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Raspberry Pi Hits the 2 Million Mark

timothy posted about 8 months ago | from the chicken-in-every-pot dept.

Stats 246

The Raspberry Pi project that we've been fans of for quite a while now has hit a new milestone: Today, they announced that as of the last week in October, the project has sold more than two million boards. Raspberry Pi is anything but alone in the tiny, hackable computer world (all kinds of other options, from Arduino to the x86-based Minnowboard, are out there, and all have their selling points), but the low price, open-source emphasis, and focus on education have all helped the Pi catch on. If yours is one of these 2 million, what are you using it for? (And if you favor some other small system for your own experiments, what factors matter?)

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So this Arduino thing... (3, Interesting)

oldhack (1037484) | about 8 months ago | (#45449587)

Tell us about it. What do you cook up with Arduino kits, and how do you use them?

Re:So this Arduino thing... (1)

Joce640k (829181) | about 8 months ago | (#45449705)

LED cubes!

Re:So this Arduino thing... (2)

Opportunist (166417) | about 8 months ago | (#45449947)

Dirt cheap 3D printers.

Sorry, still not getting one. (3, Insightful)

Ihlosi (895663) | about 8 months ago | (#45449597)

ARMv6 is outdated, ARMv7 is the way to go. And I'd rather have a not-so-beefy GPU than one that takes binary firmware blobs.

Re:Sorry, still not getting one. (5, Interesting)

kthreadd (1558445) | about 8 months ago | (#45449639)

Then you may want to take a look at BeagleBone Black. Costs $10 more but uses a much more modern and powerful chip.

BeagleBone Fully Documented; Broadcom Proprietary (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45450141)

TI fully documents their system on chip (SOC) chips.
Broadcom doesn't.

This alone makes Broadcom (which is in the Raspberry Pi) completely non-free and craptastic, and the BeagleBone worthy of consideration by a hacker.

F Broadcom. F Raspberry Pi. Don't waste your time on non-free systems which you have to reverse engineer because the documentation is purposely incomplete.

The fact that there are significant reverse-engineering efforts going on
https://github.com/raspberrypi/firmware/wiki
https://github.com/hermanhermitage/videocoreiv/
is proof that the Broadcom chip in the Raspberry Pi is anything but open.

Re:Sorry, still not getting one. (1)

AmiMoJo (196126) | about 8 months ago | (#45450177)

One thing I couldn't see on the BeagleBone Black page or wiki was the power consumption. An RPi can run indefinitely from a modest solar panel and battery if you use a tickless kernel.

Re:Sorry, still not getting one. (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45450249)

No special mucking around, idle, ethernet connected, no display.
Pi 340mA@5V, BBB 230mA@5V.

Re:Sorry, still not getting one. (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45450379)

I have a few different arm boards including two raspberry pi boards. Power consumption / power efficiency is NOT a selling point of the pi, if comparing to other arm boards. The pi has no low power states, it is full power all the time. The pi also uses linear voltage regulators, so very inefficient.

My original model panda board has 1G ram, is several times faster than the pi, and uses half the power most of the time, and has the same peak power.

My odroid U2 is at least 10 times faster than the pi, has 2G ram, and uses about the same power (or a little less) most of the time (but it has crazy high peak power if running at 100%cpu with a massive heatsink). If you pull the heatsink, it thermal throttles to still way faster than a pi, and keeps the peak power consumption pretty close to the pi.

I don't have a beagle bone black, but I would suspect it is lower power consumption than a pi.

The selling point for the pi is the community around it is _much_ larger than any of these other SBCs.

Re:Sorry, still not getting one. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45450243)

The BeagleBone's FPU is significantly slower than the RPi for double precision math. ARM got rid of the FPU pipeline to make room for single precision SIMD silicon, but they didn't build in support for doubles, and actually didn't even implement the full IEEE standard for singles. :-/

Re:Sorry, still not getting one. (5, Insightful)

DigitAl56K (805623) | about 8 months ago | (#45449739)

Many people won't care what the CPU is. I thought about getting one and I know I don't care. It's cheap and flexible, has decent enough interfaces, has a huge community, and many people who will be coding on it will be writing Python anyway. I had a problem in mind and needed a small programmable device to solve it. I think many people will approach the pi this way rather than from a spec sheet perspective. I.e. "what can I do with this" vs. "what's it made from".

Re:Sorry, still not getting one. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45449971)

Maybe. I would think the opposite. I bought a few faster boards for $10 more after comparing spec sheets. But then maybe we projecting our own opinions onto a large group of people we both don't know.

Re: Sorry, still not getting one. (4, Insightful)

DigitAl56K (805623) | about 8 months ago | (#45450085)

No. 2M people bought a pi. Apparently it was good enough for them.

