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311 comments

Finally (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45613377)

That took forever...

Re:Finally (-1, Flamebait)

supertrooper (2073218) | about 8 months ago | (#45613473)

We're glad that you're still around to make very intelligent remarks. Without you we wouldn't know what to feel now, so thanks for this.

Dead Nigger (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45613569)

This is good news, one less nigger!

Dead Nigger Storage Inc is a successful business founded in 1994 by Toluca Lake, Los Angeles resident Jimmie Dimmick, after a misunderstanding with two acquaintances from the local underworld. In an interview made in 2004 with Pulp Magazine, Dimmick stated that the idea for his business originally came from his dealings with a mysterious "Mr Wolfe" several years previously.

Dead Nigger Storage Inc is publicly traded on the Nasdaq stock market under the symbol DEDNIG.

Business Overview

The business focuses on a simple service provision as the basis for their corporate offering, namely the creation of storage facilities specially built to store dead and/or decaying afro-americans. With offices in Alabama; Elko, Nevada; Georgia; Louisiana; Palmdale, California; and South Carolina, Dead Nigger Storage Inc now has more branches throughout the Confederate States of America than both KFC and Big Kahuna Burgers combined.

Originally run from Jimmie and Bonnie Dimmick's garage, the business' growth rate within the first few months of operating forced them into a rethink. In 1998, the Dimmicks purchased Monster Joe's Truck and Tow in Downtown Los Angeles, which has remained their base of operations to this day.

With the catchy friendly slogan of "Storing Dead Niggers is our business" Dead Nigger Storage Inc remains a market leader at the forefront of ethnic minority storage, despite the recent upsurge in the market for companies such as Jews on Ice and the Cracker Barrel.

Very recently, Dead Nigger Storage Inc has expanded into a chain with several branches outside of the United States. Though each branch outside the USA are largely similar to their American counterparts, most customers note a handful of "little differences". For example, in America one can store a decapitated Nigerian. In the Paris branch, however, one stores un Nigirié guillotin. In general, dead niggers are still called dead niggers, but over there they're called les dead niggers and corpse sizes are measured differently because of the metric system.

Private businesses that offer the same services around the USA is putting Dead Nigger Storage Inc at risk of going bankrupt because of the "Low low prices!" and a complementary cup of coffee.

In 1999 Detroit became the largest Dead Nigger Storage facility in the western hemisphere.

Traditional Methods of Storing Dead Niggers

"You know what they preserve dead niggers with in Holland instead of synthetic petroleum based chemical preservatives? Mayonnaise." ~ Vincent Vega on storing Dead Niggers

Many individuals have struggled with the issue of dead nigger storage, including Jefferson Davis and John C. Calhoun who favoured the time-attested methodology of dry suspension, a technique that preserved by hanging them in carefully controlled environments for up to 21 days.

Other techniques utilised include smoking, often over specially constructed firepits or pyres. Although this often provides a more pleasurable flavour and aroma, it often led to a complete burning of the subject.

Pulverization is often utilised, either through the use of sticks, or in more extreme case through "dragging", a technique thought to include a pick-up truck. Another practice designed to aid tenderization is referred to as "curbstomping".

Dead Nigger Storage in Popular Culture

Uncyclopedia contains numerous amusing references to Dead Nigger Storage.

Dead Nigger Storage is subtly referenced in 14 separate Quentin Tarantino movies including Reservoir Dogs and the two Kill Bill films. The company also has numerous placements with Tarantino's latin lover Robert Rodriguez' movies, including The Adventures of Sharkboy and Lavagirl.

English Murder Mystery Writer Agatha Christie, referenced the company in perhaps her most famous work, Ten Dead Negroes made into the 1957 film The Only Good Injun is a Dead Injun. Perhaps her most famous reference remains the Hercule Poirot "quote" "Sacre bleu! C'est un morte negro, non?" in The Murder of Michael Donald.

One of the main accusations of racism aimed at George Lucas over his Star Wars franchise was his portrayal of certain species along stereotypical lines. Famously, in the scene when Jar Jar Binks is fatally wounded in the head whilst riding in the back seat of Mace Windu's landspeeder, a small sign can be seen in the background stating "Dead Gungan Storage".

Re:Finally (-1, Flamebait)

SternisheFan (2529412) | about 8 months ago | (#45613667)

That took forever...

That took forever...

Aww, was it upsetting for you to go through those 22 weeks his health and body were failing?

Imagine what is must have been like for him.

Re:Finally (2)

isorox (205688) | about 8 months ago | (#45614253)

That took forever...

That took forever...

