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The NSA Is Looking For a Few Good Geeks

Soulskill posted about 10 months ago | from the searching-for-the-next-snowden dept.

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itwbennett writes "Dan Tynan noticed something curious when he was reading a TechCrunch story (about Google's mystery barges, as it happens). There was a banner ad promoting careers at the NSA — and this was no ad-serving network fluke. Tynan visited the TechCrunch site on three different machines, and saw an NSA ad every time. In one version of the ad, a male voice says, 'There are activities that I've worked on that make, you know, front page headlines. And I can say, I know all about that, I had a hand in that. The things that happen here at NSA really have national and world ramifications.'"

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world ramifications... (5, Insightful)

arthurpaliden (939626) | about 10 months ago | (#45371685)

"The things that happen here at NSA really have national and world ramifications."

Like making the rest of the world distrust and hate the USA.

Re:world ramifications... (1)

i kan reed (749298) | about 10 months ago | (#45371703)

You had to be pretty dumb to have trusted us any time since there wasn't a soviet union to worry about anymore(or before then, but at least you had a good reason).

Re:world ramifications... (0)

LifesABeach (234436) | about 10 months ago | (#45372115)

For those that are impacted by spying, spying is not news. For the unwashed that have discovered they, in mass, are being spied upon, are incensed. This is but one flaw of the "Proud Ignorance" approach to living. And one can only imagine the wonders yet to be discovered when humanity sheds it's Proud Ignorance.

Re:world ramifications... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45371805)

Darn, I missed the ads cause of my adblocker.

Re:world ramifications... (1)

saihung (19097) | about 10 months ago | (#45371817)

You mean other countries get angry when we spy on their leaders? And then blame the person disclosing the spying instead of, you know, apologizing? Really?

Re:world ramifications... (4, Funny)

kthreadd (1558445) | about 10 months ago | (#45371825)

"The things that happen here at NSA really have national and world ramifications."

Like making the rest of the world distrust and hate the USA.

They actually do quite a lot of other things as well there, like research into improving cryptography for example.

Re:world ramifications... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45371843)

Doesn't matter. I'd feel like a piece of shit if I worked for them.

Give me a break. (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45371903)

They actually do quite a lot of other things as well there, like research into improving cryptography for example.

Seriously? Improving it as in finding holes [nytimes.com] that they can exploit [nytimes.com] and tell no one else about? Or spending millions [nytimes.com] on research into how to create holes they can hope to get included [propublica.org] as encryption standards [propublica.org] ?

From the link above:

The N.S.A.'s Sigint Enabling Project is a $250 million-a-year program that works with Internet companies to weaken privacy by inserting back doors into encryption products. This excerpt from a 2013 budget proposal outlines some methods the agency uses to undermine encryption used by the public.

Re:Give me a break. (2)

FlyHelicopters (1540845) | about 10 months ago | (#45372023)

Yes, but the NSA's problem, in all fairness, is that properly written 256-bit encryption is uncrackable. Many people have made jokes saying, "it is safe, unless the NSA wants in.", but the truth is, without an exploit, proper encryption is uncrackable and will remain so for a very long time.

There are evil people in the world that they want to listen to, the problem is that the good people use the same tools as the evil people.

What would you use for a solution?

Re:Give me a break. (3, Interesting)

dgatwood (11270) | about 10 months ago | (#45372171)

Boots on the ground? It always worked before we had high tech. I mean, before there were phones, they had to plant people inside an organization to learn its secrets unless they just happened to get lucky enough to catch a courier. The fact that communication channels are back to being moderately secure is uninteresting. It's really just a correction of a weakness that high tech introduced in the first place.

Re:Give me a break. (1)

JohnFen (1641097) | about 10 months ago | (#45372187)

I wouldn't characterize the NSA as "good guys", but ignoring that for the sake of argument...

If you really have to do general harm to listen in to the bad guys, then the solution is to give up on the notion of listening to them in that way. It makes the job harder, and that sucks for them, but that's the way the cookie crumbles.