Ubuntu. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45449995)

Ubuntu has stated in the past on their bug tracker that they will only support the RasPi if and when they start shipping a version with ARMv7. Despite it's issues, many people prefer Ubuntu over . So that's a reason why someone might want ARMv7.

Re:Sorry, still not getting one. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45450367)

I did the same, and went with a BBB.
Internal flash vs. having to find a SD card that works reliably.
0.1" Headers on 2 sides (and on the same 0.1" grid... *stares at arduino*)
Way more GPIOs.
Easier mounting:
On the BBB just fully populating the pin headers secures it "well enough" to a larger base board for non-vibrating environments, if I want to make sure nothing moves I can secure it with 4 screws nicely arranged on the corners.
On the Pi I *need* 2 standoffs just so it doesn't wobble around badly. And even with those it's not well secured. Mounted upside down so it plugs into a base board, any downward pressure on the corner with the ethernet tries to lever out the 0.1" header...

It's quite ridicules isn't it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45449759)

After 2 million you think you could at least make an effort to fix the binary blob problem.

The Raspberry Pi is the Microsoft Windows of the OS world.

Re:It's quite ridicules isn't it? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45449857)

I'm pretty sure Microsoft Windows is the Microsoft Windows of the OS world. Don't know what you were going for there.

Re:It's quite ridicules isn't it? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45449929)

The Raspberry Pi is the Microsoft Windows of the OS world.

I'm pretty sure Microsoft Windows is the Microsoft Windows of the OS world. Don't know what you were going for there.

For parent, OS = Operating System.

For GP, OS = Open Source.

Confusion removed, HTH.

Re:It's quite ridicules isn't it? (3, Funny)

fisted (2295862) | about 8 months ago | (#45450241)

It was probably meant the other way around:
Microsoft Windows is the Raspberry Pi of the OS world.
In terms of performance, that sounds about right.

Raspberry Pi Is Proprietary Shit (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45450161)

The Raspberry Pi is not an open architecture.

Read this (and weep):
http://RaspberryPi.StackExchange.com/questions/7122/level-of-hackability-of-raspberry-pi

There are a lot more sources that confirm this (sad) info. Just search for "raspberry pi bootloader".

Broadcom has a *very bad* reputation in the open source world, and they have *EARNED* it.

If you want to play in their walled garden, limited by what they will allow you to do, it is a cool toy. If you want to do whatever you want, you will be very disappointed.

Isn't the true value of a *general purpose* computer being able to do anything you can conceive?

The fact that there are significant reverse-engineering efforts going on
https://github.com/raspberrypi/firmware/wiki
https://github.com/hermanhermitage/videocoreiv/
is proof that the platform is anything but open.

You don't have to reverse engineer something that is open.

Vendor lock-in is very bad. That's what you get with the main chip on the Raspberry Pi.

Stay away from proprietary purposely non-documented shit. Don't waste your time.

Re:Raspberry Pi Is Proprietary Shit (1)

ArbitraryName (3391191) | about 8 months ago | (#45450493)

Mind keeping your copypasta to once per thread?

So, 2 million and 1 will come from somewhere else (3, Insightful)

DavidClarkeHR (2769805) | about 8 months ago | (#45449815)

ARMv6 is outdated, ARMv7 is the way to go. And I'd rather have a not-so-beefy GPU than one that takes binary firmware blobs.

Of course, if the tech doesn't fit, you must ... not purchase it. Or something like that

On the other hand, 2 million purchases seem to think that forking over $40 for a board isn't a TERRIBLE idea.

Re:So, 2 million and 1 will come from somewhere el (1)

DrPBacon (3044515) | about 8 months ago | (#45449931)

There will be a rich supply of perfectly working boards on eBay soon I hope :D

Re:Sorry, still not getting one. (3, Informative)

Richard_at_work (517087) | about 8 months ago | (#45449885)

Meh, makes a perfect DLNA server and irssi box, sat behind my TV downstairs - low power, low noise, cheap and cheerful. I don't see what benefit an ARMv7 would bring for me in any of the uses I have put mine to.

Re:Sorry, still not getting one. (1)

fisted (2295862) | about 8 months ago | (#45450271)

irssi box, indeed. same here. also, receiving end of the serial console of my desktop.

Re:Sorry, still not getting one. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45450525)

ARMv7 Low Cost Desktop!

Re:Sorry, still not getting one. (4, Insightful)

jones_supa (887896) | about 8 months ago | (#45449941)

ARMv6 is outdated, ARMv7 is the way to go.

People do still cool stuff with the 6502 even if it's "outdated". ARMv6 is not outdated, it's a stable platform.

