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Scientists Says Jellyfish Are Taking Over the Oceans

timothy posted about 9 months ago | from the on-the-upside-they-make-great-pets-and-snacks dept.

Earth 274

Hugh Pickens DOT Com writes "Karla Cripps reports at CNN that a combination of overfishing, warming water, low oxygen and pollution are creating perfect conditions for jellyfish to multiply. "The jellyfish seem to be the ones that are flourishing in this while everything else is suffering," says Australian jellyfish researcher Lisa-ann Gershwin. In 2000, a bloom of sea tomato jellyfish in Australia was so enormous — it stretched for more than 1,000 miles from north to south — that it was even visible from space. While most blooms are not quite that big, Gershwin's survey of research on jellyfish from the last few decades indicate that populations are most likely on the rise, and that this boom is taking place in an ocean that is faced with overfishing, acid rain, nutrient pollution from fertilizers and climate change, among other problems. This past summer, southern Europe experienced one of its worst jellyfish infestations ever. Experts there have been reporting a steady increase in the number of jellyfish in the Mediterranean Sea for years. With more than 2,000 species of jellyfish swimming through the world's waters, most stings are completely harmless, some will leave you in excruciating pain, then there are the killers. There are several species of big box jellyfish that have caused many deaths — these include chironex fleckeri in Australia, known as the "most lethal jellyfish in the world whose sting can kill in three minutes. "Just the lightest brush — you don't even feel it — and then, whammo, you're in more pain than you ever could have imagined, and you are struggling to breathe and you can't move your limbs and you can't stop vomiting and your blood pressure just keeps going up and up," says Gershwin. "It is really surprising how many places they occur around the world — places you would never expect: Hawaii, Caribbean, Florida, Wales, New Caledonia, Thailand, Malaysia, Philippines, India ... as well as Australia.""

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274 comments

must be first post (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45356839)

Jam don't shake like that.

Ethical fishing (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45356897)

Time to dust off that recipe for sesame jelly fish with chili sauce.

Re:Ethical fishing (4, Insightful)

dpilot (134227) | about 9 months ago | (#45357015)

I know you're making a joke, but it's actually serious. They're busy trying to promote eating Lionfish, another troublesome invasive species. Perhaps not coincidentally, Lionfish can also be dangerous to handle, so part of the promotion is teaching people how to safely handle and prepare them.

There were several jellyfish recpies, but your sesame jellyfish is the only one with a picture.

Re:Ethical fishing (2)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 8 months ago | (#45357111)

I always read articles about that sort of thing but I can never find them in any market. Why are invasive species not more readily available to purchase?

Re:Ethical fishing (3, Funny)

Charliemopps (1157495) | about 8 months ago | (#45357469)

Maybe because Jelly fish tastes like slimy Jello that paralyzes your tong?

it's EXXXTREEEEEEMEEE!! (2)

Thud457 (234763) | about 8 months ago | (#45357531)

New Doritos Locos Jazzin' Jellyfish tacos!

Fugu me.

Re:Ethical fishing (2)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about 8 months ago | (#45357593)

Perhaps not coincidentally, Lionfish can also be dangerous to handle, so part of the promotion is teaching people how to safely handle and prepare them.

They could market it to the adventurous folks: "Better than fugu: Now twice as dangerous!"

Re:Ethical fishing (2)

gweilo8888 (921799) | about 8 months ago | (#45357245)

Was just about to say the same thing, glad to see I'm not alone. Together we can eat our way out of this problem!

Re:Ethical fishing (1)

oodaloop (1229816) | about 8 months ago | (#45357373)

Yeah, you, Spongebob and Patrick.

Re:Ethical fishing (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45357263)

The solution to any invasive species problem is an Asian cookbook. Cold cut roast duck with marinated jellyfish and diced cucumber is freaking amazing.

Re:Ethical fishing (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45357677)

What we need to do, is help sea turtles out more, as they are the ones that were eating these jellyfish for centuries before their population took a hit.

On the plus side (4, Informative)

schneidafunk (795759) | about 9 months ago | (#45356901)

Many endangered species, such as sea turtles, eat jellyfish.

Re:On the plus side (5, Insightful)

i kan reed (749298) | about 9 months ago | (#45356937)

And if we hadn't overfished turtles(with their incredibly long life cycle), the jellyfish population would likely be in check.

