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US Gov't Circulates Watch List of Buyers of Polygraph Training Materials

timothy posted about 9 months ago | from the and-if-you-have-nothing-to-hide dept.

Government 303

George Maschke writes "Investigative reporter Marisa Taylor of the McClatchy newspaper group reports that a list of 4,904 individuals who purchased a book, DVD, or personal training on how to pass a polygraph test has been circulated to nearly 30 federal agencies including the CIA, NSA, DIA, DOE, TSA, IRS, and FDA. Most of the individuals on the list purchased former police polygraphist Doug Williams' book, How to Sting the Polygraph, which explains how to pass or beat a polygraph test. Williams also sells a DVD on the subject and offers in-person training. In February 2013, federal law enforcement officials seized Williams' business records, from which the watch list was primarily compiled. Williams has not been charged with a crime."

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When will they realize (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45421943)

When will they realize that their entire polygraph system is flawed in principle? It's mumbo jumbo! Might as well be reading tea leaves. It only works if the person being "tested" believes that it works.

Re:When will they realize (5, Funny)

lxs (131946) | about 9 months ago | (#45421993)

Now you've put all the readers of my tea leaves self-defense newsletter on a watchlist. Thanks!

Not even then (2)

PeterM from Berkeley (15510) | about 9 months ago | (#45421999)

It's quite possible someone could 'react' to sensitive questions just out of fear. There's a lot at stake.

False positives, not so good--trash a probably innocent person. I think FMRI has a chance of determining truthfulness, but polygraphs, not so much.

--PM

Re:Not even then (5, Interesting)

lxs (131946) | about 9 months ago | (#45422077)

Let's see if we can catch a dead salmon in a lie! [wired.com]

Re:Not even then (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45422395)

That's a shame. I mean, dead salmon are extremely trust worthy. No dead salmon would ever hand over all your secret cables or internal training manuals to journalists. When a dead salmon can't get a job in the security field because of a flawed test, the terrorists have won.

Re:Not even then (4, Funny)

Thud457 (234763) | about 9 months ago | (#45422463)

I dunno, something smells fishy about that guy.

Re:Not even then (4, Interesting)

currently_awake (1248758) | about 9 months ago | (#45422167)

Given that a polygraph is not a reliable way to catch lies, and buying a book on beating it isn't illegal, and given that they just divulged confidential corporate information: I expect that a certain business man just got handed free money.

Re:Not even then (4, Insightful)

jythie (914043) | about 9 months ago | (#45422367)

If our legal system was primarily driven by law then yes, but there is way too much politics involved here. Judges, the humans who get to decide such things, have a significant conflict of interests but will not recuse themselves, and it is unlikely they will rule against their own community's systematic behavior.

Re:Not even then (4, Informative)

jhumkey (711391) | about 9 months ago | (#45422295)

I made that point once to a KY State Police polygraph operator (who I met because my father was a KSP officer) . . . the polygraph operator responded . . . "That's why we give/read a list of questions in advance . . . we want your reaction to the "lie" . . . not to the magnitude of the question."

But . . . that was 20 years ago . . . things may have changed.

Re:Not even then (2)

king neckbeard (1801738) | about 9 months ago | (#45422385)

Even if it did, it's almost always going to be horribly irresponsible to do that while helium is a limited resource. They should instead rely on doing real background checks and not relying on silver bullets to do their job for them.

Re:When will they realize (1)

TheCarp (96830) | about 9 months ago | (#45422061)

The moment that cronie's nephew's job isn't dependant on them not realizing it. So about the same time they realize arresting people over smoking flowers (which was also started as a jobs program since the FBN had fuck all to do after prohibition ended) .

Re:When will they realize (1)

TheCarp (96830) | about 9 months ago | (#45422103)

....is a bad idea too.

damn I should fire my editor, he sucks.

Re:When will they realize (4, Insightful)

MightyMartian (840721) | about 9 months ago | (#45422115)

"Flawed in principle" is putting it rather mildly. I'd put it as "complete and utter bullshit." Polygraphs are on a level with dousing and voodoo dolls.

Re:When will they realize (5, Funny)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 9 months ago | (#45422143)

"Flawed in principle" is putting it rather mildly. I'd put it as "complete and utter bullshit." Polygraphs are on a level with dousing and voodoo dolls.

We should really just go back to good old Phrenology. Imagine how sophisticated our discernment of the criminal type could be, now that we have rapid 3d scanning technology!

