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Study Suggests Link Between Dread Pirate Roberts and Satoshi Nakamoto

timothy posted about a year ago | from the now-he's-gonna-get-you-too dept.

Bitcoin 172

wabrandsma writes "Two Israeli computer scientists say they may have uncovered a puzzling financial link between Ross William Ulbricht, the recently arrested operator of the Internet black market known as the Silk Road, and the secretive inventor of bitcoin, the anonymous online currency, used to make Silk Road purchases."

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Weasel Words: (5, Interesting)

Zanadou (1043400) | about a year ago | (#45509857)

"Suggest(s)" = you could fit the whole universe into that.

Re:Weasel Words: (4, Insightful)

billstewart (78916) | about a year ago | (#45512295)

Unfortunately, the US government will probably try to find a way to do just that. If they can allege a link between Satoshi and DPR-or-Ulbrich, that gives them a better excuse to try to pry information out of anybody involved with Bitcoin, either through legal process in the US or through possibly-illegal wiretapping overseas.

... and if they do that ... (1)

Taco Cowboy (5327) | about a year ago | (#45512673)

Unfortunately, the US government will probably try to find a way to do just that.

... and if they do that, it will be VERY GOOD FOR THE REST OF US because the REAL IDENTITY of Satoshi Nakamoto will forever be a mystery.

And that, will be a BOON to Bitcoin as a whole.

You keep using that name (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45509861)

"You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means."

When a person attempts to steal notorieity by using a famous name as a pseudonym, don't feed their ego (and ruin a good movie) by calling them the name they chose. Pick an unused name that implies disrepect to the person, and call them that. e.g. Inept Pirate Doofus.

Re:You keep using that name (4, Funny)

Samantha Wright (1324923) | about a year ago | (#45509917)

The other day I got ripped off during a TF2 item trade with Gabe Newell!

How about 'Accused Person Ross' (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45512119)

Fun and all, but using the name to associate to the person, and repeating it endlessly, is surely just a way of demonizing him?

He is at this moment innocent.

Re:You keep using that name (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45512277)

There are multiple DreadPirateRoberts. The name gets passed along.

A link between DPR and an early Bitcoiner (4, Interesting)

Agent ME (1411269) | about a year ago | (#45509871)

tl;dr: At least one person who used Bitcoin in the first month also used Silk Road, so we made a news story about it. Could be DPR himself, who knows.

Re:A link between DPR and an early Bitcoiner (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45509969)

From the article, that one person made a BTC transfer of an equivalent 60,000 USD (at the time of the transfer being made).

It's not likely just a case of an early bitcoin user buying some drugs on silk road.

Re:A link between DPR and an early Bitcoiner (4, Insightful)

simonbp (412489) | about a year ago | (#45509985)

Regardless if there was an official link, it is probably true that Bitcoin really took off when illegal/quasi-legal enterprises like Silk Road started using them. That's not to say Silk Road created Bitcoin or that all Bitcoin commerce is illegal, just that it would never have grown to real prominence without it.

Re:A link between DPR and an early Bitcoiner (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45510061)

Much how Paypal really gained it's early exposure being the easy way to fund porn and gambling sites.

No, PayPal always for eBay, not porn (4, Informative)

raymorris (2726007) | about a year ago | (#45510891)

PayPal never was popular for porn. On any given day of your choice, there was 100 times as many PayPal transactions on eBay than PayPal transactions for porn.

Porn went from AdultCheck and other AVS systems to iBill and a few iBill competitors. With the fall of iBill, CCBill took over the adult sector.

Re: Early Paypal (3, Informative)

billstewart (78916) | about a year ago | (#45512287)

Paypal's primary niche in the early days was being a popular way to pay sellers on eBay using credit cards. The seller could accept Paypal much more easily than opening merchant accounts with multiple credit card services, and the buyer didn't have to give the seller their credit card number, and the transaction fees were competitive. It was way better and faster than buyers having to mail sellers a check, waiting for the post office, sellers having to wait for the check to clear, buyers hoping the seller wasn't scamming them; it cuts a huge step out of the non-credit-card market.

