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Linux Kernel Running In JavaScript Emulator With Graphics and Network Support

timothy posted about 10 months ago | from the ascii-art dept.

Networking 177

New submitter warmflatsprite writes "It seems that there have been a rash of JavaScript virtual machines running Linux lately (or maybe I just travel in really weird circles). However until now none of them had network support, so they weren't too terribly useful. Sebastian Macke's jor1k project uses asm.js to produce a very fast emulation of the OpenCores OpenRISC processor (or1k) along with a HTML5 canvas framebuffer for graphics support. Recently Ben Burns contributed an emulated OpenCores ethmac ethernet adapter to the project. This sends ethernet frames to a gateway server via websocket where they are switched and/or piped into TAP virtual ethernet adapter. With this you can build whatever kind of network appliance you'd like for the myriad of fast, sandboxed VMs running in your users' browsers. For the live demo all VMs connect to a single private LAN (subnet 10.5.0.0/16). The websocket gateway also NATs traffic from that LAN out to the open Internet."

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So...? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45401779)

What does one use this for?

Re:So...? (3, Informative)

sirber (891722) | about 10 months ago | (#45401841)

What does one use this for?

Self-achievement? Learning? To get chicks?

Re:So...? (3, Interesting)

DragonDru (984185) | about 10 months ago | (#45401879)

Infect Windows with Linux Viruses?
Make firefox faster?
Simpler BotNet design?

It was likely a learning project, and is kind of cool. But it is more reason to run NoScript and similar.

Re:So...? (1)

watcher-rv4 (2712547) | about 10 months ago | (#45401925)

Yeah, really smart way to get chicks.

Re:So...? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45402125)

Smart chicks, maybe.
They do exist.

Re:So...? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45403097)

Is that you, girlintraining?

Re:So...? (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45403519)

Girlintraining is not a girl. It's a pre-op M2F transsexual currently undergoing HRT.

Re:So...? (2)

DocSavage64109 (799754) | about 10 months ago | (#45403799)

I'm sure they'd be all over some guy because he managed to run a VM in a web browser.

Re:So...? (0)

Thanshin (1188877) | about 10 months ago | (#45401955)

To understand that all reality is but a virtual machine running on a virtual machine.

God is trying to make us understand reality through the emulation of the OpenCores ethmac ethernet adapter.

He isn't very happy with the results. He is thinking that everything was simpler when he made his points through floods and flaming sword wielding archangels.

Re:So...? (1)

Will.Woodhull (1038600) | about 10 months ago | (#45403243)

Yeah, he was happier back in those days. Until His Mom took away those toys and told Him to clean up His room. He's been in the sulking place ever since. Now he just want to throw things at the walls, and shove those who want to friend him too much under the bus.

Mom's pretty cool, though. Cakes and ale parties just about anytime you ask for one, and if you promise not to make a mess, She'll get out the fingerpaints or anything else you want to play with, and even help you through the tough spots, like when you mix the colors together wrong and get something yuckie. She knows how to fix that, and if you come up with something really neat, she'll change the whole room to match your theme. Like what she did when Schroedinger did that sketch of a cat. Wow!

Re:So...? (1)

Horshu (2754893) | about 10 months ago | (#45401957)

For the runtime errors. The lovely, lovely runtime errors!

Re:So...? (2)

Will.Woodhull (1038600) | about 10 months ago | (#45403343)

Idunno. Can you even call them runtime errors in a setup like this?

This is using a Linux VM, emulated in Javascript, in a sandbox, inside your browser. I don't think the thing could possibly run. Or even walk. I think the fastest it could go would be a slow crawl.

Re:So...? (4, Funny)

Sockatume (732728) | about 10 months ago | (#45402025)

As a component of a Beowulf cluster, obviously.

Re:So...? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45402575)

All we need now is JS acceleration built in to cpus.

Yo dawg, I heard you like VMs so..

Yo dawg... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45402029)

[233.6925329] panic in year 0 -- XHIBIT dump, turtle stack overflow

Re:So...? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45402035)

To talk about more interesting stuff about. On a 'news for nerds' site. Than arguing about the stupid we vs they political slop usually up here?

Looks like a very interesting hack. Smashing together several bits of not meant to run OS stuff to make it run OS stuff.

