Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Snowden Document Shows Canada Set Up Spy Posts For NSA

Unknown Lamer posted about 9 months ago | from the not-you-guys-too dept.

Canada 177

An anonymous reader writes with news that even Canada is getting its hands dirty in the international dragnet fiasco. From the article: "The leaked NSA document being reported exclusively by CBC News reveals Canada is involved with the huge American intelligence agency in clandestine surveillance activities in 'approximately 20 high-priority countries.' ... Wesley Wark, a Canadian security and intelligence expert at the University of Ottawa, says the document makes it clear Canada can take advantage of its relatively benign image internationally to covertly amass a vast amount of information abroad. 'I think we still trade on a degree of an international brand as an innocent partner in the international sphere,' Wark said. 'There's not that much known about Canadian intelligence.'"

cancel ×

177 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

I want to have sex with a nubile girl! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45648729)

Please tell me how I can get a nubile girl to give me a blowjob and let me fuck her! Please, I need it bad!!

Re:I want to have sex with a nubile girl! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45648789)

Congratulations on the first post!!!

Old News (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45648737)

I thought it was common knowledge for quite a long time that the canadian Communications Security Establishment [wikipedia.org] set up all the american embassies with their SIGINT gear and such.

Re:Old News (4, Interesting)

Optimal Cynic (2886377) | about 9 months ago | (#45648925)

Yeah, I don't see why there's so much shock. "US ally assists US spy agency in spying." Wow. My flabber is truly gasted.

Re:Old News (1, Insightful)

X.25 (255792) | about 9 months ago | (#45648965)

Yeah, I don't see why there's so much shock. "US ally assists US spy agency in spying." Wow. My flabber is truly gasted.

What they are doing is not spying.

I surely hope you understand that. If you do not, then no amount of talk will explain you the difference.

You have to understand it for yourself.

Re:Old News (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45648977)

Then what would you call it?

Re:Old News (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45649087)

Then what would you call it?

A clandestine social network utilizing the oneway mirror protocol?

Re:Old News (3, Funny)

TheP4st (1164315) | about 9 months ago | (#45649283)

Then what would you call it?

Covert Operation Collecting Knowledge, or COCK for short? Which clearly would not be the same as spying.

Re:Old News (1)

davecb (6526) | about 9 months ago | (#45649223)

If they snoop on their masters, treason.

Re:Old News (1)

Eskarel (565631) | about 9 months ago | (#45649337)

Nope, this stuff is spying, this is regular old SIGINT, not metadata collection. You know how you can tell, there's a crap tonne of evidence.

Re:Old News (1)

Joce640k (829181) | about 9 months ago | (#45649083)

Message for Mohammed McMohammed, Afghanistan:

The cheese is on the bread.

Repeat:

The cheese is on the bread.

(Let's see if the NSA can figure out the recipient of that. Or what it means. Gee, they've just been completely defeated by a 100-year old idea...)

Re:Old News (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45649443)

Wait, do you really believe all this surveillance is to counter terrorism?

Re:Old News (2)

Joce640k (829181) | about 9 months ago | (#45649841)

Me? Not at all.

Re:Old News (4, Funny)

NatasRevol (731260) | about 9 months ago | (#45650221)

Mr. McMohammed is the only Scottish Muslim in Afghanistan, so it shouldn't be hard to track him down.

Re:Old News (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45649137)

Documentary evidence makes a world of difference.

Re:Old News (1)

MikeBabcock (65886) | about 9 months ago | (#45649247)

True, and when you have a technologically advanced country with limited resources and population, being good at being covert is a serious asset.

Consider for a moment the historical reality of Canada's leadership in the Iran hostage crisis in 79/80.

Re:Old News (1)

S.O.B. (136083) | about 9 months ago | (#45649681)

Consider for a moment the historical reality of Canada's leadership in the Iran hostage crisis in 79/80.

Canada had nothing to do with it. Ben Affleck saved the hostages.