Re:Sorry, still not getting one. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45449963)

Even ARMv7 is outdated. STM recommend not to use it in new designs.

Re:Sorry, still not getting one. (4, Funny)

ArbitraryName (3391191) | about 8 months ago | (#45449975)

Good for you. This article is for the non-hipsters.

Re:Sorry, still not getting one. (5, Insightful)

maevius (518697) | about 8 months ago | (#45450011)

You. Still. Don't. Get IT!

It is not about the power! You have a cheap ass device that has a massive community that have solved almost all the bugs in the thing so any problem you have is a google search away. The foundation pays for ports of software to it. When you buy a new peripheral you can find quickly if it works with the pi and how to make it work. You can find lots of different enclosures and almost any other wacky thing you can think about.

Also...All modern GPU have binary blobs. On pcs, on phones, on tablets, on embedded. Get over it.

Re:Sorry, still not getting one. (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45450189)

All modern GPU have binary blobs. On pcs, on phones, on tablets, on embedded. Get over it.

I will

never

"get over" my desire for freedom, for liberty, and for complete documentation.

I'm never going to pay for closed proprietary non-documented walled-garden shit. And even more importantly, I'm never going to spend my valuable time to reverse engineer it, or develop anything for it, either.

Re:Sorry, still not getting one. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45450287)

Jesus, fucking wanker. You don't need to use a binary blob so don't get your panties in a bunch.

Only need a blob if want a particular codec implemented in hardware - don't use that fucking codec.

Use the rest of the open fucking platform and go do something amazing rather than bitching you useless cunt.

Re:Sorry, still not getting one. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45450307)

How exactly do you boot a pi without the binary blob videocore bootloader?
Oh right, you don't.

Re:Sorry, still not getting one. (1)

John Allsup (987) | about 8 months ago | (#45450653)

Easiest way to do that is to go the pure maths route and just use pen and paper.  You can do stuff with pen and paper that top of the line ARM and x64 CPUs haven't caught up with, provided you have access to a well trained maths brain (and this means training your own...)

Telly (1)

benjfowler (239527) | about 8 months ago | (#45449613)

Had ambitions to get one to sling video from a home server to the telly, but not sure if it'll actually do the job anywhere near as well as a click'n'drool set top box from the likes of Logitech, even taking into account the good price and openness.

Or the chinese knockoff android devices. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45449849)

For ~50 you can get dual core setups with mali gpus, and quad cores with 2 gigs of ram are approaching 75 with 802.11n, ethernet, etc.

Best part, unlike the kludge that the Rasberry Pi uses, they've got hardware connected ethernet/wifi, so the performance is better.

I know lots of people fanboying the Pi, but none of them seems to have taken the time to research around the hype and see if it's actually the best bang for their buck amongst alternatives (And since everybody is using it as a glorified media server rather than a gpio platform, most of the alternatives are head and shoulders above the Pi for their intended usage.)

Purchased 4 so far (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45449643)

First Raspberry Pi is powers an Asterisk VOIP system
Second Raspberry Pi, is a low end NAS device for system backups
Third Raspberry Pi is running RaspFi as a squeeze slave
Fourth Raspberry Pi is running a Squeezebox server

Re:Purchased 4 so far (2)

Joce640k (829181) | about 8 months ago | (#45449713)

I made a Mini Space Invaders machine with mine.

Re:Purchased 4 so far (1)

50000BTU_barbecue (588132) | about 8 months ago | (#45449863)

Wait, like those arcade style mini-consoles from the '80s? Where can I see it?

Re:Purchased 4 so far (3, Interesting)

Joce640k (829181) | about 8 months ago | (#45449961)

The first one wasn't very good. It's in pieces at the moment because I'm rebuilding it inside one of these: https://www.google.es/search?q=invadercade&tbm=isch [google.es] (I got one dirt cheap)

I also recently discovered this: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/697708033/hdmipi-affordable-9-high-def-screen-for-the-raspbe [kickstarter.com] so it might be on hold until February. That screen is just perfect for it :-(

I coded the game myself (originally on Arduino believe it or not). I used the Space Invaders ROM disassembly as a base so the gameplay is 100% true to the original. You can play it if you've got a gameduino...

Re:Purchased 4 so far (1)

aphelion_rock (575206) | about 8 months ago | (#45450151)

I have two:

One is permanently online as an Apache2 web server with the output graphs from my Solar array and Weather station using RRDtool. The weather information is also shown on the web page of the local yacht club.

The other is where I can test new software and new peripherals.

I chose the Raspberry Pi for its low power consumption, 2 Watts from a Samsung phone charger.