Re:world ramifications... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45371949)

A "-1, Wrong" mod would be awesome right about now.

Re:world ramifications... (1)

mbkennel (97636) | about 10 months ago | (#45371987)


Looking for a few good geeks, and a whole bunch o' bad ones.

Re:world ramifications... (1)

DarkOx (621550) | about 10 months ago | (#45372089)

Yes and stacking the membership on standards bodies to make sure those improvements are not useful to the general public. Here will give you a great cryptographic cipher but make sure your key exchange process is hopeless borked. Screw the NSA we'd all be safer without them.

And no we don't need them for international spying we have the CIA for that and they have their own signals intelligence groups. The best thing for the nation would be if we just shuttered the whole agency tomorrow.

Re:world ramifications... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45371841)

Like violating the law to spy one everyone. Some of you Americans need to put together a task force and eliminate the NSA.

Re:world ramifications... (1)

TheNastyInThePasty (2382648) | about 10 months ago | (#45371859)

There are activities that I've worked on that make, you know, front page headlines. And I can say, I know all about that, I had a hand in that.

Yes, that headline reads "New NSA revelations reveal activities that violate our constitutional right to privacy" Not a headline I'd want to be associated with.

Re:world ramifications... (1)

FlyHelicopters (1540845) | about 10 months ago | (#45372119)

Where in the Constitution does it say we have a right to privacy?

I'm not saying we *shouldn't* have it, I'm just asking where it actually says it.

Re:world ramifications... (4, Informative)

JohnFen (1641097) | about 10 months ago | (#45372205)

In the context of the NSA's activities, my answer is "the fourth amendment."

Re:world ramifications... (4, Interesting)

SirGarlon (845873) | about 10 months ago | (#45371921)

There's a podcast interviewing former NSA officer Brian Snow [pauldotcom.com] that was recorded before the Snowden leaks, and provides some valuable perspective on what the NSA does. I am probably going to get modded and/or flamed to oblivion for saying this, but listening to that podcast made me believe that not everything the NSA does is bad.

Re:world ramifications... (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45372137)

The Nazi war machine contributed to a several engineering accomplishments in history. Does that make World War 2 any less bad?

Not being evil (or not 100% evil) is not an excuse for allowing evil people to take advantage of a seemingly unstoppable tool.

Re:world ramifications... (4, Insightful)

number11 (129686) | about 10 months ago | (#45372145)

I am probably going to get modded and/or flamed to oblivion for saying this, but listening to that podcast made me believe that not everything the NSA does is bad.

Of course not. Very few things in life are all black or all white. The NSA is like the neighbor who poisons any dog that comes onto his property, and you're pretty sure he shoplifts, but if you need a hand hoisting an engine or a ride to the store, he's always willing to help.

That doesn't mean he shouldn't be locked up, though.

Re:world ramifications... (2, Insightful)

squiggleslash (241428) | about 10 months ago | (#45371931)

For all Its faults, the NSA is more of a flawed character than an evil one. It does have a particular job to do, the job it's supposed to do is a worthwhile one, and for the most part "our"* criticism of it has to do with its methods, not its mandate. We do, actually, want to know what foreign governments are up to, especially in terms of what those governments might be planning that severely affects America's interests. We do, actually, want our government to know what terrorists are up to, as part of a combined good faith effort to counter-act them.

We also, of course, want a lot of other things, but just as the most pacifist of us would stop short of demanding an end to the US military - at least, while other governments have one - few would demand an intelligence gathering organization cease to exist simply because of privacy issues. In both cases we might want to rein in the excesses, but we don't want to do away with them altogether.

So no, I don't see it as completely unreasonable that the NSA would recruit from the nerd communities, leaving aside the somewhat inconvenient fact that they kinda need our skills these days...

Would I take a job there? Probably not, largely because (post Snowden) I'd be concerned I'd be put in a position whether I have to choose between betraying my principles or betraying my promises. But others may feel much more comfortable with the possible boundaries the job has.