Re:Old News (2)

NatasRevol (731260) | about 9 months ago | (#45650231)

Ben Affleck is Canadian.

QED.

Re:Old News (4, Interesting)

Xest (935314) | about 9 months ago | (#45649385)

Not just US ally, Canada is one of the five-eyes group of nations (US, UK, Canada, Australia, New Zealand). It's pretty well established that these nations security services all work together in unison on just about everything now.

I'd wager given the status of five-eyes that New Zealand similarly uses it's benign image to spy where the US/UK can't get away with it on their behalf.

Re:Old News (1)

kilfarsnar (561956) | about 9 months ago | (#45650349)

And they say the British Empire is dead.

Re:Old News (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45648931)

I thought it was common knowledge for quite a long time that the canadian Communications Security Establishment [wikipedia.org] set up all the american embassies with their SIGINT gear and such.

True.

I also thought it was common knowledge that very large joint programs between US and Canadian forces have been going on for decades.

People may not know what goes on inside Cheyenne Mountain, but it's clearly no secret as to who comprises the leadership controlling NORAD at the highest levels.

Re:Old News (4, Interesting)

EasyTarget (43516) | about 9 months ago | (#45648973)

.. common knowledge for quite a long time

If I had asserted it in public prior to the Snowdon leaks, anonymous apologists would have popped up saying: 'Where is your proof'.
Now we have that proof the same anonymous apologists are saying it was: 'Common knowledge'.
Hummm.

Re:Old News (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45649027)

Well in this case I mean since about roughly 1994 when Mike Frost had Michel Gratton write the book on the topic, Spyworld [amazon.ca] .

This doesn't excuse the activity, it's just news thats 20 years old or so.

Re:Old News (1)

Desler (1608317) | about 9 months ago | (#45649539)

Your "proof" would have been that they're one of the Five Eyes group which is publicly documented that they shared intelligence with each other.

Re:Old News (1)

Desler (1608317) | about 9 months ago | (#45649547)

My bad. That should be *share* since obviously they never stopped.

Re:Old News (1)

leomekenkamp (566309) | about 9 months ago | (#45650519)

I have a sneaking suspicion that the intersection of the sets of WIYP anonymous apologists and the CK anonymous apologists is probably empty.

Old News Indeed (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45650089)

I would have thought Tim Horton's had WIFI for a while now.

Enough (4, Interesting)

Joce640k (829181) | about 9 months ago | (#45648739)

They can't be trusted. Obama's unspecified "checks and balances" aren't working. Time to start encrypting everything by default.

Re:Enough (2)

DarkOx (621550) | about 9 months ago | (#45648757)

It's time to demand Clapper be hauled away in handcuffs

Re:Enough (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45648781)

Blaming one scapegoat will not resolve the deep deep deep corruption in our governing system(s). Short of a complete revolution with heads rolling, it would be futile and would only serve the propagandists.

Re:Enough (5, Interesting)

DarkOx (621550) | about 9 months ago | (#45648841)

No the problems start at the top, Senators, Presidents, powerful Congressmen, generals. The problem is the system has no way to deal with them because at those levels it basically depends on the punishing themselves and they have learned to circle the wagons when the people get riled up.

The only option is to target their enablers, folks like clapper. If enough political pressure can be brought to bear and you give them the option to toss someone like Clapper under the bus along with a few low level admin types like snowdens coworkers who broke some rule somewhere some time they will.

Do this often enough and they won't be able to find these facilitators who are willing to go a long with what they know to unethical, immoral, illegal or some combination there of because they will also know that when it comes to light and it will someday, it's going to be them that pays for it.

Re:Enough (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45649117)

I disagree. I think if we executed a few Senators, Congressmen and lobbyists in the public square we would see a significant change in their behavior and the laws that are passed.

The thought of being hanged, then drawn & quartered and then having your pieces parts burned at the stake will motivate enough lawmakers to change things.

Re:Enough (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45649501)

Allahu Akbar!

