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New Smart Glasses Allow Nurses To See Veins Through Skin

samzenpus posted about 9 months ago | from the I'm-looking-through-you dept.

Medicine 124

Lucas123 writes "Epson and Evena Medical today unveiled a new smart-glass technology that allows nurses to see 'through' a patient's skin to the vasculature beneath in order to make intravenous placement easier. The Eyes-On Glasses System is based on Epson's Moverio Smart Glasses Technology, an Android-based, see-through wearable display launched earlier this year that allows users to interact with apps and games. The glasses use near-infrared light to highlight deoxygenated hemoglobin in a patient's veins and capture the images with two stereoscopic cameras. The cameras then project the vein images onto the see-through glass screens. The glasses can store the images and video and transfer them wirelessly to a patient's electronic health record, and they also come with dual built-in speakers for video conferencing."

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But can they see why (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45477699)

Kids love cinemon toast crunch?

Re:But can they see why (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45477807)

Kids love it because of the cinnamon and sugar. End of story.

Does the glasses pose any danger to the eyes ? (2)

Taco Cowboy (5327) | about 9 months ago | (#45477839)

From TFA:

The Eyes-On Glasses System is based on Epson's Moverio Smart Glasses Technology, an Android-based, see-through wearable display launched earlier this year that allows users to interact with apps and games.

That technology from Epson when applied to game, users do not put on those wearable display for hours and hours every single day, they only put them on when they play games.

On the other hand, nurses working in the hospitals may end up wearing the glasses which projects infrared lights many hours each days.

My question being --- Would prolonged exposure to infrared light poses any danger on the eyes of the wearer ?

Re:Does the glasses pose any danger to the eyes ? (2)

milkmage (795746) | about 9 months ago | (#45477953)

1) if they only need these things when inserting an IV, they only need to be worn when needed - nurses don't do IVs all day long. a single gaming session is going to last way longer than the 10 seconds it takes to stick a needle in your arm... and it's only for IVs not an injection (which a probably more common)

2) human eyes cannot see the infrared spectrum.. so what's the risk?

Re:Does the glasses pose any danger to the eyes ? (1)

geekoid (135745) | about 9 months ago | (#45478063)

We can't see it but it still burns our skin.
I can't see a bullet coming at me, does that mean it won't hurt me?

Re:Does the glasses pose any danger to the eyes ? (3, Informative)

lxs (131946) | about 9 months ago | (#45480205)

So does visible light of similar intensity.
There is very little difference between near infrared and the visible spectrum. Just because our rods and cones don't react to the different wavelength doesn't make it any more dangerous. The exception to this rule are powerful near IR lasers that appear to the eye as faint red light sources and don't trigger pupil contraction and aversion reflexes.

Re:Does the glasses pose any danger to the eyes ? (1)

Obfuscant (592200) | about 9 months ago | (#45478155)

2) human eyes cannot see the infrared spectrum.. so what's the risk?

Human eyes can also not see the ultraviolet spectrum. Or the microwave spectrum. As Weird Al says, stick your head in the microwave and get yourself a tan.

Re:Does the glasses pose any danger to the eyes ? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45478227)

How about those women with big luscious titties except they got all these big blue veins all over the tits? Imagine seeing their tits with these glasses! Hey I think I can see her pusle!

Re:Does the glasses pose any danger to the eyes ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45479217)

How about those women with big luscious titties

You'll be able to see the implants in stunning detail, and all the scars from the surgery.
If they're huge and real, then after about age 17 they're not going to be "luscious", they're going to be swinging like a grapefruit in a tube sock.

Re:Does the glasses pose any danger to the eyes ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45478309)

Actually, they sometimes do injections, at least, all day long e.g. when they are giving the hospital staff their flu shots. People who work in infection control can spend quite a lot of time giving injections.

Re:Does the glasses pose any danger to the eyes ? (2)

Macgrrl (762836) | about 9 months ago | (#45478913)

Those sort of injections are usually intramuscular rather than intravenous - phlebotomists however stick needles in veins all day long.

Re:Does the glasses pose any danger to the eyes ? (1)

wonkey_monkey (2592601) | about 9 months ago | (#45479525)

phlebotomists

Heh. Botom.