Re:On the plus side (3, Informative)

denis-The-menace (471988) | about 9 months ago | (#45357051)

Wild salmon, too

Don't worry, we are making them extinct in about 10 years.
Please be patient! /s

Re:On the plus side (5, Funny)

SJHillman (1966756) | about 8 months ago | (#45357097)

Can't we just flip the world over? That way, all of the jellyfish will drain onto the turtles, all the way down.

Re:On the plus side (1)

ScottCooperDotNet (929575) | about 8 months ago | (#45357309)

They'd all land in the Outback and dry out. What solution is that?

On the plus side, seafood BBQ.

Re:On the plus side (1)

geekoid (135745) | about 8 months ago | (#45357687)

I don't eat things that poop out of their mouths.

Re:On the plus side (5, Interesting)

afidel (530433) | about 9 months ago | (#45356971)

The biggest thing we can do to help turtles is to install UV lights on commercial fishing nets to significantly reduce the bycatch rate, turtles can see into the UV spectrum but fish cannot so there is no impact on the fishermen other than a fairly minimal cost for waterproof led housings.

Re:On the plus side (4, Informative)

schneidafunk (795759) | about 9 months ago | (#45357003)

That's very interesting. However, there is also a big problem with people poaching their eggs [seaturtles.org] .

Re:On the plus side (5, Funny)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 9 months ago | (#45357045)

Is there a better way to cook them?

Re:On the plus side (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45357177)

Is there a better way to cook them?

Yes, when you use them to make a baby seal omlette.

Re:On the plus side (4, Funny)

BullInChina (3376331) | about 8 months ago | (#45357251)

Shortest animal in a bar joke ever. So this baby seal walks into this club.

Re:On the plus side (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45357519)

Vagina jokes are never funny. Period.

Re:On the plus side (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45357255)

I'm sure you could look at a Thai or Cajun cookbook and get some good ideas.

There's a simple solution to poaching (4, Insightful)

MikeRT (947531) | about 8 months ago | (#45357223)

Put the territory under some sort of corporate or government control and let the employees in charge of the territory use deadly force to stop the poachers. Works quite well in Africa where their game reserve rangers can put a .308 through you quite legally if they catch you hunting endangered species.

Re:On the plus side (3, Interesting)

beckett (27524) | about 8 months ago | (#45357461)

we can farm turtles through aquaculture techniques [wikipedia.org] and mitigate directed fishing pressure on sea turtles and wild eggs. this farm has been operating for over 40 years, and can complete the life cycle from hatch to reproductive recruitment.

"We must plant the sea and herd its animals using the sea as farmers instead of hunters. That is what civilization is all about - farming replacing hunting." - Jacques Yves Cousteau

Re:On the plus side (5, Interesting)

Dixie_Flatline (5077) | about 9 months ago | (#45356979)

The problem is that it takes whole ecosystems to successfully fend off encroaching jellyfish, which is why they're on the rise--the ecosystems are collapsing.

There are a few creatures that eat jellyfish, but they eat EVERYTHING. Once the ecosystem starts to crumble, jellyfish feed into the loop by eating larvae and fry and eggs and anything available. They're good in anoxic environments, they're not affected by acidification (since they have no hard parts that are vulnerable; the only hard part they have isn't impacted), and they provide low nutritional value back to the ocean despite their intake.

It's a bit of a miracle that the oceans ever moved past the jellyfish stage at all. They're very old, really adaptable, and very, very good at surviving.

Re:On the plus side (1)

i kan reed (749298) | about 9 months ago | (#45357027)

You'd be surprised at just how much competitive benefit a central nervous system provides.

Re:On the plus side (1)

Dixie_Flatline (5077) | about 8 months ago | (#45357121)

I dunno, doesn't seem to help people being stung by jellyfish. :)

I think we might be able to engineer our way out of the worst of it, but it's clear that without the benefit of sheer numbers and biomass, jellyfish can wildly out-compete already struggling ecosystems. If we don't want to be eating jellyfish chips for the next 100 years as our main source of seafood, we're really going to have to do better with regards to the ocean.

Re:On the plus side (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45357243)

I did accidently bite one that got on my scuba regulator. They have no flavor at all - pretty crappy eating at best - and the tentacles hurt your tongue without the fun of a good hot spice. I rate them as about the last thing anyone would like to eat.

