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Ancient Egyptians Created "Meat Mummies" So Dead Could Continue To Eat

samzenpus posted about 9 months ago | from the wrap-that-up-for-me dept.

Science 93

sciencehabit writes "What is your beloved mummy going to eat for the rest of eternity? For some ancient Egyptians, the answer included meat. In King Tutankhamun's tomb, for example, archaeologists found 48 wooden cases of butchered cuts of beef and poultry. But unlike offerings of fruit and grains, which could last for quite a while once dehydrated and placed in dry tombs, pieces of meat required special treatment. After just a few hours in the desert heat, 'they will become a terrible mess if you don't take some steps to preserve them,' says Richard Evershed, an archaeological chemist at the University of Bristol in the United Kingdom. The solution? Mummify. Now, a team of researchers led by Evershed is shedding light on the embalming processes used to create these so-called meat mummies, including mummified beef ribs."

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News? Stuff that matters? (0)

BringsApples (3418089) | about 9 months ago | (#45458941)

Really?

Re:News? Stuff that matters? (4, Funny)

G3ckoG33k (647276) | about 9 months ago | (#45458973)

Think of it as an analogue to McDonalds, or SPAM.

Re:News? Stuff that matters? (4, Funny)

flyneye (84093) | about 9 months ago | (#45459597)

Add water, makes its own sauce...

Re:News? Stuff that matters? (1)

retroworks (652802) | about 9 months ago | (#45460111)

mod up funny

Re:News? Stuff that matters? (1)

PatM8236 (3438955) | about 9 months ago | (#45474239)

Lol, I don't think there's anything in the WORLD that could make me eat SPAM. McDonalds I choke down from time to time, but overall....yuck! Should pull all 3 side by side and see which lasts the longest...

Re:News? Stuff that matters? (4, Funny)

HornWumpus (783565) | about 9 months ago | (#45459043)

Nerds love jerky.

Re:News? Stuff that matters? (1)

BringsApples (3418089) | about 9 months ago | (#45459097)

Are you calling King Tutankhamun a jerky? I wooo wooo....!

Re:News? Stuff that matters? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45463325)

You "wooo wooo"? WTF?

What is this I dont even

Re:News? Stuff that matters? (1)

SleazyRidr (1563649) | about 9 months ago | (#45464145)

You make me want to la la.

Re:News? Stuff that matters? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45460051)

I was actually eating beef jerky when I saw this headline.

Now I want to see how "mummified meat" compares!

Re:News? Stuff that matters? (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about 9 months ago | (#45465099)

Zevulon the Great. He's teriyaki style.

Re:News? Stuff that matters? (1)

zoomshorts (137587) | about 9 months ago | (#45459083)

Horse shit dot com

Re:News? Stuff that matters? (5, Informative)

geekoid (135745) | about 9 months ago | (#45459121)

"archaeological chemist"
How is that not news for nerds?
This is awesome nerd fair.

Re:News? Stuff that matters? (-1)

BringsApples (3418089) | about 9 months ago | (#45459289)

Yeah but this "archaeological chemist" thinks that ancient Egypt was a desert, whereas most others have concluded that it was a lush rainforest, and that the people of that day were into farming on a large scale. That and there aren't many comments on this "nerd fair" article.

Re:News? Stuff that matters? (2)

cold fjord (826450) | about 9 months ago | (#45459363)

That and there aren't many comments on this "nerd fair" article.

I think people are still trying to digest the idea. Clearly that is more palatable than the meat. And that's not saying much....

Re:News? Stuff that matters? (4, Informative)

Gavagai80 (1275204) | about 9 months ago | (#45460129)

Ancient Egypt was definitely not rain forest, can't imagine where you got that idea. It was, of course, farmed on a large scale -- just as it is today, by using the Nile.

Re:News? Stuff that matters? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45460551)

"After just a few hours in the desert heat"

If I remember right there are arguments over what that area looked like during that time. The wood found is of that from Tropical like regions, and there are other findings that the area was or could have been a tropical like region. I believe the region still was a pretty hot and humid if it was a tropical like region. Of course the Egypt's also traveled the seas so they could have obtained there resources elsewhere.