* as left wing nerds - teahadists can pretend you're against it too, but be honest, you supported the darkest of Cheney's fantasies, we don't believe your sudden opposition to the NSA to be anything other than related to who's in the White House.

Re:world ramifications... (1)

An ominous Cow art (320322) | about 10 months ago | (#45372121)

A person I had an extremely high opinion of began working there in the mid-90s. A few years later, s/he hinted very vaguely of something unethical that was going on there but which s/he was not directly involved in. I knew better than to ask further about it, because I knew I'd get no answer.

We've apparently drifted apart since then, but I sometimes wonder how all of this stuff is affecting this person.

Re:world ramifications... (3, Insightful)

JohnFen (1641097) | about 10 months ago | (#45372233)

For all Its faults, the NSA is more of a flawed character than an evil one

We are what we do. The NSA is doing evil, regardless of what their intentions are.

Re:world ramifications... (1)

jellomizer (103300) | about 10 months ago | (#45372087)

The interesting thing about security, is when things don't happen is when you do you job well.
Oh look we found this guy who was getting radicalized. We tell the FBI. Then either he gets arrested or he is monitored so heavily that he will not try anything.

The general public say, Yo NSA stop spying on people, it is not like there are a bunch of credible plots anyways.

Re:world ramifications... (1)

arthurpaliden (939626) | about 10 months ago | (#45372185)

The thing is the NSA has admitted that they domestic US spying has not given any results. It has been a colossal waste of money as well as a violation of the US constitution.

America (3, Interesting)

i kan reed (749298) | about 10 months ago | (#45371687)

Enough advertising overcomes any negative consequences of your actions.

Re:America (5, Insightful)

icebike (68054) | about 10 months ago | (#45372005)

Enough advertising overcomes any negative consequences of your actions.

Pretty much this.!

By "owning" it in advertising and public speeches and press releases, they hope to pull a "Toyota" maneuver.

(When Toyota was facing run-away vehicles and brake problems with spectacular crashes, they began an ad campaign touting their safety. They are still at it today with a drumbeat of ads telling how safe their cars are and totally ignoring the massive recalls they were forced into. I suspect Toyota learned the technique from Iomega which did the same thing in the face of their Famous Click of Death [wikipedia.org] drive series).

I predicted this some months ago. I suspect going forward they will just start saying in effect: "Yeah, we read your mail. Get over it." Now that its out in the open, they will become bolder and brasher, and no mere legal barriers will stand in their way, (not that they ever did). There are just enough useful idiots out there that believe this is a "good thing" that the NSA will probably get away with this tactic.

Technical solutions are going to have to be devised, better encryption, multi-path routing, etc. And instead of welcoming their contributions, crypto developers are going to have to understand that they can't be trusted.

Re:America (2)

FriendlyLurker (50431) | about 10 months ago | (#45372091)

Re:America (1)

LifesABeach (234436) | about 10 months ago | (#45372161)

It appears that if one has completed a secondary education, then one is bypassed by the NSA?

well no shit (2)

X0563511 (793323) | about 10 months ago | (#45371689)

They fire everyone, and now they have to hire people? Imagine that.

Re:well no shit (1)

icebike (68054) | about 10 months ago | (#45372031)

They fire everyone, and now they have to hire people? Imagine that.

Who got fired? (Other than Snowden). Even Snowden's company still in under contract.

i wonder... (5, Funny)

ganjadude (952775) | about 10 months ago | (#45371697)

why the NSA would need to seek out new team members, you would think they already know who the brightest and best are from the data collected!

Re:i wonder... (1)

arthurpaliden (939626) | about 10 months ago | (#45371719)

There was a purge....

Re:i wonder... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45371869)

And then they show ads to those people on their computers to recruit them.

Your point?

Re:i wonder... (1)

jellomizer (103300) | about 10 months ago | (#45372113)

Well for one.
I doubt there is a connection between their HR systems and their other systems.
Secondly, the best and brightest will not probably be too happy if government officials knock on their door, and "offer them" a government job.