Re:A link between DPR and an early Bitcoiner (1)

LordLucless (582312) | about a year ago | (#45510171)

That was always going to be true.

Persecution increases pressure, which drives evolution. Criminals are under a survival-pressure to avoid detection, which means they will actively be looking for/experimenting with ways to avoid detection. The general population is under no such pressure, and so adopts more slowly. I'm willing to bet that child pornographers, or other criminals whose crime is generally one of communication, adopted encryption before the rest of the general population, too, for the same reason.

Re:A link between DPR and an early Bitcoiner (2, Insightful)

rtb61 (674572) | about a year ago | (#45511165)

However it is a pretty sure sign that the US government is working on generating a publicly acceptable reason to launch an all out attack on bitcoin. Now might well be the opportune time to cash in those bitcoins before an NSA/CIA/SS (secret service) attack nullifies their value.

Re:A link between DPR and an early Bitcoiner (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45511713)

if an attack on bitcoin by US Government causes the fall of US Dollar as the reserve currency would the attack be worth it?

Re:A link between DPR and an early Bitcoiner (-1)

able1234au (995975) | about a year ago | (#45512369)

Bitcoin is far too small a currency to have any affect on the U.S. dollar. Astroturfers on Slashdot keep posting these stories as if Bitcoin matters. It is a scam and once the governments shut down the illegal transactions it will disappear.

Re:A link between DPR and an early Bitcoiner (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45512515)

>it is a scam
Nope.

>Once the governments shut down
And how are they going to do that? It's decentralised, and there are hundreds of clones (LTC for example).

>the illegal transactions
In some jurisdictions. Other jurisdictions rule these transactions are completely legal. If the buyer, the seller, and the marketplace are in a jurisdiction where their actions are legal, what right does the government of another sovereign body have to stop these transactions?

Bitcoin does matter. It may not matter to you, but it matters. It won't bring down the US dollar, but it matters.

Take your moronic FUD elsewhere please.

Re:A link between DPR and an early Bitcoiner (2)

Opportunist (166417) | about a year ago | (#45512289)

Pretty much any kind of hard to track payment service has been used for illegal means. Western Union was the staple of bank fraud money exit a while ago, does that mean that WU supports it? Far from it.

Criminals simply want to use means that are easy to use and hard to track. Whatever fits that bill will be used. If the salvation army ran such a service, it would be used by criminals.

Re:A link between DPR and an early Bitcoiner (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45510095)

There's a comment on TFA that says:
          "It is well documented in the bitcoin blockchain that Satoshi Nakamoto famously gave away most of the early bitcoins to encourage adaptation."

Re:A link between DPR and an early Bitcoiner (5, Insightful)

Coryoth (254751) | about a year ago | (#45510155)

I think the more interesting part is the fact that we have some decent mathematicians (in this case Adi Shamir among others) are setting about pulling the entire bitcoin transaction graph and doing some serious data-mining on it. The reported result sounds like a mildly interesting result that happened to pop up in the first pass.

Given the advanced tools available these days for graph mining (largely developed for social network analysis among other things) I suspect some rather more interesting results may start coming out soon. What may seem hard to track on an individual basis may fall somewhat more easily to powerful analysis tools that get to make use of the big picture. I bet there's some interesting info on cliques and exchanges that could be teased out by serious researchers with some decent compute power at their disposal. Pseudonymity may be even weaker than you might think.

Serious(ly incompent) data mining (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45511583)

Unfortunately their paper was mostly fail and confusion: https://gist.github.com/jgarzik/3901921 [github.com] , since academia has mostly been steadfastly ignoring Bitcoin there is not any really competent peer review yet and you can basically make anything up you want and get it published, especial if you have a name like Shamir on the paper.

every transaction can be analyzed (2)

Geoffrey.landis (926948) | about a year ago | (#45511761)

I think the more interesting part is the fact that we have some decent mathematicians (in this case Adi Shamir among others) are setting about pulling the entire bitcoin transaction graph and doing some serious data-mining on it.