Aww, was it upsetting for you to go through those 22 weeks his health and body were failing?

Imagine what is must have been like for him.

We wouldn't do it to pets

What a great man (4, Insightful)

Finallyjoined!!! (1158431) | about 8 months ago | (#45613399)

He will be sadly missed. Huge respect.

Re:What a great man (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45613469)

A man truly worthy of the title 'hero'. Rest in Peace. You achieved the goal to which you devoted your entire life.

Re:What a great man (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45613479)

Absolutely. Was he still considered a terrorist by the US, or did he live to see that finally set right?

Re:What a great man (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45613535)

Both. He was, in his own words in his autobiography, a terrorist inspired by Castro and Che Guevara and spearheaded the creation of an ANC spinoff for the purposes of armed violence.

Re:What a great man (3, Interesting)

PopeRatzo (965947) | about 8 months ago | (#45613615)

Was he still considered a terrorist by the US

It's so much worse than just Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher calling Mandela a "terrorist".

When congress passed anti-apartheid sanctions, Reagan vetoed them, and then actively called the Senators before the veto override vote to try to convince them to let it stand. Congress went ahead and overrode the veto, giving Reagan one of his worst political defeats as president. It was the only time in the 20th century when congress overrode a president's veto of a foreign policy bill.

Reagan still refused to enforce the sanctions against the apartheid regime, asking South African President Botha to call congress himself and lobby to have the sanctions lifted.

Reagan's successor, George H W Bush, included in his platform a promise to enforce the sanctions to their fullest extent, which he ultimately did.

Mandela's legacy will ring out long after Reagan and Thatcher's have been relegated to the trash.

Re:What a great man (0, Troll)

Finallyjoined!!! (1158431) | about 8 months ago | (#45613779)

Slightly revisionist history, Reagan & Thatcher opposed "sanctions". They didn't support apartheid.

Re:What a great man (4, Insightful)

PopeRatzo (965947) | about 8 months ago | (#45613963)

Reagan & Thatcher opposed "sanctions". They didn't support apartheid.

They supported the apartheid government, which is the same thing. It's like saying you support the German government in 1939, but you don't support Nazis.

Both Reagan and Thatcher called Mandela "terrorist" well after the world could see the truth. They were trying to hold on to the last vestiges of white colonial Africa. May their names be erased from the Book of Life.

Re:What a great man (1)

udachny (2454394) | about 8 months ago | (#45614189)

Ding dong the communist witch is dead. Communist witch is dead, the deader the better. The only good collectivist is a dead collectivist.

So that's the opposite view from yours, obviously.

Re:What a great man (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45613831)

As was revealed in Reagan's diaries [showbiz411.com] after his death he believed sanctions would do far more to hurt South African blacks than help them, Turned out he was right [nytimes.com] . The best that can be said is that the sanctions somewhat sped up an already inevitable process, but at an incredible price of widespread poverty and violence amongst primarily poor black South Africans. That's not a legacy I would care to be associated with.

Re:What a great man (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45614075)

If sanctions are not effective, why are they used so avidly against Iran?

Re:What a great man (4, Insightful)

PopeRatzo (965947) | about 8 months ago | (#45614143)

If sanctions are not effective, why are they used so avidly against Iran?

Well...there you go again, bringing up inconvenient questions.

I think the answer is, sanctions work in Iran because it's just a bunch of muslims getting hurt, but they don't work in South Africa because some rich white racists lost money.

Mandela pleaded with the world to keep the sanctions in place against the apartheid South African government. He pleaded with Thatcher and Reagan to support those sanctions, and for his troubles they labeled him a "terrorist" and did everything they could to thwart the end of apartheid.

Re: What a great man (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45614227)

You obviously didn't read the article you linked to.

Re:What a great man (5, Informative)

bmajik (96670) | about 8 months ago | (#45613871)

Not that you're interested, but for the benefit of people who come across your posts, I offer this clarification:

Read the Wikipedia article on Mandela. All of it.

ANC/Mandela supported economic nationalism. He was honored by the Soviet Union for his pro-communist affiliations. In 61-62 he participated in a _bombing campaign_ to put pressure on the apartheid government.

Mandela was anti-capitalist. Not as in, "bmajik says so", but as in, Mandela says so.

Reagan and Thatcher were hesitant to cut off South Africa not because they gave a shit about Mandela or because they loved sticking it to black people; they saw SA as a pawn in the cold war. They didn't want a bunch of African Nationalist Parties starting communist and Russia-aligned states all over the untapped African continent.