We could even have employees shave their heads, and do a daily scan as they walk in the door. If the bump indicative of 'leaking tendencies' or 'disloyalty' increases in size, we'll know something is up. This plan is practically infallible.

Re:When will they realize (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45422227)

sodium pentathol FTW!!!

Re:When will they realize (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45422281)

"Flawed in principle" is putting it rather mildly. I'd put it as "complete and utter bullshit." Polygraphs are on a level with dousing and voodoo dolls.

Voodoo dolls are -- contrary to common belief -- made to stimulate areas where you have pain. They work if you associate with the doll, in which case you will feel a sensation in the same area the doll is being pierced -- increasing blood circulation. This psychological effect is the same as feeling the pain of figures in an animated movie.

Polygraphs work!
They just don't do what you want them to do. They measure, quite correctly, various things -- heart rates, breathing, etc. What is also true is that psychological effects can alter your physical reactions. So there will be patterns due to what is going on in your brain. The non sequitur is that these patterns are automatically connected to lying, or that you can, even in principle, detect lying.
What is left is that the test is an interrogation based on deceit. The deceit is that the device is infallible and that your happiness relies on you complying with the procedure.

Re:When will they realize (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45422397)

The divination you're thinking of is called "dowsing". "Dousing" refers to throwing water on something.

Re:When will they realize (1)

jythie (914043) | about 9 months ago | (#45422347)

Such a realization would put a lot of careers at risk since people all through the law enforcement chain have built their reputation at least in part around polygraphs. It would mean confronting the fact that they used invalid evidence and thus their convictions might be false. It also means people with strong conviction records will have their stats questioned, if not by others then by themselves, and that represent a serious risk to self image (as well as political career).

In other words, too much investment in being right to admit being wrong.

Value for money (1)

2phar (137027) | about 9 months ago | (#45421945)

Well.. I guess they'll get to put the book to good use real soon now..

overreach (5, Insightful)

SkunkPussy (85271) | about 9 months ago | (#45421957)

That is pretty shady that they seize his materials, use it to their advantage, but then don't charge him with any crime. That's basically tyranny.

Re:overreach (2)

gl4ss (559668) | about 9 months ago | (#45422009)

it's robbery as well.

you know what would be funny? administer a polygraph test on the people who seized the materials and ask them questions about their motives.

and I mean, fuck, http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=how+to+beat+a+polygraph&sm=3 [youtube.com] do they really expect to keep a list of everyone who clicks that link?(yes they do, sadly).

Re:overreach (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45422083)

hey now, I learned from slashdot that if they just copied the information on his business records, that doesn't count as theft

Re:overreach (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45422181)

hey now, I learned from slashdot that if they just copied the information on his business records, that doesn't count as theft

according to the Ass of America, it does (RIAA)

Re:overreach (1)

Mr D from 63 (3395377) | about 9 months ago | (#45422363)

Maybe they did the author a favor. Seems like they have validated his methods by these actions. Sales should increase.

Re:overreach (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45422015)

Tyranny? In America?? Gee, you fucking think so?

Re:overreach (1)

aeranvar (2589619) | about 9 months ago | (#45422039)

Tyranny? No way. This is 'murica, the land of the free. The government was just exercising the freedom it has to seize his stuff.

Re:overreach (5, Funny)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 9 months ago | (#45422151)

That is pretty shady that they seize his materials, use it to their advantage, but then don't charge him with any crime. That's basically tyranny.

Commies like you have no faith in America. It's not like he had any reasonable expectation of security in his person, papers, and effects or anything, now is it?

Re:overreach (1)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | about 9 months ago | (#45422291)

That's basically tyranny.

That's not what we were taught in government schooling.

Re:overreach (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45422443)

That is tyranny. That is so much tyranny Ima right a comment on it I tell ya. How much tyranny will the people put up with?

NSA will use the list to recruit new hires (5, Funny)

JoeyRox (2711699) | about 9 months ago | (#45421969)

Since the job obviously involves repeatedly lying to the American public.

Re:NSA will use the list to recruit new hires (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45422161)

Most of the NSA employees are sitting in a cubicle in front of computers and browsing spied results to try and do an analysis.
The Good Wife's episode 'The bit bucket' pictured that. I had actually never pictured the NSA that way. I always imagined older people in a suit etc.
Those employees are expected to be very obedient, so I would expect that having studied the polygraph would be a big no no actually...

But what if... (1)

gti_guy (875684) | about 9 months ago | (#45421971)

BitTorrent?

