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International Space Station Infected With Malware Carried By Russian Astronauts

samzenpus posted about 9 months ago | from the click-here-if-you-want-air dept.

Space 226

DavidGilbert99 writes "Nowhere is safe. Even in the cold expanse of space, computer malware manages to find a way. According to Russian security expert Eugene Kaspersky, the SCADA systems on board the International Space Station have been infected by malware which was carried into space on USB sticks by Russian astronauts."

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Oh, the irony... (4, Funny)

nospam007 (722110) | about 9 months ago | (#45391691)

Skynet transported into space by sneakernet.

Re:Oh, the irony... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45391833)

The real irony is that the malware was created by the US.

1. Create malware against enemy.
2. Cooperate and act like a friend.
3. Whine about it when the enemy spreads the malware to his friends.
4. ???
5. Profit!

Re:Oh, the irony... (4, Interesting)

girlintraining (1395911) | about 9 months ago | (#45392075)

Skynet transported into space by sneakernet.

More seriously... those SCADA systems control life support. That's a problem if you're one of those types of people that would rather go on sucking nitrogen/oxygen mixtures instead of vaccum up there. Now, I'm pretty sure that unlike in the movies there's no computer control that lets them just vent all the atmosphere into space in a few seconds, but if those systems were programmed to damage the ISS, it might force it to be abandoned. That would be bad.. especially if it de-orbited suddenly. That's a very, very big thing to be coming down to Earth, and it wouldn't break apart in a tight pattern either.

Re:Oh, the irony... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45392129)

The ISS is nothing more than a thinly veiled weapons platform cloaked as a space station. Rods from God is the ultimate weapon, inflicting nuclear scale devastation without the pesky fallout. Within our lifetimes expect to see an attack launched and the USA will claim that they had no part in it, when in reality they will be the instigating party with plausible deniability.

Re: Oh, the irony... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45392211)

Please go and seek help from a shrink. I pity you.

Re: Oh, the irony... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45392693)

That's what they said to all those who claimed the NSA was spying on everyone. Those people ate their words.

Re: Oh, the irony... (-1, Flamebait)

liamevo (1358257) | about 9 months ago | (#45392739)

No they didn't. And what sort of proof is that anyways?

Re:Oh, the irony... (1)

fast turtle (1118037) | about 9 months ago | (#45392591)

Not subtle enough. All you really need to do is drop the O2 Concentration by 2-3 percent while allowing CO2 to increase. Astronauts then make mistake that kills everyone aboard while leaving things mostly operational. Optionally add C0 (Carbom Monixide) to the mix and ensure that they die quietly.

Another possibility is to screw up the results of some of the experiments. Who says they're not valuable? Hell what if ET is trying to inject some knowledge in a manner that Humanitie can accept - "Eureka!!" Now I can patent the hell out of shipstones or what ever else you can think of.

Re:Oh, the irony... (2)

fahrbot-bot (874524) | about 9 months ago | (#45392755)

That's a problem if you're one of those types of people that would rather go on sucking nitrogen/oxygen mixtures instead of vaccum up there.

Okay that's going to cause some confusion, because in Soviet Russia, vacuum sucks you.

Linux... (5, Insightful)

ZiakII (829432) | about 9 months ago | (#45391701)

From the article As these systems are based on Linux, they are open to infection.

What system is not open to infection...

Re:Linux... (5, Insightful)

dukeblue219 (212029) | about 9 months ago | (#45391753)

To geeks it sounds like an uninformed attack on linux's security, but I think what the author means to say is "these are not proprietary custom-designed systems, but are based on a common Earthly operating system and thus may have known vulnerabilities."

Re:Linux... (5, Insightful)

freezin fat guy (713417) | about 9 months ago | (#45391941)

If the author of the comments were as unbiased as you it might indeed mean that.

However, he makes money telling Windows users they will be safe if they remember to pay him their fees. Not the same protection racket from the Linux crowd so I'm sure he's pleased to take any swipe he can.