Re:Enough (1)

NatasRevol (731260) | about 9 months ago | (#45650245)

Before that happens, they'll write laws making that illegal.

Re:Enough (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45649287)

No the problems start at the top, Senators, Presidents, powerful Congressmen, generals. The problem is the system has no way to deal with them because at those levels it basically depends on the punishing themselves and they have learned to circle the wagons when the people get riled up.

That's why the metagovernment project [metagovernment.org] was born. There's no way to change the system from within. And there's no (sane) way to violently overthrow it. So metagovernment simply replaces it; slowly and methodically, over a long period of time.

It's the only thing that can possibly free us; and it is something you can work on today.

Re:Enough (2)

ImOuttaHere (2996813) | about 9 months ago | (#45649299)

I think this is too simplistic. You can replace every single president, senator and congress-critter in Washington and you'll have the same outcome as you're faced with today. The reason is that members of three letter agencies feel, with all their bleed'n-red-Amerikan-hearts that they are responsible maintaining "continuity". They don't care which political party is in power. They know politicians will come and go.

I think you're very close with your inclusion of generals on your list of those needing to be replaced. Broaden that a bit to include anyone who can set policy and direction without public review and oversight , and I think you'd have something to work with.

Which is the reason behind my ongoing snickering over a recently /.'d article that described how "hurt" NSA employees are that Obama has not paid them a personal visit. I can't imagine who died and left them in charge, but in charge they definitely feel. Think about it from my perspective and the underlying meaning of their being "hurt" might take on new weight and meaning.

No the problems start at the top, Senators, Presidents, powerful Congressmen, generals...

Not quite (1)

ThatsNotPudding (1045640) | about 9 months ago | (#45649351)

No the problems start at the top, Senators, Presidents, powerful Congressmen, generals.

No, the real problem is that after ten years of unfettered spying on everyone, the NSA is now at the top of that list, with dirt on everyone from the POTUS on down. THIS is why no real reform will ever occur.

Re:Enough (1)

number17 (952777) | about 9 months ago | (#45649781)

toss someone like Clapper under the bus along with a few low level admin types like snowdens coworkers who broke some rule somewhere some time they will.

Wouldn't it be easier to just not renew the contract for the private company that Snowden worked for?

Re:Enough (2)

Charliemopps (1157495) | about 9 months ago | (#45649127)

What's funny is that he outranks the president. Look what happened when Clinton lied to congress... Then Clapper... and Clapper lied about important shit, many times.

Re:Enough (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45649269)

What's funny is that he outranks the president. Look what happened when Clinton lied to congress... Then Clapper... and Clapper lied about important shit, many times.

Yes, but Clinton lied about sex!

Re:Enough (1)

Sarten-X (1102295) | about 9 months ago | (#45649427)

Exactly right.

I happened to be in Europe at the time. The French couldn't understand what was so scandalous about a leader having a mistress or three.

Re:Enough (1)

Friso van der Meer (3459273) | about 9 months ago | (#45648767)

Encrypt the coffers! Firewall the moat!

Re:Enough (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45648909)

"encrypting".....yeah, that's all that's needed. After you do that everything will be "all better".

LOL!!!

Put that "right to bear arms" to the task it was intended for already..............it SURE AS FUCK was NOT for "defense", and you know it.

Re:Enough (1)

Joce640k (829181) | about 9 months ago | (#45649073)

And your brilliant solution was....?

PS: If you're a terrorist reading this, here's how to communicate securely without any encryption tools needed: Publish your messages in places where a million people can see them, eg. Twitter, a newsgroup, youtube video comments...anything with a lot of readers. Just agree that it will be done on Tuesdays and Thursdays on Youtube's most popular video of the moment at 4:30pm (or something like that). You can upload the message via an Internet cafe if you're really paranoid.

(It's nothing new, just a 21st century variant of publishing special adverts in newspapers).