Re:On the plus side (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45357331)

This was predicted in an episode of Captain Planet [wikia.com] 22 fucking years ago! Another worthy episode to check out would be the one where this person in a latin community finds a way to clone themselves, leading to an overpopulation problem. When the moral of the episode is explained in plain English at the end of the episode, it is a plea to breed responsibly and have only as many kids as you can properly raise.

-- Ethanol-fueled

Re:On the plus side (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45357147)

Say that when a jellyfish is ruling over you! They're coming for us and our central nervous system only makes us more yummy.

Re:On the plus side (3, Informative)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | about 8 months ago | (#45357279)

Jellyfish do have a very minimalistic nervous system. It's simple, but it's there. Visible in some species as a ring around the bell, near the edge. Just enough to handle the only two things a jellyfish needs to do: Swim straight (It makes sure the bell contracts in sync, not one side before the other) and handle the task of transferring food from tentacles to stomach.

Re:On the plus side (4, Interesting)

denis-The-menace (471988) | about 8 months ago | (#45357131)

I read what is REALLY helping them spread are all those floating bits of plastic out there.

Jellyfish spores need something to cling-to to survive.
That used to be very hard in the ocean because it's all water.

But today, thanks to plastic bits floating everywhere in the ocean, this is no longer a problem.

Re:On the plus side (4, Interesting)

catchblue22 (1004569) | about 8 months ago | (#45357525)

I wrote a summary of research paper 10 years ago for a course I was taking. That paper described what happened in the Black Sea after top level predators were removed. As I remember, the removal of the top level predators made the entire ecosystem unstable. Overfishing of smaller fish opened up a niche for other species like jellyfish, which then displaced for a time the opportunities for the populations of the small fish to recover.

In essence, this is what is happening worldwide. We are killing off the sharks via the shark fin industry, and sharks are the top level predator in the ocean. We are also overfishing smaller species. This seems to be opening up niches for jellyfish, which may displace the fish that we normally eat. This experiment has already been carried out in the Black Sea, and the results are not good.

50 years in the future (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45357023)

Slashdot headline 50 years from now:

"Scientists Says Turtles Are Taking Over the Oceans"

(The typo is intentional, because even in 50 years, /. will still lack quality control.)

Re:50 years in the future (2)

camperdave (969942) | about 8 months ago | (#45357317)

Maybe in 50 years there will be a magazine named "Scientists", and your headline will make perfect sense.

Re:50 years in the future (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45357561)

How many dupes will there have been by that point?

On the down side, they're endangered (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45357189)

Those endangered species are endangered because we're killing them, not merely because they don't have enough jellyfish.

Re:On the plus side (1)

s.petry (762400) | about 8 months ago | (#45357481)

I believe this was a joke and mistakenly modded "informative" instead of funny. Giving an endangered species more jellyfish to eat does not fix the pollution and environmental damage that caused them to become endangered to begin with.

Oh noes! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45356989)

Something else for the environment list to get all uppity about. When are they going to realize we live on a dynamic planet!?

I, for one, welcome our squishy little underlords.

Re:Oh noes! (2)

i kan reed (749298) | about 9 months ago | (#45357071)

Something else for the environment list to get all uppity about. When are they going to realize we live on a dynamic planet!?

What does this even mean? Do you even know?

Re:Oh noes! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45357379)

Something else for the environment list to get all uppity about. When are they going to realize we live on a dynamic planet!?

What does this even mean? Do you even know?

Yes, it means shit changes. Species go extinct. Other species move in to fill a niche when condition change. That's how life works.
Preserving the status quo, and attempting to freeze the environment in a particular point in time, is futile and shortsighted.

Re:Oh noes! (3, Insightful)

i kan reed (749298) | about 8 months ago | (#45357441)

As long as you don't mind being one of those species. Sure. Guess what: your species depends on its environment to a greater degree than others like cockroaches or jellyfish.

Well.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45356995)

Stay out of the ocean. Don't swim in the food chain.

Most likely on the rise? (-1, Troll)

TWiTfan (2887093) | about 9 months ago | (#45357007)

indicate that populations are most likely on the rise

I guess that's what passes for scientific evidence these days in this era of environmental activism masquerading as science: "Eh, probably, maybe..."

and that this boom is taking place in an ocean that is faced with overfishing, acid rain, nutrient pollution from fertilizers and climate change, among other problems.

And of course it follows that if these populations are on the rise (and they MAYBE are, probably) then it's the fault of all the environmentalists' usual suspects. Just surprised they didn't find a way to blame nuclear energy too.