Re:Linux... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45392025)

/THIS

Re:Linux... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45391787)

A Commodore 64.

Re:Linux... (5, Insightful)

UnknowingFool (672806) | about 9 months ago | (#45391819)

I took that as either a lack of knowledge or bias. In the next few paragraphs they talk about Stuxner which was a Windows worm. Linux is by no means perfectly secure. Nothing is. I would take the track record of Linux over Windows any day.

Re:Linux... (1)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | about 9 months ago | (#45392009)

The difference between Linux and Windows is, it takes a hacker to break into Linux. Any snot-nosed script kiddie can do Windows. The one thing I got from TFA is, the space station was never configured for security. It seems to be ASSumed that anyone arriving onboard is cleared to use the computers, and there is nothing to defend against. Oh well - no system can be secure when idiots run them!

Re:Linux... (2)

Doug Otto (2821601) | about 9 months ago | (#45392065)

it takes a hacker to break into Linux. Any snot-nosed script kiddie can do Windows.

Unfortunately, those same snot-nosed kiddies can do Linux too providing they're able to use a search engine.

Re:Linux... (0)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | about 9 months ago | (#45392315)

Well - the kiddies did a number on my Windows machines a few years ago. Local kids who knew my own kids. Since I reformatted the last Windows machine, and installed Linux, I've not had any problems. Maybe the local kiddies weren't able to use the search engines? I dunno - but the facts seem to support my opinion that script kiddies don't do Linux. Or, if they are doing Linux, they don't stoop to the childish pranks that Windows script kiddies do.

Re:Linux... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45392475)

Script kiddies know how to run scripts. Full stop. Its the people who make the scripts the kiddies run that may or may not target linux.

Re:Linux... (5, Interesting)

marcello_dl (667940) | about 9 months ago | (#45391825)

My question instead is "What linux system automounts usb drives without the noexec flag", or "how on hell did whatever program get executed by the onboard systems". Did the malware reside on some personal device and exploited some remote weakness on the systems which i guess give network access to get the much needed email and lolcat pic of the day?

But I'm too lazy for TFA so I'll pass with a "meh".

Re:Linux... (5, Informative)

thue (121682) | about 9 months ago | (#45392007)

There is a whole class of vulnerabilities related to maliciously crafted filesystem structures. You necessarily don't need to execute or open any files, you just need to try to mount it.

There is another class of vulnerabilities related to the preview feature of some Linux file managers. So you don't even need to open any non-executable files to be vulnerable either.

And then there if of course standard buffer overflows when opening non-executable files.

Re:Linux... (2)

RightwingNutjob (1302813) | about 9 months ago | (#45392843)

Wasn't there a privilege escalation bug in the usb filessystem code in the Linux kernel a few years ago? If it's in space now, it's probably running a 5-10 year old kernel at best, with that vulnerability still there.

Re: Linux... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45392189)

A very good point. If it couldn't easily accidentally happen an alternative theory is that it was intentionally executed....

Re:Linux... (1)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | about 9 months ago | (#45392389)

mounting /noexec can help protect dumb users from themselves but won't help against a virus, since nothing as stupid as Autorun exists in Linux (I'm sure Canonical will take that as a challenge). Once the virus is running its unauthorized code somehow (on Linux the only attacks are basically against graphical file browsers), /noexec is barely a speedbump.

Re:Linux... (4, Insightful)

Skiron (735617) | about 9 months ago | (#45391875)

Yes, WTF is that all about? Sounds to me like a MS wedge of money went to the reporter to sneak that in [quote below]

The reason is that the space station uses computer-controlled SCADA systems in order to manage various physical components of the satellite. As these systems are based on Linux, they are open to infection.

Re:Linux... (5, Informative)

mcgrew (92797) | about 9 months ago | (#45392619)

TFA was bad, I read it. I wish I'd read it before I voted in the firehose :(

Sorry, guys. That one line "As these systems are based on Linux, they are open to infection" discredits the author and the rest of the article. Since Windows viruses like the Stuxnet virus they say infected the station, Linux has nothing to do with it.