To Manela's credit, while he advocated for nationalizing of banks, gold production, other mining, and the abolition of private property, he didn't enact these policies when he eventually took control of the government. He was smart enough to understand that SA badly needed foreign investment, and nationalizing industry and destroying property doesn't get you investors.

Mandela is a mixed bag. As terrorists go, he was a pretty pleasant one -- MK (the militant wing he was part of) only attacked infrastructure at night, hoping to minimize civilian losses.

But, he was willing to resort to violence to bring about a communist revolution in Africa.

You think Reagan and Thatcher were against that? You're right.

Again -- read the WP article. I just summarized it here.

Re:What a great man (4, Interesting)

PopeRatzo (965947) | about 8 months ago | (#45613977)

So, when Thatcher and Reagan participate in "bombing campaigns" it's "fighting for liberty" but when Mandela does it, they call it terrorism. Yes, that sounds like what you're saying.

Thatcher was "resorting" to her own campaign of violence in Ireland, and Reagan, disappointed that he didn't have a real war to fight, sent the marines to invade, uh, Grenada.

South Africa was enormously helped by the influence of Nelson Mandela. Both the UK and the US were left worse off by the influence of Thatcher and Reagan, (may they burn in Hell).

Re:What a great man (5, Insightful)

bmajik (96670) | about 8 months ago | (#45614103)

I hesitated to respond to you because we live in entirely different worlds, and I don't think any number of Slashdot posts is going to fix that.

However, to be clear, I wasn't implying that Reagan or Thatcher had a problem with violence.

On the contrary; they had a problem with South Africa becoming a communist satellite. When the communist agitators resort to violence, that just makes it easier to convince the domestic public that the communists are bad. Obviously when it is bin Laden fighting the Soviets, violence is just fine. We both understand how it works.

Regarding your last point: South Africa of today is one of the most dangerous and violent places on earth; Mandela did next to nothing to address black on white or even black-on-black violence. There was a huge white-flight out of SA during the 90s.

Perhaps you think this is a positive outcome. I don't.

No racial reconciliation is perfect, of course. I would say that the US probably didn't do enough to help re-enfranchise blacks, and that South Africa may have done a bit too much.

The bottom line is this: I very much enjoyed living in the Reagan years America. I very much would NOT have liked living in the Mandela years SA.

I think Reagan and Thatcher were both great, as far as people who have actually held office go, and I am disappointed that the Reagan we got was nowhere close to the Reagan that campaigned. I was all for abolishing the Depts of Ed, Energy, and the ATF. Very disappointed with Reagan on that score...

The other transgressions in his career (military adventurism) bother me, but I don't think they actually bother Reagan detractors that much. The people who bitterly hate Reagan tend to hate him for reasons that his supporters like him. Similarly, if you accuse Thatcher of being a union buster or for cleaning up free loaders on the dole, people like me will say "bravo Thatcher".

The bottom line is that you and I probably agree that Reagan/Thatcher supported a bunch of wars and terrorists that they shouldn't have. But you shouldn't pretend like that is the basis for your displeasure with them. Especially not when every other US and UK leader since (some of which you've certainly hated LESS, if not mildly supported) has done the same exact shit...

Re:What a great man (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45614111)

He even criticized our rescue mission to Grenada and our strike on Libya.

Re:What a great man (0)

Finallyjoined!!! (1158431) | about 8 months ago | (#45614249)

Probably not wise to quote wikipedia as "authoritative".
Just pointing it out.. K!

Re:What a great man (2)

10101001 10101001 (732688) | about 8 months ago | (#45614295)

ANC/Mandela supported economic nationalism. He was honored by the Soviet Union for his pro-communist affiliations. ...

Mandela was anti-capitalist. Not as in, "bmajik says so", but as in, Mandela says so.

And? Mandela could have been Satan incarnate. That doesn't justify vetoing anti-apartheid sanctions.

In 61-62 he participated in a _bombing campaign_ to put pressure on the apartheid government.

I like how you sandwich that in the above. It's as if you believe that Mandela was a one dimensional man with specific intentions involving communism. Meanwhile, if he had staged non-violent sanctions, would that have been okay? Because Reagan wasn't even willing to push or enforce for that. And if he managed it, Reagan would have likely called for his own _bombing campaign_.

Reagan and Thatcher were hesitant to cut off South Africa not because they gave a shit about Mandela or because they loved sticking it to black people; they saw SA as a pawn in the cold war. They didn't want a bunch of African Nationalist Parties starting communist and Russia-aligned states all over the untapped African continent.

