5% failure rate out of the box.

And, while not a Kindle,I have a first-flight Nook Color reader (~ 2 1/2 years old), and the battery performance is off significantly, to the point where it requires daily charging. Of course, it's backlit, color, and is a walled-garden Android minitablet, so the charge cycle is going to be a lot higher than an e-Ink Kindle. . .

Re:lifespan? (1)

PhrostyMcByte (589271) | about a year ago | (#45347563)

Sell a Kindle now and get maybe 2-3 years of kickbacks from Amazon. After that time, the user is comfortable with Amazon and just orders their next upgraded Kindle direct. Book store ends up cut out completely.

Re:lifespan? (1)

Immerman (2627577) | about a year ago | (#45349189)

Not necessarily.

There's still a definite class of books that can't be Kindled - coffee-table photo-books as one example, and those that just belong on a bookshelf somewhere. There's also something to be said for having a storefront to take your hardware problem to, even if they just throw it in a box and ship it to Amazon for you behind the scenes. Also potential for a graceful "warrantied replacement/upgrade" mechanism where you could bring in your old/problem Kindle and have it immediately replaced with a refurbished one, or, for a modest fee, a newer model.

I suspect bookstore chains as we know them are going to be in steep decline for some time yet, but there is perhaps room for them to move into complementary business models as the shift to commonplace electronic books takes place.

Re:lifespan? (1)

geek (5680) | about a year ago | (#45348013)

I bought the first Kindle ages ago. Still works like a charm. I then bought the first Kindle Touch, works flawlessly still. I recently bought the new Kindle Paperwhite and honestly can't see myself ever getting rid of it. I actually replaced my Nexus 7 with the Kindle Paperwhite because I'm going Google free and frankly, I hate reading on LCD's. E-Ink is perfect for me.

Re:lifespan? (1)

hAckz0r (989977) | about a year ago | (#45348057)

What's the typical lifespan of a kindle?

I've had my Kindle 2 since Feb 2009, so four+ years and counting, of using it daily.

Every day, to work and back it reads to me via text-to-speach while I am driving. Its the best text-to-speech I have come across. I don't think the newer ones (aka fire) can do what I want, so I'm not trading it in. The bubble membrane keyboard, with a few snips of tape for tactile location of the proper keys, allows me to operate it without having to be distracted. I never need to look at it. The touch interface kindles could never do that, and I don't think the Android version even has text-to-speech, or at least all my kindle devices have text-to-speech that totally sucks in comparison.

Re:lifespan? (1)

nogginthenog (582552) | about a year ago | (#45348711)

I still have my Kindle 2 also. Still works great. I use it on my morning/evening commute and normally for a while before bed. The free 3G still works. Some of the keys are getting worn but I don't intend replacing it soon.

Re:lifespan? (1)

Lumpy (12016) | about a year ago | (#45349867)

Mine is 4 years old and still going strong, use it daily and still takes a week to need a recharge.

So a commission to cut your own throat? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45346813)

So a commission to cut your own throat? I say this as a kindle fan.

Re:So a commission to cut your own throat? (1)

Saethan (2725367) | about a year ago | (#45346863)

Yeah, 10% seems low, especially when once customers discover the ease of buying books online, they might stop being customers. On the other hand, I might actually -go- to a book store again if I knew the book purchases through my Kindle would help 'em out a bit...

Re:So a commission to cut your own throat? (1)

quintus_horatius (1119995) | about a year ago | (#45346981)

especially when once customers discover the ease of buying books online, they might stop being customers.

People will buy and use a Kindle anyway. Why not get a cut?

Re:So a commission to cut your own throat? (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45347165)

Why not accept Jewish gold from the Nazis - someone will - why not you?

Re:So a commission to cut your own throat? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45347251)

I agree.
If someone offered me Jewish gold I'd take it.
The Jews are mostly dead, and their decedents got Palestine.
So I think the gold is paid for.

Re:So a commission to cut your own throat? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45378027)

That was true in 1951. But it wasn't a reason to take it. Nor was it a reason to say it was paid for.

Re:So a commission to cut your own throat? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45347599)

Once you melt it down, no one will know where it came from anyway.

Re:So a commission to cut your own throat? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45347897)

Godwin! You lose!

Re:So a commission to cut your own throat? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45348567)

Nu-uh - I didn't mention Hitler.