Re:Purchased 4 so far (3, Insightful)

mrclisdue (1321513) | about 8 months ago | (#45449769)

Running xbmc (openelec) on a total of 31, so far. I use 7 here at home, and the rest I've acquired for friends and relatives. I've totally cut the cable, I have moderately high-speed internet and I get a 10 or so tv channels ota. Basically, $70/mo for internet, and all my television (including all live sports (I *do* pay $150/yr for nhl gamecenter, archived games, etc)), music, movies, looked after. Most of the others who have acquired the pis from me have cut the cable, too...

Re:Purchased 4 so far (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45449825)

Running xbmc (openelec) on a total of 31, so far. I use 7 here at home, and the rest I've acquired for friends and relatives. I've totally cut the cable, I have moderately high-speed internet and I get a 10 or so tv channels ota. Basically, $70/mo for internet, and all my television (including all live sports (I *do* pay $150/yr for nhl gamecenter, archived games, etc)), music, movies, looked after. Most of the others who have acquired the pis from me have cut the cable, too...

Doesn't work nearly as well outside the USA. Hurrah for capitalism, right?

Re:Purchased 4 so far (4, Interesting)

mrclisdue (1321513) | about 8 months ago | (#45449969)

Doesn't work nearly as well outside the USA. Hurrah for capitalism, right?

Not sure why you think this...it works *wherever* there is high speed internet...I'm outside the USA, by the way, and all 31 of those pis are outside the USA, including 4 in Mexico and 5 in France....

Get little machine (2)

jackb_guppy (204733) | about 8 months ago | (#45449659)

This weekend I found IPFIRE (Linux firewall/router follwoing IPCOP like design). Installed a UML295 LTE internet usb dongle with the on-board ethernet, up and running 10Mb/s (Both Up and Down) backup for my internet connections. Can also use it as base for mobile router in the car for the kids. Not bad for the low cost investment.

Cue the hate. (4, Insightful)

serviscope_minor (664417) | about 8 months ago | (#45449697)

For some reason the RPi always seem to get so much bitterness here. Apparently there are a lot of self-described nerds on a tech website for nerds who cannot imagine the use of a very small, cheap, low power hackable computer with moderate computing power.

I find this very strange.

Re:Cue the hate. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45449771)

for small, cheap and hackable I usually stick with assembly on an atmel tiny 45

Re:Cue the hate. (2)

Joce640k (829181) | about 8 months ago | (#45449853)

I use Tiny85 (on a homebrew PCB) or eBay Arduino Pro Minis, depending on the job in hand.

OTOH some projects need a video output. AVR chips aren't very good at that.

Freetards earn the hate. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45449775)

I already own a very small, cheap, computer except mine has a HELL of a lot more computing power than this P.O.S. It's called an "iphone" (perhaps you have heard of it) and hundreds of millions of people already own them and they have been used to do some amazing things like control robots and play music. Wake me when this rasptard pie gets anywhere close to this. But freetards like you don't think they count because for you morons everything has to be under a communist license or some such bullshit.

Re:Freetards earn the hate. (4, Interesting)

JaredOfEuropa (526365) | about 8 months ago | (#45449861)

Wow... iPhone vs Rpi, this ought to be good. Fight!

I've built an older iPhone into a wall to serve as a control panel for my home automation system. Works great and a bargain at the 2nd hand price I paid, but I've picked up a Pi as well as an Arduino to try and create more of these wall mounted controllers. The reason to switch to these platforms? More control over the form factor, easier to program, easier to interface with other hardware (like dimmers), ability to use tactile keys rather than a touchscreen, etc. I haven't decided yet between Arduino and the Pi.

Re:Freetards earn the hate. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45450407)

What do you do when the battery dies? I have an iPod that I'd like to use but even with the USB cable plugged, it doesn't want to start because it complains about a dead battery. Too bad because I could probably find some uses for it.

Re:Freetards earn the hate. (1)

JaredOfEuropa (526365) | about 8 months ago | (#45450559)

Replace it, probably. Or replace the battery; this is a 3GS model where replacing the battery should be simple.

Re:Freetards earn the hate. (1)

gedeco (696368) | about 8 months ago | (#45450099)

I already own a very small, cheap, computer except mine has a HELL of a lot more computing power than this P.O.S. It's called an "iphone" (perhaps you have heard of it) and hundreds of millions of people already own them and they have been used to do some amazing things like control robots and play music. Wake me when this rasptard pie gets anywhere close to this. But freetards like you don't think they count because for you morons everything has to be under a communist license or some such bullshit.

Steve,

Is that you?
You became a zombie.

Re:Freetards earn the hate. (1)

ArbitraryName (3391191) | about 8 months ago | (#45450119)

Awesome, where should I send my $50 for the iphones you're selling?