Re:But what if... (1)

gmuslera (3436) | about 9 months ago | (#45422427)

More interesting, what if spam/unsolicited mail? PIAWAAS (put me in a watchlist as a service) could be the new gold mine for startups,

great way to calibrate a polygraph (1)

BACbKA (534028) | about 9 months ago | (#45421973)

So the first question should nowadays be:

Have you ever successfully completed a polygraph cheating course? If yes, we won't hire you anyway.

Re:great way to calibrate a polygraph (1)

RoTNCoRE (744518) | about 9 months ago | (#45422179)

FYI, they ask that shortly after the 'what's your name' type questions.

The Streisand effect strikes again (4, Insightful)

Kardos (1348077) | about 9 months ago | (#45421987)

Thanks for the advertisement! Once that hits the 'tubes in ebook form, thousands or even millions of us will get a copy. They can't put all of us on the watch list, right? Right?

Re:The Streisand effect strikes again (1)

cold fjord (826450) | about 9 months ago | (#45422007)

You're talking a list of no more than a couple of megabytes of data, right? They might be able to.

Re:The Streisand effect strikes again (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45422113)

What exactly makes you think they are not willing to put everybody on the watch list? The fact that they are unwilling to spy on all of us? Oh, wait...

Re:The Streisand effect strikes again (5, Insightful)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | about 9 months ago | (#45422123)

They probably will, but with that many people on the list, the list becomes worthless.

The author should put it up on Amazon for 99 cents for a limited time, given all this free publicity he'll probably sell a million copies.

Re:The Streisand effect strikes again (1)

vettemph (540399) | about 9 months ago | (#45422257)

I am confident that we are all 'on' the watch list but with a ranking system that place some higher than others. Your ranking changes with every mouse click, every new GPS coordinate.
Be paranoid my friend.
Encrypt everything.
Subvert everything possible.
Blend in.
No tattoos.
No shirt logos.
Plain black car.
etc....

Good luck.
Allah Ackbar
rocket launcher
dirka dirka dirka
drown them in noise...

Re:The Streisand effect strikes again (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45422471)

Get this ebook instead (because it's free): http://www.antipolygraph.org/lie-behind-the-lie-detector.pdf

Probably the most interesting fact in the whole book (explained in detail) is that the polygraph is not only bad at detecting real liars--it is also biased in such a way that someone who's completely honest is more likely to be "caught". This is, as I understand it, because an honest person is about equally stressed on the "benchmark" questions where they assume you to be lying and thus a larger percentage of his other answers are flagged for being higher than the "lies".

4th Amendment? (4, Insightful)

Vermonter (2683811) | about 9 months ago | (#45421989)

What about the 4th Amendment? This is a matter of national importance, damnit! We don't have time to let your petty rights get in the way.

Stupidity gets routed around. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45422003)

And, this will be on the torrents shortly, if not already there. When will they learn that overreach only punishes the innocent.

Rather funny. . . . (5, Insightful)

Salgak1 (20136) | about 9 months ago | (#45422037)

. . . .that now you can be a suspect for owning a book or DVD. Good thing I never bought a copy of the Constitution . . .

Re:Rather funny. . . . (1)

cold fjord (826450) | about 9 months ago | (#45422197)

You think it's "rather funny" that they might think you have an interest in beating polygraph examinations if you bought a book on beating polygraph examinations?

Re:Rather funny. . . . (2)

jythie (914043) | about 9 months ago | (#45422419)

Kinda reminds me of the 'if you are not guilty then you have nothing to hide' logic. Polygraphs are very iffy, the error rate is pretty high, and some people are worried about being caught up in those errors even when they are innocent. It is not much better then the eye contact thing.

Re:Rather funny. . . . (2)

cffrost (885375) | about 9 months ago | (#45422437)

You think it's "rather funny" that they might think you have an interest in beating polygraph examinations if you bought a book on beating polygraph examinations?

I do. I've downloaded textbooks on explosives and fractional distillation, and DSM IV TR, to name a few (out of thousands) — they don't mean I'm going into the demolition business, building a petroleum refinery, or practicing psychiatry. I'm also interested in beating polygraph tests, but that doesn't mean I'd ever consensually submit to taking one.

I think "curiosity = suspicious" will lead us on dark path to an ignorant and paranoid society, if we're not there already.

Re:Rather funny. . . . (5, Funny)

c0lo (1497653) | about 9 months ago | (#45422213)

Good thing I never bought a copy of the Constitution . . .