Re:Does the glasses pose any danger to the eyes ? (1)

demonlapin (527802) | about 9 months ago | (#45478969)

Those are intramuscular injections, not IV's. You're trying to avoid a vein with those.

Re:Does the glasses pose any danger to the eyes ? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45479537)

Those are intramuscular injections, not IV's. You're trying to avoid a vein with those.

Oh, never mind then, it clearly isn't useful to see the veins when you are trying to avoid them.

Re:Does the glasses pose any danger to the eyes ? (1)

gmclapp (2834681) | about 9 months ago | (#45481037)

Insightful (+10)

Re: Does the glasses pose any danger to the eyes ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45481105)

You have a point in a logical sense, but I'm afraid not in a practical sense. The reason IVs usually get started at the inside of the elbow is because veins are easily found near the surface of the skin there. The reason you get injections in the butt or the outer upper arm is for the exact opposite reason. There are no surface veins to avoid.

In the US, most pharmacists can give flu shots, for example, and the training course for it spends about 5 minutes on "how to identify an ass or shoulder" and the rest of the time on sterilization and what to do if the patient has an allergic reaction. That's simply because it's hard to pick the wrong injection spot as long as you are in the right general location of the body.

A nurse wouldn't need glasses to tell her to avoid something that isn't there to begin with. The only exception I can think of would be in burn cases where most of the patients limbs no longer have normal skin and the nurse would be injecting in an unfamiliar place with more vascularization.

Re:Does the glasses pose any danger to the eyes ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45479421)

Cool: so we can expose our eyes to strong x-rays all day without issue?

Re:Does the glasses pose any danger to the eyes ? (3, Informative)

quantumghost (1052586) | about 9 months ago | (#45478027)

From TFA:

That technology from Epson when applied to game, users do not put on those wearable display for hours and hours every single day, they only put them on when they play games.

On the other hand, nurses working in the hospitals may end up wearing the glasses which projects infrared lights many hours each days.

My question being --- Would prolonged exposure to infrared light poses any danger on the eyes of the wearer ?

Unlikely. IR light has a longer wavelength and thus less energy than normal "visible" light, this is why we can't see in the infrared - the photons are not energetic enough to cause a conformal change in one of the double bonds in rhodopsin [wikipedia.org] . This also partial explains why we can't see in the UV spectrum. The only variable will be the intensity of the light potentially causing thermal damage, but I doubt this would be that powerful enough for that. In addition, starting IVs is not the only thing nurses do....I'd guestimate that it is only about 5% of their daily work load on the general med-surg floors (where most patients have an IV already) and probably no more than 10-15% of the ED RNs.

Re:Does the glasses pose any danger to the eyes ? (4, Informative)

theshowmecanuck (703852) | about 9 months ago | (#45478431)

My impression is that the IR light is directed at the patient. It is probably mostly absorbed and converted to heat when it hits the skin, but the haemoglobin in veins close to the surface absorb differently from the surrounding tissue and makes the veins stand out. Whatever small amount of whatever wavelength it has transformed to after it has hit patients arm or other body part to be stuck, is reflected, recorded by cameras, and is projected on the lenses of the glasses. The way I read it, it is the projected images (like on a monitor or tv) that are viewed, likely as false colour or grey scale; not a full shot of IR pointed back at the wearer. So I would guess the answer is, not likely.

Re:Does the glasses pose any danger to the eyes ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45480239)

I think it uses projected red and IR light, and displays the ratio of reflected light - this is what is used for measuring pulse in photophlegmometry

Re:Does the glasses pose any danger to the eyes ? (2)

Vitriol+Angst (458300) | about 9 months ago | (#45480699)

I'd have to say that this system is slightly less dangerous than a warm blanket, but slightly more dangerous than looking a person with the naked eye.

Near infrared radiation must be stopped!

Re:Does the glasses pose any danger to the eyes ? (1)

gmclapp (2834681) | about 9 months ago | (#45480949)

The glasses have two cameras that capture near infrared light that is already coming from the patient. The image projected on the glasses for the nurse to actually see is in the normal visible light spectrum.

Additionally, your eyes are exposed to infrared light constantly. It just happens that your eyes don't "see" it.