Re:So...? (5, Funny)

Sloppy (14984) | about 10 months ago | (#45402227)

It lets you be a VPS provider, using nothing other than a copy of Chromium. No need for fancy processors and virtualizing instructions, no hypervisors, no containers, whatever.

Scales beautifully: Got a new customer? Just open another tab!

Re:So...? (0)

Luyseyal (3154) | about 10 months ago | (#45403585)

Hahaha that's awesome. Genuine LOL here.

Thanks,
-l

Re:So...? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45402249)

Actually for learning purposes it's kinda neat to browse to a link and instantly have a VM set up and booted for you. Do it twice and you have two VMs that can network to each other, and boot time is decent as well. It would be quite interesting to use this to kids some Linux basics, show them some networking stuff (netcat) etc.

Re:So...? (5, Interesting)

mlts (1038732) | about 10 months ago | (#45402501)

I wonder how useful it would be for security sensitive applications. For example, even though it sounds goofy to run a Web browser in a Linux kernel running in a window, the difficulity for malware to get out of rings of context (including multiple instruction sets) would be enormous. Not impossible, but highly unlikely.

Something like this would provide a decent defense against browser-based (or browser add-ons) attacks (which is a significant vector for malware these days.)

Re:So...? (5, Funny)

David_Hart (1184661) | about 10 months ago | (#45402279)

What does one use this for?

The same thing we do every night, Pinky - try to take over the world!

Re:So...? (5, Interesting)

s-macke (3429555) | about 10 months ago | (#45403173)

A year ago, when I started the project it was simply interest in learning Javascript. I was fascinated by the emulator from Fabrice Bellard http://www.bellard.org/jslinux/ [bellard.org]
I am a programmer focused on simulations/emulations and performance. I was also interested in learning the internals of how a computer nowadays works. The x86 CPU is way to compilcated. You lose the clear sight for stupid details like the A20 gate. The OpenRISC project is perfect. It is a CPU with a very easy and clear CPU. Nothing historic. It has even some similarities with byte code, which makes it very fast if you emulate it properly. I optimized especially for running Linux violating the specification a bit.
The whole CPU with MMU fits in around 1000 lines of code. During that day I never expected to get that far. Now with all three cores and devices it needs around 7000 lines of code.

I have a list of useful things you can do with it:
1. Use it as an education system of the Linux system or other tools. For example you could write a git tutorial with live examples.
2. This emulator provides an alternative way to port old software to run on modern systems. In direct comparison to the project Emscripten it is slow, but the porting could be much easier. For terminal applications probably no porting is neccessary at all (e. g. Frotz).
3. The emulated OpenRISC CPU is very easy and contains around 1000 lines of code. So it is the perfect example to learn how emulation works.
4. With network support it allows you to access other computers within the Web Browser providing ready to use tools. (Even an encrypted chat is possible if you run the sshd daemon)
5. Use it as a speedtest for Javascript engines.
6. It is an advertisement for the OpenRISC project.

You can also read the motivation of Ben Burns in his Blog: http://www.benjamincburns.com/2013/11/10/jor1k-ethmac-support.html [benjamincburns.com]
And I have to admit that I did the wayland support last time only to get some news. :)

Re:So...? (1)

Luyseyal (3154) | about 10 months ago | (#45403713)

This is a cool project. Thank you for working on it.

-l

Re:So...? (1)

tech.kyle (2800087) | about 10 months ago | (#45403193)

For people who can't help but "rm -rf /"

is javascript faster than java? (0, Offtopic)

sirber (891722) | about 10 months ago | (#45401791)

javascript can run linux while java choke in everyday tasks?

Re:is javascript faster than java? (5, Informative)

DragonDru (984185) | about 10 months ago | (#45401853)

javascript != java http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JavaScript [wikipedia.org]

The change of name from LiveScript to JavaScript roughly coincided with Netscape adding support for Java technology in its Netscape Navigator web browser. The final choice of name caused confusion, giving the impression that the language was a spin-off of the Java programming language, and the choice has been characterized by many as a marketing ploy by Netscape to give JavaScript the cachet of what was then the hot new web programming language.