Re:i wonder... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45372179)

They only say they want the best and the brightest. But hiring the actual best and/or brightest would mean less of their funding could be laundered out into some rich guy's pockets. Hell, they're probably only looking for H1B workers anyway...

Good geeks? (4, Insightful)

jez9999 (618189) | about 10 months ago | (#45371733)

At this point, no "good" geek would work for the NSA.

Re:Good geeks? (4, Insightful)

Fwipp (1473271) | about 10 months ago | (#45371781)

I like this post, because I can't tell if it means
"No honorable person would work for the NSA"
or
"Anyone applying to the NSA is out to betray them."

Re:Good geeks? (1)

TheCarp (96830) | about 10 months ago | (#45371851)

Except....if statement 2 is true, then statement 1 isn't.

Re:Good geeks? (1)

Minwee (522556) | about 10 months ago | (#45371907)

It depends on what the meaning of the word "for" is.

Re:Good geeks? (1)

jellomizer (103300) | about 10 months ago | (#45372159)

Some geeks are not so political and would jump on being able to work with supercomputers and get paid for it.

After WWII we got a lot of Rocket Scientists. Did these ex Nazi's have a change of heart? or they were just interesting go where there was interesting work for them to do. While working for the Nazi's they probably didn't care about the politics, but they liked the work, the same when they worked for the US for the cold war.

Re:Good geeks? (4, Insightful)

gstoddart (321705) | about 10 months ago | (#45371799)

At this point, no "good" geek would work for the NSA.

Define 'good' and define 'geek'.

If you think there aren't people who work in the tech field who will say "I'm totally in favor of this, because it protects us from the terrorists", you're likely sadly mistaken.

Geeks aren't some uniform group of people who all believe the same things. Reading Slashdot should show you that quite readily in about 2 minutes.

Many of us might say "yeah, not on your life", but I bet almost as many might say "sure, I'm in, sounds fun".

Re:Good geeks? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45371957)

There are only two types of geeks who would work for the NSA:

1) the traitor geeks, who are (a) deluded by the terrorism hyperbole, or (b) just like the money;
2) the autistic geeks, oblivious to the ethical problems with working for the NSA

I'd probably fit into 1(b), especially if I didn't have other options.

Re:Good geeks? (1)

gstoddart (321705) | about 10 months ago | (#45372033)

1) the traitor geeks

Sadly, one man's traitor is another man's patriot.

I don't doubt that people sincerely believe they're doing the right thing, even if it means skirting around some laws.

I don't agree with their conclusions, but I acknowledge that it's what they believe.

I'd probably fit into 1(b), especially if I didn't have other options.

So, you're saying that you're a traitorous whore who would sell out your principles if the money was right?

And this makes you better than anybody working there, how, exactly?

Re:Good geeks? (2)

s.petry (762400) | about 10 months ago | (#45372045)

I agree that geeks are not uniform. Sociopaths and Psychopaths that don't give a rats ass who they screw over as long as they Get PAID! come immediately to mind as people that will apply for NSA jobs. This is in addition of course to a whole lot of people that see it as a way to make a decent living, you know, because McDonald's does not pay very well. Lots of other people are simply ignorant to the happenings and still believe that there are all of these bogey men to hunt.

Re:Good geeks? (1)

icebike (68054) | about 10 months ago | (#45372151)

Well your average geek (use what ever characteristics you want for the definition) tends to be a bit brighter than your average dim-bulb office pencil pusher or mill-rat.

They can look to recent examples and notice that we aren't safer from terrorists, that the total surveillance mentality hasn't served us well, and bomber set bombs even when the Russians warn us about them in advance. Furthermore simply talking in code while posting on slashdot (and 3 zillion other forums) can transmit messages for any sort of operation hidden in discussions of cat videos or ranting about some changes to Linux or IOS.

It doesn't work. It can't work. And Geeks realize this more than Joe Sixpack.

Re:Good geeks? (1)

kthreadd (1558445) | about 10 months ago | (#45371877)

At this point, no "good" geek would work for the NSA.