This is amazing (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45477719)

Can't wait for the nurses "hey, I didn't know you were THAT happy to see me" jokes

Hey, if this means... (4, Interesting)

gweilo8888 (921799) | about 9 months ago | (#45477759)

...that they don't have to play "Go Fish" in my arm every time I get an IV in, I'm all for it, unintended consequences be damned.

Had to go into the hospital for the first time in ages the other day, and it took about five or six sticks -- including the kind where you can see them feeling around for anything once the needle's already in you -- before they hit the vein. And I'm skinny, as well, at least in the places where they stick me. Can't begin to imagine what it's like if your veins are invisible.

Re:Hey, if this means... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45477899)

next time request a white or asian nurse, nigger nurses live to play "torture whitey" when doing blood work.

Re:Hey, if this means... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45477995)

Plus Asians are used to small pricks.

Re:Hey, if this means... (1)

gweilo8888 (921799) | about 9 months ago | (#45478945)

Yeah, not so much. I'm white, the nurses were both white. Try again, flamebait.

Re:Hey, if this means... (1)

Nyder (754090) | about 9 months ago | (#45478067)

...that they don't have to play "Go Fish" in my arm every time I get an IV in, I'm all for it, unintended consequences be damned.

Had to go into the hospital for the first time in ages the other day, and it took about five or six sticks -- including the kind where you can see them feeling around for anything once the needle's already in you -- before they hit the vein. And I'm skinny, as well, at least in the places where they stick me. Can't begin to imagine what it's like if your veins are invisible.

I have very hard to find veins. 2 hours of poking and prodding is about how long it takes them to decide to take my blood from an artery. I tell them before hand, but they never listen. Of course, it will still probably be 2 or 3 years before hospitals get this sort of tech, let alone little clinics.

 

Re:Hey, if this means... (1)

corran__horn (178058) | about 9 months ago | (#45478347)

I have heard of widespread deployment of the base technology in IHC hospitals in Salt Lake City already. The glasses part is just a new adaptation.

Re:Hey, if this means... (2)

TheLink (130905) | about 9 months ago | (#45478719)

So you think it won't be in vein? ;)

Re:Hey, if this means... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45478233)

I'm curious how often this happens? Everyone I know, including me, get stuck the one time and one time only. I mean it takes less than a second and I'm stuck and the blood is coming out. What is the difference between you whiners?

Re:Hey, if this means... (2)

Deadstick (535032) | about 9 months ago | (#45478411)

I don't know what the difference is, but I had an Air Force tech go five tries in each arm and give up, whereupon a doctor smirked at him, picked up the needle and took four tries.

But at the civilian blood shop I use today, it's first try every time.

Re:Hey, if this means... (1)

Cantankerous Cur (3435207) | about 9 months ago | (#45480221)

The Red Cross needs these stat. *shudders*

Re:Hey, if this means... (1)

gweilo8888 (921799) | about 9 months ago | (#45478953)

You wouldn't be so quick to dismiss us as whiners if you went through it yourself. And it's worse for my wife -- I've seen her have to be stuck a dozen or more times before they could hit a vein. In fact, her doctor's office sent her to the hospital to have somebody there do a stick, because several nurses at the doctor's office tried multiple times in multiple places and couldn't get one.

Re:Hey, if this means... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45479215)

I don't give blood at blood drives anymore, but my typical contribution at a bloodmobile (two different organizations) was "show me your arms, which arm works best for you, spend several minutes looking for a vein in my right arm, ask to look at the left arm, look at it for a minute, go back to the right arm, have a second phlebotomist look at it, stick me, wriggle the needle around for up to a minute while trying to find the deep and wriggly vein, and about half the time either not get any blood, or not get enough blood for a full unit." Out of at least two dozen donations, I probably maybe 6 that went smoothly like yours. When doctors need blood for blood tests, the nurses usually give up on finding a vein at the elbow and take it from the back of my hand. I don't know, maybe I am more dehydrated than I realize.

Re:Hey, if this means... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45479301)

My veins are so visible that I almost always get a comment about it, then they miss. I think they're trick veins.

Re:Hey, if this means... (1)

L1Trauma (531944) | about 9 months ago | (#45478465)

Ask them to use an ultrasound. It's fairly easy to find deeper veins with it. My patients who are hard sticks ask for it by name.