Re:is javascript faster than java? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45402129)

javascript != java

Otherwise the question in the title would have made even less sense than it does now.

Re:is javascript faster than java? (3, Interesting)

erikkemperman (252014) | about 10 months ago | (#45402867)

JavaScript != Java indeed. I'm still amazed at the silliness of the choice.

I've actually seen a newbie developer paste a snippet of one into the other... Finally I had an occasion to use the phrase "that's not even wrong" in an actual conversation.

The dev didn't last at our company.

Re:is javascript faster than java? (3, Insightful)

jones_supa (887896) | about 10 months ago | (#45402907)

javascript != java

But you can still ask the question whether JavaScript is faster than Java.

Re:is javascript faster than java? (2)

SJHillman (1966756) | about 10 months ago | (#45402995)

You can ask a lot of questions, but that doesn't mean they're good questions.

Re:is javascript faster than java? (1)

jones_supa (887896) | about 10 months ago | (#45403573)

Very true. :D

Re:is javascript faster than java? (2)

SJHillman (1966756) | about 10 months ago | (#45402153)

Comparing Java and JavaScript is like comparing a bicycle and a space shuttle. Sure, they're vaguely related as means of transportation but are otherwise completely unrelated.

Re:is javascript faster than java? (2)

Nerdfest (867930) | about 10 months ago | (#45402619)

Someone here had a sig that was "Java is to Javascript as Car is to Carpet".

Re:is javascript faster than java? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45402957)

But carpets can fly :-)

Re:is javascript faster than java? (1)

viperidaenz (2515578) | about 10 months ago | (#45403311)

.... only if you live in a magical fairy land.

Re:is javascript faster than java? (2)

GodWasAnAlien (206300) | about 10 months ago | (#45403023)

> Comparing Java and JavaScript is like comparing a bicycle and a space shuttle.

which one is the space shuttle?

Your comparison comparison is like comparing monkeys with the Eiffel tower.

Re:is javascript faster than java? (1)

Mitchell314 (1576581) | about 10 months ago | (#45403529)

Or like similes to metaphors.

Re:is javascript faster than java? (4, Interesting)

elfprince13 (1521333) | about 10 months ago | (#45402169)

JavaScript faster than Java? No. It's not. Not even close. Java has fantastic performance when used correctly. It just happens to be a common intro-course language, so lowest-common-denominator sorts of programmers write a lot of crap code with it. The HotSpot VM JIT is basically magic, and the garbage collection beats out everything else.

Re:is javascript faster than java? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45402301)

Um, Javascript can also have fantastic performance if you "use it correctly". Neither is particularly fantastic if you use like like an average programmer, though.

Re:is javascript faster than java? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45402355)

Java has fantastic performance when used correctly.

From what I can tell from the documentation I have seen that is not actually possible.
It seems like it is almost impossible to find the "correct" way to do things in Java to make it get a performance that isn't abysmal. The documentation lacks the information on when and when not to use the different classes.

Re:is javascript faster than java? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45402443)

JavaScript faster than Java? No. It's not. Not even close. Java has fantastic performance when used correctly. It just happens to be a common intro-course language, so lowest-common-denominator sorts of programmers write a lot of crap code with it. The HotSpot VM JIT is basically magic, and the garbage collection beats out everything else.

You could give the same apologist agument for "brainfuck" programs not being well written. Guns don't kill people, People kill people. right. When you see problems all clustering around something, maybe the something has a problem.

take a look at two major java programs: Crashplan and Minecraft. These are not written by people unskilled in the computational arts. Yet These have hideous memory bloat and lagging issues when you run them for a long time. then there's all the programs that can't run under the same VM. You can't use Chrome and have a 64 bit java installed as the default Java.

Re:is javascript faster than java? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45402713)

take a look at two major java programs: Crashplan and Minecraft. These are not written by people unskilled in the computational arts.

When did the minecraft team throw out all of notch's code?

Re: is javascript faster than java? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45403461)

Its being stedily replaced since dinnerbone and jeb took over.

Re:is javascript faster than java? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45402275)

... java choke in everyday tasks?

Citation needed.

The performance of Java is very impressive. Not sure where you get your information. I do quite a bit of Java development, including big data processing and some performance sensitive code. What kind of "every day tasks" does it choke on exactly?