Doh :-(

Re:So a commission to cut your own throat? (1)

14erCleaner (745600) | about a year ago | (#45346985)

Getting a 10% commission on every book sold for that Kindle seems like a good deal for the bookseller. Note that they don't have to sell the book to the Kindle owner themselves.

Of course, the cynical response to this proposal would be "what independent bookstores?". Not many of them are left, so the few survivors might as well get what they can out of this.

Re:So a commission to cut your own throat? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45347469)

Of course the bookseller is only getting a 6% discount on the kindle itself, which means that unless the customer buys a LOT of books you are getting almost nothing on markup (remember that standard markup on paperback books is something like 40%)

Bluntly, it is not even worth the space a display would take up - you are better off putting up a display of something you can actually make money on.

Re:So a commission to cut your own throat? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45347081)

If that's 10% of the retail price, that's a good deal. Amazon typically only takes 35% of retail, the rest (65%) going to the publisher. (Depending on the retail price: below 2.99 or above 9.99, Amazon takes 65%. That's for its small-publisher and indie deals, deals cut with the "Big 6" publishers may be different.)

Re:So a commission to cut your own throat? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45347111)

Did they say that this deal will continue for ever? Even once the bookstores have destroyed their own business model and become wholly dependent on Amazon's income for survival?

Re:So a commission to cut your own throat? (1)

RabidReindeer (2625839) | about a year ago | (#45347213)

Yeah, 10% seems low, especially when once customers discover the ease of buying books online, they might stop being customers.

On the other hand, I might actually -go- to a book store again if I knew the book purchases through my Kindle would help 'em out a bit...

I haven't completely broken the habit of bookstores. But if there was an app that would allow me to easily scan a UPC code and wish/purchase an eBook, it would be a convenience. I mostly don't buy physical books anymore because I flat ran out of storage space - the exceptions being "art" books, cookbooks, technical tomes and (the few remaining) magazines. But having "display models" of the electronically-available works would help make sales. For one thing, I rarely use the ebook preview feature, since it leaves lint behind on the reader device if I decide not to buy the book.

Re:So a commission to cut your own throat? (1)

ArbitraryName (3391191) | about a year ago | (#45347613)

I haven't completely broken the habit of bookstores. But if there was an app that would allow me to easily scan a UPC code and wish/purchase an eBook, it would be a convenience

This is one of the main features of the Amazon app for Android (and I assume iOS as well). You can scan the barcode on anything to look it up on Amazon.

Re:So a commission to cut your own throat? (1)

RabidReindeer (2625839) | about a year ago | (#45349441)

I haven't completely broken the habit of bookstores. But if there was an app that would allow me to easily scan a UPC code and wish/purchase an eBook, it would be a convenience

This is one of the main features of the Amazon app for Android (and I assume iOS as well). You can scan the barcode on anything to look it up on Amazon.

Well, A) I don't shop Amazon anymore, between "Animal Farm", their acting as a front for the US Government and various other misdemeanors. B) I don't want to "look it up", I want to put it someplace where my ebookstore of choice (not Amazon) can stuff it into an online purchase if I want or put it on my wish list.

Re:So a commission to cut your own throat? (1)

Archfeld (6757) | about a year ago | (#45347275)

I've got a Kindle and it is great for magazines, but I still buy hardcopy books. There is something about the smell and feel of a book, not to mention the hand me down effect. My brother, the next door neighbor and the local school library all seem to appreciate getting the books to read for free, and I really like frequenting half-price books, granted the .25 to 1.00 I get back in trade is not much but considering I read 2-3 books a week it DOES add up.
  If the cost of an online book was substantially cheaper than a hard copy I might feel different but it really isn't...

Re:So a commission to cut your own throat? (1)

jsrjsr (658966) | about a year ago | (#45347811)

For the books I usually buy, the price of a Kindle edition is half that of a hardcover. When the book goes to paperback the price usually drops to a buck or two less than the paperback. Seems about equivalent (or better) to buying a paperback and then reselling it to the used book store. Plus I get to keep my Kindle editions forever (even if the book has DRM unless something unusual happens -- and if I really wanted to, I could break the DRM and keep it anyway).

Re:So a commission to cut your own throat? (1)

Archfeld (6757) | about a year ago | (#45351823)

If I could find a way to hand the e-book around the my circle of reading buddies it might become inviting but as many books as I offer them, they return so the price is split several ways making the physical book even more attractive. I will stipulate that part of the attraction of a book is a visceral smell and feel of paper.