I am not sure if the person that turned this story in wrote such a false "After just a few hours in the desert heat" statement or if it was the original authors/scientists that made this statement. But it should be just cut down to "the region was hot, and perhaps humid"

Re:News? Stuff that matters? (1)

BringsApples (3418089) | about 9 months ago | (#45460557)

Maybe ancient ancient Egypt was. Did they get a date on that meat? I didn't see that in the article anywhere. But yes, for what I said to be true, it would require Ancient Egypt to be older than they suspect it is.

Re:News? Stuff that matters? (3, Informative)

sunsurfandsand (1959680) | about 9 months ago | (#45462453)

Did they get a date on that meat?

"Best by 1334 BC"

Re:News? Stuff that matters? (2)

cusco (717999) | about 9 months ago | (#45461139)

Yeah but this "archaeological chemist" thinks that ancient Egypt was a desert, whereas most others have concluded that it was a lush rainforest, and that the people of that day were into farming on a large scale. That and there aren't many comments on this "nerd fair" article.

Twelve thousand years ago the area was mixed grassland and scrub fed from the heavier rainfall caused by the extended ice cap. Forests ran along river banks. By four thousand years ago the area was arid desert. It was never rain forest.

Re:News? Stuff that matters? (1)

BringsApples (3418089) | about 9 months ago | (#45461555)

I have no way to prove anything about ancient Egypt, anymore than you do, but what you said stands within reason. I'd just question why what would appear to be the world's most ingenious civilization, that spanned the globe apparently, would set up shop in a desert. Of course there could have been a good reason, the ancient Egyptians did all sorts of strange things. It's just that all of the other pyramids around the world are in lush rainforest-like places, many covered completely in vegetation. Also the sphinx was apparently worn down by a significant amount of rain since it was constructed.

Re:News? Stuff that matters? (1)

cusco (717999) | about 9 months ago | (#45462695)

Not all the pyramids, those of Chanchan in Peru are in the midst of the Atacama Desert, the driest desert in the world and the largest pyramid of all, the Great Mound near Kehokia, is in the Great Plains of North America. My time was off a bit though, it was during the period of 10,500-5,500 years ago that the Sahara was grasslands. [livescience.com]

Re:News? Stuff that matters? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45463771)

Great Mound near Kehokia, is in the Great Plains of North America

Cahokia, [wikipedia.org] not Kehokia.

Cahokia was the largest and most influential urban settlement in the Mississippian culture which developed advanced societies across much of what is now the Southeastern United States, beginning more than 500 years before European contact.[5] Cahokia's population at its peak in the 1200s was among the largest cities in the world, and its ancient population would not be surpassed by any city in the United States until the late 18th century. Today, Cahokia Mounds is considered the largest and most complex archaeological site north of the great Pre-Columbian cities in Mexico.

Cahokia Mounds is a National Historic Landmark and designated site for state protection. In addition, it is one of only 21 World Heritage Sites within the United States. It is the largest prehistoric earthen construction in the Americas north of Mexico.[4] The site is open to the public and administered by the Illinois Historic Preservation Agency, and is supported by the Cahokia Mounds Museum Society.

I grew up in Cahokia, IL. which is about ten miles away from the mounds, and is the oldest setlement in or west of the Mississippi valley. It was founded hundreds of years after the Cahokia peoples vanished

(mcgrew, can't log in today, my laptop at home broke last night dammit. Hope I can get data off of it in time to post another chapter Saturday)

Re:News? Stuff that matters? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45463769)

I'd just question why what would appear to be the world's most ingenious civilization, that spanned the globe apparently, would set up shop in a desert.

Spanned the globe? Globe? No. Ancient Egyptians spanned the Egypt and bits of Libya, Sudan, and Middle-East.

There wasn' t one pyramid-building civilization, there were many. When people start to build monuments out of stone, pyramid is the natural shape to start with because it's inherently stable so it's easier to build one than, say, Empire State Building.