Yeah... In retrospect, this would have been a total waste of money.

Police State (1)

Philotomy (1635267) | about 9 months ago | (#45422041)

Police states suck. That is all.

TPB... (3, Funny)

stokessd (89903) | about 9 months ago | (#45422051)

"How to Sting The Polygraph" is not on The Pirate Bay yet, but there are several other titles along the same lines. And of course some porn with polygraph in the title, which I'm going to check out "for professional reasons only".

Sheldon

He needs to get money (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45422053)

He did nothing illegal.
And now the government has stolen and is distributing his list of customers, seriously damaging his business.

Lawyers must be queueing up to help him become a millionaire.

Re:He needs to get money (2)

JockTroll (996521) | about 9 months ago | (#45422225)

Against the government? That's so '90s. Nowadays, go against the governments and you will be asked, in order: 1) why do you hate America, 2) are you a terrorist and 3) kindly follow us without trouble.

Hope and Change!!!! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45422059)

Obama's doing what all you leftist RETARDS blamed BOOOOSH!!!! for.

Imagine that.

Mod me down because THE FUCKING TRUTH HURTS.

"If you like your plan, you can keep it."

Gitmo closed yet?

Re:Hope and Change!!!! (1)

geogob (569250) | about 9 months ago | (#45422205)

I know your a flamebating troll... But anyone considering Obama a left wing politician needs to go out of America and take a look at the world. Even for Canada, the nearest country to American from the geographical and political and social point of view, Obama could be considered a far right politician.

Just mentioning that, giving this troll some food (for thought).

Re:Hope and Change!!!! (1)

Salgak1 (20136) | about 9 months ago | (#45422435)

You're making a fundamental error: you're assuming that the US Political Spectrum is the same as the rest of the planet.

That is far from the reality: the US spectrum is decidedly to the right of most other nations. What is considered Conservative in most countries is center-left at best in the US. . .

Think of it as the Fahrenheit scale of Politics. . .

Re:Hope and Change!!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45422221)

BOOOOSH!!!!

How old are you, three? Fucking libtard.

Re:Hope and Change!!!! (1)

c0lo (1497653) | about 9 months ago | (#45422259)

Mod me down because THE FUCKING TRUTH HURTS.

I'm sorry if it hurts you so bad, but I already posted, thus can't mod you down.
May I humbly suggest you take some painkillers instead?

Re:Hope and Change!!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45422337)

Like, maybe the whole jar full?

Just sayin'...

Re:Hope and Change!!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45422361)

Like, maybe the whole jar full?

It will surely help. Some strong spirits to the mixture and one will never hurt again.

Re:Hope and Change!!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45422273)

You really think anything would have been any different under Romney? We would have had all this bullshit plus even MORE lies and egregious violations of human rights and constitutional protections.

The fact that you still are mesmerized by the whole red/blue obama/bush dem/repub distraction means you STILL haven;t figured it out.

Congratulations, sheep.

Finally - a use for the DMCA! (2)

dbIII (701233) | about 9 months ago | (#45422063)

Hit them with copyright violation shit for copying his business records with their list of people that question this stupid polygraph voodoo.

Re:Finally - a use for the DMCA! (1)

c0lo (1497653) | about 9 months ago | (#45422275)

Hit them with copyright violation shit for copying his business records with their list of people that question this stupid polygraph voodoo.

Wishfull thinking... but facts are not protected by copyright, only forms of expression are.

Makes me wonder (5, Interesting)

onyxruby (118189) | about 9 months ago | (#45422065)

I have blatantly admonished the polygraph as being junk science online for close to 20 years now. I've pointed out how traitors from Ames to Snowden all passed the Polygraph with flying colors. I've also pointed out how there isn't a courtroom in this country that will accept the use of one. I've talked about how the scientific community considers them absolutely rubbish and no better than snake oil. I really can't think of a better way of how to illustrate that security theater is an active danger to this country than by citing the polygraph as example number 1.

It makes me wonder if I'm on this list of theirs too...

Re:Makes me wonder (4, Funny)

JeffOwl (2858633) | about 9 months ago | (#45422105)

Your are now.

Re:Makes me wonder (3, Interesting)

Kazoo the Clown (644526) | about 9 months ago | (#45422231)

The polygraph is actually good for one thing. Making criminals who don't know any better nervous thinking that maybe it does work. Some will come clean thinking the jig is up anyhow and confess or otherwise offer up useful information.. Of course it won't be useful for that anymore once criminals realize the technology is just snake oil. But it's inevitable, that ship has sailed.