Re:Hey, if this means... (1)

gweilo8888 (921799) | about 9 months ago | (#45478963)

Thanks for the tip. I'm going to assume this ends up being an extra expense, though, and one that the insurance company then denies as frivolous, meaning we foot the whole bill for the ultrasound ourselves. That being the case, gritting one's teeth and bearing it sounds preferable to an extra few hundred bucks.

Re:Hey, if this means... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45478997)

I'm just editing a video on IV cannulation, and it can be tough finding the right spot even for an experienced operator.

Also having phlebotomised people in a previous job, it's easy to get the easy ones, but sometimes even the ones you think will be easy, aren't. Old people especially: really prominent veins, but they are as tough as old hoses and there's no tissue to support them so they move all over the place when you try to stick the needle in.

Re:This is amazing (1)

bob_super (3391281) | about 9 months ago | (#45478205)

If she's hold a needle with the intent of sticking me, I clearly will not be "happy" to see her.

Was this technology funded by famous stars who can't find their veins anymore?

Re:This is amazing (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45478335)

Pediatrics & gerontology would be big users of it.

Re:This is amazing (1)

Antique Geekmeister (740220) | about 9 months ago | (#45478569)

Also anyone who's got low blood pressure problems, or who needs so many IV's for medical reasons that they have veins fail. I've certainly had cancer burdened friends on chemo who've had veins become very difficult to find after they've had so many IV's and so many needle sticks for treatment. And with age, people's veins often become more frail and more likely to be damaged.

Re:This is amazing (1)

andot (714926) | about 9 months ago | (#45479441)

I can confirm this. After 10 sessions of chemo my veins are extremely hard to find. It takes 3-4 attempts to hit the vein for nurse usually.

Re:This is amazing (1)

Seumas (6865) | about 9 months ago | (#45478819)

Can't wait for the nurses to still poke 700 holes in my arm trying to get the vein, anyway.

Re:This is amazing (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45479803)

Neither can I, then it saves the awkward chat-up lines while she is poking my arms or checking blood pressure.

"Oh, what's that, I can control my heartbeat? Yeah, you bet your ass I can, better retake my pressure since that reading is wrong. Better use the good ol' hand on wrist, aw yeah touch my little skinny wrist baby we just playin'."
I get weird in hospitals.

Someone had to say it. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45477745)

Let me know when they invent the ones which can allow us to see nurse's skin through clothes.

Re:Someone had to say it. (1)

zlives (2009072) | about 9 months ago | (#45477885)

same tech

Re:Someone had to say it. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45479263)

Tequila.

Comics (4, Funny)

Master Moose (1243274) | about 9 months ago | (#45477761)

I am sure that I saw an advert for this towards the back pages of my Fantastic Four comics circa 1982

DIY IR Goggles! (1)

NIK282000 (737852) | about 9 months ago | (#45477781)

You can make your own passive IR goggles using "congo blue" and "primary red" lighting gels. They work just the same as the ones in TFA but they require about 1kw/m^2 of external incandecent lighting. Not really hospital friendly but they are fantastic for wandering around the neighbourhood in the summer.
 
Look for Bill Beaty's IR goggles

Imagine the s3x or the pR0n! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45477793)

Ohh... wait. I can't get that image off my ... yuk

Sounds familiar (4, Funny)

TheloniousToady (3343045) | about 9 months ago | (#45477823)

Haven't we seen stories in this vein before?

(Or not.)

Re:Sounds familiar (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45477853)

Slashdot always keeps it's finger on the pulse of medical technology.

Re:Sounds familiar (1)

ZXDunny (1376265) | about 9 months ago | (#45477861)

Yes, you have. I'm a nurse in the UK and it's been common knowledge for a few years now that a blank photo negative (ie, no picture, just black) stuck over a mobile phone camera lens coupled with an IR torch allows you to see the veins through the camera viewfinder. It's neat to mess around with a really useful with a difficult cannulation.

Re:Sounds familiar (2)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 9 months ago | (#45477981)

And they make several commercial devices that do exactly the same. The one we have projects the image on the skin which would seemingly make it easier to use - less parallax issues. This tech has been around for a while. The glasses are the new kink, not sure if it's of any real use.