Pyramids were built on different times in different parts of the world. The Maya in Central America were considerate enough to date their monuments and from that we know that they were built mostly between AD 200-800. The Ancient Egyptians weren't as considerate, but the builders at least left quarry marks in stones that show that they were built roughly around 2500 BC. That's about 3000 year difference in time.

People have claimed and unfortunately are still claiming that the Great Pyramid is older than the Egyptian civilization. To do so they have to ignore the evidence left by the builders themselves. For example, the name of king Khufu was painted in the wall of one of the relieving chambers in a place that was inaccessible until a route there was blown in the early 19th century. Similarly, on the outer side there are blocks that have quarry marks mentioning Khufu's name in them.

Re:News? Stuff that matters? (1)

Valdrax (32670) | about 9 months ago | (#45468739)

I'd just question why what would appear to be the world's most ingenious civilization, that spanned the globe apparently, would set up shop in a desert. Of course there could have been a good reason, the ancient Egyptians did all sorts of strange things. It's just that all of the other pyramids around the world are in lush rainforest-like places, many covered completely in vegetation. Also the sphinx was apparently worn down by a significant amount of rain since it was constructed.

I don't know how to say this without significant offense, but you've been listening to waaay too many crackpots.

As another poster pointed out, pyramids are a common monument structure, not because one globe-spanning civilization was obsessed with them, but because they are some of the simplest stable structures to create. (Never mind that there are significant differences in the way different cultures made their pyramids look either.)

The reason the Egyptians "set up shop in a desert" is that it wasn't one at the time. People were living in Egypt as far back as 8000 years ago, and it took over 2000 years for the region to become a desert. However, the Nile River valley was and still is one of the most fertile places on the planet. It nurtured their civilization for millennia after the surrounding area went to hell.

As for the sphinx & rain thing, that's been pretty thoroughly debunked too. [wikipedia.org]

Re:News? Stuff that matters? (1)

BringsApples (3418089) | about 9 months ago | (#45469187)

In today's world, I'll take the crack-pot label any day, but I understand what you mean. Let me assure you that I have seen the crackpots that I assume that you're talking about, and ...yeah, they can be funny. There are enough questions about Egypt that no one can answer with any sort of authority, and I'm not going to try either. I think we'd both agree that something amazing happened there, regardless of how, when or why. Cheers!

Re:News? Stuff that matters? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45461599)

I wouldn't say "never" due to plate tectonics, but I'm pretty sure it hasn't been a rainforest for as long as humans have existed.

Re:News? Stuff that matters? (2)

akinliat (1771190) | about 9 months ago | (#45463471)

IIRC, the reason that the Nile valley was settled and farmed had less to do with rainfall, and more to do with the regular, seasonal floods that acted as a natural irrigation system for the floodplain. The area probably was less arid than today, but the (twice-yearly?) floods made the floodplain fertile.

Re:News? Stuff that matters? (1)

SleazyRidr (1563649) | about 9 months ago | (#45464181)

We're talking 5,000 years ago, not a million. Egypt was a desert during "ancient" times.

Re:News? Stuff that matters? (1)

adisakp (705706) | about 9 months ago | (#45464541)

Yeah but this "archaeological chemist" thinks that ancient Egypt was a desert, whereas most others have concluded that it was a lush rainforest, and that the people of that day were into farming on a large scale. That and there aren't many comments on this "nerd fair" article.

It wasn't a rain forest. Yearly flooding of the Nile provided fertile soil and water which allowed for farming of the flood plain. Go a bit away from the Nile and you were still out in the dessert rather quickly. This is why nearly all major ancient Egyptian sites are along the Nile River (whereas a rainforest would have allowed for a more geographical dispersed population).

The Nile no longer floods every year though due to the construction of the Aswan damn.

Re:News? Stuff that matters? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45459511)

Well, it got us an article tagged "Africa Death Food."
So that's something!