Re:So a commission to cut your own throat? (1)

alen (225700) | about a year ago | (#45347921)

Kindle books always go on sale, and lots of sites to track it

the entire kindle version of the song of ice and fire is on sale for $22.59 now

Re:So a commission to cut your own throat? (1)

mcgrew (92797) | about a year ago | (#45350841)

If the cost of an online book was substantially cheaper than a hard copy I might feel different but it really isn't...

What about writers who sell physical books but give away the electronic versions? That's what Doctorow does and what I'm doing with "Nobots". If it works I'll make future books the same way.

Asimov: [aber.ac.uk]

Margie even wrote about it that night in her diary. On the page headed May 17, 2157, she wrote, "Today, Tommy found a real book!"

It was a very old book. Margie's grandfather once said that when he was a little boy his grandfather told him that there was a time when all stories were printed on paper.

They turned the pages, which were yellow and crinkly, and it was awfully funny to read words that stood still instead of moving the way they were supposed to--on a screen, you know. And then, when they turned back to the page before, it had the same words on it that it had had when they read it the first time.

"Gee," said Tommy, "what a waste. When you're through with the book, you just throw it away, I guess. Our television screen must have had a million books on it and it's good for plenty more. I wouldn't throw it away."

Re:So a commission to cut your own throat? (1)

Archfeld (6757) | about a year ago | (#45351965)

Love the quote, thank-you. Asimov and your signature author Heinlein are two of my favorites. On a side note I also collect authors' signatures, and that is hard to do on an electronic version. I've spent countless hours in pursuit of authors and had great luck getting them to sign my books. Like I posted to previous reply, I share around a circle of friends and they also buy books so the costs are shared, with the added benefit of getting to chat at our bi-monthly pen and paper RPG sessions. We've been playing D&D, and Gurps together for more than 20 years now.

Re:So a commission to cut your own throat? (1)

mcgrew (92797) | about a year ago | (#45362767)

The whole story's at that link (Yay, Google!). I have at least one printed book with that story in it, I have a lot of Asimov although I've read a LOT more of his books than I've bought.

I'm not surprised that there's no problem getting a book signed, fans are an author's greatest asset. If I sign this book you're a lot more likely to buy my next one. I wrote Asimov a fan letter, and he answered it with a post card. I wish I still had it.

I hadn't even thought of signed editions, that is an advantage to printed books. E editions are good for convenience; if I have a boring wait somewhere I can just pull out my phone and there are tons of books. I'm reading some Dickens now. But I still like having shelves of books, and prefer reading paper to reading a screen.

Re:So a commission to cut your own throat? (1)

mlts (1038732) | about a year ago | (#45348599)

What would be ideal would be a more extended partnership with local book sellers. It would be nice if the local book seller could sell a hardcopy with the ability to grab the Amazon ebook edition as well for a couple dollars more than just the hardcopy itself. This way, both Amazon and the local store benefit from each other.

This might even be doable (assuming Amazon could get the permission from publishers) with used books as well.

Re:So a commission to cut your own throat? (1)

dyingtolive (1393037) | about a year ago | (#45347013)

"We'll pay you to stop being a bookstore and start being a Licensed Kindle Kiosk".

Re:So a commission to cut your own throat? (2)

ScentCone (795499) | about a year ago | (#45347087)

"We'll pay you to stop being a bookstore and start being a Licensed Kindle Kiosk".

As opposed to simply watching that business go away anyway, and closing up shop entirely? So, sell nothing and go out of business, or recognize that your customers' expectations and habits have changed, and be a part of it. The problem isn't the e-reader, the problem is printed books.

Re:So a commission to cut your own throat? (1)

dyingtolive (1393037) | about a year ago | (#45347257)

It's still a stopgap though. At least with books, however unpopular they get, you always have those hipsters and anachronists who will always seek them out. For some formats/types of book, I actually prefer dead tree myself. Roleplaying source books and textbooks will always be superior in print. Fiction can go straight to the Kindle.