Re:Freetards earn the hate. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45450545)

If you are cheap, then yeah stick to cheap nonfunctional lin-sux OS & low end slow and frail freetard hardware. If you want actual quality hardware and software, you gotta pay.

Re:Cue the hate. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45449833)

Maybe it's because of fucktards like you who think that it has modern computing power.
 
Seriously, considering the number of single board computers there are floating around out there I think the Pi gets plenty of love. Why you're butthurt over it is stranger than why so many people bought this much hyped piece of hardware to find out that it doesn't live up to its reputation.

Re:Cue the hate. (3, Interesting)

rwa2 (4391) | about 8 months ago | (#45449845)

My father gave me one, I put RaspBMC on it because it seemed like the easiest way to get Debian on it.

That said, I've never really been a big fan of XBMC even running on decent hardware, and it's kinda hard to think of much else to do with a Raspberry Pi that doesn't involve sinking a lot of money for an LCD screen and USB wifi, at which point you're better off with a cheap tablet/smartphone. So I kinda just carry it around so I could put the BSOD screensaver on random LCD TVs that I find in public.

Frankly, I had more fun with the $25 Arduino UNO he sent me. I used it to control one of those cheap Lutron color LED strips:
https://plus.google.com/109464377854747809155/videos [google.com]
So if I was a little more motivated, my workstation's mood lighting could correspond to the weather or Nagios or something.

We Value Freedom & Liberty Here (0, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45450231)

For some reason the RPi always seem to get so much bitterness here. Apparently there are a lot of self-described nerds on a tech website for nerds who cannot imagine the use of a very small, cheap, low power hackable computer with moderate computing power.

I find this very strange.

You're new here, right?

We value Free here, as in freedom -- as in LIBERTY. The Raspberry Pi is not in any sense free. It is closed and proprietary. It has a craptastic Broadcom system on chip (SoC) which Broadcom refuses to properly document.

The Raspberry Pi is not really an open architecture.

Read this (and weep):
http://RaspberryPi.StackExchange.com/questions/7122/level-of-hackability-of-raspberry-pi

There are a lot more sources that confirm this (sad) info. Just search for "raspberry pi bootloader".

Broadcom has a *very bad* reputation in the open source world, and they have *EARNED* it.

If you want to play in their walled garden, limited by what they will allow you to do, it is a cool toy. If you want to do whatever you want, you will be very disappointed.

Isn't the true value of a *general purpose* computer being able to do anything you can conceive?

The fact that there are significant reverse-engineering efforts going on
https://github.com/raspberrypi/firmware/wiki
https://github.com/hermanhermitage/videocoreiv/
is proof that the platform is anything but open.

You don't have to reverse engineer something that is open.

Vendor lock-in is very bad. That's what you get with the main chip on the Raspberry Pi.

Not hate, factual observation of problems (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45450331)

The R-Pi reminds me of Global Warming, it's full of people who totally deny that there is anything wrong with it, despite the problems being visible to everyone and even confirmed by the Raspberry Pi Foundation themselves. It's pretty wierd.

Anyway, no, not hate, just plain factual observations. For a start it has a partially broken hardware USB controller inside the main chip which drops USB data because it expects the ARM core to respond in realtime, which the driver cannot do, as RPF have confirmed.

And secondly, it's very much closed hardware, unlike the ridiculous claim of openness made in TFS. We don't even have the full datasheet and pinout of the closed-tight-as-a-drum Broadcom device, just a few pages of partial information for peripheral programming. The Broadcom developers are having to do all the kernel work because nobody else has the full information. Not exactly open as TFS portrays.

The R-Pi used to be unique at the price, but there's no shortage of other boards in the same price bracket nowadays, with more modern CPUs, with full documentation, and without Broadcom's obsession for closedness, and more coming out every week. The main people still buying R-Pis are those wanting cheap media players, because the closed Broadcom chip is at heart just a dedicated hardware media playback device. It's good at that.

If you want a media player, it's still worth getting. For all other purposes, it's not the board to get anymore. Plus its USB is substandard and won't ever be fixed, and its networking works over USB so that suffers dropped packets too. You've been warned, but who cares. </shrug>

ptxdist (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45449715)

I am using it with a customized ptxdist: https://gitorious.org/ptxdist-raspberry-pi
So if you are into hacking want to use qt5.2 this might be a good starting point.

DroP Linux (1)

DrPBacon (3044515) | about 8 months ago | (#45449741)

Building an X-free Linux distro :)

Which device for tamper resistant android w/ touch (2)

raymorris (2726007) | about 8 months ago | (#45449747)

Slashdotters know about a lot of different small hardware.
Suppose you wanted to build a gas pump controller with a touch screen based on Android.
One issue is that in order to protect customers before certifying the pump, the department of weights and measures wants to see that the gas station owner can't easily manipulate the device to show an inflated reading. What kind of hardware would you consider?