Re:Sounds familiar (1)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about 9 months ago | (#45478267)

it's been common knowledge for a few years now

So making 10 attempts to get the needle into a vein just satisfies your sadistic tendencies? :)

Re:Sounds familiar (1)

denzacar (181829) | about 9 months ago | (#45477871)

This is not a joking matter.
Tech like this can spare those in need a lot of pain.

You insensitive prick.

Re:Sounds familiar (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45477933)

Or just a really good experienced stick.

I used to work in a hospital as a courier/people pusher. There was one phlebotomist who was always sent to the pediatric ward and labor/delivery/neonatal ward for difficult blood draws, and occasionally a blind eye was turned when a particularly hard IV placement was called for. He was near 100% on first try success, and patients who were able to communicate never complained of pain or him digging around.

His dirty little secret? He was a reformed heroin addict...

Re:Sounds familiar (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45477983)

This is not a joking matter.
Tech like this can spare those in need a lot of pain.

You insensitive prick.

First of all, if the nurse needs a set of goddamn glasses to find the vein then he needs to find a different line of work. Seriously, that's first year intern shit.
Second, getting an IV, even when they miss multiple times and bruise the fuck out of your arm, is NOT "a lot of pain". If you think it is, then you've never experienced pain, or you're a complete fucking pussy.

Re:Sounds familiar (2)

geekoid (135745) | about 9 months ago | (#45478075)

That's the best jab you got?

Re:Sounds familiar (1)

denzacar (181829) | about 9 months ago | (#45478671)

Half the joke is getting the point in on the first try.

Re:Sounds familiar (4, Funny)

TheloniousToady (3343045) | about 9 months ago | (#45478615)

"Insensitive prick"? Well, maybe...but that's none of your darn business. It'll happen to you too one day, just wait and see. Meanwhile, let's have a little respect for our elders...

Re:Sounds familiar (1)

rtb61 (674572) | about 9 months ago | (#45478979)

The why not automate the whole process. A device that uses ultrasound and infra-red to scan the target region and indicates to the operator when they are over the best location and then automatically quickly inserts the needle to the correct depth at the best target location at exactly the right angle, leaving the nurse to just check on the quality of insertion.

YES (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45477829)

I WON'T MISS ANYMORE

Brought to you by (1)

kramerd (1227006) | about 9 months ago | (#45477837)

the "how the hell did no one think of this before" Department

Re:Brought to you by (2)

quantumghost (1052586) | about 9 months ago | (#45478175)

This is not quite new....I've seen IR based devices over 8 years ago, I first saw this tech in 2005 and it was pretty mature at the time. I can't recall which company it was, but a quick google serarch shows this company [accuvein.com] has been doing something similar for 4 years. The article is grabbing headlines because they packaged it into a eye-glass format.

Re:Brought to you by (1)

wonkey_monkey (2592601) | about 9 months ago | (#45479619)

The article is grabbing headlines because they packaged it into a eye-glass format.

O2-amp [wordpress.com]

Although perhaps tellingly I can't find any real demo images...

Pair this with... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45477841)

Pair this with the blood analyzer from yesterdays Slashdot article and with a new very sensitive sensors I saw from a Slashdot submission(that was not published) on Star Trek style Tricorders, and very good software to run it all and last but not least a cancer sniffing dog and you won't need a doctor at for diagnostics ( the don't really do diagnostics today anyway, just push pills)

(Not another) Raspbery Pi comment... (2)

hamster_nz (656572) | about 9 months ago | (#45477851)

Can't wait to see if this is possible to see this effect with the Raspberry Pi and a Pi NoIR camera [raspberrypi.org] , given that you can
use the material from inside a floppy disk as a visible light filter [instructables.com]

More IR filters (1)

Okian Warrior (537106) | about 9 months ago | (#45478641)

you can use the material from inside a floppy disk as a visible light filter

If you have a developed roll of film, the black frame at the ends of the roll is opaque to visible light but transparent to IR.

If you have an old blacklight bulb, the glass is Wood's Glass [wikipedia.org] , which blocks visible light but is transparent to IR and UV.