The more disturbing fact is that bitcoin makes this kind of analysis possible in the first place.

A currency where every transaction can be analyzed and data-mined! Yow.

NSA must love this.

Re:every transaction can be analyzed (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45512249)

The NSA already had this, more or less. What it means now is the corrupt fucks are going to find themselves with less and less places to hide as Bitcoin becomes more and more common. It evens the playing field. Would you rather a private playing field, sure, but that ship has sailed, second best option is privacy for nobody.

Zerocoin (5, Informative)

Mathinker (909784) | about a year ago | (#45512283)

Zerocoin should be launched soon. It uses zero-knowledge proofs to add in a lot of anonymity that bitcoin lacks.

Re:A link between DPR and an early Bitcoiner (1)

rmdingler (1955220) | about a year ago | (#45510511)

As you wish.

stop pretending (-1, Flamebait)

globaljustin (574257) | about a year ago | (#45511411)

At least one person who used Bitcoin in the first month also used Silk Road,

this financial link is way beyond that *one* scenario and you know it

can we stop pretending Silk Road and Bitcoin are just these humble, innocent, aw-shucks technologies???

hackers have been using this 'play dumb' routine for years & it's going to cause our industry **MORE** regulation

the internet does not self-regulate *everything* and we are fools to carry the 'what me?' attitude to the nth degree

tl;dr: Silk Road is for illegal drugs & Bitcoin is how you pay for them

the fact that people use them for other things doesn't mean authorities are just going to look the other way

Find Andy Kaufman (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45509873)

and you'll have found Satoshi Nakamoto.

The interesting question (3, Insightful)

jones_supa (887896) | about a year ago | (#45509881)

We still do not surely know who is Satoshi Nakamoto.

Re: The interesting question (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45509907)

Keyser Soze

Re: The interesting question (1, Interesting)

Zaelath (2588189) | about a year ago | (#45510111)

seems an apt guess given the greatest trick he ever pulled was to convince the world that his hard to find digital apples were worth money (after picking all the low hanging fruit for himself first).

Re: The interesting question (4, Interesting)

uvajed_ekil (914487) | about a year ago | (#45510325)

Hmm, no, I think. While a fair number of the numerous other digital "alt" coins (bitcoin competitors and copycats) are known or suspected to have been "pre-mined," no one credible has ever accused Satoshi of cheating. Sure he was likely the first to mine BTC, but he was not a scammer developing the network merely to cash in himself. And I doubt many earl adopters are still holding their first coins.

Personally, I cashed out several times, like when it hit $6, then again at $20, then again at $110, a few at $210, then more at $140ish a couple months ago, at which time I gave up on mining and mostly stopped trading. We were all optimistic but few of us were patient enough to really amass huge wallets for the long term, nor did most of us really see the huge recent price spike coming, unfortunately. If there is any evidence that Satoshi somehow took advantage of BTC in a secretive, underhanded way, please enlighten us.

Just for shits and giggles, what if DPR and Satoshi were indeed in cahoots at the beginning, with DPR having the balls and skills to build a huge black market and Satoshi providing him with the means to make it work? Sounds unlikely to me, but it is conceivable that Satoshi created bitcoin not only knowing that it would be abused for illegal transactions, but also intending it to be used as such. Hmm...

Re: The interesting question (2)

Zaelath (2588189) | about a year ago | (#45511139)

I'm not suggesting it was pre-mined, I'm suggesting that the exponential difficulty curve is a gold rush, and when you establish what constitutes gold you have a significant advantage over "the world".

It reeks of both insider trading and tulips.

Re: The interesting question (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45512261)

It was open source. In fact /. had one of the very first wide spread articles about bitcoin when the white paper first came out. Early bitcoiners have also been screaming about it at the top of their lungs for as long as it existed. What else do you expect? Should I just give you my bitcoins because you didn't bother and now have sour grapes?