Wondering if it even happened I googled. space.com: [space.com]

A virus designed to swipe passwords from online gamers has inexplicably popped up in some laptop computers aboard the International Space Station.

The low-risk virus was detected on July 25, but did not infect the space station?s command and control computers and poses no threat to the orbiting laboratory, NASA officials said.

?This is basically a nuisance,? NASA spokesperson Kelly Humphries told SPACE.com from the agency?s Johnson Space Center in Houston

According to a NASA planning document obtained by SPACE.com, the virus was identified as W32.Gammima.AG. The California-based retail anti-virus software manufacturer Symantec describes it as a Windows-based worm which spreads by copying itself onto removable media.

It has nothing to do with Linux, TFA is either a troll or an MS shill. The submitter should be ashamed of himself for submitting such a piss-poor article (and I'm ashamed I voted before reading). TFA linked in the summary is garbage. It didn't even get the damned virus right. There are far better accounts, including the one I linked above.

Re:Linux... (4, Insightful)

kesuki (321456) | about 9 months ago | (#45391891)

there are two problems with this http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stuxnet [wikipedia.org] according to wikipedia stuxnet was to be self deleting in 2012 but is mentioned in TFA, and stuxnet doesn't affect linux systems at all. also the space station only uses linux for their laptops. so TFA is very poorly written and with no fact checking. scada is not based on linux either it is windows based so tfa is way off base. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SCADA [wikipedia.org]

Re:Linux... (1)

kannibal_klown (531544) | about 9 months ago | (#45391997)

From the article As these systems are based on Linux, they are open to infection.

What system is not open to infection...

Probably as opposed to the old NASA Space Shuttles which, at least I'd heard, really really old 70s/80s tech instead of modern computer systems.

Re:Linux... (4, Informative)

sl4shd0rk (755837) | about 9 months ago | (#45392027)

Strange, Stuxnet is a Windows program*.

The worm consists of a layered attack against three different systems:
        The Windows operating system,
        Siemens PCS 7, WinCC and STEP7 industrial software applications that run on Windows and
        One or more Siemens S7 PLCs.

Perhaps ISS is running Wine, or there was an error in translation? Not saying Linux is impenetrable, just pointing out the facts (at least as I know them).

[*] - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stuxnet [wikipedia.org]

Re:Linux... (5, Informative)

echusarcana (832151) | about 9 months ago | (#45392237)

This story is factually incorrect and refers to an incident a number of years ago. At the time of the infection, the system was running Windows XP.

http://www.extremetech.com/extreme/155392-international-space-station-switches-from-windows-to-linux-for-improved-reliability [extremetech.com]

Re:Linux... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45392453)

What system is not open to infection...
Linux and Android, at least according the the Linux fanatics I come across each day.

Re:Linux... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45392781)

From the article As these systems are based on Linux, they are open to infection.

What system is not open to infection...

Uh, the one orbiting above the fucking planet.

Or at least it was.

Sorry, I'm against the blatant attack against Linux here too, but this is just a simple case of utter fucking stupidity.

The damn underwear has been freeze-dried and sealed, certified bed-bug free before it makes the trip, and no one thought to check a fucking thumb drive...

Seriously? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45391709)

How the fuck does that even happen?

Re:Seriously? (2)

rvw (755107) | about 9 months ago | (#45391829)

How the fuck does that even happen?

Probably Vladimir downloaded some videos on his stick for the lonely hours. Staring at the stars makes you crave for other stars you know. The rest is history...

Re:Seriously? (1)

Stargoat (658863) | about 9 months ago | (#45392083)

Some knucklehead did not turn off the autoplay for CDs and USBs. It's as simple as that.

Re:Seriously? (1)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | about 9 months ago | (#45392409)

The same way your own population might eventually pick up an engineered virus you released into an enemy population as a bioweapon, but with computers.

even there (2)

watcher-rv4 (2712547) | about 9 months ago | (#45391715)

So, they found a backdoor left by NSA and exploited it.