You can actually do quite a lot of good things at the NSA. Research and development of cryptography and cyber attack preventions for example.

Re:Good geeks? (1)

DoofusOfDeath (636671) | about 10 months ago | (#45371905)

And if those advances are used to violate the Constitution and perhaps impose tyranny, are they still "a lot of good things"?

Re:Good geeks? (1)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 10 months ago | (#45371989)

At this point, no "good" geek would work for the NSA.

You can actually do quite a lot of good things at the NSA. Research and development of cryptography and cyber attack preventions for example.

Besides the fact it seems the NSA is far more interested in fucking up cryptography, what with their mandatory backdoors and all, what good is that research and development if the only people allowed to access or use it are TLA agents?

Side note: This is at least the second post where you've made this claim about the "good side" of the No Such Agency, without citing a source that would verify any of it.

Might seem kinda shill-y to some people here.

Re:Good geeks? (1)

robmv (855035) | about 10 months ago | (#45371953)

Why not? when an institution is failing in their duty because of bad management, corruption, whatever, it is the time for the good people to be part of it. Things don't get fixed by not participating.

Re:Good geeks? (1)

An ominous Cow art (320322) | about 10 months ago | (#45371977)

And I'm not sure I'd want to entrust National Security to anyone who browses the web without an adblocker in place...

Re:Good geeks? (1)

cold fjord (826450) | about 10 months ago | (#45372001)

At this point, no "good" geek would work for the NSA.

For certain values of "good." Those values aren't necessarily shared by all good people.

Re:Good geeks? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45372057)

Agreed. For instance, good at bootlicking. Those geeks like to work there.

Re:Good geeks? (1)

kruach aum (1934852) | about 10 months ago | (#45372037)

That depends on whether 'good' refers to morality or aptitude. Though, admittedly, when it refers to aptitude the sort of person that would qualify commonly has an NSA non-compliant set of morals.

Re:Good geeks? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45372101)

What about the geeks who work for companies that produce open source software like Red Hat or IBM in co-operation with the NSA? Are they good, or are they lackeys for an authoritarian State surveillance apparatus?

http://www.nsa.gov/research/selinux/contrib.shtml

Do the following people and companies belong in a hall of fame, or a hall of shame according to your criteria of what make a "good" geek?

Network Associates Laboratories (NAI Labs)
The MITRE Corporation
Secure Computing Corporation (SCC)
Matt Anderson
Ryan Bergauer
Bastian Blank
Thomas Bleher
Joshua Brindle
Russell Coker
John Dennis
Janak Desai
Ulrich Drepper
Lorenzo Hernandez Garcia-Hierro
Darrel Goeddel
Carsten Grohmann
Steve Grubb
Ivan Gyurdiev
Serge Hallyn
Chad Hanson
Joerg Hoh
Trent Jaeger
Dustin Kirkland
Kaigai Kohei
Paul Krumviede
Joy Latten
Tom London
Karl MacMillan
Brian May
Frank Mayer
Todd Miller
Roland McGrath
Paul Moore
James Morris
Yuichi Nakamura
Greg Norris
Eric Paris
Chris PeBenito
Red Hat
Petre Rodan
Shaun Savage
Chad Sellers
Rogelio Serrano Jr.
Justin Smith
Manoj Srivastava
Tresys Technology
Michael Thompson
Trusted Computer Solutions
Tom Vogt
Reino Wallin
Dan Walsh
Colin Walters
Mark Westerman
David A. Wheeler
Venkat Yekkirala
Catherine Zhang

More importantly, how do the above listed folks feel about the revelations concerning the NSA, GHCQ, etc. that have come to light. How do they feel about the close partnerships between NSA and the companies they work for? How do they feel about their own work being used by such a totalitarian-like intelligence agency? Indifferent? Worried? Gung-ho? Who knows, but I think its a bit simplistic to categorize whether a geek is "good" or "bad" simply because they have direct or indirect relationship with the NSA.