Re:Enough (3, Interesting)

smpoole7 (1467717) | about 9 months ago | (#45649215)

> PS: If you're a terrorist reading this ...

I'm NOT defending the NSA, but remember that this type of communication requires ... communication. In other words, you have to arrange in advance that the phrase "the chair is purple" means "proceed to site B." The US Government's plan has been to

(a) freeze the assets of the terrorists so that they're constantly strapped for cash
(b) via drone strikes and etc., make it clear that when they DO try to meet to arrange things, they'll possibly be blown up
(c) look at every single communication between the groups when they DO try to arrange things.

That's their plan, anyway. But anyone with any sense at all should have known that, once all of that surveillance was in place, it would be abused. As it has been.

Counter argument: if the government had *allowed* details of the surveillance to leak, it might deter the terrorists. Kind of like during the Cold War, the US and Soviets *wanted* each side to at least have a rough idea of their capabilities, to further discourage anyone with an itchy finger on the Big Red Button.

But the truth is, intelligence agencies want to know everything. Absolutely everything. It's just like a dog licking his privates: if he can, he will. Likewise, if they can monitor everything you do, they will. They can't resist it.

Re:Enough (1)

Joce640k (829181) | about 9 months ago | (#45649275)

> PS: If you're a terrorist reading this ...

I'm NOT defending the NSA, but remember that this type of communication requires ... communication.

Yes, but once you get the ball rolling it self perpetuates.

Agreed that the real problem is the mentality of the people running the show who just want *everything*. That's why we need to start encrypting now, and later to start increasing the signal to noise ratio.

(Shouldn't that be "decreasing"? Everybody says always "increasing", shrug...).

Re:Enough (1)

bytesex (112972) | about 9 months ago | (#45649343)

It's like key negotiation: if your key has leaked, or you have a feeling it might be about to leak, you change it. Requiring another round of communication.

Re:Enough (1)

Joce640k (829181) | about 9 months ago | (#45649795)

It's like key negotiation: if your key has leaked, or you have a feeling it might be about to leak, you change it. Requiring another round of communication.

If you meet somebody in the flesh you can exchange any number of keys. Change it once a week, it doesn't matter.

Use the valuable, single-use, keys to exchange more lists of keys. Give one key list to each agent via their list of disposable keys. You only need a single known-secure key exchange to enable thousands of other people to communicate securely.

I imagine you could knock up a piece of software to automate all of that in a couple of weeks. The key lists could be plain text files posted anywhere on the internet.

Re:Enough (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45649713)

Counter argument: if the government had *allowed* details of the surveillance to leak, it might deter the terrorists. Kind of like during the Cold War, the US and Soviets *wanted* each side to at least have a rough idea of their capabilities, to further discourage anyone with an itchy finger on the Big Red Button.

Indeed. I am reminded of Doctor Strangelove: "Of course, the whole point of a doomsday machine is lost if you keep it a secret! Why didn't you tell the world, eh?"

Re:Enough (2)

Burz (138833) | about 9 months ago | (#45648959)

A darknet is the only proper way to do that. Otherwise, they get most of the metadata anyway: Who, When, Where. Those are important details.

Re:Enough (1)

Joce640k (829181) | about 9 months ago | (#45649005)

Fixing that will be *very* difficult..

Whatever method you use you rely on other people to be relays for your data. They can set up fake relays, they're tapped into the backbones so they can track packets and see how they bounce, they might even be able to insert their own delays to get the packet timing perfect for them, etc.

How about we start with encryption and go from there...?

Re:Enough (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45649045)

Time to start encrypting everything by default.

Can we please start with https://slashdot.org [slashdot.org] ?

eh? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45648743)

eh?

Re:eh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45648869)

Haha Kanada

Re:eh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45649301)

TETSUOOOOO~

Yeah, sure, and Santa Claus (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45648747)

watches child porn. No one over 10 believes in Canada. It's a metaphor for everything that could be right about other countries.