Re:even there (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45391805)

yeah i remember when people where outraged at oracle for not patching a vulnerability for months and months ... but the truth is they weren't being lazy about patching it, they just didn't want to have to close the backdoor and only finally patched when the guys who found it went "full disclosure" on their ass.

Re:even there (1)

Wootery (1087023) | about 9 months ago | (#45392045)

the truth is they weren't being lazy about patching it, they just didn't want to have to close the backdoor and only finally patched when the guys who found it went "full disclosure" on their ass

Distinct from laziness... how?

They were reluctant to do the work, right? Sounds like laziness to me.

Or are you saying Oracle had an interest in 'actively leaving holes in', as it were?

Re:even there (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45392549)

Larry Ellison has been on public record enthusiastically supporting the NSA spying and data collection.

Re:even there (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45392139)

So simple, it`s partly true; the NSA has been employing Prism for quite some time now, Prism is a product of the israeli company called SiSense; STUXNET and DUQU were developed by the classmates of Sisense. Prism spys on EVERYONE, and Stuxnet is in the space-station.

why couldnt those israelis just stick to sending us delicious oranges instead of the current status quo?!?! :(

In space.... (5, Funny)

cold fjord (826450) | about 9 months ago | (#45391719)

They say that in space nobody can hear you scream, but I'll bet they can hear you curse. #$%@#$%!!! MALWARE!!!!

Re:In space.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45391953)

"Space, the final frontier; these are the voyages of an illegal israeli spaceprogram, seeking out iranian anti-humanic chimpanzees in orbit, infecting everything with STUXNET and DUQU."
say nought about israeli nuclear power, the oil and gasfields off the coast of Gaza, or the blackouts.
Cue rhetorical "we gotta stop them iranian negotiations because it threatens our freedom to raise the debt-ceiling."

Linux viruses OP (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45391727)

My favorite line from the article: "As these systems are based on Linux, they are open to infection."

Quote: (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45391745)

"As these systems are based on Linux, they are open to infection." I don't think that's why SCADA is vulnerable to infection exactly... that's like saying the reason it's vulnerable to infection is because it's a computer system.

Re:Quote: (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45392493)

Well, if it were a specialized system used only on the ISS and developed in-house by NASA or the Russian Federal Space Agency, it would be very unlikely to be vulnerable to any malware someone could just be accidentally carrying on his USB stick.

Effects of zero gravity on congruent hemispheres (2)

xymog (59935) | about 9 months ago | (#45391765)

Even astronauts need porn in space.

Re:Effects of zero gravity on congruent hemisphere (2)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | about 9 months ago | (#45392479)

In space, nobody can hear you fap...

Just pay the fee (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45391775)

But it's cool though, all we have to do is pay the $200 fee asked for by the friendly pop-up and we'll be all set.

Proving once again (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45391795)

That the weakest point in any security scheme are the people accessing it.

something here isnt right (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45391797)

What a load of nonsense. The iss has only just been migrated to linux. This attacks almost certainly happened while it was still running a particular microsoft product.

Awesome! (5, Funny)

mythosaz (572040) | about 9 months ago | (#45391809)

I can't be the first guy to read this today and go, "Seriously? We infected computers on the ISS? That's freakin' awesome."

Re:Awesome! (5, Funny)

GodfatherofSoul (174979) | about 9 months ago | (#45391817)

We?

Re:Awesome! (2)

girlintraining (1395911) | about 9 months ago | (#45391929)

We?

You are to disavow that previous post, Citizen. Cooperation is mandatory. Thank you for your cooperation.

Re:Awesome! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45391865)

The doctor didn't smack you hard enough when you were born.

WTF? (4, Interesting)

Virtucon (127420) | about 9 months ago | (#45391815)

I use Kapersky and while I like the product I don't necessarily like this comment:

The reason is that the space station uses computer-controlled SCADA systems in order to manage various physical components of the satellite. As these systems are based on Linux, they are open to infection.