Re:News? Stuff that matters? (1)

Jane Q. Public (1010737) | about 9 months ago | (#45460415)

Really?

The "Archeological Chemist" apparently knows next to nothing about food preservation. This "mess after a few hours" thing is bunk.

As the U.S. Army Survival Manual has been saying for at least 4 decades: in a hot, arid desert, you can bury a piece of raw meat the size of your arm under the sand, and it will remain edible (if somewhat dried out) for at least 2 years.

Re:News? Stuff that matters? (1)

BringsApples (3418089) | about 9 months ago | (#45460537)

Yuk! But this only strengthens the argument that Egypt was once a lush rainforest-like environment.

Re:News? Stuff that matters? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45460901)

You must be new here.

Or you're... slow. Real slow.

At My School... (1)

DexterIsADog (2954149) | about 9 months ago | (#45458951)

...this was lunch. Every day. I went back to the old campus recently and now it's a high end food court. The lunch ladies morphed into hot young babes.

Re:At My School... (1)

bob_super (3391281) | about 9 months ago | (#45459157)

Now that you've old and toothless, campus food is indeed perfect and the middle-aged angry girls look like babes.

Re:At My School... (1)

DexterIsADog (2954149) | about 9 months ago | (#45459847)

Since you wrote "you've" when you apparently meant "you're", I'm guessing you're still rocking junior high.

Nice snipe, though. With whom are *you* so angry?

Re:At My School... (1)

bob_super (3391281) | about 9 months ago | (#45459937)

That wasn't personal, sorry if you took it that way.
Your statement just conjured an image of how old I would have to be to find the lunch ladies attractive...

Typos happen, it's freezing in this lab, to keep the magic smoke inside darn components.

Re:At My School... (1)

HornWumpus (783565) | about 9 months ago | (#45460827)

In total darkness; not only are the lunch ladies beautiful, I'm handsome.

Re:At My School... (1)

operagost (62405) | about 9 months ago | (#45463435)

In this economy, you are going to find some pretty attractive 20-somethings working in unglamorous jobs.

Sounds like a cool grindcore band... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45458957)

This definitely sounds like a headline act at one of the local metal dives.

Re:Sounds like a cool grindcore band... (1)

Todd Palin (1402501) | about 9 months ago | (#45460115)

Or perhaps Lady GaGa?

Makes me hungry just thinking about it (1)

volvox_voxel (2752469) | about 9 months ago | (#45459005)

..Is there such a thin"g as healthy / organic jerky? I have to go on a long trip for the holidays and need to keep a carload of people sated.. "meat mummies" however, does not sound as appealing as "hungry man" or "Smoked Bronco Billy's", or "snackmasters" ; don't think I could convince the wife..

Re:Makes me hungry just thinking about it (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45459025)

I thought those were your pet names for your gay boyfriend.

Re:Makes me hungry just thinking about it (1)

volvox_voxel (2752469) | about 9 months ago | (#45459113)

..I was just making up names, trying not to accidentally shill a real company, with visions of TV dinner add campaigns that played on the manly theme to convince people to buy bland prepackaged food. It's amazing how well some advertising themes can work.

Re:Makes me hungry just thinking about it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45459233)

Believe it or not, "Hungry Man" [hungry-man.com] is a real frozen-dinner brand that's been in the US for decades -- as you said, it's amazing how well some ad themes work.

Re:Makes me hungry just thinking about it (1)

flyneye (84093) | about 9 months ago | (#45459627)

Doubtless there were hieroglyphs advertising those same dinners when they were first frozen. The ancient Egyptians were amazing.
I like the turkey and the terriyaki too.
I like the chicken if the sauce is not too blue....