Re:Yeah, sure, and Santa Claus (1)

Vanderhoth (1582661) | about 9 months ago | (#45649445)

This is why Canada is going to take over the world.

By the time anyone is willing to take the reports of some fisherman in slicks and a dingy sinking battle ships seriously we'll own three quarters of the world. The only country that *could* do anything about it is the US and we'll just stop printing Canada on world maps and globes, the Americans will never find us. The plan is working perfectly, eh.

Re:Yeah, sure, and Santa Claus (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45649731)

The US gets its maps printed in Canada? Well then - I guess then they've signed they're own death warrant.

Re:Yeah, sure, and Santa Claus (1)

Vanderhoth (1582661) | about 9 months ago | (#45650057)

I still remember when I first moved from Nova Scotia to North Carolina and having an argument with the geography teacher over where Nova Scotia was located. After about five minutes of arguing we went to the map and I was kicked out of class for the rest of the year for "show boating" as he put it. Then even when I was living in Bar Harbor, Main I still met people that didn't know where *Canada* was. It's like come on, Main is right on the border with New Brunswick and there's a ferry that runs from Bar Harbor to Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, How could you not know where Canada was?

The rest of the world loves to joke about how bad Americans are with geography, but I've lived it first hand. To be fair though, we did have to spend a lot of time memorizing the 50 states and their capitols and the 100 counties in NC. So I can see where geography for the rest of the world might get neglected. When I was in middle school in Nova Scotia we covered the ten provinces and two territories (it's three territories now) of Canada, which is a piece of cake as long as you don't have to spell Saskatchewan.

Re:Yeah, sure, and Santa Claus (1)

kilfarsnar (561956) | about 9 months ago | (#45650507)

I still remember when I first moved from Nova Scotia to North Carolina and having an argument with the geography teacher over where Nova Scotia was located. After about five minutes of arguing we went to the map and I was kicked out of class for the rest of the year for "show boating" as he put it. Then even when I was living in Bar Harbor, Main I still met people that didn't know where *Canada* was. It's like come on, Main is right on the border with New Brunswick and there's a ferry that runs from Bar Harbor to Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, How could you not know where Canada was?

Your geography teacher didn't know where Nova Scotia is? SMH. And then he/she kicks you out of class for making him/her look bad for not knowing his/her own damn material. BTW, it's spelled "Maine". ;-)

So? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45648749)

This is unsurprising. Intelligence services gather intelligence. Stop being daft.

"There's not that much known about Canadian intel" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45648751)

The ones I've met are fairly bright.

Re:"There's not that much known about Canadian int (2, Funny)

Hamsterdan (815291) | about 9 months ago | (#45648807)

We elected Harper, so I don't think so....

Re:"There's not that much known about Canadian int (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45649271)

Why is parent modded troll?
We knew his platform, we banked on his minority status during his first two terms for him to not actually implement it. Then we give him a majority, then we cry bloody murder like raging retards when he gets to work on implementing his platform THAT WE ALL KNEW ABOUT ALREADY.

It's true, Canadians aren't all that bright.

Re:"There's not that much known about Canadian int (1)

JustOK (667959) | about 9 months ago | (#45649383)

Well, it is dark for like 6 months a year up there.

Re:"There's not that much known about Canadian int (1)

Vanderhoth (1582661) | about 9 months ago | (#45649923)

Well, to be fair the Cons won the majority with just 39% of the vote so 61% of Canadians didn't vote for them. The problem is most of the seats are in Ontario (NDP/Con 95), BC (Con/NDP 28), Alberta (Con 21), Saskatchewan(Con 14) make up 158 of 282 seats, which is 56% of the seats for four out of 13 provinces and territories. Alberta, the Texas of Canada, and Saskatchewan are almost competently conservative. Ontario and BC are at least half Con. So conservatively speaking (pun intended) there's about 96 seats, or 37% of Canada.