So, they don't give a shit about Mandela, but it's because of Mandela they weren't willing to piss off the South African government as it could possibly lead to Mandela gaining power... Funny. It also goes against the long-held truth that America has consistently in the past (a) pushed sanctions and (b) simultaneously provided support for a pro-nationalist pawn in the country to form a coup. The only reason Mandela wasn't chosen is he was anti-capitalist. And odds are good no other pro-capitalist was chosen because the South African government was good enough for Reagan as a useful pro-capitalist pawn.

To Manela's credit, while he advocated for nationalizing of banks, gold production, other mining, and the abolition of private property, he didn't enact these policies when he eventually took control of the government. He was smart enough to understand that SA badly needed foreign investment, and nationalizing industry and destroying property doesn't get you investors.

I like how you mixed "nationalizing industry and destroying property". Perhaps if you said "destroying capital" it'd mean something. In fact, nationalizing industry can spur foreign investment if done correctly. The hard part is, of course, convincing foreign investors that you're only going to nationalize those resources that were unreasonably sold to foreign investors in the past. That's the real destroyer, the destroyer of confidence. And there's no real simple way to fix that problem, no matter how unjust a previous government was with previous contracts or grants. The closest thing is to have a slow transition and a strong political party to see it through. The only alternative is to just let things stand and hope that either inequity fixes itself or you can use taxes or something similar to mold the system to solve the problems. In short, there's no simple solutions, and as you state, Mandela was wise to not engage in coarse action.

Mandela is a mixed bag. As terrorists go, he was a pretty pleasant one -- MK (the militant wing he was part of) only attacked infrastructure at night, hoping to minimize civilian losses.

Certainly better than the US government's own various bombing campaigns.

But, he was willing to resort to violence to bring about a communist revolution in Africa.

As above, being peaceful wouldn't have meant the US would have responded in kind.

You think Reagan and Thatcher were against that? You're right.

As you hinted above, Reagan and Thatcher were against any potentially Soviet Union puppet because Reagan and Thatcher wanted to be the puppet masters. You had to be the US or the Soviet's puppet. So, you were right in a way. The US didn't care about Mandela as a person or whether the black people were being killed or not. All they cared about was retaining their puppet and doing nothing to help a potential Soviet puppet. And if Mandela had risen to power, even under a democracy and non-violent means, then the US would violently overthrow that regime and put in its place a democracy or theocracy or aristocracy or whatever it took to have their puppet.

You see, as much as you can potentially condemn Mandela for what he did or might have been, you overlook that Mandela wasn't *the* guaranteed new leader of South Africa. Reagan and ilk were not interested in rocking the boat that was the apartheid South African government because they were uninterested in the foreign policy risk. In essence, the people of South Africa or even the rest of the world didn't matter. All that mattered was the political game. One could argue that such show of strength was necessary, but Carter didn't cause WW3.

The whole notion that any of it was necessary seems as much absurd in hindsight as Mandela creating a communism regime just for the Soviet Union. That's the only point where I'd at least begin to tolerate Reagan's concerns at the time. But even that doesn't justify vetoing sanctions or refusal to enforce them. It only explains why they wouldn't have supported Mandela. Well, the US never had to. And perhaps because they didn't is precisely why Mandela and others like him are so well liked. The US is great at picking losers, perhaps?

Re:What a great man (2)

ackthpt (218170) | about 8 months ago | (#45613909)

Was he still considered a terrorist by the US

It's so much worse than just Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher calling Mandela a "terrorist".

When congress passed anti-apartheid sanctions, Reagan vetoed them, and then actively called the Senators before the veto override vote to try to convince them to let it stand. Congress went ahead and overrode the veto, giving Reagan one of his worst political defeats as president. It was the only time in the 20th century when congress overrode a president's veto of a foreign policy bill.

Reagan still refused to enforce the sanctions against the apartheid regime, asking South African President Botha to call congress himself and lobby to have the sanctions lifted.

Reagan's successor, George H W Bush, included in his platform a promise to enforce the sanctions to their fullest extent, which he ultimately did.

Mandela's legacy will ring out long after Reagan and Thatcher's have been relegated to the trash.

I continue to feel Reagan is overrated. Mandela was the Gandhi of our time.

Re:What a great man (3, Informative)

isorox (205688) | about 8 months ago | (#45614269)

Was he still considered a terrorist by the US

It's so much worse than just Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher calling Mandela a "terrorist".

When congress passed anti-apartheid sanctions, Reagan vetoed them, and then actively called the Senators before the veto override vote to try to convince them to let it stand. Congress went ahead and overrode the veto, giving Reagan one of his worst political defeats as president. It was the only time in the 20th century when congress overrode a president's veto of a foreign policy bill.