So even on the ISS there's no concept of an air gap when it comes to SCADA systems? I realize there's monitoring and management required but there are tools and policies for dealing with that but shit, what is being eluded to is that the Russian Astronauts gerfinkerpoked around with a USB thumb drive and now we have an F*d up multi-billion dollar, multi-ton object in orbit possibly out of control? I think that's a disservice to Russian Astronauts (Cosmonauts) everywhere.

All systems can have vulnerabilities but if the systems onboard the ISS have been compromised by trojans, malware, viruses etc. I think the Linux community needs
to be made aware of the vulnerabilities so that these issues can be addressed and code fixed. Not that ol Kaspersky here needs to make a but right, but if they're not inherently part of Linux and are just stupid admin pet tricks, then that needs to be brought to public attention so that the ISS partners can address their IT problem. Playing coy and providing anecdotal commentary on "infections" and "bad things happened at a Nuclear plant" only mean that there are still vulnerabilities and bad practices that need to be addressed. I mean it's not like we wouldn't have that happen here in the US, say on a major Website, right? [foxnews.com]

On the other hand Microsoft should be smiling right now since it was announced that the ISS was going all Linux just this year. [redorbit.com] Maybe it was because the Astronauts couldn't find the Start Menu?

Re:WTF? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45391923)

You seem be the type of guy who mastered autofellatio and likes to swallow.

Re:WTF? (3, Funny)

hannson (1369413) | about 9 months ago | (#45392115)

What do you mean? An African or European swallow?

Re:WTF? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45391935)

So even on the ISS there's no concept of an air gap when it comes to SCADA systems?

Not enough spare air available in space.

Yes I'm a pedant (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45392125)

"what is being eluded to is that the Rus.." elude : verb - evade or escape from (a danger, enemy, or pursuer), typically in a skillful or cunning way. allude: verb - suggest or call attention to indirectly; hint at. I believe you meant "alluded to" rather than "eluded to" ...

Re:WTF? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45392169)

So even on the ISS there's no concept of an air gap when it comes to SCADA systems?

"Even" on? There's a lack of an air gap because it's such an exceptional-case network. There are some situations where you just expect things to be normal, rather than the "window$ luzers" realm where malware is common, and in those situations it's not unusual to save a few bucks. e.g. my home server's SuperMicro IPMI management port is plugged into the same router as its "real" ethernet. Yes, I know it's "wrong" and would be unacceptable in the pro realm, but this is my fucking house, not a serious data center, and I'm not really going to spend double to run an extra router, extra set of cables, etc just to protect this one asset. I can trivially imagine the same kind of thing happening at a small business, too. And while the ISS has higher budgets, keep in mind their shipping costs are way, way higher, too.

Re:WTF? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45392319)

Obviously there was an air gap, a gap that is traversed by USB sticks.

Re:WTF? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45392503)

They probably value the flexibility to do monitoring and ad-hoc patching from the ground over security in what is supposed to be a closed-off private network.

NASA does some amazing jiggery-pokery-at-a-distance on the software of the unmanned probes to work around unexpected hardware and software issues.
http://www.slashgear.com/nasa-to-apply-two-software-patches-to-curiosity-rover-11273409/ [slashgear.com]

It's slightly less critical when you have personnel close by, but I'm sure the astronauts would have better things to do in an emergency than sysadmining.

I don't think stuxnet runs without Windows... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45391861)

Everything I have been able to find out about it says it only runs on Windows...

So even if the code resided on a Linux system, it won't run.

malware seriously (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45391863)

seriously will people ever stop making malware? its getting really annoying. Is there a way to stop the funding for it?
Malware embedded in sites.
Malware embedded in games.
Hacks/aimbot in games.
Govt sponsored malware.
Just think of how sophisticated malware has become if all that brainpower had been used to advance society.....