Nova Scotia (Con/Lib 11), Newfoundland (Lib/Con 10), PEI (Lib/Con 4) and New Brunswick (Con 7) only make up 32 seats altogether, less than 12%. The territories have 3 seats, just over 1%. Who cares how they voted, sorry guys. Quebec is the only province that has any amount of sway with 75 seats, but they voted almost completely NDP, which showed as the NDP is the official opposition with 103 seats. Then there's poor lonely Manitoba (NDP/Con 14) out there all on his own.

The only way to get the conservatives out would be to get Ontario, Quebec and BC to vote NDP or Liberal. Saskatchewan and Alberta are always going to be conservative. The Maritimes can be swayed, but will always default to liberal, not that it matters with only 32 seats combine. We might as well join up with the territories and their 3 seats in the "no one cares about you" category. Ontario and Quebec are really the only two that matter for an election, they do have a large percentage of the population, but they were each guaranteed a minimum number of seats under confederation so even if they only had 100 people living in each province they'd still have the majority sway over Canada.

Then there's the "The Fair Representation Act" (passed with the Con's majority in 2011 to take effect in the 2015 election) which grants even more seats to Ontario, Quebec, Alberta and BC so it's likely the Cons will win another majority because they basically set it up so the provinces that are most likely to vote them in, with the exception of Quebec, also have the most seats. For Quebec the Con's continue to give special rewards in the hope that catering to them will pick up a few conservative ridings. They basically set the board so they can't lose.

Canada is much more left-wing (~60%) than right-wing (~40%), but we have two left wing parties that split the left vote allowing the right-wing to monopolize. Which consequentially was because of the 2003 merger of the two right-wing parties and the event that gave Harper his initial minority government and lead to the cons being in charge for the last 10 years. If it was still two right, two left parties the Con's wouldn't have a chance, and IF we ever go to a two party system because the Liberals and NDP merge they'll cripple the conservatives.

Not that I have anything against the Cons. I personally don't like Harper or agree with his Bush Jr., ignorance is bliss, leadership style, but I like a lot of the core conservative values. Unfortunately, execution is everything and the Cons have just sucked at it since Harper took the wheel.

Re:"There's not that much known about Canadian int (1)

StrangeBrew (769203) | about 9 months ago | (#45650415)

There is no hope for you if you honestly believe that the Liberals wouldn't cooperate with the U.S., Britain, or any other ally in exactly the same way. The NDP, on the other hand, would start spying for China and Russia instead.

Re:"There's not that much known about Canadian int (1)

Vanderhoth (1582661) | about 9 months ago | (#45650595)

I don't think anything I said eluded to what I believe the Liberals, Conservatives or NDP would do if they were the ones in power. All I said, other than providing a bunch of factual numbers, was I don't like Harper's Bush Jr., ignorance is bliss, leadership style. Which is basically to lock the media out, fire or gag anyone that can provide evidence his policies aren't based on facts and and flood every channel with attack and economic action plan ads.

The conservatives have done a few good things under Harper, but they choose to focus on things Trudeau said over a decade ago for a documentary taken out of context or his non-existent pot smoking habit (especially since the cons are the ones that legalized pot for medical use) or that he's having some female degrading women and politics event (because you know women don't need to know or care about politics) rather than saying, "Yeah, you like tax cuts? Guess what, we did that for you Canada! You like not being dragged into a world wide recession? We did that for you to! You like not having your housing market crash? Yep, that's us as well!".

What? (5, Funny)

Hamsterdan (815291) | about 9 months ago | (#45648787)

* 'There's not that much known about Canadian intelligence.'*

As A Canadian, I kinda resent that :)

Don't. (1)

MRe_nl (306212) | about 9 months ago | (#45648847)

There is no higher praise.
It's like being called a traitor by Dick Cheney ; ).

On the other hand the amount of surprise at these revelations is surprising. Where is peoples sense of history? Remember the second world war (Axis and Allies anyone?) and extrapolate from that incorporating the events since.