Road Trip Food (1)

TheSeatOfMyPants (2645007) | about 9 months ago | (#45460199)

Well, here's some of the stuff my family used for the 8-12 hour drives to visit relatives when I was a kid:
-- Non-dense cereals (different brands/flavors to suit people) in ziploc baggies
-- Anything that can be used in a non-refrigerated brown-bag lunch works -- bring an ice chest for anything that's better when cold.
-- Cheese & deli meat safe at room temp (e.g. salami, pepperoni...)
-- Soft French bread rounds (for sandwiches or alone) & mustard
-- Large croissants (alone or sandwiches)
-- Garlic bread
-- Mozzarella "string" cheese or mozzarella balls
-- Buy pizzas & immediately cover in plastic wrap and refrigerate until cold, then cut into pieces (square pizza is easiest), wrap them individually & keep in ice chest.
-- Books/websites aimed at getting kids to start cooking always have at least a few ideas for quick &easy food/snacks you can make with little effort.

Things you or others could make relatively quickly orpossibly buy at a bakery:
-- Rum cake, pound cake, spice cake, etc.
-- Brownies (preferably using a sweet liquor like rum or kahlua; quadruple the alcohol in it so it doesn't all burn off, and you'll have some very relaxed/happy travelers without it being enough to hurt a kid or someone on medication)
-- Sweet or pizza-type focaccia [wikipedia.org] , the moister the better

Re:Makes me hungry just thinking about it (2)

Jamie Ian Macgregor (3389757) | about 9 months ago | (#45460421)

try biltong, it's far better than anything jerked, it's made from real cuts of meat, vinegar, herbs, spices and salt. oh, and the name means 'buttock strips'

Re:Makes me hungry just thinking about it (1)

operagost (62405) | about 9 months ago | (#45463449)

Jerky Direct has organics.

Purina Zombie Chow (1)

themushroom (197365) | about 9 months ago | (#45459017)

How do you tell the diner from the food?

Re:Purina Zombie Chow (2)

Todd Palin (1402501) | about 9 months ago | (#45460067)

How do you tell the diner from the dinner, perhaps?

Great (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45459035)

Now they can send their resumé to Con-Agra.

Okay, one odd fact... (4, Insightful)

themushroom (197365) | about 9 months ago | (#45459053)

When people were mummified, their internal organs were put into clay pots in the sarcophagus.
So if the kings were to eat after death... where did anyone think the food was going to go?

Re:Okay, one odd fact... (1)

avandesande (143899) | about 9 months ago | (#45459151)

There is no better thing for a mummy to eat, than tasty morsels of mummy meat!

No chance of it going bad in their abdominal cavity.

Re:Okay, one odd fact... (2)

ljw1004 (764174) | about 9 months ago | (#45459195)

Did they know the same physiology that we do today? Did they know that the stomach and intestine were needed for digestion?

Re:Okay, one odd fact... (2)

Golddess (1361003) | about 9 months ago | (#45459209)

My thoughts similarly. After all, didn't they think that the brain's only purpose was to produce mucus?

Re:Okay, one odd fact... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45460549)

Of course they did. If you eat something bad, it hurts your stomach. If you eat too much, and get indigestion, it hurts your stomach. When you feel full... it's your stomach that feels full.

You'd have to be batshit insane to think any other part of the body was primarily involved in food processing.

ps. By stomach, I mean entire digestive tract... there's not a good word for it. I've seen pregnant women get offended when doctors use the word "tummy" - it's as good a word as any - a woman with a baby in her stomach should probably be arrested. Abdomen is probably the best term for the area, but may be too technical for some.

Re:Okay, one odd fact... (1)

BringsApples (3418089) | about 9 months ago | (#45459255)

Maybe the king died as he was eating, and they wrapped up his left-over food? This is the first I've ever heard of there being "food" in any tomb.

I wish I knew the context behind why they did anything that they did in ancient Egypt.

Re:Okay, one odd fact... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45464823)

Where do you think?

In the clay pot, of course.

Americans have that too. It's called the McRib (1)

JoeyRox (2711699) | about 9 months ago | (#45459067)

But the treatment process is very delicate so it's only available a few times a year.

Yeah (1)

Stargoat (658863) | about 9 months ago | (#45459091)

I would eat some mummy meat. I bet it might be tasty.