WHY DOES half the population of the world ruins shit and hold the other half back? (half being just an arbitrary number)

Re:malware seriously (2)

Jeremy Erwin (2054) | about 9 months ago | (#45391973)

WHY DOES half the population of the world ruins shit and hold the other half back? (half being just an arbitrary number)
because 90% of anything is crap. count yourself lucky that it's only 50%

Re:malware seriously (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45392431)

I agree with your sentiment (this is why we can't have nice things), but a better question might be will people ever stop writing software with vulnerabilities in it?

Thirty years ago I was writing online software (yes, before the web) that was resistant to buffer overflows, command/sql injection, and stored passwords as salted hashes. And a few years before that I was using a computer whose hardware would not, ever, execute data (tag bits would be wrong, and they weren't changeable).

There's no fricking excuse for it these day, but there is programmer laziness and "user convenience".

A Victory for Mass Consumerism! (1)

kelarius (947816) | about 9 months ago | (#45391905)

Now even those in space can order male enhancement drugs and refinance their space houses with ease!

Re:A Victory for Mass Consumerism! (3, Funny)

bobbied (2522392) | about 9 months ago | (#45391983)

Sure they can *order* stuff, it's just the *delivery* charges are out of this world.

Study (2)

tobiasly (524456) | about 9 months ago | (#45391907)

It's just part of an ongoing study [theonion.com] .

Effect of zero gravity on malware? (1)

dutchwhizzman (817898) | about 9 months ago | (#45392191)

You just have to study if malware infections are at all influenced by gravity, if only to rule out that is of any influence at all. right?

And yet (1)

JustOK (667959) | about 9 months ago | (#45391965)

And yet everyone is ignoring the possibility that aliens planted the malware. Interesting.

The article says cosmonauts with USB stick... (4, Funny)

clickety6 (141178) | about 9 months ago | (#45391969)

... I say Hiller and Levinson with an Apple Macintosh Powerbook 5300!

Clearly the only way to stop Malware in space... (1)

cjjjer (530715) | about 9 months ago | (#45391985)

Ripley: I say we take off and nuke the entire site from orbit. It's the only way to be sure.
Hudson: Fuckin' A!

Re:Clearly the only way to stop Malware in space.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45392051)

In Russia, the virus nuke you from orbit!

banzai buddy (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45392005)

so what if they wanted help and companionship that banzai buddy provides?

Root access? (4, Insightful)

Whammy666 (589169) | about 9 months ago | (#45392011)

So who's idea was it to to allow a foreign USB stick to get plugged into a ISS system with root access? This seems like a major security protocol problem rather than a weakness of Linux.

Re:Root access? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45392443)

All countries getting up to the ISS are probably trying to install their own spyware.

Re:Root access? (0)

marcosdumay (620877) | about 9 months ago | (#45392505)

Despite the fact that the article seems to be a complete fabrication... Where is "foreign" for the International Space Station?

Infosec Professionals on the ISS (2)

zenrandom (708587) | about 9 months ago | (#45392053)

I for one, volunteer my services as the on-site information security professional for diagnosis, cleanup, and protection. Space Suit Up!

Re:Infosec Professionals on the ISS (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45392827)

The salary only seems good until you consider the commuting costs.

Nuke it from orbit (1)

dunkindave (1801608) | about 9 months ago | (#45392067)

Nuke it from orbit, it's the only way!

Oh, wait...

Air gap (2)

evil_aaronm (671521) | about 9 months ago | (#45392123)

That's a hell of an air gap to cross.

Not the first infection (4, Interesting)

OzPeter (195038) | about 9 months ago | (#45392131)

While I was digging around to try and find out what SCADA systems the ISS uses (which I never found), I did find this: international-space-station-switches-from-windows-to-linux-for-improved-reliability [extremetech.com] which has:

in 2008, a Russian cosmonaut brought a laptop aboard with the W32.Gammima.AG worm, which quickly spread to the other laptops on board. Switching to Linux will essentially immunize the ISS against future infections.

Bad info in article (1)

JRHelgeson (576325) | about 9 months ago | (#45392141)

From TFA:

Stuxnet only became known to the public when an employee of the Natanz facility took an infected work laptop home and connected to the internet, with the malware quickly spreading around the globe infecting millions of PCs.