Re: The interesting question (3, Interesting)

Opportunist (166417) | about a year ago | (#45512303)

Mostly tulips. I still wait for the day when someone tries to cash in a sensible amount of money. Not some 100s but rather some 100,000s. If that holds, the currency will hold water. If that doesn't go down well and causes the price to plummet, it's a tulip.

Well, as long as the FBI keeps taking money out of circulation in busts, it just might work out too...

Re: The interesting question (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45512393)

These things already happen pretty commonly. If you are talking in dollars then it is multiple times per day, in bitcoin around once a month.

Re: The interesting question (3, Insightful)

PCM2 (4486) | about a year ago | (#45511201)

Just for shits and giggles, what if DPR and Satoshi were indeed in cahoots at the beginning, with DPR having the balls and skills to build a huge black market and Satoshi providing him with the means to make it work?

Have you read the details of how DPR got caught? Satoshi may be some kind of genius, but if Ross Ulbricht really is DPR then he definitely does not have the skills to run any kind of criminal enterprise. As for balls, stupidity can convince a person to do all kinds of things.

Re: The interesting question (4, Insightful)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | about a year ago | (#45511441)

Satoshi effectively anticipated all kinds of attacks on bitcoin. Ulbricht co-lo'ed Silk Road in San Franscisco (USA).

'nuff said.

Re: The interesting question (1)

ArchieBunker (132337) | about a year ago | (#45511403)

Does anyone profit anymore with GPU rigs, or do you have to shell out $10K and then wait a year for a Butterfly Labs box.

Re: The interesting question (1)

daninaustin (985354) | about a year ago | (#45511507)

GPU's won't make you any money now. Butterfly labs is terrible about shipping their product so it's probably best to get something that is shipping like asicminer blades. Still, with the price of the hardware and difficulty increases it's unlikely you can make any money now

Re: The interesting question (1)

ArchieBunker (132337) | about a year ago | (#45511541)

Ah I suspected as much. Many thanks.

Re: The interesting question (2)

gl4ss (559668) | about a year ago | (#45511667)

sure you can.

as long as you steal the electricity.

Steve (1)

tepples (727027) | about a year ago | (#45510673)

the greatest trick he ever pulled was to convince the world that his hard to find digital apples were worth money

Are you talking about Mr. Nakamoto or Mr. Jobs?

Re: The interesting question (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45510561)

Keyser Soze

Hey, I work for that guy.

Re:The interesting question (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45509943)

We still do not surely know who is Satoshi Nakamoto.

I'm betting on Jimmy Hoffa.

Re:The interesting question (4, Funny)

msauve (701917) | about a year ago | (#45510015)

Well, we do know that the Walrus was Paul.

Re:The interesting question (1)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | about a year ago | (#45511423)

Paul is dead, man. Miss him, miss him.

Re:The interesting question (3, Funny)

Opportunist (166417) | about a year ago | (#45512309)

If you keep missing him, how the heck did he die?

Ash Ketchum (1)

tepples (727027) | about a year ago | (#45510643)

But we know who this Satoshi [bulbagarden.net] is.

Re:The interesting question (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45510677)

Julian Assange.

Re:The interesting question (2)

rwyoder (759998) | about a year ago | (#45510959)

We still do not surely know who is Satoshi Nakamoto.

Who is Satoshi Nakamoto? He is supposed to be Turkish. Some say his father was German. Nobody believed he was real. Nobody ever saw him or knew anybody that ever worked directly for him, but to hear DPR tell it, anybody could have been Nakamoto. You never knew. That was his power. The greatest trick the Devil ever pulled was convincing the world he didn't exist. And like that, poof. He's gone.

Re:The interesting question (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45511159)

The mystery was solved a long time ago. Satoshi Nakamoto is just a pseudonym for Keyser Soze.

Re:The interesting question (2)

Paradise Pete (33184) | about a year ago | (#45511977)

We still do not surely know who is Satoshi Nakamoto.

Clearly he's Jean-Baptiste Mardelle.

Yawwwwn. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45509903)

tl;dr: BS article....*YAWN*

Correct Me If I'm Wrong (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45509945)

Correct me if I'm wring, but wasn't the last Bitcoin story full of comments lambasting people for "incorrectly assuming" that Bitcoin was anonymous?