Heh. In more practical terms, it would be cool to figure out what went into making this meat. We could eat ancient Egyptian meat, much in the same way that we enjoy Midas Touch from Dogfish Head Craft Brewed Ales.

Re:Yeah (3, Funny)

Mr D from 63 (3395377) | about 9 months ago | (#45459177)

It was better known by the locals as "Mesopotamia Mystery Meat"

Re:Yeah (1)

cusco (717999) | about 9 months ago | (#45461153)

By this time the Andean peoples were already drying meat for use in the off season. I wonder what made it so much more difficult to dry meat in the Sahara.

Wow.. (1)

houbou (1097327) | about 9 months ago | (#45459119)

Ignorance is bliss....

Re:Wow.. (1)

cold fjord (826450) | about 9 months ago | (#45459383)

And in this case, bliss is underrated.

Patent Issue (1)

avandesande (143899) | about 9 months ago | (#45459167)

Would this undermine claims on Slim Jim proprietary recipe?

Obligatory Hubert Farnsworth (4, Funny)

dkleinsc (563838) | about 9 months ago | (#45459193)

This is an outrage - I was going to eat that mummy!

Re: Obligatory Hubert Farnsworth (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45461311)

Well done sir - I've been scrolling through all these comments waiting for someone I make that reference!

Coming soon... (1)

TheloniousToady (3343045) | about 9 months ago | (#45459199)

...to a McDonald's near you: "Meat McMummy". And don't peal off the simulated gauze wrapping: it's edible. Yum!

The francise possibilities (1)

Forever Wondering (2506940) | about 9 months ago | (#45459227)

In-N-Out-Mummy, Mummy King, Mummy-In-The-Box, McMummy's ...

That explains a lot (1)

paiute (550198) | about 9 months ago | (#45459357)

I always thought Finnan haddie was supernatural.

But What Does it Taste Like? (1)

wisnoskij (1206448) | about 9 months ago | (#45459517)

But What Does it Taste Like?

Re:But What Does it Taste Like? (1)

Todd Palin (1402501) | about 9 months ago | (#45460057)

chicken

Because ... (1)

PPH (736903) | about 9 months ago | (#45459573)

... man cannot live on Twinkies alone.

Re:Because ... (1)

Tablizer (95088) | about 9 months ago | (#45461211)

Why would you want to eat Buck Roger's robot?

WTF Modern Science (-1, Flamebait)

sidevans (66118) | about 9 months ago | (#45459633)

Why do you insist on the Pyramids being built in a desert? Science has proven the Nile moved over time...
Why do you insist they were built by humans? We have more resources and technology than ever before in history, and it's still considered impossible...

Re:WTF Modern Science (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45459689)

Why do you insist on the Pyramids being built in a desert? Science has proven the Nile moved over time...
Why do you insist they were built by humans? We have more resources and technology than ever before in history, and it's still considered impossible...

There are people who also consider it to be impossible that the world isn't flat. The word for people like this is "idiots".

Re:WTF Modern Science (2)

ThatsMyNick (2004126) | about 9 months ago | (#45459695)

Why do you insist they were built by humans? We have more resources and technology than ever before in history, and it's still considered impossible...

Because the other explanations are 1) They were build by aliens, or (other non human earthlings) and 2) It came into existence naturally. Both are even more unlikely.

Re:WTF Modern Science (1)

Nidi62 (1525137) | about 9 months ago | (#45459829)

We have more resources and technology than ever before in history, and it's still considered impossible...

No, it's considered very impractical. We could fairly easily build them, it would just be expensive and take a while. The Egyptians had plenty of wealth and resources (natural, scientific, labor, and time) to build the pyramids.

Why do you insist on the Pyramids being built in a desert? Science has proven the Nile moved over time...

According to the article found here: http://ees.ac.uk/userfiles/file/EA-32pp03-05-Lutley.pdf [ees.ac.uk] , in the past 5k years the Nile has shifted only within the Nile floodplain, a shift of about 4 km total from West to East. Giza is located roughly 5 miles from the edge of the current path of the Nile. So, it is quite possible that the pyramids were built closer to the Nile than they are now (look at page 5 of the article). If you notice, none of the pyramids are built on the floodplain.