Amateur hour. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45449749)

Wake me when they get to 9 million in a single weekend. [businessinsider.com]

Raspberry PI USB Power Issues (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45449839)

Have they fixed the Raspberry Pi restarts the moment you plug in anything that actually needs power in USB? Seriously, you would have thought they would have added a voltage regulator or SOMETHING to stop a full reset from occuring from the voltage drop.

It makes using the Raspberry PI with ANY USB devices very difficult..

Re:Raspberry PI USB Power Issues (1)

DrPBacon (3044515) | about 8 months ago | (#45449907)

You anonymous cowards are so ungrateful... It costs $40! In Australia!

Re:Raspberry PI USB Power Issues (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45449937)

Do they even have electricity in Australia?

Re:Raspberry PI USB Power Issues (2)

rubycodez (864176) | about 8 months ago | (#45450027)

yes, to run the beer fridge on the porch

Re:Raspberry PI USB Power Issues (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45450289)

Who in his right mind pays $40 for crap, even if the $$ is Australian? The strange thing is that it wouldn't have cost a lot more to make infinitely better - I'm talking about a real, reliable NIC instead of this USB crap, a not ancient version of ARM and so on. But, no. It's cheap, therefore it has to be *total* crap. *Sigh*

Re:Raspberry PI USB Power Issues (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45449927)

That was addressed long time ago, get decent power supply with spare amperage.

Re:Raspberry PI USB Power Issues (1)

allo (1728082) | about 8 months ago | (#45450305)

nope, this doesn't help.

But what helps: get a powered hup. The HOST-Connector powers the rPi (really cool), and the CLIENT-Ports power your usb-devices.

Media center (4, Interesting)

Jack Malmostoso (899729) | about 8 months ago | (#45449875)

My RPi is loaded with RaspBMC and I use it to watch videos I have stored on my main machine.
It is hooked up directly to the USB port of my TV so it powers up when I turn the TV on, and turns off when I'm done.
It is powerful enough to stream 1080p over SMB/CIFS, and I got a 10EUR IR remote that needed exactly zero configuration (plugged in the USB receiver, counted up to 10, it was ready to go).

Sure, it's not the fastest machine on earth, but for what I use it it's miles better than DLNA or similar crap.

Mine Scares Cats (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45449901)

I wanted to build a fun little project over the summer to scare cats out of the garden.

The RPi was a great platform to work with for a casual project like this. Having the GPIO was a real winner here.

I wrote it all up for others to peruse and have offered enough information that anyone could build it for themselves.

http://norris.org.au/cattack/ [norris.org.au]

There are *quirks* to this hardware, but it is not a commercial device, it is for education use. I was telling my teacher-in-training friend that I don't know if I'd want to use the RPi in class with 30 students all finding the quirks at different times: it would be chaos! But for a single enthusiastic student working through these problems will give them a fantastic introduction to troubleshooting and the real life pain that comes with getting something to work.

Re:Mine Scares Cats (-1, Flamebait)

rubycodez (864176) | about 8 months ago | (#45450045)

a used .22 LR pistol can be had for a quarter the price, and the same cat never comes back to bother your garden

Very cool (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45449917)

Very cool thank you for your efforts
http://5rabadf.blogspot.com/

practical road blocks (-1, Flamebait)

Gothmolly (148874) | about 8 months ago | (#45449955)

No VGA out - how do you hook it up to a monitor? You find an HDMI converter or hook it up to the family TV - lame.
3.3V logic - everything else in the world uses 5V, so you end up converting everything - lame.
Raspbian distro - UK keyboard default, no DHCP out of the box - lame.

It's almost there, just ... cool to the guy who invented it, but fiddly for everyone else.

Re:practical road blocks (2)

ArchieBunker (132337) | about 8 months ago | (#45450005)

You're stuck in a 20 year time warp my friend. HDMI has been the standard video transport method for a long time. If you need to interface your board to 5V logic then use one of the many cheap level converters out there. Most 5v logic will probably run at 3.3v anyhow these days.

Re:practical road blocks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45450333)

No, but the angry owner may show up with a .45. Besides, all countries are not the US, and you might find yourself on the wrong side of the law for not only killing someone's pet, but also possession of an illegal firearm. There you go, Mr Gung Ho.

Re:practical road blocks (2)

Zaiff Urgulbunger (591514) | about 8 months ago | (#45450405)

UK keyboard default

If your-country != default, you change it. What's so hard?

Re:practical road blocks (2)

hamster_nz (656572) | about 8 months ago | (#45450651)

I use a HDMI -> DVI-D cable with no problems. I like 3.3V though, all the cool sensors use 3.3V logic...