P.S. What's the deal with the "unknown" inventor? Are people so willingly buying into this system with no idea about its origin? I don't know the answer to these two questions, but I don't use Bitcoin, nor do I plan to ever.

Re:Correct Me If I'm Wrong (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45510069)

Well, I don't know the origin of Man's control of fire, nor who first did it, but I,m still quite happy to use it for keeping warm and smelting.

Re:Correct Me If I'm Wrong (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45510101)

You're mad! How can you possibly use fire, it's just waiting for the right moment to turn on you and destroy you!

Re:Correct Me If I'm Wrong (4, Informative)

bcmm (768152) | about a year ago | (#45510135)

It's not like Satoshi is controlling the system from the shadows or something - Bitcoin is open-source. You don't need to trust its creators.

Re:Correct Me If I'm Wrong (5, Interesting)

Teancum (67324) | about a year ago | (#45510361)

It's not like Satoshi is controlling the system from the shadows or something - Bitcoin is open-source. You don't need to trust its creators.

The only thing that Satoshi controls in the protocol is a hash code which would allow somebody to insert a broadcast message to all "standard" clients. This was presumably done to broadcast something like "the Bitcoin client has been compromised... please upgrade to version x.x!"

Of course it could have any sort of message including publishing a URL, a political message, or even just "Satoshi lives!". Without the hashcode, clients (this isn't even miners) are not supposed to pass on the message in the network. The core group of developers supposedly received this hash code from Satoshi and is guarding its use for things deemed appropriate for all Bitcoin users.

The interesting thing is that this is a distributed network messaging protocol, so such a message could conceivably be inserted by any computer on the network and would in theory be untraceable as well. Other miscellaneous data could also conceivably be put into Bitcoin, but Satoshi deliberately put in some poison pills to keep that from happening in the protocol.

Re:Correct Me If I'm Wrong (1)

jythie (914043) | about a year ago | (#45511415)

People are likely concerned for the same reason they worry about protocols or algorithms put out by the NSA... the twinge worry that the creator slipped something into the math that others have not found yet.

Good goyim, (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45510041)

Listen to these Jews, bitcoin is like another show!

Re:Good goyim, (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45510843)

Listen to these Nazis, bitcoin is like another show!

Re:Good goyim, (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45512417)

Listen to these Jews, bitcoin is like another show!

There's no puzzling financial problem too small to be missed by a Jew, even if it means sniffing out subtle coinage connections. Lol.

What's this got to do... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45510075)

...with Cary Elwes character from "The Princess Bride"?

Not the person, it's the office (5, Interesting)

Okian Warrior (537106) | about a year ago | (#45510221)

What's this got to do with Cary Elwes character from "The Princess Bride"?

In the novel (and movie), it was discovered that the "Dread Pirate Roberts" was not a single person.

One person started the legend, got rich and retired. His replacement kept the name in order to take advantage of the reputation, got rich, and retired... and this continued for several generations of the name.

From Wikipedia: "It is revealed during the course of the story that Roberts is not one man, but a series of individuals who periodically pass the name and reputation to a chosen successor. Everyone except the successor and the former Roberts is then released at a convenient port, and a new crew is hired. The former Roberts stays aboard as first mate, referring to his successor as "Captain Roberts", and thereby establishing the new Roberts' persona. After the crew is convinced, the former Roberts leaves the ship and retires on his earnings."

The original SilkRoad founder used the pseudonym "Dread Pirate Roberts", got rich, and turned over the name to his successor (who was sloppy and got arrested). The original founder's choice of name was probably an homage to a popular character, but it has mirrored the backstory of the book character with some measure of irony. (Or maybe it's not irony, it's just unexpected - I can't really tell.)

Re:Not the person, it's the office (1)

witherstaff (713820) | about a year ago | (#45510323)

I thought the DPR that got busted was also the founder, the whole it was someone else was just trying to cover his tracks. I haven't been keeping up with the story enough to know if there is any evidence other than DPR saying he didn't start the site.