If all you (as a store) do is Kindles, then you're the replaceable AA batteries of the literature distribution system. I guess in theory, you'd do this and still keep stock of real books for anyone who might want them, but I can't imagine that you'd reap enough profit from this program to keep up with how much you've undercut your original business. It's also only for the first two years from the devices purchase date that stores get the cut of the books sold. Bookstores may be going out of business but all this does is offer a solid execution date. It's an unsustainable business model for any area that doesn't have huge growth.

Re:So a commission to cut your own throat? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45347159)

Like offering kickbacks to Rabbi's to promote the National Socialist part in prewar germany.

Re:So a commission to cut your own throat? (1)

alen (225700) | about a year ago | (#45347191)

not like their profit margins are close to 100% as it is now

Long term... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45346825)

Doesn't this seem like Amazon is handing book sellers a knife and asking them to slit their own throat?

It's a trap! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45346847)

Don't do it. You'll be stuck in the belly of Amazon where it will digest you for the next 1000 years.

What a great idea (1)

gravis777 (123605) | about a year ago | (#45346921)

I agree that 10% sounds low, but its better than nothing. Why would a store want to sell a product that affects their business model? Now if said store got a kickback from it....

It also keeps bookstores from having to stock as many physical books. I am not sure what the percentage rate a store gets from selling a physical book, but I can certainly see this being an attractive offer for many B&M stores.

Ask Kodak (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | about a year ago | (#45347137)

Why would a store want to sell a product that affects their business model?

Because if they don't somebody else will.

Razor Blades (1)

ZipK (1051658) | about a year ago | (#45346933)

The marketing maxim "give away the razor, sell the blades" now seems to be "slit your throat by selling the razor."

Re:Razor Blades (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45347001)

Exactly ... isn't this basically "we're going put you out of business anyway, but here's a little cash if you help us do it." ?

Re:Razor Blades (3, Insightful)

0123456 (636235) | about a year ago | (#45347091)

Exactly ... isn't this basically "we're going put you out of business anyway, but here's a little cash if you help us do it." ?

Book stores don't sell every book that's available on Kindle (you'd need a big store to sell >1,000,000 different books). People who buy books on Kindle may well prefer buying paper books at their local book store when they are available there, so they don't have to wait for Amazon to deliver.

So, while it's not an obvious win for the stores, there are potential benefits.

Re:Razor Blades (1)

hAckz0r (989977) | about a year ago | (#45348135)

so they don't have to wait for Amazon to deliver.

Wait what.. A whole ten seconds to download the book? I could buy 100 books in the time you would need to drive to your local book store. And that includes reading what the book is about and deciding if I'd like it or not.

The question I would bring up is whether Kindle has the book in its inventory. I buy lots of science and technical books, but not all are released for the Kindle. For those I can click a link to request the publisher to convert it for the kindle, but more likely, at least for the short term, I am just SOL.

Re:Razor Blades (1)

0123456 (636235) | about a year ago | (#45352035)

Wait what.. A whole ten seconds to download the book?

If you learned how to read, you might have noticed that comment referred to PAPER books, which you can't yet download and print in ten seconds.

Some people prefer paper books. Some people prefer paper books for some things and e-books for others. Some books aren't available as e-books, but are available on paper.

People who only buy e-books aren't going to be in a book store, so they're utterly irrelevant.

Re:Razor Blades (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45347101)

A capitalist will sell you the rope to hang him with.

TALK ABOUT EUNUCKS ?? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45346953)

Because that is what it is !! Guarding a harem ?? All you have to do is take the schlossen cutoff !! Get out of your car !! Cut of your schlossen !!

Seems right.... (4, Insightful)

wbr1 (2538558) | about a year ago | (#45346987)

Sell this device now and get a cut for immediate gain. Watch as devices sold slowly render your main business dead, and only have residual income after that.

Re:Seems right.... (3, Insightful)

ScentCone (795499) | about a year ago | (#45347061)

Watch as devices sold slowly render your main business dead

Which is going to happen to that retail store whether or not the devices are bought through them. Why not get a piece of the action while your business is failing anyway? Sell e-readers, and use the proceeds to tune up your coffee lounge area.

Re:Seems right.... (2)

Bill_the_Engineer (772575) | about a year ago | (#45347211)

Which is going to happen to that retail store whether or not the devices are bought through them. Why not get a piece of the action while your business is failing anyway?