But I think the bigger sin is no RTC!

Software support and longevity. (2)

marcovje (205102) | about 8 months ago | (#45449987)

I mainly use it as always-on machine in addition to the filer. The main reason is that with a filer you are more conservative. OpenVPN, postgresql db. I also have some applicationservers (3-tier) developed for it, but that is not production yes.

Most important bit is long time usability and support, features are only secondary. In that RPI is unique.

How I use my RP (4, Informative)

yossie (93792) | about 8 months ago | (#45449999)

Most of the time, my RP, coupled with a 8-Relay board ($20 on ebay,) reports (via SMS) whenever any of my house doors are opened or closed, as well the garage door. Further, it has a web server with a small app that allows me to raise/lower the garage door.
A picture of the board I constructed can be seen at http://www.blacksteel.com/pics/RP.jpg - the board has since been re-arranged a bit to give me better access to the HDMI port. The software is pretty minimal - a shell script to handle periodic polling of the various magnetic reed switches on the doors, it also keeps track of all changes in a mysql database. A php script to handle opening/closing the garage door (and animating the process in an image using data from the switches!)
Also, whenever I have a movie that can't be played back by my old but still working Apple TV 1 running XBMC, I use OpenElec XBMC on my RP - it's not the most responsive XBCM in the world, but it plays back high resolution MKV's whereas the ATV1 can't keep up.
All in all, it's an amazing board and I have other plans for it, grin. I likely will get another one or two at some point.

Re:How I use my RP (3, Informative)

ahabswhale (1189519) | about 8 months ago | (#45450123)

Thanks for sharing that. I've always wondered how people use these devices.

How I'm using my RPi's (1)

DoctorPepper (92269) | about 8 months ago | (#45450061)

I bought two Raspberry Pi's in October. One of them is currently doing duty as an IRC server inside of one of my Broadband-Hamnet mesh nodes (formerly HSMM-MESH), the other is for use as a backup, and for experimenting.

http://www.hsmm-mesh.org/ [hsmm-mesh.org]

How I use my Pi (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45450083)

I wrote up a post a while back about how I use my Raspberry Pi: Things I do with my Raspberry Pi [magnatecha.com]

It got pretty popular at the time, so you might have seen it before.

Not very open (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45450095)

Some of the software and much of the hardware for the Pi is not open. OLinuXino by Olimex is much more open ( runs official Debian, board layouts are open, 2 layer design and TQFP parts - available from Olimex in unit quantity - for home build). I love my Pi and wish the Foundation the best of luck, but I like my Olimex better.

Not Free (As In Freedom) (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45450117)

The Raspberry Pi is not in any sense free. It has the craptastic Broadcom system on chip, which Broadcom refuses to fully document (just like all of the other craptastic Broadcom products).

I learned this when I won a free Raspberry Pi, and then started looking into it. I learned just how unfree it is.

Read this (and weep):
http://RaspberryPi.StackExchange.com/questions/7122/level-of-hackability-of-raspberry-pi

There are a lot more sources that confirm this (sad) info. Just search for "raspberry pi bootloader".

Broadcom has a *very bad* reputation in the open source world, and they have *EARNED* it.

If you want to play in their walled garden, limited by what they will allow you to do, it is a cool toy. If you want to do whatever you want, you will be very disappointed.

Isn't the true value of a *general purpose* computer being able to do anything you can conceive?

The fact that there are significant reverse-engineering efforts going on
https://github.com/raspberrypi/firmware/wiki
https://github.com/hermanhermitage/videocoreiv/
is proof that the platform is anything but open -- anything but free.

You don't have to reverse engineer something that is open and fully documented.

Vendor lock-in is very bad. That's what you get with the main chip on the Raspberry Pi.

Meh.

I value my freedom. I will not waste my precious and valuable time on non-free crap like the Raspberry Pi, no matter how cheap it is.

Practical question (1)

ArchieBunker (132337) | about 8 months ago | (#45450209)

What is the "lack of freedom" preventing you from doing?

Re:Practical question (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45450513)

It prevents me from using OpenBSD [marc.info] on the R Pi.

It prevents me from developing my own OS for the R Pi.

It prevents me from having a system with complete source code, cuz you can't even boot without Broadcom's craptastic binary blob.

It prevents me from using the device any way I want to, and any way I can conceive of. I am limited to what Broadcom supports and approves of.

Is that enough???

Freedom isn't about practicality. Freedom is about LIBERTY. Freedom is about being able to do anything you can conceive -- anything you can think of. Freedom is about complete documentation, especially of all interfaces.

Your question is horribly misguided, and it proves you don't understand (or love) liberty and freedom.