Re:Not the person, it's the office (2)

larry bagina (561269) | about a year ago | (#45511115)

Allegedly, evidence taken from his computer (example [forbes.com] ) includes a diary while building and operating SR.

Re:Not the person, it's the office (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45511809)

Don't know if that's entirely conclusive - consider a hypothetical situation:

Person A builds website, writes journal keeping track of the process of doing so.
Person B wants to take over and run website, doesn't know how it all works.
Person A could spend X amount of time mentoring Person B, but couldn't be assed and so just says "Look, here's the diary I wrote when building it, that should get you sorted".

I would want to see something more than the fact that it was on his computer (i.e. the style it's written in matches his own, it's in a directory with a whole heap of other, more personal diary entries written in the same style that clearly detail Person B's life rather than Person A's) before blindly assuming that he wrote it.

Bitcoin is not anonymous. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45510107)

Bitcoin is not anonymous. Bitcoin has never bean anonymous. Bitcoin has never been intended to be anonymous.

Stop pretending that anything otherwise is or has ever been true.

Re:Bitcoin is not anonymous. (1)

StripedCow (776465) | about a year ago | (#45510411)

Bitcoin itself is of course not anonymous, otherwise its name would have not been known.

Its use on the other hand...

Re:Bitcoin is not anonymous. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45511267)

Its use on the other hand...

It's use leaves an indelible trail of A paid B paid C paid D ... from the creation of every BTC to it's current holder. The exact counterpoint to anonymous.

While there is bitcoin services that provide money laundering services, the use of those money laundering services also ends up in the indelible history of your BTC. So while it might no longer be clear who you received your BTC from, it is now irrevocably known that your BTC came from a money laundering service, which is illegal under US law.

Also, as in the case of The Silk Road, if the money laundering service kept logs, your whole transaction history is exposed, as your transaction history is a matter of public record, with only the owners of the wallets obscured (sometimes). When the owner of the wallet is revealed, so is your illicit history.

Re:Bitcoin is not anonymous. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45511185)

It's more accurate to say that Bitcoin is pseudonymous.

Re:Bitcoin is not anonymous. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45511445)

We are at war with Eastasia. We have always been at war with Eastasia.

DPR sucked at crypto. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45510109)

We know Ross William Ulbricht is not Satoshi Nakamoto due to the obvious difference in technical skill. Satoshi Nakamoto would have done a way better job with the security of Silk Road if he ran it.

Re:DPR sucked at crypto. (1)

game kid (805301) | about a year ago | (#45510213)

...or at least wouldn't have vaguely bragged about it on LinkedIn.

LinkedIn, ffs...those guys would spam their moms' email if they could convince investors that it would increase their market cap. Don't trust them to hide your shadowy marketplaces either.

Ulbricht was making a donation.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45510263)

I doubt the two had any connection, I'm guessing Ross maybe felt that he had accumulated enough bitcoin wealth that he could share the love and simply donated the money to what he had thought or had hoped was one of Satoshi's wallets.

Re:Ulbricht was making a donation.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45510789)

The transaction went the other way. This was a charter user of Bitcoin (perhaps Satoshi) sending money to Ulbricht.

Re:Ulbricht was making a donation.. (1)

larry bagina (561269) | about a year ago | (#45511125)

Or the NSA. Using bitcoin and the silk road to finance their secret activities.

NSA Running Silk Road??? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45510335)

Or was it a CIA front operation???

Bitcoin is US government.

Re:NSA Running Silk Road??? (1)

AHuxley (892839) | about a year ago | (#45510693)

For now, just watching and mapping out all networked users.

And so the FUD begins (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45510407)

Here is yet another attempt at spreading FUD around bitcoin for it is not a government regulated currency.

FTA:

"Although the authors state that they cannot prove that that account belongs to the person who created the bitcoin currency, it is widely believed that the first accounts belong to a person who identifies himself as “Satoshi Nakamoto,” but who has remained anonymous and has not been publicly heard from since 2010."