If your selling enough kindles to make that 10% actually mean something then you have enough walk in traffic to not need that 10% incentive. Not to mention, when you sell a kindle to your bookstore patron you are pushing your patrons to use Amazon instead. You just told your customers to go ahead and make your future purchases with Amazon because it's okay I get a cut.

I think this is really targeted towards book blog sites that provide links to Amazon and not to real brick-and-mortar bookstores.

Re:Seems right.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45347261)

Believe something within your control isn't and it won't be.

Captcha: foregone.

Energy Dept Opens Competition to Select Solar Deca (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45347083)

The Energy Department on November 1 began the process to select collegiate teams to compete in the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2015. Colleges, universities, and other post-secondary educational institutions are welcome to submit proposals, which are reviewed, scored, and ranked based on a merit review process. Subject to the quantity and quality of proposals, up to 20 teams will be selected to begin a two-year project to build solar-powered, highly energy-efficient houses that combine affordability, consumer appeal, and design excellence.
Throughout the two-year project, the selected teams will design, construct, and test their houses before reassembling them at the Solar Decathlon 2015 competition site, which will be announced in the coming months. As part of the Solar Decathlon, teams compete in ten different contest categories—ranging from best architecture and engineering to energy production for heating and cooling—while gaining valuable real-world experience in a growing global industry.
In fall 2015, the student teams will showcase their solar-powered houses to the public, highlighting renewable energy systems and energy-efficient technologies, products, and appliances that are already available to homeowners to help them save money by saving energy. The selected teams and their proposed projects will represent a diverse range of design approaches, building technologies, target markets, geographic locations, climates, and regions, including urban, suburban, and rural settings.
Since 2002, the National Mall in Washington, D.C., had been the venue for five successful Solar Decathlons. In 2013, the Energy Department moved the competition to Irvine, California. Solar Decathlon 2013 concluded on October 13. See the Energy Department progress alert. [energy.gov]

Not a dead model at all (3, Insightful)

SuperKendall (25149) | about a year ago | (#45347411)

I don't understand why the new model for local book stores is not clear to everyone. It is this; local bookstores are essentially places to browse books to see what you want, then thy can earn money either of direct sales from the location (which is very much going to happen in the cases of gifts) or from affiliate revenue.

Gifts alone are not enough revenue to cut it; buying a Kindle from your local affiliate is a whole new stream of revenue that is likely enough to keep a store afloat. All the store has to do is figure out a way to entice people to buy Kindle's from the store and they get two-three years of recurring revenue as the owner buys books even if they never return to the store!

Book stores would also be smart to place QR stickers on each book that provided an affiliate link to purchase the book on Amazon.

Re:Not a dead model at all (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45347999)

Yes put a QR sticker on the book so you can get 10% of the profit rather than 100%

10% is greater than Zero (2)

SuperKendall (25149) | about a year ago | (#45348367)

Yes put a QR sticker on the book so you can get 10% of the profit rather than 100%

Your math is wrong; 10% is greater than 0%. People are ALREADY looking at a book in a bookstore, scanning the barcode on Amazons shopping app, and ordering it online.

10% A MONTH for three years is also better than 0% over three years, which is what you may get if a bookstore sells a kindle reader and the purchasers keeps buying books. Wh wouldn't they? I know I buy a book or two every month. That's all money that an affiliate could have a percentage of and I'd be happy to help make that happen.

Your math is even "wronger", in that a book store selling only physical books must purchase a huge stock of books, many of which will not sell. A book store oriented to making money from affiliate revenue need stock only a copy or two of each book, possibly keeping more of some really popular books for those that actually want to purchase. But in any case it mens much less money tied up in inventory and books that don't sell no longer hurt you.

Re:10% is greater than Zero (1)

geek (5680) | about a year ago | (#45348481)

10% isn't enough to pay the electric bill let alone employee wages, rent, taxes etc. In fact 10% would likely be much worse than 0 because falling behind on bills carries penalties.

There is a minimum stores need to survive, anything less and they go under. Hint: 10% is about 85% too little during the best of times. I personally know store owners and have seen how narrow the margins are. For many of them it's a month to month decision whether or not to close the doors. Reducing their margins this drastically is insanity.

How stupid are you? The magic of recurring revenue (1)

SuperKendall (25149) | about a year ago | (#45348609)

10% isn't enough to pay the electric bill let alone employee wages, rent, taxes etc.