Re:Practical question (1)

ArbitraryName (3391191) | about 8 months ago | (#45450583)

So "freedom" is about forcing people to do what you want? That's an interesting definition.

Re:Not Free (As In Freedom) (4, Insightful)

hamster_nz (656572) | about 8 months ago | (#45450495)

Wow! Said like a true Open Source fundamentalist. I'm hoping you wrote that on an OpenRISC based computer, not a PC with a closed source CPU, closed source BIOS, closed source chipset, closed source video adapter... :-)

I like my hardware Open, however I don't mind shelling out $35 for board to do stuff with. Download and write an image SD card, plug it in.

Up and running in 15 minutes, with no 'wasted' time or money..

Re:Not Free (As In Freedom) (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45450531)

What an incredibly narrow-minded diatribe. I don't think anyone attempts to describe the Pi as free in any sense, except that it runs open source software. It was designed, built and sold as a miniature, cheap PC with enough power to give kids and teens their first taste of programming without their parents worrying about little Johnny or little Jane messing up the family computer. Ebon Upton works for Broadcom, and enacted his vision with the hardware he had to hand. He had a very specific demographic and price-point in mind, and that just didn't include you.

The charity behind the Pi only expected to sell a few thousand units in the first year, and if that had been all they'd managed they would still have been happy to have inspired a small group of youngsters to get into coding. No, those youngsters wouldn't have learned how to hit the metal directly, but by the time a coder gets to that stage they can look more widely at other hardware that does allow it (if such a thing actually exists).

As it's turned out, there are a huge number of people in the world who have the imagination to see that a crap, non-free, small, cheap PC with a big support community can be used for far more than teaching young people how to code.

What I use my Pi for (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45450219)

I have two mounted behind two LCD TV's. They get power off the TV's USB port, and the hook up via the HDI port. I use this for digital signage.One uses Feh to do rotating fixed sign. the other pulls data from the net for a flavor list for my ice cream store. It's a real time update. Works great.

I've got three of them myself. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45450285)

Two are running raspbmc, hooked up to 1080p TVs and feed off the NAS, this works great, and it's so easy. The other one is in the kid's room hooked up to a $8 used PS3 webcam and mic so we can watch/listen, plus it has an mp3 playlist of various lullabies and white noise. Bloody brilliant machine. I'm going to get one for my mom and dad so they can experience the joys of XBMC as well, the plugins for legal free streaming HD content are amazing, and they'll easily be able to stream videos and pictures from their cameras and laptops. I'm going to get another one just for fooling around with and see what else I can come up with. I just wish it easily supported VGA monitors (I have one that's 1280x1024 and it doesn't work with it), but I'm still quite happy with it!

Bitcoin mining peon. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45450327)

I have around 90 GH/s of bitcoin mining asics being managed by a raspi, Keeps it at about 50% load constant. There's a neato distro for that and I kick in a measly 1 minute per day of mining to support it. http://minepeon.com/ [minepeon.com]

Photo Booth (4, Interesting)

SgtKeeling (717065) | about 8 months ago | (#45450359)

I made a photo booth which was installed inside of an old phone booth in a local cafe for a new-media art festival this past summer. I used a Raspberry Pi, a usb webcam, a big red button connected via GPIO, a coin slot connected via GPIO, and an ethernet cable running to the router in the back room. People would insert their dime or two nickles and the button would light up. Pressing the button would take a photo. The Pi then uploaded the photos to a website which looped through all of the photos taken during the festival. People could visit the website on their own devices, but there were also a few screens set up around the town in shop windows displaying the photos. The program to do all this was a simple python script with a loop.

You can still see the photos taken here: http://donttakemypicture.org/ [donttakemypicture.org]
The site uses javascript to keep checking for new photos and to change the photo displayed for you every few seconds.

I have two of them and I use them for... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45450433)

1st one is a target backup for my webserver running the stock Raspbian. Every day, it gets synced with the website servers as a backup via cron and rsync.

2nd one is a file server for the webserver that is mapped over the network for additional storage for a segment of the website - again, running the stock Raspbian.

The reason I went with those is the sub 3-watt power envelope. Previously these were serviced by full blown servers drawing 80-90 watts at the wall each. Now, it's all under 10 watts - saves me on the electric bill and does the job just fine. Overall saves $150/year or twice what it cost to put together...

Sleeping in a drawer (1, Informative)

damaki (997243) | about 8 months ago | (#45450591)

I bought this to use it as a lightweight server, found it highly underpowered, CPU and memory wise, and discovered that some software I needed was x86 only. So I left it gathering dust in a drawer. I have been tried finding a use for this thingy but could not. End of the story.
I end up using the t-shirt more than the pi itself.
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