The logical deduction is that the ads are fake (4, Interesting)

cruff (171569) | about 10 months ago | (#45371743)

Given that the NSA is recording everything, and probably has broken all your encryption keys, you would think the NSA would already know who to target for employment. Thus the obvious conclusion is that these ads are fakes or honeypots.

Re:The logical deduction is that the ads are fake (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45371995)

Given that the NSA is recording everything, and probably has broken all your encryption keys, you would think the NSA would already know who to target for employment. Thus the obvious conclusion is that these ads are fakes or honeypots.

or they are targeted to exactly the people found that the NSA was interested in hiring.

Re:The logical deduction is that the ads are fake (2)

icebike (68054) | about 10 months ago | (#45372175)

Given that the NSA is recording everything, and probably has broken all your encryption keys, you would think the NSA would already know who to target for employment. Thus the obvious conclusion is that these ads are fakes or honeypots.

My thoughts exactly. Even hovering your mouse over those ads is probably recorded.
This can't be much besides a "trial balloon" to see how much "chatter" they can induce.

Not worth my time. (4, Insightful)

Anon-Admin (443764) | about 10 months ago | (#45371753)

I looked into the NSA and the CIA. neither pay anywhere near what the private sector pays. Both want to pump you up on "Doing your national duty", "Serving your country", and/or "Protecting your fellow Americans"

If they want IT talent, they need to pony up the cash.

Re:Not worth my time. (1)

FlyHelicopters (1540845) | about 10 months ago | (#45372085)

^ This... I looked into the CIA after 9/11, I also looked into the military (being a commercial helicopter pilot, I thought I could help).

Neither of them are offering anything remotely close to what I'd call "reasonable pay" for what they want in return.

They would have to double it to interest me, triple it to get me jumping up and down about it.

They will fill their quota, but that doesn't mean they'll fill it with the best and brightest.

lol (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45371755)

New Positions Available!

Location: Hawaii

If I didn't have any ethics... (3, Interesting)

Frobnicator (565869) | about 10 months ago | (#45371771)

Like most of us on /., we have a group of brilliant individuals. Occasionally we come up with some excellent but immoral or illegal ideas that would very easily separate people from their money. These are different from our typical ideas that manage to separate people from their money, as we are all paid well for the work we do.

Sometimes we will flesh these immoral or illegal business plans out a little bit, realize just what is involved in the process, and then sigh, "I could be rich if I didn't have any ethics."

Many people make the news every day. Most often these include major scams and crimes or immoral behavior.

Yes, there is work to be had and money to be found in those activities, and you can make global news from them. If you don't have any ethics.

Re:If I didn't have any ethics... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45371929)

Wow, the thousands of people that work there, the cutting edge research done, the foreign intelligence analysis performed, every thing they do there, all immoral and unethical? That is quite the black-and-white world you live in, but I suppose those who lay exclusive claim to "the" morally right position look at the world that way after all. Now please be kind and stand over there with the anti-abortionists, the Assange fanboys, the Evangelical Christians, and all the other judgemental pricks who can only feel good about themselves by passing uninformed judgement on others.

Re:If I didn't have any ethics... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45372201)

Wow, the thousands of people that work there, the cutting edge research done, the foreign intelligence analysis performed, every thing they do there, all immoral and unethical? That is quite the black-and-white world you live in, but I suppose those who lay exclusive claim to "the" morally right position look at the world that way after all.

Maybe not every member of the Ku Klux Klan is a bad person, but that doesn't give the organization itself a pass.

Re:If I didn't have any ethics... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45372025)

Sometimes we will flesh these immoral or illegal business plans out a little bit, realize just what is involved in the process, and then sigh, "I could be rich if I didn't have any ethics...."

...Yes, there is work to be had and money to be found in those activities, and you can make global news from them. If you don't have any ethics.

Can you be more specific?

Hello ... (4, Funny)

PPH (736903) | about 10 months ago | (#45371777)

... my name is Ted Stowden. I'd like some information on a career in your fine organization. No need to send me anything. I know which server its on.