How do you know? You can't possibly know the rent for every small to medium sized bookstore to proclaim that. Also, why do you assume affiliate revenue is 10% compared to a baseline profit the bookstore would have earned from the book, after factoring in stock that didn't sell or was damaged and stolen? All of those factors are greatly reduced by a bookstore that is operating off the model of making money from recurring revenue.

Fundamentally though, you are being really, really stupid on a key aspect that earns the bookstore money - you are totally ignoring the point I made clearly that the store gets a cut of EVERY book bought over years. A person might have bought one book at the store, with a profit of $0.50 for example. But instead the store get lets say $0.25 (or more) a MONTH over three years! Furthermore that doesn't even requiring having stock or help to serve them. Which would you rather have as a business owner???

You also I think are drastically over-estimating how much they make per book sold - and forgetting they also are getting all of the profit from selling a Kindle, how many books do you have to sell to equal that?

You are missing the potentially greatest path to resurgence for the physical book store there ever will be, and ignoring it because you can't seem to understand the profit flow possible or indeed what is really going on.

You represent the worst aspect of Slashdot, the technocrat who knows fuck-all about running a real business with physical goods. What a shame you cannot see this opportunity clearly, but that doesn't mean it is not there.

Re:How stupid are you? The magic of recurring reve (1)

geek (5680) | about a year ago | (#45349783)

You're obviously a troll and someone thats never run a business. How about we take 90% of your income away and see how well you survive? I'm done with you. Can't argue with fucking retards.

Amazon says... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45346997)

"Help us put the final nail in your coffin."

Re:Amazon says... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45347049)

You hear that Mr. Anderson?... That is the sound of inevitability... It is the sound of your death... Goodbye, Mr. Anderson...

Turkeys and Christmas (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45347005)

In other news, the local turkey farm has now opened for Christmas.

Turkeys have been offered extra feed if they are prepared to wear bright red hats and suits, and wander around singing christmas carols.

That's just wrong (1)

Solandri (704621) | about a year ago | (#45347485)

It may seem harmless at first glance. But this is analogous to the problem we're having with cable TV - where the company which owns the delivery hardware is also the company which is selling you the content.

For this to work properly, the delivery infrastructure has to remain separate from the product being delivered. That's what we do with electricity and gas. For efficiency purposes, one company owns the power lines or the gas pipes. But they're not allowed to discriminate against electricity and gas suppliers, and anyone is allowed to sell those products through their lines/pipes.

Without this separation, there's a huge conflict of interest. A company with an inferior product can force its acceptance through its dominance of the delivery system (e.g. cable companies and their "packages" where you're forced to pay for lots of channels you haven't the slightest interest in watching). Or a company with an inferior delivery system can force its acceptance through dominance in a popular product (e.g. game consoles which sign an exclusive deal for a certain game).

In a nutshell, you shouldn't be allowed to use dominance in one market as leverage to gain dominance in a different, orthogonal market.

Now Amazon is selling these books stores... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45347947)

...the rope to hang themselves with.

Will no one think of all the disenfranchised hipsters with only popular places to hang out?

Awesome... (1)

PortHaven (242123) | about a year ago | (#45347981)

We can read and still enjoy the vanilla'esqe smell of a nice old used book store.

Good move Amazon. Go once step further, and let them sell kindle books and keep 10%.

2 years? only on ebooks? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45349405)

fuck you.

gimme 20 years of 10% commission.. on not only sales from the device sold, but also sales from the person/account associated with it..... on *every* payment processed by amazon, including ebook sales and rentals, app sales, in-app purchases, media files and rentals, subscriptions, etc.. including amazon.com orders... *EVERYTHING* ..

if you want me to sell out to the devil and peddle his wares (that cut into my own sales), then the devil better pay up big.

Let the physical store sell ebooks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45353823)

I so wish that amazon would let the physical stores sell the books too.

Let me go in and browse books the way that I'm used to and when I decide on a book I enter a (store and book specific) code from the back when purchasing which gives the physical store a decent cut but lets me leave with just another ebook on my kindle.

Bezos, blech!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45366099)

The sad thing is that for all his grinning boyish glee, Bezos is a ruthless capitalist ideologue no different than any industrialist, and he's bent on domination at all costs, especially those whose livihoods suffer in his wake. It's a very Chinese mindset interestingly, which boils down to "screw you. If I can take it, it's mine." Charming grin tho.

Check for New Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?