Of course, I know you don't actually have any empirical evidence or anything like that, but it's a fun to ask questions you can't possibly answer.

Re:is javascript faster than java? (2)

goombah99 (560566) | about 10 months ago | (#45402321)

I'm just learning javascript. I'm puzzled how one makes it "fast". When my highly active programs run in a browser they tend to glitch and halt after a while if they have been doing lots and lots of quick object instantiation and destruction. My guess was this was some memory leak or deferred garbage collection. I see inconsistent results across browsers.

I'm enjoying learinging at how easy it makes doing graphics in a browser window. however It's a weird mishmash of incomplete grammars and high level commands. For example the lack of a class statement or a defined way to access a superclass is bewildering. It's even less complete that perl objects in many ways. Listing all the keys in a hash (associative array) gets conflated with all the other attributes of the hash, so there's weird kludges like "hasOwnProperty" that smack of being bandaid and afterthoughts. On the other hand it's got things like timed thread execution and some quite high level concept built in as primitives.

What perplexes me the most is I haven't figured out how to debug it yet. I've been relying on a particular package called "processing.js" which has some very simple graphics. since processing.js acutally re-writes your javascript at run time, the messages in the browser console log are worthless. they don't even tell you the line number where the error occurs most of the time. The other debugging problem Ihave is that often the javascript one is writing only can work in the context of a web page (for example to play loaded sounds). so I don't see how one runs or debugs this outside of a browser. I don't get what the IDE's offer. I'm a noob so give me a clue not heckling please.

Anyone have any advice on how to debug in java, especially when using processing.js.

Re:is javascript faster than java? (2)

Immerman (2627577) | about 10 months ago | (#45402681)

Lots of small quick memory allocations/releases is generally a performance killer regardless of language or environment - if you use a garbage collecting environment it tends to be even worse, but regardless you're asking a memory manager that has to be able to deal with memory requests of all sorts of sizes and use-cases, to deal with an extreme special case that demands near-maximum amount of effort to mitigate memory fragmentation. In almost all cases your performance and stability will increase substantially if you instead allocate a sufficiently large pool of objects and manage their usage yourself.

Here's hoping someone can suggest a decent Java debugger - I abandoned it after a while in part because of the lack of something I would consider only slightly less vital than the compiler itself. Of course that would be of absolutely no use to somebody programming in the unrelated Javascript language.

Re:is javascript faster than java? (3, Interesting)

narcc (412956) | about 10 months ago | (#45403877)

I'm puzzled how one makes it "fast". When my highly active programs run in a browser they tend to glitch and halt after a while if they have been doing lots and lots of quick object instantiation and destruction.

You've almost figured it out!

Recycle your objects. Enjoy instant performance improvements. (While this is not just true for JavaScript, it's obviously the advice you need.)

Oh, and try learning the language. It's not like Java and C#. If you try to treat it that way, you'll end up writing crap. You can break yourself out of that easily enough by working through The Little Schemer in JS instead of Scheme.

Temple (1)

TempleOS (3394245) | about 10 months ago | (#45401819)

I made God's official temple, like Solomon. The world doesn't yet know. They will do offerings in TempleOS. The CIA is fucken dead... gonna crawl on their knees.

Re:Temple (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45402221)

Are you sane?

Bored with layers of indirection game now. (2, Insightful)

Joining Yet Again (2992179) | about 10 months ago | (#45401823)

Can we go back to trying to target for time+space efficiency rather than buzzwords?

Re:Bored with layers of indirection game now. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45402179)

Can we go back to trying to target for time+space efficiency rather than buzzwords?

Actually programming on such a JavaScript emulated Linux will give a great incentive to optimize the efficiency of your Linux programs because otherwise you'll run out of memory and/or wait forever for your program to finish.

Re:Bored with layers of indirection game now. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45402203)

They are, this is the most efficient Linux kernel running in JavaScript, through WINE, on Red Hat, in a VMware image, on a tablet running KitKat flavored Android (... a Javaclone on an ARM).

Yes, network support. (5, Insightful)

ArbitraryName (3391191) | about 10 months ago | (#45401883)

A lack of network support was what was holding back a JavaScript VM running Linux from being useful. No other reason whatsoever.