Re:Most likely on the rise? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45357081)

I guess that's what passes for scientific evidence these days in this era of environmental activism masquerading as science: "Eh, probably, maybe..."

So, in your universe, science is something that always gives 100% certain answers?

Re:Most likely on the rise? (1, Insightful)

houstonbofh (602064) | about 8 months ago | (#45357213)

I guess that's what passes for scientific evidence these days in this era of environmental activism masquerading as science: "Eh, probably, maybe..."

So, in your universe, science is something that always gives 100% certain answers?

So in your world, gravity works, "mostly sometimes" but not 100%?

Re:Most likely on the rise? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45357355)

In my universe, scientists studying gravity still aren't completely sure how it works. I would expect the same to be true of jellyfish -- especially since we've had far less time to study them than we have had to study gravity.

The OP suggested, because Gershwin expressed uncertainty about his conclusion, that research on jellyfish populations must be pseudoscientific. That's total bullcrap.

Re:Most likely on the rise? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45357507)

Her conclusion.

Re:Most likely on the rise? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45357175)

Just surprised they didn't find a way to blame nuclear energy too.

That will be when they find Jellyzilla. Searches are currently active in Tokyo Bay.

Tinfoil Hat Time (2)

DarthVain (724186) | about 8 months ago | (#45357195)

Funny enough:

http://hardware.slashdot.org/story/11/07/10/0234250/millions-of-jellyfish-invade-nuclear-reactors [slashdot.org]

http://news.slashdot.org/story/13/10/01/2123254/new-threat-to-seaside-nuclear-plants-datacenters-jellyfish [slashdot.org]

They don't need to blame nuclear energy, they are working in concert with the jellyfish to shut them down.

Next in the nuclear arms race will be some sort of aquatic animal with lasers attached to their heads clean out the jellyfish infestations.

Re:Tinfoil Hat Time (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45357365)

Life finds a way.

Re:Most likely on the rise? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45357275)

And of course it follows that if these populations are on the rise (and they MAYBE are, probably) then it's the fault of all the environmentalists' usual suspects.

Those environmentalists are a bunch of nutjobs.

It is obvious that this increase in jellyfish is a sign of the imminent awakening of great Cthulhu.

Never expect (4, Funny)

SJHillman (1966756) | about 9 months ago | (#45357031)

"It is really surprising how many places they occur around the world — places you would never expect: Hawaii, Caribbean, Florida, Wales, New Caledonia, Thailand, Malaysia, Philippines, India ... as well as Australia.""

No, places I would never expect would be Kansas, Siberia and the middle of the Sahara. If cable television has taught me anything, it's that the sea is out to kill me. If I can smell saltwater in the air, I'm expecting some explosion of deadliness.

Re:Never expect (4, Funny)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 8 months ago | (#45357087)

In/Around Australia I would expect the jellyfish to be 10 meters across and armed with giant fangs. Everything there seems to be there solely to ruin your day.

Re:Never expect (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45357201)

You're not wrong. They have the box jellyfish, a species that actually hunts its prey rather than just drifting around hoping for something.

Re:Never expect (5, Funny)

camperdave (969942) | about 8 months ago | (#45357385)

Everything there seems to be there solely to ruin your day.

Sounds like an excellent place to put a penal colony.

Re:Never expect (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45357203)

Kansas, Siberia and the middle of the Sahara

Soon: JELLYNADO

Re:Never expect (1)

bobbied (2522392) | about 8 months ago | (#45357357)

COOL! I'll bring the bread and you bring the Peanut butter OK?

Re:Never expect (1)

SJHillman (1966756) | about 8 months ago | (#45357511)

The big obstacle to a Jellynado movie is finding a way to make the hero survive without having to buy the rights to Optimus Prime, Batman and Godzilla.

Re:Never expect (1)

strength_of_10_men (967050) | about 8 months ago | (#45357483)

No, places I would never expect would be Kansas, Siberia and the middle of the Sahara.