Reagan still refused to enforce the sanctions against the apartheid regime, asking South African President Botha to call congress himself and lobby to have the sanctions lifted.

Reagan's successor, George H W Bush, included in his platform a promise to enforce the sanctions to their fullest extent, which he ultimately did.

Mandela's legacy will ring out long after Reagan and Thatcher's have been relegated to the trash.

I continue to feel Reagan is overrated. Mandela was the Gandhi of our time.

How many buildings did Gandhi blow up?

Re:What a great man (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45613991)

It's so much worse than just Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher calling Mandela a "terrorist".

Not to mention the CIA helped get him imprisoned [nytimes.com] .

Re:What a great man (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45614199)

Thatcher never called Mandela a terrorist, you'll comb records in vain for any first-hand report of that remark because it never happened.

Mandela himself stated that he considered Thatcher to be a strong enemy of apartheid, and it's even been argued that she played a pivotal role [theguardian.com] in ending it.

Re:What a great man (1)

Finallyjoined!!! (1158431) | about 8 months ago | (#45614281)

Top marks, upvote parent.

Re: What a great man (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45613557)

You guys know nothing of Mandela and believe he was a hero. He was branded a hero. He condoned all the murdering that was done throughout his life. Yes, he did not openly kill whites when president and was mild in his approach to stop genocide. Yet he came there with lots of murders and never condemned the ANC for their corruption. He was not a great man but a great brand. My standards for greatness is a little higher than the basics he managed to do right.

Re: What a great man (4, Insightful)

amiga3D (567632) | about 8 months ago | (#45613827)

People are a product of their times. While true that Mandela embraced violence he felt that he had no choice at the time. Terrible acts were being committed against his people by the government of South Africa. I think most telling was that when he finally overcame and was elected president he did not use that power to trample the former oppressors but instead used his power to heal his country. I think I was most impressed by how instead of imprisoning and executing former secret police he had them confess on video their crimes and then pardoned them. Some criticized him for this but they miss the beauty and power of the act. By having them confess on video he broke these men and made them small. If he had executed them in a wave of bloodshed then the backlash would have caused South Africa to take decades to heal, if ever. The legacy of these men will be forever shame and disgrace as is that of the apartheid regime. No hero is perfect and I feel that Mandela genuinely deserves the term.

Re: What a great man (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45614123)

Mandela was working against a government who developed such things as the 'street sweeper' ultra-high capacity shotgun for crowd control

When a freaking beast has their boot on your throat it is impossible to play nice

The greatest credit to Mandela is that when he did gain power he did not succumb to stupid behavior (land grabs, nepotism and economic decline) like his neighbor Mugabe

Re: What a great man (0)

Finallyjoined!!! (1158431) | about 8 months ago | (#45613847)

Sorry you twat, we know a great deal about Nelson Mandela, you on the other hand, probably get all of your news from the back of crisp packets.

Re: What a great man (4, Insightful)

Alain Williams (2972) | about 8 months ago | (#45613903)

You can't make an omlette without breaking eggs. He might not have been an angel 100% of the time, but overall he did the right things. He did much more good with his life than I have in mine, and more good that I suspect you have done.

Re: What a great man (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45614185)

You guys know nothing of Mandela and believe he was a hero. He was branded a hero. He condoned all the murdering that was done throughout his life. Yes, he did not openly kill whites when president and was mild in his approach to stop genocide. Yet he came there with lots of murders and never condemned the ANC for their corruption. He was not a great man but a great brand. My standards for greatness is a little higher than the basics he managed to do right.

Unfortunately, you are right...
I am a Greek, never been in S.Africa, but lots of my Greek friends were born there but forced to leave because of his supporters - the few still living there have to witness every day the collapse of what was a functional state and the huge rise of crime -murders, RAPES, thief- that the apartheid (which means "segregation") kept in control (the same is happened in almost all "black" Africa, just when the "whites" lost control).
I don't support racial segregation (as "apartheid" was), but i understand the social/cultural -NOT BIOLOGICAL- need for that in some cases (and many "blacks" -forced to live in the "free from whites" Africa- also do!)...
Watch this sort clip of the S. Africa president advertise apartheid racism (Mandela was better than this but...):
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6fzRSE_p1Ys

Re:What a great man (1)

krygny (473134) | about 8 months ago | (#45613785)

The guy sure had prunes.

RIP

Re:What a great man (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45613875)

Nothing but an uppity nigger.

Re:What a great man (1)

serviscope_minor (664417) | about 8 months ago | (#45613885)

I love the justaposition of your sentiment and signiture.

Re:What a great man (1)

RabidReindeer (2625839) | about 8 months ago | (#45613999)

He will be sadly missed. Huge respect.