Weak and suggestive... but a perfect opportunity for the powers that be to try to stop Bitcoin from becoming a success.

Obviously these people have not understood that the the true value of Bitcoin lies not in it's function as a currency but in the validation mathematics of the blockchain that wrestles validation control out of the hands of the few and creates a distributed validation system...

The powers that be have much to gain from this FUD

Re:And so the FUD begins (1)

jythie (914043) | about a year ago | (#45511393)

The powers that be do not really care.

On the off-chance that they were in cahoots... (3, Funny)

RandomUsername99 (574692) | about a year ago | (#45510445)

On the off-chance that they were in cahoots, and this guy helped start an international currency, in large part, to make silk road a reality... he totally just won drug-dealing.

Re:On the off-chance that they were in cahoots... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45510751)

Apart from the fact that he got caught, you mean?

Re:On the off-chance that they were in cahoots... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45511225)

Caught doing what? Starting an international currency?

Yeah. Dude has won at drug dealing.

Re:On the off-chance that they were in cahoots... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45511585)

He (Satoshi Nakamoto) is thus far unknown and very much at large.

You can't spell yarg without arg (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45510633)

I can't stop seeing the headline as "Dead Pirate Roberts and Satoshi Nakamoto" - sounds like a great film or a hell of a band. I call dibs.

Oh sorry I thought it said Dead Pirate Robots (0)

Press2ToContinue (2424598) | about a year ago | (#45510681)

nevermind...

Need we point out that we shoud not trust... (-1, Troll)

landofcleve (1959610) | about a year ago | (#45510835)

The false flag specialists of the State of Israel. Are we going to let the bankers sully the name of the world's first currency of liberty.

Puzzling conneciton (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45510983)

You don't have to be a scientist to see a a much more evident link between the relative immunity of Bitcoin against regulators and governments and the attempts to undermine confidence in the currency by bringing out all kinds of stories and rumors.

This is just freaky (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45511155)

I went to college with Ross. We even lived in the same phase of the same apartment complex. We had several mutual friends. I never knew him personally (hadn't even heard his name until said mutual friends started posting on Facebook in stunned disbelief that their old friend was arrested for running the Silk Road), but it's entirely possible that we may have ran into each other at parties and were just never introduced.

fris7 4sot (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45511187)

to get Involved -in

Re:fris7 4sot (0)

noh8rz10 (2716597) | about a year ago | (#45511339)

L4$T p0$t (at the time of writing)

aanother study suggests a link between jews and... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45511367)

mutilated cocks!

well, there you have it (0)

Cyko_01 (1092499) | about a year ago | (#45511757)

bitcoin was invented solely for buying and selling drugs on the internet. It is evil and must be stopped. queue the ridiculous headlines

Re:well, there you have it (1)

Krishnoid (984597) | about a year ago | (#45511953)

s/coin/torrent/; s/buying and selling drugs/infringing copyright/; s/queue/cue/;

Wrong wrong wrong! (-1)

slashmydots (2189826) | about a year ago | (#45512185)

I didn't even RTFA because there is no point. Any idiot in the BTC community knows Satoshi didn't invent bitcoins. He wrote a book about it that outlined the theory of how it could maybe work. Some developers are the ones who use the book as a basis for the bitcoin network. Dread Pirate Roberts is quite likely one of those original developers. Not many people know who they are as far as I can tell. It doesn't make sense though because investing in bitcoins from the start would give anyone more than enough money. Running silkroad would be necessary.

Re:Wrong wrong wrong! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45512607)

Someone or some group using the alias Satoshi Nakamoto did release source code and a working client as proof of concept, not just a book.

The only connection to DPR is that some coins that had been sitting around since bitcoins early days were moved to his wallet in 2013. Nobody knows who or why.

The link is so weak its unbelievable to see the story being reposted again and again. Its not news.

Who wrote this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45512241)

> Two Israeli computer scientists

Come on, Adi Shamir deserve more respect than that!

Nope. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#45512521)

Satoshi's British.

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