Re:Yes, network support. (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45402215)

2014 will be the year of the Javascript emulated Linux Desktop

Re:Yes, network support. (3, Funny)

Trepidity (597) | about 10 months ago | (#45402247)

Just as long as we get a year of the Linux desktop, I'm willing to settle for it at this point.

Re:Yes, network support. (1)

jones_supa (887896) | about 10 months ago | (#45403105)

A desktop which uses WebGL would be interesting.

Re:Yes, network support. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45402311)

Linux on a Javascript VM is definitely the best way to run a browser in a browser in a browser in a browser in a browser in a browser in a browser ...

It is impressive... but (1)

cb88 (1410145) | about 10 months ago | (#45401935)

it is not "fast, sandboxed VMs running in your users' browsers" it is just barely fast enough to be able to drag a window around and almost isn't fast enought to run a terminal. Performance bounces somewhere between 5-80Mhz equivalent depending on what you are running. I would imagine large chunks of contiguous code run reasonaly well but once it gets branchy performance plummets... its interesting to see how the varios demos perform.

Beowulf (1)

simonbp (412489) | about 10 months ago | (#45401943)

Imagine a Beowulf cluster of these! It would be the slowest, worst cluster ever!

Re:Beowulf (1)

vux984 (928602) | about 10 months ago | (#45402027)

came here to see this. thanks.

F*ck it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45402011)

My TurboCOBOL VM can run Linux faster than any other.

And don't forget the YASEP (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45402013)

The YASEP is one of these other CPU cores that has a JS simulator, see
http://yasep.org [yasep.org]
No linux image though, the goal being to co-develop/co-simulate the core along the VHDL code (running on in FPGA and with GHDL).
But while we're at it, the JS code serves as a development tool, not just for the VHDL and architecture, but also for the code that runs on it !
It can already compute and display Mandelbrot sets in multi-CPU configurations in a windowed environment :-)
So yeah, nested indirections have benefits :-)

Yeah, but does it run... (3, Funny)

sl4shd0rk (755837) | about 10 months ago | (#45402047)

..er, forget it.

Even runs on iPhone 5s... (3, Interesting)

OlivierB (709839) | about 10 months ago | (#45402107)

The most incredible thing is the speed at which it runs: 11.5 MIPS.

My desktop dual-core Xeon W3503@2.40Ghz barely manages 40 MIPS in Chrome.

The iPhone 5s is crazy fast by most standards

Re:Even runs on iPhone 5s... (2)

WilyCoder (736280) | about 10 months ago | (#45402229)

"my desktop dual core"

isnt multiple cores irrelevant in the single threaded javascript environment?

Re:Even runs on iPhone 5s... (1)

OlivierB (709839) | about 10 months ago | (#45402281)

You're right. The task manager was hovering around 100%, and but I forgot there was another chrome window running in the background

Re:Even runs on iPhone 5s... (2)

bensyverson (732781) | about 10 months ago | (#45402403)

With the introduction of Web Workers, JavaScript is no longer single threaded. It's pretty nice!

Re:Even runs on iPhone 5s... (1)

bensyverson (732781) | about 10 months ago | (#45402497)

Yes, the 5s is incredibly fast. With a Geekbench score of 2523, it's faster than a 2011 Mac Mini (which were not slow machines by any means). It matches my last workhorse, a 17" MacBook Pro, which clocked in at 2524.

Incidentally, it doesn't take a weatherman to know which way the wind blows. Intel recently started up ARM production for the first time ever, and Apple has been referring to the A7 as "desktop class." It's only a matter of time before they ship the first ARM MacBook.

All of this is relevant to JavaScript, because as developers look to bridge the ARM/i386 and Mobile/Desktop worlds, web apps will look more and more attractive. This Linux emulator is a good proof of concept that you can basically do anything as a web app now. The floodgates are open.

Re:Even runs on iPhone 5s... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45402855)

"Intel recently started up ARM production for the first time ever, "
Nope - see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/XScale

I still have some Palm Zire 71/72, and Windows CE/Mobile devices with Intel ARM CPU's.