Re:Makes me wonder (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45422323)

It's also good for proving if your significant other cheated on you with your mother and cousin on the Maury Povich show.

Re:Makes me wonder (1)

intermodal (534361) | about 9 months ago | (#45422317)

Polygraph isn't science at all. It's an imprecise voodoo. But I still object to your characterization of Snowden as a traitor. I don't know who Ames is off the top of my head, but even the US Government has not attempted to charge Snowden with treason, which makes your statement libellous.

Re:Makes me wonder (1)

Hatta (162192) | about 9 months ago | (#45422391)

Traitors like James Clapper presumably passed the polygraph with flying colors as well.

The machine says, "You're a liar!" (2)

rmdingler (1955220) | about 9 months ago | (#45422067)

The polygraph is an interrogation device. Nothing more, nothing less. Based on someone's theory that certain measurable physiological responses accompany the human act of lying, it's primary function is to wring a confession out of a suspect the 'authorities' believe is spewing falsehoods from his lie hole. It is not admissible in court for a reason.

Re:The machine says, "You're a liar!" (4, Informative)

cheesybagel (670288) | about 9 months ago | (#45422139)

It's bullshit since it measures that you are under stress. Some people don't get visibly stressed while lying. In fact some people get *calmer* while lying and this is well known. Other people get stressed not because they committed the action but for other reasons (they find it repulsive, are afraid of being wrongly sentenced, whatever).

Re:The machine says, "You're a liar!" (1)

rmdingler (1955220) | about 9 months ago | (#45422223)

Some people don't get visibly stressed while lying. In fact some people get *calmer* while lying and this is well known.

Well sure, occasionally a sociopath or two will escape the dragnet...

Re:The machine says, "You're a liar!" (1)

cheesybagel (670288) | about 9 months ago | (#45422241)

Like someone else said here Aldrich Ames.

Re:The machine says, "You're a liar!" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45422263)

It's bad not just because of the false negatives but because of the false positives as well.

Re:The machine says, "You're a liar!" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45422235)

None of that matters. In fact, the interrogators can completely ignore the actual readings and say you're lying whenever it suits them. The aim is not to determine whether you're lying, it's to manipulate you into making a confession. Polygraph results are not admissible in court, but confessions extracted during a polygraph interrogation are.

Re:The machine says, "You're a liar!" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45422329)

"He was nervous when we accused him of being a murderer and slaughtering 12 children your honor. His nervousness about the subject clearly shows he was lying about how he murdered those children, obviously an innocent person would be answering in a quite relaxed manner. I say we burn him. BURN HIM I SAY BURN HIM!"

Are you HOPE-A-DOPES happy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45422081)

Do you still have a tingle running down your leg?

Do you still pat yourself on the back for voting for a black man?

This very government is now taking over health care. Yeah, that'll work really well....

Re:Are you HOPE-A-DOPES happy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45422311)

Baaah, Baaah, Bah.

Next Up... (1)

cffrost (885375) | about 9 months ago | (#45422085)

Next up: A watch-list of people who have failed to purchase dream-catchers, healing crystals, Ouija boards, homeopathic "medicine," magic 8-balls, or religious paraphernalia in the past ten years.

Squeeze your butt cheeks (3, Informative)

sproketboy (608031) | about 9 months ago | (#45422091)

Youtube search penn and teller bullshit lie detectors. It's all explained there. You don't need a book or a DVD to learn it.

Re:Squeeze your butt cheeks (1)

Jason Levine (196982) | about 9 months ago | (#45422229)

So what you're saying is that Penn and Teller, the network that aired their show, YouTube (where the videos are uploaded), and anyone who has viewed the videos needs to go on the list also, right?

It might be easier for the NSA et all to just make a list of people they DON'T want to watch. "John Smith is utterly boring in every way. He just sits around all day watching reality shows. Whatever you do, don't monitor him."

Re:Squeeze your butt cheeks (2)

91degrees (207121) | about 9 months ago | (#45422255)

Trouble with Penn And Teller as a source is the show is, well Bullshit!. There's some good stuff but it's extremely biased and each episode clearly has an agenda. Even Penn Jillette has said prettty much as much (Teller was silent on the matter)

Re:Squeeze your butt cheeks (1)

gaudior (113467) | about 9 months ago | (#45422475)

(Teller was silent on the matter)

Of course he was.