Re:Hello ... (1)

Arancaytar (966377) | about 10 months ago | (#45372131)

Hello, my name is Mr. Nedwons and I come from... someplace far away. Definitely nowhere near Moscow.

Hello, future leakers! (1)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | about 10 months ago | (#45371779)

So, they are recruiting experts in a community that almost exclusively supports Snowden and despises the NSA's various mass-spying-on-civilians programs?

Re:Hello, future leakers! (3, Insightful)

the eric conspiracy (20178) | about 10 months ago | (#45372069)

That's a very myopic view of the situation.

People with expertise in data systems have a wide range of opinions and come from a variety of backgrounds. There is no monolithic community that is implied with possession of this knowledge.

Even if you are in the subset that supports Snowden you don't have to have the opinion that what the NSA does is fundamentally wrong. It may be that all it really needs is more enlightened political leadership and restructured laws. After all even the most ideal free societies have opponents and will have a need to protect themselves to ensure their continuation.

What's the news here? (1)

hubie (108345) | about 10 months ago | (#45371801)

The NSA advertises jobs all the time in a variety of formats. They have recruitment booths at technical conferences, internships, etc.. They have a whole web site [nsa.gov] and all. What is particularly newsworthy about this?

Re:What's the news here? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45371959)

Perhaps not really important or earth-shattering to either of us but there is a lot of gall and hubris involved with the way they created that specific advertisement that is clearly speaking in context with the Snowden leaks. That's worthy of at least a mention.

Re:What's the news here? (3, Insightful)

Animats (122034) | about 10 months ago | (#45372169)

Right. They've been open about it for years. NSA has a long history in computing.

At one time, going to NSA HQ was very mysterious, and travel expenses were paid with a check from a furniture company. But they gave up on that years ago. Now, like the CIA, they have signs outside.

Until the USSR went down, all NSA really cared about was what the USSR was doing. Anything else had lower priority. After the USSR went down, there were lots of retirements and layoffs. After 9/11, everything changed. Suddenly the threat was from little groups, not a superpower. Huge internal realignment. Much more pressure for timely info (the USSR was a slow-moving opponent) and for data sharing with law enforcement. That's when NSA became more intrusive.

Any SysAdmin positions? (5, Funny)

komodo685 (2920329) | about 10 months ago | (#45371813)

I know this former SysAdmin in Russia who had to resort to tech support FFS. Already has clearance. He'd be just what you deserve.

fuck you (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45371823)

The NSA should be in search of a new population to fool instead.

One Epidemic, Meet Another (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45371833)

Looks like Big Brother has finally gotten around to noticing that You Can't Hire Mr. Perfect.

Old joke... (5, Funny)

jayveekay (735967) | about 10 months ago | (#45371845)

If you want to apply for a job at the NSA, just pick up the phone. Any phone.

Re:Old joke... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45372225)

Pick up any phone, press any number key to silence the dial tone, then whisper... "I'd like to be hired by the NSA" and hang up. If they are interested in hiring you, you will receive a call back within 1 business day. If not, they were not interested in hiring you.

I gotta lead (2)

Tablizer (95088) | about 10 months ago | (#45371875)

There's an American dude named Edward, currently hanging out in Russia, who's currently looking.

I'd shake anyone's hand that joined (1, Insightful)

Crashmarik (635988) | about 10 months ago | (#45371885)

Post WWII the NSA/CIA and intelligence agencies of the free world have been vital for keeping the peace. I don't see that changing anytime soon. We are all likely alive at least in part due to their actions.

"And I can say... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45371891)

...I know all about that, I had a hand in that."

Umm, I'm pretty sure you can't say anything. Unless you want to spend a few weeks in the Moscow airport.

Re:"And I can say... (1)

Chas (5144) | about 10 months ago | (#45372039)

Exactly.

"You opened your mouth. Zis is KAOS! Err... The NSA! We do not open our mouths here!"

Anyone saying " And I can say, I know all about that, I had a hand in that." is out of a job and probably getting a first class ticket to GITMO if they don't run first.