Transmission characteristics of Wood's glass [komar.org]

See through skin? (0)

CFBMoo1 (157453) | about 9 months ago | (#45477855)

If they can do skin I am damn well using all the cereal box tops I've been saving up since the 1970's! Finally my hobby is redeemed! X-Ray glasses that work!

Karl Pilkington truly is a visionary. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45477915)

One one of the episodes of the animated show featuring him, he proclaimed "i have a good idea". ricky gervais and stephen merchant said they would be the judge of that...and in fact would both state before even hearing it that the idea would be not good. and karl says "see through skin". laughter ensues. smart glasses that look through the skin is pretty close.=)

Re: Karl Pilkington truly is a visionary. (1)

socz (1057222) | about 9 months ago | (#45479349)

An Idiot Abroad is one of my all time favorite shows. Amazing what he went through.

Cool tech (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45477961)

But they've overdone it with all the videoconferencing bullshit.

What happened to doing one thing and doing it well?

Bitches will be facebooking (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45477963)

Back in the days, when facebook was just beginning to get popular, friend of mine took his elderly mother to the hospital. Nurse who should have done her job, instead was on facebook

Interesting (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45478057)

But will they be able to see why kids love the taste of Cinnamon Toast Crunch?

This is hardly new (3, Interesting)

AuraSeer (409950) | about 9 months ago | (#45478113)

We already have technology that does this. We have hand-held devices that shine near-infrared light through the skin and make the veins show up just fine.

They have significant problems, which this system shares. Most importantly, they show *all* veins, including all the ones which can't be cannulated because they are too small, too fragile, or too badly scarred. You have to palpate (feel) the vein to assess whether it's suitable, and if you can palpate it, you don't need to see it at all.

Also, they really only work at all on caucasian skin.

Further, this system is kind of ridiculously expensive. Even though the prices have dropped on commodity displays, microprocessors, 3G and wifi, and all those bells and whistles, it's still a complex piece of gear. We may as well pay for a bedside ultrasound which costs no more, is more precise, and is useful for a lot more than just IV starts.

Re:This is hardly new (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45478305)

> Further, this system is kind of ridiculously expensive.

Part of that is because the FDA forces such extreme controls over who can buy them and own them. It cost us more than $10k of background checks, both for the hospital and several individuals that would have access to it, before we were allowed to purchase it. I don't know how much more the storage cabinet that weighs just over 500 pounds cost. Even after that, we can almost never use it because the FDA requires it be kept in that locked cabinet with very strict access controls and logging. Also, the local police objected to it vigorously. The device can make it easier for heroin users to find veins so in the view of the FDA and law enforcement, the device is drug paraphernalia and should be illegal. It's the same reason we were forced to put blue tinted lights in the bathrooms of the hospital. By not doing so they claimed we were encouraging illegal drug use. Somehow the cops think we're criminals and deserve to be put in jail if we use normal fluorescent lights. Cop logic makes no sense.

Taking blood (0)

Ralph Ostrander (2846785) | about 9 months ago | (#45478147)

In fifty years taking blood will look like a civil war bone saw to us now.

It's heroin addict's paraphanalia (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45478265)

Mr. Heroin addict: don't be found with this in your car -- an extra needle poke is easier to take than a ride with bracelets to the jail...

But will they be allowed to use it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45478329)

Dean Kamen, the guy that invented the Segway scooter, invented a gizmo years ago that helped doctors and nurses find the vein for starting an IV.

While in the hospital for a week in March 2008 after bowel resection surgery, they had to restart my IV after 3 days. They had a devil of a time finding a vein. When none of the nurses on the floor could do it, I asked why a doctor couldn't come to do it. "It's not the doctor's responsibility to start IVs" (definite implication that it was beneath their station to do such menial work).

I then asked about this wonder machine. "Oh, we can't use that." When I pressed why not, one nurse finally admitted that someone had screwed up using it and now no one could use it.

In many ways, medicine is a backwards and archaic profession. No wonder healthcare costs are skyrocketing and quality of care isn't going up.

Re:But will they be allowed to use it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45479141)

The doctors aren't usually better. You want the experienced nurse to do it.

It's like the engineer vs the experienced welder. The engineer might know the theory better, but the welder knows where and how to weld.