History remembers the great conquerors, but he was one of the great peacemakers. Let his memory last as long. This was one Nobel prize that was richly deserved.

Sad to lose him, even though it's been years since he was a major player. The last year could not have been pleasant, though. Now he can rest. He's earned it.

Re:What a great man (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45614109)

This is a man who openly admitted to murdering civilians in court and was sentenced to a jail term accordingly. (google Church Street Bombings)

But it's okay because it was against those evil white people, right?

Liberals.

Re:What a great man (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45614343)

"He will be sadly missed. Huge respect."

A huge loss for the IT community, I guess, otherwise, respect aside, why TF is that news for nerds?

I already read that in my 273 other news sources hours ago.

He will be missed... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45613419)

...he was...like...Morgan Freeman 2.0 down there...

And now that he's dead... (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45613423)

... get ready for uhuru [wordpress.com] .

Re:And now that he's dead... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45613669)

Yeah, I always thought she was pretty hot...

propz 2 all da ded homiez (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45613445)

tip yo 40

cause of death (3, Funny)

Gravis Zero (934156) | about 8 months ago | (#45613453)

hang gliding accident

just another nigga dead (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45613459)

just another nigga dead

Re:just another ... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45613555)

just another nigga dead

libertarian/Conservative poster

Re:just another nigga dead (1)

Finallyjoined!!! (1158431) | about 8 months ago | (#45613577)

Your bell end must be red raw from all the wanking.

Because you are, without doubt, a fucking wanker.

Re:just another nigga dead (1)

reikae (80981) | about 8 months ago | (#45613761)

As an avid wanker I find it offensive that you group us self-lovers together with the troll grandparent.

On-topic: I hope the man of peace has finally found peace.

Re:just another nigga dead (0)

Finallyjoined!!! (1158431) | about 8 months ago | (#45614117)

On the contrary, you fucking wanker, I group noone nohow nowhere. Seriously, I just point out where I see elbows appearing to play the violin; vigorously ! :-)
Sing in your head : "free ee ee ee Nelson Mandela

Mandela taught forgiveness (5, Insightful)

JoeyRox (2711699) | about 8 months ago | (#45613499)

To be imprisoned for 27 years but still have the selflessness to bring peace and freedom to his country so that nobody should share his fate is the essence of compassion, generosity, and forgiveness. He is a shinning example of the human spirit.

Re:Mandela taught forgiveness (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45613563)

The triumph of the human spirit over aggressive oppressors is something that we should all hope to emulate

Re:Mandela taught forgiveness (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45613571)

^-- This.

Re:Mandela taught forgiveness (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45613725)

Oh yes, South Africa is just so much better off now without apartheid. It's a festering shithole of crimes: murder, rape, carjackings...

Re:Mandela taught forgiveness (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45613937)

Niggers and Muslims are the same everywhere.

Little Blurb about it on Drudge Report (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45613517)

I found out about this on Drudge when I was reading the little news postings, you know, the unimportant ones... Typical Drudge.

Re:Little Blurb about it on Drudge Report (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45613783)

It was highlighted in red, and still is, dumbfuck.

RIP Bill Cosby (4, Funny)

Niterios (2700835) | about 8 months ago | (#45613537)

Just wait for all the Bill Cosby pictures with the caption "RIP Nelson Mandela".

Re:RIP Bill Cosby (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45613589)

It's Morgan Freeman's pictures, dork!

Re:RIP Bill Cosby (1)

sir_eccles (1235902) | about 8 months ago | (#45613891)

Idris Elba actually.

Re:RIP Bill Cosby (1)

Macman408 (1308925) | about 8 months ago | (#45613911)

Not gonna lie... When I saw the headline, I was mentally picturing Morgan Freeman for several seconds before I mentally slapped myself.

Not news for nerds (-1, Troll)

T5 (308759) | about 8 months ago | (#45613565)

How is this relevant on /.? I mean no disrespect, but this is a topic for more mainstream news sources, not a site dedicated to technology.

Let's get back to Geekdom, shall we?

Re:Not news for nerds (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45613627)

STUFF THAT MATTERS

Re:Not news for nerds (4, Informative)

RLiegh (247921) | about 8 months ago | (#45613641)

Because it's "stuff that matters."

Re:Not news for nerds (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45613735)

niggers who've been in jail die daily, big whoop

Re:Not news for nerds (-1, Flamebait)

isorox (205688) | about 8 months ago | (#45614285)

Because it's "stuff that matters."