Re:Even runs on iPhone 5s... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45403861)

Careful, bullshit.
geekbench3
5s: ~1400 single core, ~2500 multi-core
low-end 2011 mini (2415M): ~2300 single core, ~4600 multi-core
It *is* pretty close to a 2009 17" MBP (== a Core2Duo T9550) or a 2007 mini...

Re:Even runs on iPhone 5s... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45402965)

Not sure how aged that Xeon model is, but my two years old i7 laptop gets constant 150-160 MIPS on Firefox, Linux x86_64.

Turtles all the way down (3, Insightful)

barlevg (2111272) | about 10 months ago | (#45402181)

Can this Linux kernel run a Javascript VM? If so, can that VM run the Linux kernel? And if so, can that kernel run a Javascript VM? And if so...

Re:Turtles all the way down (1)

s-macke (3429555) | about 10 months ago | (#45403297)

In principle yes. But we have to cross compile the Javascript engine. And this is very difficult because the most important Javascript engines are very complicated to build and support only ARM and x86 CPUs.

LOL (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45402189)

Kind a fun demonstration at how much of a toy os linux is. A real os is going to be a lot more complex, such that running in javascript would be pretty much impossible.

Re:LOL (1)

rubycodez (864176) | about 10 months ago | (#45403457)

oh yes, Windows is much more complex, needing about twice the resources and memory to get the same job done as a Linux or BSD, in between siezeups needing a reboot. truly a powerhouse.

What Is The Fucking Point? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45402205)

Seriously! What is the fucking point of this? Why are they more interested in this mental masturbation than in improving the Linux Kernel, or developing a new application all together?

There is zero value in running the Linux kernel inside a Javascript VM, inside a browser. Burning 10 dollar bills is more fun!

Re:What Is The Fucking Point? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45403161)

Maybe they were interested in mastering asm.js. It can be a useful skill. For sure it will teach the internals of JavaScript engines.
Everyone find its own way.

Re:What Is The Fucking Point? (1)

s-macke (3429555) | about 10 months ago | (#45403363)

The Linux Kernel was improved because of this emulator. Bugs in the OpenRISC part of the Linux Kernel were removed.

Stop the Presses!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45402239)

What this is really saying is that complicated network capable operations can be run in javascript. This is the ultimate in drive-by downloads because almost every website insists on using javascript. You have no idea what the javascript is doing. So any website you go to will be free to run spamming, network detection, etc. just by you going to a webpage. We are screwed.

Any nerds left on /.? (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45402261)

It's amazing to me that "tech for the sake of tech" posts like this elicit much the same responses I would expect from a non-nerdy audience. At what point did slashdotters become mostly a group of curmudgeonly old-men who care only about what use can be made of new things and who find NO INTEREST what-so-ever in new and different ideas?

THIS is why it takes that ex-jock-turned-business man to make money on technology. Somebody who isn't an old-fart slashdotter who "ho-hum"s everything new. This community is SUCH a disappointment.

Re:Any nerds left on /.? (1)

barlevg (2111272) | about 10 months ago | (#45402289)

The majority of SLASHDOTTERS and the majority of TROLLS are two different groups. js

Re:Any nerds left on /.? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45402335)

I'm not so sure. It seems the latter far outnumbers the former these days. Thus "the community" is more troll than human.

Re:Any nerds left on /.? (1)

barlevg (2111272) | about 10 months ago | (#45402457)

It all depends on how you measure the "community." If you're talking about unique visitors to /., then I can pretty much guarantee that lurkers who never/rarely post are in the majority. Trolls, by their nature, tend to post more than other types of people on the interweb.

Re:Any nerds left on /.? (1)

Atzanteol (99067) | about 10 months ago | (#45402645)

That's true - technically by numbers of viewers the trolls may be outnumbered. But Slashdot's "value add" has always been the rich discussion and comment system. And in that arena the trolls are definitely more active and visible.

I think it's time Slashdot editors started doing more active culling of posts that will very obviously have no benefit. Give an editor unlimited mod points and mod down off-topic, stupid, etc. posts. The ones that derail any decent conversation right out of the gate *all the f'ing time*.

For example:
"What's the point of this? Why not spend more time getting chicks." (just mod it down - nobody cares that some luddite doesn't like new things)
"Just use a Mac!" (as answer to every-single-ask slashdot no matter how off-topic).
Many many more...