It's a job... (2)

spaceyhackerlady (462530) | about 10 months ago | (#45371927)

Working for the NSA or any of their ilk is probably like any other job: day-to-day routine stuff and some really cool shit. With, of course, the proviso that you can never breathe a word of it to anybody, and they'd rather you not discuss the fact that you even work there.

The MI5 recruiting web site discusses some of this [mi5.gov.uk] . If you want the approval of others on what a neat job you have, think again. This certainly limits the pool of available candidates. I wonder what it means for the intelligence community in general.

Hang on a sec...there's somebody at the door. GIDYW*(YW*DHNDW

NO CARRIER

Re:It's a job... (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 10 months ago | (#45372047)

So is the day to to day routine stuff violating people's constitutional rights or is that the exciting stuff?

Inner Party (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45371937)

'There are activities that I've worked on that make, you know, front page headlines. And I can say, I know all about that, I had a hand in that. The things that happen here at NSA really have national and world ramifications.'

Become a member of the inner party today.

Sure I'll work for you guys (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45371965)

In the meantime, let me get started on my application for asylum in Russia.

So what does it pay? (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 10 months ago | (#45371991)

I want to know what exactly they are paying in exchange for being able to look at yourself in the mirror.

Re:So what does it pay? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45372041)

Don't worry. You'll be well taken care of. Just one little matter. Please write, "my soul" on a piece of paper, and turn it over to us for safe keeping.

Perks? (1)

Groo Wanderer (180806) | about 10 months ago | (#45372011)

Does an employment contract come with the perk of war crimes indemnification in writing? Just curious.

All you AC posting here... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45372049)

Your are not AC anymore...

What is the story here? (1)

ljhiller (40044) | about 10 months ago | (#45372073)

1) the NSA is recruiting?

2) the NSA is spying on everybody and recruiting by injecting banner ads into TCP streams to recruit TechCrunch readers?

3) a banner ad company (unnamed) is serving NSA ads to anybody that searches or surfs pages where NSA occurs more than 5 times, then uses cookies, flash cookies, unique browser characteristics, and any other form of persistent storage and leaked information to continue to serve these ads across browsing sessions?

4) That Dan Tynan, a TechCrunch writer and O'Reilly author, doesn't understand how ad distributors do business?

If they had a facility near me... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45372135)

I would definitely work for them. I wouldn't do any actual work though, which is good for everybody.

A whole different breed of recruits (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45372147)

I'd imagine at least some of the NSA employees hired before the Snowden leaks actually cared about defending American freedom. Now that the NSA's agenda is public information, only the lowest of the low will accept an offer.

That means it will continue along this course, with even more ideological solidarity, until shut down completely.

Of course they are advertising for people. (1)

sugar and acid (88555) | about 10 months ago | (#45372153)

Snowden worked for a company that the NSA had subcontracted IT support to. Having seen this blow up in their face, they are dumping all those contracts and bringing it in house. Now this will mean that it is under very heavy security clearance and surveillance, but they need to do it quickly hence the need for direct advertising.

Geeks or Leaks? (1)

axehind (518047) | about 10 months ago | (#45372199)

For some reason my mind replaced Geeks with Leaks. It caused me to do a double take!

Plenty of lowlives in USA (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45372209)

Our country has many losers that will snap up the jobs to violate their fellow countryman's constitutional rights.

I had a hand in that! (3, Interesting)

MobyDisk (75490) | about 10 months ago | (#45372213)

'There are activities that I've worked on that make, you know, front page headlines. And I can say, I know all about that, I had a hand in that.

That's silly/ There are not many headlines in the last few years that the NSA is proud of. And if you work at the NSA and had a hand in something that made front page headlines, you probably aren't allowed to talk about it anyway.

My friends who work at the NSA hate when the NSA comes up as a topic, because it is never good news. They just have to hide their heads and walk out of the room. Sometimes that is because they are not allowed to talk about it. Other times it is because they are sick of hearing the flak.

The NSA Is Looking For a Few Good Geeks... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45372223)

...to join the Dark Side of The Force.

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