95 year old man dies after long uneventful retirement

Re:Not news for nerds (1)

Nyder (754090) | about 8 months ago | (#45613659)

How is this relevant on /.? I mean no disrespect, but this is a topic for more mainstream news sources, not a site dedicated to technology.

Let's get back to Geekdom, shall we?

Well, considering this is the only news site I go to, I'm glad for these occasional posts of "mainstream" news. I know you said no disrespect, but if you really didn't want to disrespect the passing of Mandela, you should of just not posted.

Geek or not, Nelson Mandela was a cool dude.

Re:Not news for nerds (1)

hubie (108345) | about 8 months ago | (#45613889)

but if you really didn't want to disrespect the passing of Mandela, you should of just not posted.

I completely disagree. It isn't being disrespectful at all to question why this should be posted to a tech site. I'd much rather have someone question the relevance of something here than have them shamed into silence by people who feel strongly about some non-technical topic.

Re:Not news for nerds (1)

krammit (540755) | about 8 months ago | (#45614305)

The 9/11 attacks were posted here, as was just about every response to it. Sometimes, the stuff that matters tag needs to be taken a little more prominently.

Re:Not news for nerds (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45613685)

It's not without precedent that when a major general news story break, Slashdot will post it so that we can discuss it amongst the community. If you don't want to read the article, then don't click the link. It really doesn't get to where there are so many non-nerd articles that it's disruptive to the main mission of Slashdot.

Re:Not news for nerds (4, Insightful)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 8 months ago | (#45613697)

How is this relevant on /.? I mean no disrespect

Well, you've shown it, intentionally or not.

Anyone old enough to have at least a 10th grade education should know why Nelson Mandela was an important person, and why his death is relevant to everyone on the planet.

IMO.

Re:Not news for nerds (1)

Angeret (1134311) | about 8 months ago | (#45613713)

It matters not if it is relevant, most if not all news services & sites of any worth will be posting something about Mandela. You could always just move on to the next tech story if you don't want to read this - you do have that power you know.

One word (5, Informative)

bob_super (3391281) | about 8 months ago | (#45613715)

"Ubuntu"

Learn a bit.

Local perspective (5, Informative)

Any Web Loco (555458) | about 8 months ago | (#45613595)

South Africa's Mail & Guardian [mg.co.za] is worth a read - local perspective.

Why is this here? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45613613)

So Slashdot is just NORMAL news now?

Re:Why is this here? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45613629)

Slashdot drops to its knees anytime nigger cock is in the news.

Re:Why is this here? (1)

Finallyjoined!!! (1158431) | about 8 months ago | (#45613811)

Thought the age limit on /. was "over 12"

Re:Why is this here? (2)

coldsalmon (946941) | about 8 months ago | (#45613637)

Without Nelson Mandela, there would have been no Mark Shuttleworth, and hence no Ubuntu Phone.

Re:Why is this here? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45613915)

Pretty sure a white guy in SA would have done just fine.

Re:Why is this here? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45613679)

darkies get killed daily, why is this news for nerds or stuff that matters?!

Re:Why is this here? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45613703)

Don't be an idiot! You obviously don't know anything about his contributions to the 2.4 kernel, do you? Google it yourself, I ain't doing your work for you.

Truly a South African icon (5, Funny)

_UnderTow_ (86073) | about 8 months ago | (#45613645)

I just heard some sad news on talk radio - Anit-Apartheid activist Nelson Mandela was found dead in his South Africa home this morning. There weren't any more details. I'm sure everyone in this community will miss him - even if you didn't enjoy his work, there's no denying his contributions to popular culture. Truly a South African icon.

Re:Truly a South African icon (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45613707)

shut up

Re:Truly a South African icon (1)

isorox (205688) | about 8 months ago | (#45614291)

Thank you, the post I was looking for :D

R.I.P., good man. (1)

haaz (3346) | about 8 months ago | (#45613687)

Nelson Mandela is a hero to many, myself included. May he rest in peace as we honor and mourn him, though we never shall forget him.

Mandela's dead, but new crypto currency emerged (-1, Offtopic)

Bargain Orgy (3454989) | about 8 months ago | (#45613739)

Here it is -> "Zurker finally allows to sell Zen - own crypto-currency" -- rpx.me/wnnr .
COINcidence? I DONT think so..

Re:Mandela's dead, but new crypto currency emerged (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45613853)

-1 Spam

Re:Mandela's dead, but new crypto currency emerged (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45613941)

-1 Spam

You're wrong, sir. It's not a spam, but IMO quite important info.
I've checked this few minutes ago.
Don't like? Don't check, but don't judge also.