Stuxnet never spread via the internet. It spread via USB only and then only up to 3 infections before it removed itself from the USB stick.

Anyone has the real facts? (4, Interesting)

dutchwhizzman (817898) | about 9 months ago | (#45392203)

Since TFA is obviously a load of bollocks, it'd be nice if someone would get us actual facts. Does NASA have anything to mention about this yet?

Re:Anyone has the real facts? (2)

dutchwhizzman (817898) | about 9 months ago | (#45392459)

Carefully reading TFA, leads me to believe that Kasperski never said that ISS got infected with stuxnet, or that he implied that this infection was a recent event. It could very well be that he is referring to the original infection in 2009 or so that lead to the windows systems being replaced with linux. This still means that TFA is a load of bullocks and that the journalist writing it is bad at fact checking and biased as hell.

Next time they will probably listen (1)

Provocateur (133110) | about 9 months ago | (#45392215)

I specifically told them NOT to put a floppy disk drive in there (although I wasn't really thinking of the Russians at the time).

So... Space Porn? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45392255)

So... Space Porn?

Translated: (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45392337)

All of the russians SCADA systems are under control, one way or another.

Uh What? Who's minding the store here? (1)

bobbied (2522392) | about 9 months ago | (#45392375)

First, the reporter that wrote this article obviously doesn't understand the difference between Linux and Windows. Stuxnet is decidedly a *windows* issue and is not going to be a problem for a Linux SCADA system.

Second, Who in their right mind lets a rouge USB stick even onto the station, much less inserted, mounted and code executed from it? I don't care if it's Linux, windows or anything else, you simply do not allow unknown USB devices to get mounted without at least doing some kind of scan before you do anything with the data/programs it contains. These devices should NOT be allowed, even in the astronaut's pocket, unless they have been scanned.

Third, What kind of Linux system admin gives out enough privileges to make *any* kind of virus/Trojan or other security issue to infect a Linux workstation/server by a user? You DON'T give out root access to just anybody without a good reason and a minimum level of training.

So, my recommendations? 1. Ban all rouge USB devices by policy and make a rule that they are not to be flown unless they've been declared and scanned. 2. Disable auto-mount/auto-run on EVERY system on the station that has an accessible USB port or optical drive. 3. Remove direct root/administrator access from all systems, except when absolutely necessary. Force everybody to be non-privileged "users" when accessing the station's systems. 4. On every system that the users routinely access (and all other ones as possible) install and run a real time virus scanner which is kept up to date, with static scans made at least weekly.

Re:Uh What? Who's minding the store here? (2)

MickyTheIdiot (1032226) | about 9 months ago | (#45392437)

Ban all rouge USB devices by policy

And ban the blue, silver, purple, grey, and every other damn color too!

In outer space.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45392405)

Soviet SCADA station infect you!

C0m (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45392541)

IN oAADITION, [goat.cx]

Blame it on the Russians! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45392565)

International Space Station Infected With Malware Created By US and Israel

The malwar was uncovered when... (2)

madhatter256 (443326) | about 9 months ago | (#45392667)

The malware was uncovered when the astronauts started getting pop-up ads about girls within the area wanting to hook up.

http://xkcd.com/713/ [xkcd.com]

Premature judgement? (1)

byeley (2451634) | about 9 months ago | (#45392731)

What if there really were sexy singles in his area?

Cold expanse of space matters why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45392799)

"Even in the cold expanse of space, computer malware manages to find a way."
Maybe because to computer malware, there is no difference between a place with a warm atmosphere and one without?

Kapersky (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45392817)

Surely there can be no conflict of interest when a security firm reveals that the sky is falling due to lack of security. These guys are worse than lawyers with their job creation. It has never been proven, but it certainly would make sense if these same "security firms" weren't actively releasing new viruses into the wild to ensure perpetual need for their products. The main question of course is: If Kapersky is so buddy-buddy with the ISS, why didn't their software work to prevent this infection?
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