Re:Squeeze your butt cheeks (2)

amoeba1911 (978485) | about 9 months ago | (#45422303)

coming soon...
New & Improved Polygraph: Now with 100% more butt-probe to detect butt cheek squeezing cheaters.

Marisa Taylor's PGP Public Key (5, Informative)

George Maschke (699175) | about 9 months ago | (#45422101)

I should have mentioned in the original post that investigative reporter Marisa Taylor of the McClatchy newspaper group has a PGP public key (7DCA14DC) [mit.edu] that can be used to securely contact her. I've signed it with my own key (316A947C) [mit.edu] .

Re:Marisa Taylor's PGP Public Key (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45422163)

Well I wasn't going to trust the reporter's public key before, but since some random guy on Slashdot signed it, it must be all good.

Re:Marisa Taylor's PGP Public Key (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45422339)

Not random in any sense of the word. https://antipolygraph.org/contact.shtml

Traffic jam (0)

shimul1990 (3413815) | about 9 months ago | (#45422171)

Traffic jam in our country is totally devastating for working hour.

Only 5,000? (1)

T.E.D. (34228) | about 9 months ago | (#45422173)

Surely he's sold more than 5,000 copies of that book. Books on noodling (an activity primarily carried out by illiterate people) sell more than 5,000.

Registered book offenders? (1)

ElitistWhiner (79961) | about 9 months ago | (#45422191)

I thought this country was secured by constitutional right to privacy from registering individual book reading/buying.

Re:Registered book offenders? (3, Insightful)

SirGarlon (845873) | about 9 months ago | (#45422403)

Even if the courts uphold a right to privacy -- and generally they don't, preferring weasel words such as "balance of public and private interests" and "expectation of privacy" -- it's up to the executive branch to uphold that right, and they're the ones violating it. The fox guards the henhouse.

Re:Registered book offenders? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45422423)

I thought this country was secured by constitutional right to privacy from registering individual book reading/buying.

Haven't you learned the lesson yet ? The Constitution is worth jack shit.
Politicians don't give a rat's ass about it, even the 9 hoompaloompas in the supreme court don't give a rat's ass about it anymore.

OK but can anyone tell me (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45422201)

Where have all the cowboys gone?

Yippy-I-Ay!

and do cowboys always tent up with other cowboys?

Lavabit encryption keys (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45422219)

"The unprecedented creation of such a list and decision to disseminate it widely demonstrate the ease with which the federal government can collect and share Americans’ personal information, even when there’s no clear reason for doing so."

So you see that information the FBI gains in an investigation, it feels free to share with any other agency, including the NSA. Even though the NSA is not supposed to have domestic surveillance data.

You might recall a judge handed the FBI, Lavabits HTTPS keys, which handed them to the CIA, NSA, IRS, DOE....

All that FBI collected evidence seems to be handed over with no problem and no care about the legality of it.

how to pass a polygraph (1)

amoeba1911 (978485) | about 9 months ago | (#45422247)

Easy! convince yourself deep down that your lie is in fact not a lie. With enough training, you can internally legitimize even the most absurd nonsense you can think of. There are 6 million Mormons, living proof.

WiN!

Re:how to pass a polygraph (1)

PPH (736903) | about 9 months ago | (#45422313)

There are 6 million Mormons,

Sure. You'll take on the Mormons and the combined might of the Federal law enforcement bureaucracy.

Prove you're a tough guy and insult the CoS.

Need another watch list (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45422327)

Shouldn't there be a watch list of people dumb enough to think polygraph tests are actually useful for anything?

Bennett Haselton Doesn't See the Big Deal (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45422343)

If you're guilty, you're probably worried. If you're innocent, there's no harm in talking to the police while attached to a machine that will randomly determine your sincerity.

Watch List (1)

PPH (736903) | about 9 months ago | (#45422353)

Just more ammunition to justify a search warrant should they so desire. Pretty soon, we'll all be on a list of one sort or another.

Not on a list, you say? We have a list of your kind!

Libraries are always having to fight these schemes (1)

davecb (6526) | about 9 months ago | (#45422357)

Every government wants to know who read books they don't approve of. Libraries (and library software) carefully protect borrower privacy by only keeping borrowers names recorded with the book borrowed until they have been returned.

This is the law in several privacy-protective countries, and to sell software, you have to adhere to the law. Other countries don't prohibit privacy, so the software is saleable everywhere.

--dave

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