Killer robots (2)

PPH (736903) | about 9 months ago | (#45478373)

With enhanced vision to pick out a suitably lethal spot. I'm certain I've seen this hinted at in numerous movies.

News at 10... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45478423)

... Heroine addicts snap up smart glasses for more accurate delivery.

Wish this was around 20 years ago (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45478433)

Having dealt with a chronic illness my whole life, my veins were completely shot by the time I was 12. More often than not, they had to try multiple times. Even after a successful IV, they often blew after a few hours or days and then the whole ordeal started again.

For those of you who have fortunately little experience with the medical system, let me tell you, IV's are a lot more painful than blood tests. They need to be fed a lot further and deeper into your veins and they often need to dig around to get into right spot (just let that mental image sink in ... "long needle" and "digging").

If this tech had been available, my veins might not be practically collapsed at 26.

I want! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45478523)

I need a pair of these for the next time I go to the beach.

New stereo vision requirement, too? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45478537)

Some 1 out of 20 folks have no stereo vision. Will phlebotomists now be required to pass a depth perception test?

Ugh, cops are going to be pissed (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45478555)

They beat our manager because he refused to put blue lights in the bathrooms of our restaurant. They accused us of supporting intravenous drug users and stopped us at random after leaving work for several weeks. Imagine how pissed they're going to be when they find-out these things exist.

see through clothing? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45478655)

Just wondering....LOL

Infrared Sees through Clothes now With WIFI (1)

VortexCortex (1117377) | about 9 months ago | (#45479007)

"The glasses can store the images and video and transfer them wirelessly to a patient's electronic health record..."

Today, your health record; Tomorrow, The World! Muaha Ha!

Sooner the better (1)

Jagungal (36053) | about 9 months ago | (#45479477)

Man .. I could have done with the last week, they were trying to get a catheter in and had six goes at finding a suitable vein.

Ended up being done by the main anesthetist who did a local and went in deep.

Many times when giving blood they have to have a couple of goes, it can be a pain.

Finding veins easily? (1)

clickety6 (141178) | about 9 months ago | (#45479639)

Why not just call it Junkie-Vision?

Vampire tech (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45479815)

This brings us one step closer to making vampires (the cool ones, not the flying rats) a reality.

technology shouldn't replace expertise (1)

cosmin_c (3381765) | about 9 months ago | (#45479965)

As a doctor I can say this is rubbish. IV access and venepuncture isn't done by visualizing the vein, it's done by using anatomy knowledge to palpate and find a vein that's robust enough to take the needle/cannula. If it's done by sight alone, then it's wrong, there are plenty of visible veins that collapse as soon as a needle is inserted. This reminds me of the attempt to give patients local anaesthesia before having a cannula inserted, which was proved to be a rubbish solution. If you're a patient, I can feel your pain, but do understand we're there to make you better and we loathe the idea of causing you pain via needles. It's just something that has to happen until we find a way of giving medication wirelessly.

Re:technology shouldn't replace expertise (1)

Mike Frett (2811077) | about 9 months ago | (#45480787)

Exactly! Unless the Glasses can feel, they are useless.

Re:technology shouldn't replace expertise (1)

green1 (322787) | about 9 months ago | (#45481917)

They don't surgically remove your fingers when they issue you the glasses. You're allowed to do both...

Re:technology shouldn't replace expertise (2)

green1 (322787) | about 9 months ago | (#45481907)

And as an EMT, (a profession that generally starts a lot more IVs) I would love to have this tech available. It's not an either or situation. seeing the veins is a great first step to evaluating which one to use. You don't cannulate the first vein you see, you still have to evaluate the suitability of each one, but being able to see them would be a great start. Limiting yourself to palpation based on anatomy can often miss good veins that are a little too deep or not quite where you expect them (not every person has identical vein locations) this wouldn't be needed for all IV starts. But on some of the more difficult ones this could really help a lot.

Good and bad (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45480261)

Really cool use of tech, but I doubt that glass reporting in to Google will be very HIIPA compliant.

Oh (1)

nightsky30 (3348843) | about 9 months ago | (#45480353)

Heeeeeelllllloooooo Nurse!!!

Expanded usage (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45481337)

Let's hope the useage will not be totally in vein.

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