Really deserved his Nobel Peace Prize (4, Insightful)

dkleinsc (563838) | about 8 months ago | (#45613777)

When Nelson Mandela and the African National Congress took power, they were in a position where they could well have taken revenge for a couple of centuries of repression by the English and Afrikaners. He led the effort to do something else (the Truth and Reconciliation Commissions), so that his country would not tear itself apart the way so many of its neighbors had done, repeatedly.

I'm not saying South Africa is a paradise compared to, say, the UK, but it's doing a heck of a lot better than Zimbabwe or Lesotho, and his decisions had a lot to do with that.

Linux tribute (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45613817)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HED4h00xPPA

'nuff said

Didn't take GNAA long (1)

benjfowler (239527) | about 8 months ago | (#45613851)

They must've broken the sound barrier getting here to post.

My own Mandela story (4, Interesting)

spaceyhackerlady (462530) | about 8 months ago | (#45613893)

When Nelson Mandela turned 70 there was quite a bit of coverage in the news here. He was still in jail, so I called Cape Town information, got the number, phoned the jail and left a message ("Happy Birthday!") for him.

The man who answered the phone sounded like he'd been on the phone a lot that day. He was also very careful to take down my name and where I was calling from. I suspect that until the government changed there would have been little point in trying to get a visa to visit South Africa...

...laura

i'm sure the former residents of (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45614031)

Rhodesia appreciate his demise, as well as the thousands of farmers and landowners displaced by subsequent regimes - meanwhile, DeBeers continues on...

Nelson Mandela dies at 95 (4, Funny)

richy freeway (623503) | about 8 months ago | (#45614195)

Respect where it's due... That's 5 miles an hour faster than Paul Walker!

And this is news for nerds??? (1)

davidwr (791652) | about 8 months ago | (#45614201)

Okay, I'll grant you that this is important news for everyone, but most of us saw this on mainstream news sites or we soon will.

Now, when Ken Thompson [wikipedia.org] dies, I'll expect his obit to hit /. within minutes if not milliseconds.

1 of the greatest leaders our world has ever known (1)

gapagos (1264716) | about 8 months ago | (#45614203)

One of the greatest leaders our world has ever known. May he rest in peace.

Re:1 of the greatest leaders our world has ever kn (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45614279)

Sweet little Mandela eh?

He signed off on the deaths of innocent people, lots of them

Nelson Mandela was the head of UmKhonto we Sizwe, (MK), the terrorist
wing of the ANC and South African Communist Party. At his trial, he had
pleaded guilty to 156 acts of public violence including mobilising
terrorist bombing campaigns, which planted bombs in public places,
including the Johannesburg railway station. Many innocent people,
including women and children, were killed by Nelson Mandela’s MK
terrorists. Here are some highlights

-Church Street West, Pretoria, on the 20 May 1983

-Amanzimtoti Shopping complex KZN, 23 December 1985

-Krugersdorp Magistrate’s Court, 17 March 1988

-Durban Pick ‘n Pay shopping complex, 1 September 1986

-Pretoria Sterland movie complex 16 April 1988 – limpet mine killed ANC terrorist M O Maponya instead

-Johannesburg Magistrate’s Court, 20 May 1987

-Roodepoort Standard Bank 3 June, 1988

Tellingly, not only did Mandela refuse to renounce violence, Amnesty refused to take his case stating “[the]
movement recorded that it could not give the name of ‘Prisoner of
Conscience’ to anyone associated with violence, even though as in
‘conventional warfare’ a degree of restraint may be exercised.”

The deep meaning... (-1, Troll)

Baldrson (78598) | about 8 months ago | (#45614237)

We can now look forward to a South Africa that will no longer be the rape capital of the world.

R.I.P. (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45614361)

Mr. Mandela, who died Thursday night at age 95, seemed to understand that the motivating force behind ethnic, religious and racial hatred is not only, or even primarily, self-interest; it is fear, distrust, a lack of understanding. In his person and his policies, he set out to show those on the other side that they had little to fear. He sought unity rather than revenge, honesty and understanding rather than the naked exercise of power. These are all fine abstractions, of course, but never so clear to us as when there is a living figure to exemplify them. That's why Mr. Mandela’s influence extended so far beyond South Africa and was felt by so many of the world's peoples other than Africans. It is the reason, now that he is gone, that it is more important than ever — in a century marked so far by frightening eruptions of terror and religious intolerance — to keep before the world the name and example of Nelson Mandela.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/nelson-mandela-brought-the-world-toward-a-racial-reconciliation/2013/12/05/4a2dfb7e-2d77-11e0-8dd8-83b74589130a_story.html [washingtonpost.com]

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