Suddenly, jellyfish EVERYWHERE [wikipedia.org]

C. sowerbii has a global distribution - it has been found in countries on almost every continent and nearly every state in America

Re:Never expect (3, Interesting)

beckett (27524) | about 8 months ago | (#45357539)

No, places I would never expect would be Kansas, Siberia and the middle of the Sahara. If cable television has taught me anything, it's that the sea is out to kill me. If I can smell saltwater in the air, I'm expecting some explosion of deadliness.

who says they have to be marine only? bioinvasive, freshwater jellies have been found:

Hamilton County [usgs.gov]
Erie County, Ohio [blogspot.ca]
Trenton, Ontario [yahoo.com]
Hoosier county (aka Laporte), Indiana [nwitimes.com]

Question (2)

VernonNemitz (581327) | about 9 months ago | (#45357043)

Does anyone know how vulnerable dolphins are to jellyfish stings? They don't have a layer of protective scales like fish, and there is a long-standing mystery regarding dolphin beachings.

Editing please (1)

ComfortablyAmbiguous (1740854) | about 9 months ago | (#45357047)

Scientists say, or Scientist says - please not Scientists says

Re:Editing please (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45357229)

It's just that they're MANY Scientists and they can't say it enough!

Getting them out of the way... (1)

pscottdv (676889) | about 9 months ago | (#45357053)

I, for one, welcome our new jellyfish overlords.

I Soviet Russia, jellyfish sting you! wait.. that one doesn't work.

and of course:

frist post! posted from my raspberry pi.

Re:Getting them out of the way... (1)

scuzzlebutt (517123) | about 8 months ago | (#45357209)

You win Slashdot.

Re:Getting them out of the way... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45357445)

No, he wins slashdot if he says something new and original. Alas no /. poster can do this, instead we are doomed to repeat the same shitty phases over and over again until the end of time.

HOT GRITS!

EVERYBODY PANIC ....slowly! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45357073)

Those jellyfish are coming right at us!

Chironex fleckeri (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45357075)

Capital letter for genus, lower case for species. Like Homo sapiens. Not "Homo Sapiens" or "homo sapiens". The two parts of a species name should also be italicized (i.e. Chironex fleckeri). Although it's a little technical, it's not a hard rule to remember when using species names.

Obviously need to over-fish jellyfish as well then (3, Insightful)

Aguazul2 (2591049) | about 8 months ago | (#45357117)

Can't we find a use for them? As soon as capitalism gets to work on them, they'll be goners too.

Let's hear it from... (5, Insightful)

benjfowler (239527) | about 8 months ago | (#45357143)

Let's hear it from greedy fisherman and their right-wing supporters, who think it's humanity's God-given right to rape the oceans and trash the food chain upon which everything depends... human greed will do us in for sure, because it overrides even the survival instinct.

Re:Let's hear it from... (2)

eneville (745111) | about 8 months ago | (#45357407)

It's not the fishermen who are greedy, it's the company that they work for which is. The fisherman just wants a comfortable life, they're quiet hard working people, taking risks on a daily basis. How often does your job threaten you with drowning when you screw up? However, I have no sympathy for the company which they work for, since that would be the accountants realm. Business is the one area of the world where altruism doesn't apply. So lets not try to confuse the fishermen with capitalism.

Scientist says, or scientists say (1)

rossdee (243626) | about 8 months ago | (#45357153)

that grammar nazis should take over slashdot

Anyway once the jellyfish have eaten all the fish in the area, what do they live on?

Re:Scientist says, or scientists say (1)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | about 8 months ago | (#45357303)

Other jellyfish, I assume.

"Visible from space" (3, Interesting)

Guppy06 (410832) | about 8 months ago | (#45357173)

I've seen Google Maps. My car is "visible from space."

Re:"Visible from space" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45357325)

I watched Enemy of the State. Your watch is "visible from space," they can even tell you if the time is off.

Re:"Visible from space" (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45357565)

Actually, you're car is visible to aerial photography. You need to zoom out a few levels to see the satellite imagery where you're car is just a few pixels. Of course, this discounts spy satellites to which we don't have access to the imagery from.

Turtle Food (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45357179)

Turtles eat Jellyfish so this should be good for turtles. Why it that every time there is some change in the ecology the neo pagans run off in panic.

The Conconquer Cockroach (1)

deodiaus2 (980169) | about 8 months ago | (#45357205)

As many species are going extinct, the "common cockroach" is flourishing and multiplying.

I have noticed this locally in Canada (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45357211)

I often go crabbing up the indian arm in Vancouver - during summer the last 3 years i've noticed a ridiculous amount of jellyfish.. you literally cannot look anywhere in the water and not see jellyfish... pulling a crab trap up through the water column sees you cutting through like 100 of them.

visible from space (1)

tverbeek (457094) | about 8 months ago | (#45357221)

"it was even visible from space"

My house is "visible from space": it's right there on Google Maps. This phrase is meaningless, because it's almost entirely a function of weather, the camera being used, and whether something is covered.