Of course that would mean editors doing *work* so it's bound to fail...

Re:Any nerds left on /.? (1)

Atzanteol (99067) | about 10 months ago | (#45402769)

And now I un-did my moderations by posting non-AC. *sigh*

Because Javascript sucks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45403331)

It's amazing to me that "tech for the sake of tech" posts like this elicit much the same responses I would expect from a non-nerdy audience. At what point did slashdotters become mostly a group of curmudgeonly old-men who care only about what use can be made of new things and who find NO INTEREST what-so-ever in new and different ideas?

Because Javascript sucks. If it were Perl, Python, or Ruby, I'd be more interested. Unlike Javascript, Perl provides power for its complicated syntax.

First post! (4, Interesting)

Fwipp (1473271) | about 10 months ago | (#45402337)

From my OpenRISC ORK Javascript Emulator Running With Network Support

i.imgur.com/zJPsjCT.png

Rich applications (1)

DarkOx (621550) | about 10 months ago | (#45402415)

Wonderful now that I can finally run a full operating system in a browser, I can finally deliver a rich client server experience in my web-based applications :-)

Re:Rich applications (1)

the_povinator (936048) | about 10 months ago | (#45402835)

I wonder how long before someone claims it's faster than running Linux directly on hardware?

Re:Rich applications (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45402901)

Maybe I can finally run a POP3 client on my ChromeBook?

All joking aside... (1)

tobiasly (524456) | about 10 months ago | (#45402689)

There are many times when I need to do remote admin on a machine from a location where I don't have SSH available. Currently that usually involves some type of hacky browser-based terminal emulator. Actually running a Linux based OS in the browser would be perfect for such occasions, assuming I'm someplace where making outbound port 22 connections isn't a problem.

where do you not have ssh available? (1)

Chirs (87576) | about 10 months ago | (#45403283)

Considering that most smartphones will happily run a terminal program...and you can get bootable linux on a usb stick or a whole linux computer on an HDMI plug.

Re:All joking aside... (1)

Bill_the_Engineer (772575) | about 10 months ago | (#45403499)

There are many times when I need to do remote admin on a machine from a location where I don't have SSH available. Currently that usually involves some type of hacky browser-based terminal emulator.

Yes some web based SSH clients are better than others, but I assume the response time would be much quicker than emulating an entire OS as running an SSH client within it.

Actually running a Linux based OS in the browser would be perfect for such occasions, assuming I'm someplace where making outbound port 22 connections isn't a problem.

I don't understand how this is a less "hacky" solution, but it may work.

Re:All joking aside... (1)

phoenix_rizzen (256998) | about 10 months ago | (#45403765)

If you have web access, then you can download PuTTY. Much simpler/easier than waiting for an OS to load in your browser ... just to run "ssh".

moD do3n (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45403073)

posts. Therefore Mr. Raymond's sales and so on, questions, then to foster a gay and

JVM (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45403209)

Run a JVM on this thing, run a Swing applications - and you got yourself an applet without installing any plugins!!

Re:JVM (1)

viperidaenz (2515578) | about 10 months ago | (#45403435)

Or you could just write a JVM in Javascript

Prelude to a new wave of drive by malware? (1)

hAckz0r (989977) | about 10 months ago | (#45403333)

Ok, supposing that instead of presenting a command line to the browser user the websocket/javascript instead installed a reverse command line back to the server, essentially giving a remote user access to the internal commands within the browser via the javascript kernel. All the remote user needs is a bug. plugin, or other feature that allows the browser to perform operations on the websurfer's host, like a fly-by install of malware or scraping the user environment of all information available. What prevents this scenario? How would the user even know other than the browser got reaaaalllly slooooowwwww.....

Just because you can (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45403631)

Does that mean you should? I'm sure you could emulate any known processor and run any OS in Visual Basic... Why would you? Gah!

Enjoyable linguistic quirk (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45403809)

In the UK, "weren't too useful" and "weren't terribly useful" have much the same meaning: not very. But "not too terribly useful" broadly parses as "fairly", because not too terribly binds as not "too-terribly".

I've seen this form from non-UK writers many times, though, and apparently it still reads as not very.

Eh.

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