So, in other words, I'm not saying it was aliens, but it is pretty damn obvious the Egyptians built the pyramids.

Re:WTF Modern Science (1)

able1234au (995975) | about 9 months ago | (#45460231)

There is a youtube video of a guy showing how he could have built stonehenge. It is quite interesting how with a few tricks he can move massive blocks of stones, and position them so they put upright into the ground. Everything is impossible if you do it the hard way, finding the easy way is the trick. Finding that easy way is not obvious of course. He uses everyday items like sticks and stones that prehistoric man had easy access to. The egyptians could do it even easier and had more than one guy.

Re:WTF Modern Science (1)

Nidi62 (1525137) | about 9 months ago | (#45460625)

There is a youtube video of a guy showing how he could have built stonehenge.

Mythbusters did it too with just some 2x4s

Re:WTF Modern Science (2)

rubycodez (864176) | about 9 months ago | (#45460303)

not impossible at all, any competent civil engineer can tell you how to do it with or without machines.

those sensationist articles you read claiming otherwise were not written by engineers.

Re:WTF Modern Science (1)

cusco (717999) | about 9 months ago | (#45461163)

it's still considered impossible

When the Peruvians here idiots exclaiming that Machu Picchu and Sacsayhuaman must have been built by aliens because people couldn't have done it they're insulted. They know almost exactly how it was done, and their ancestors were even recorded doing it by the Spanish. Can't help but think the Egyptians might well feel similarly insulted.

Re:WTF Modern Science (1)

Valdrax (32670) | about 9 months ago | (#45468901)

Why do you insist they were built by humans? We have more resources and technology than ever before in history, and it's still considered impossible...

Where do you get the idea that the pyramids would be impossible to build today? It's just a pile of limestone blocks. People built a 6 meter pyramid using a total of only 40 something men in less than a month for an episode of NOVA, using only a few modern shortcuts (iron tools to carve and a front-end loader to transport blocks to the building site to be placed by hand after demonstrating that it was possible to move the blocks by rolling them). The only thing that makes pyramids impressive is that they were built with muscle power and no understanding of pulleys.

As for how they were constructed back then, there are a number of dominant theories, and the lack of consensus isn't because there's evidence disproving them so much as a lack of a smoking gun. Plus, there's evidence that there wasn't a consistent method and that techniques evolved over time.

Seriously, what's the alternative -- aliens? What plausible reason would aliens have to come down a build huge stone pyramids and leave not a single trace of more advanced construction materials or techniques? Why no skyscrapers? Why no reinforced concrete? Why no electrical or other fuel infrastructure? Why no plastics and no glass, even? Just overly fancy stone cairns with the corpses of rich humans stuffed inside? That's it? Insanity.

The fast food industrie (1)

mbierenfeld (72214) | about 9 months ago | (#45461299)

must have found this recipe a couple of decades ago.

Stating the funking obvious. (1)

mtthwbrnd (1608651) | about 9 months ago | (#45461351)

" After just a few hours in the desert heat, 'they will become a terrible mess if you don't take some steps to preserve them,' says Richard Evershed, an archaeological chemist at the University of Bristol in the United Kingdom." I always suspected that meat might go bad under those circumstances but am so glad to see that my tax money is being used to fund a Professor (we are not worthy!) to confirm this. Does he have a citation in a peer-reviewed journal for his incredible claim though? Or is it just a wild conspiracy theory.

Dear Arby's, (1)

sabbede (2678435) | about 9 months ago | (#45462457)

Have I got a product for you!

Mummified beef... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45462845)

....it's what used to be for dinner.

Lose weight fast! (1)

Rambo Tribble (1273454) | about 9 months ago | (#45462939)

With the amazing Ancient Egyptian Diet you'll lose weight fast and those pounds will stay off, forever!

Mmm... (1)

Koreantoast (527520) | about 9 months ago | (#45463139)

Zombie bacon.
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