(On the other hand, it's often parroted that the Great Wall of China is "the only man-made object visible from space" ... but even one of China's own astronauts admitted that he couldn't pick it out from Low Earth Orbit.)

Re:visible from space (1)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | about 8 months ago | (#45357315)

Also depends if you consider an entire city as one object. Plenty of those are visible.

Re:visible from space (1)

DMUTPeregrine (612791) | about 8 months ago | (#45357557)

Google maps uses images from aircraft, not spacecraft.
But yes, the quality of the optics matters. A spacecraft with a big telescope, like a spy satellite, will have a much easier time seeing things on the ground than an astronaut with only eyes.

Re:visible from space (1)

Anonyme Connard (218057) | about 8 months ago | (#45357575)

Do you know that Google Maps is not made of satellite images only?
Your house is visible on aerial photographies. This is not what is usually refered to as "visible from space".

I for one... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45357239)

...welcome our new gelatinous overlords.

turning lemons into "lemonade" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45357241)

Any hotties need me to pee on their jellyfish stings?

Easy to solve (1)

gmuslera (3436) | about 8 months ago | (#45357249)

Give a more profitable use to jellyfish (even if it is for making glow-in-the-dark ice cream [dailymail.co.uk] , or other uses [discovery.com] ) better than "normal" fishes and the balance could be reached again... before is too late [theherald.com.au] .

Re:Easy to solve (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45357563)

Really? Fishes?

Energy Dept Launches Alternative Fuel Station App (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45357257)

As part of the Obama Administration's commitment to expand access to data and give consumers more transportation options that save money at the pump, the Energy Department today launched a new mobile app to help drivers find stations that provide alternative fuel for vehicles. [energy.gov]

Oh? (1)

sanjacguy (908392) | about 8 months ago | (#45357259)

I, for one, WELCOME our new invertebrate overlords.

Go Pods!

Remember Soylent Green (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45357285)

Don't trust any government claiming we have a new ocean food source.

What can be done? (1)

walterbyrd (182728) | about 8 months ago | (#45357399)

There are some countries that will not never stop over-fishing. I cannot imaging that carbon emissions will go down anytime soon.

Pixar quote... (1)

bobbied (2522392) | about 8 months ago | (#45357535)

Dory: [sees a very small baby jellyfish] I shall call him Squishy and he shall be mine and he shall be my Squishy Come on, Squishy Come on, little Squishy...

[makes baby talk and slowly touches the jellyfish, getting shocked]

Dory: [pulling her fin away quickly] Ow! Bad squishy, bad squishy!

Plankton die off (1)

jmichaelg (148257) | about 8 months ago | (#45357541)

Restore the plankton and you've restored the bottom of the food chain.

The plankton have died off by at least 40% [scientificamerican.com] over the past 60 years. John Martin at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute hypothesized in the early 90's that the die-off was due to diminishing iron in the ocean surface waters. He was quoted as saying "Give me a freighter full of iron fertilizer and I'll give you an ice age." meaning that spraying iron onto the ocean's surface would re-populate the plankton and they in turn would consume the excess CO2 that's currently acidifying the oceans.

In 2002, MBARI validated his hypothesis that spraying iron fertilizer would engender a plankton bloom. [mbari.org] Subsequent studies have replicated MBARI's results.

Seems to me that if someone were to claim a 100 square mile chunk of ocean, they could fertilize it, seed it with anchovies and start a very profitable aqua farm. They would be harvesting a variety of predator fish such as bass and tuna once they discovered the anchovies feasting on the plankton. Since the farm wouldn't harvest all of the carbon the plankton consumed, it'd be a net carbon sink.

Revenge by Mollusca... (1)

dtjohnson (102237) | about 8 months ago | (#45357547)

Humans (and other vertebratans) have been feeding on mollusca denizens for centuries...and they are getting pissed off about it. Snails, clams, octopus, squid, abalone, and geoducks...we've had our fill and then some. Not to mention the unspeakable things humans routinely do to slugs. Molluscans have had enough of our abuse and they are coming after us.

Energy source? (1)

J-1000 (869558) | about 8 months ago | (#45357559)

Jellyfish-powered cars?
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