Re:Don't. (5, Insightful)

DarkOx (621550) | about 9 months ago | (#45648877)

There isn't anything in any of these revelations many had not guessed or spotted. There were and still are tons of people who just wanted to live in denial about it. Snodens stuff is making that hard for them as they can't just dismiss the people saying it as tinfoil hat clad conspiracy nuts, with actual evidence floating about.

Re:What? (2)

korbulon (2792438) | about 9 months ago | (#45648857)

Nobody was implying that it doesn't exist, they were simply referring to it within the Rumsfeldian epistemological category of "unknown unknown".

Re:What? (1)

BringsApples (3418089) | about 9 months ago | (#45649377)

Canada has much more snow than the US, and yet the US produced a Snowden. Maybe Canada will produce a Chaude Journée.

Re:What? (1)

Dreth (1885712) | about 9 months ago | (#45649737)

* 'There's not that much known about Canadian intelligence.'*

As A Canadian, I kinda resent that :)

Dave Mustaine wrote:

"Canadian Intelligence,
two words combined that can't make sense."

Then ripped about 20 solos before finishing the song.

Re:What? (1)

DigitalSorceress (156609) | about 9 months ago | (#45649775)

"""
* 'There's not that much known about Canadian intelligence.'*

As A Canadian, I kinda resent that :)
"""

that just means they're doing a really good job. :)

If only you knew the the power of the .... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45648835)

Nationality most offended by this news: Canadian
Nationality least surprised by this news: Canadian

As long as Steven Harper and his "Conservative" cronies have power, surely the world knows that Canada has gone over to the dark side. There is still good here ... but it sure as hell isn't to be found amongst the ruling party. Shortcomings in our political system allow a government that has always been opposed by the majority of Canadians to hold the reigns of government.

Re:If only you knew the the power of the .... (1)

Phrogman (80473) | about 9 months ago | (#45649381)

Wow, I have never seen a score of "0, Insightful" before this.

Re:If only you knew the the power of the .... (1)

Chris Mattern (191822) | about 9 months ago | (#45650343)

When something gets modded down as "Overrated", it doesn't change the mod classification. You can get modded all the way down to -1 with a positive mod class that way. It also works the other way with "Underrated", leading to such things as "Score: 5, Troll".

Re:If only you knew the the power of the .... (1)

JustOK (667959) | about 9 months ago | (#45649389)

People always forget that he's an hyphenated Conservative and it ain't progressive.

Canadian Intelligence (3, Funny)

rikkards (98006) | about 9 months ago | (#45648861)

There's not that much known about Canadian intelligence.

Too easy..

Thank you kindly, Canada (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45648875)

That famed Canadian politeness has made you too polite to say NO, EH?

Re:Thank you kindly, Canada (2)

Nerdfest (867930) | about 9 months ago | (#45649061)

Well, that and they pay us.

Re:Thank you kindly, Canada (1)

MikeBabcock (65886) | about 9 months ago | (#45649249)

Its the least we can do for the billions the US spends on their Navy and Air force that patrols our Arctic.

Re:Thank you kindly, Canada (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45649285)

Well no, that whole NORAD thing kinda forces Canada to go along with whatever the US want, since otherwise we'd have to have a real army and defend ourselves and all that expensive jazz. Politeness doesn't enter into the equation, Canadians are assholes when you get to know them.

5 eyes (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45648891)

well given they are both part of the "5 eyes" club doesnt surprise me at all.

Canada is ruined (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45648929)

The evil Americans have infected the Great White North, now it's dirty like yellow snow.

Pantysniffers (1)

frrrp (720185) | about 9 months ago | (#45649003)

The NSA is like cancer spreading through the lymph nodes.

mSod down (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45649041)

Will work for toques and beer, eh. (1)

DaveyJJ (1198633) | about 9 months ago | (#45649111)

Throw in a box of Timbits or some bacon, and we're nothing but your bitches, you macho Yanks, you.

Wow... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45649169)

...they have Internet in Canada!?

Wesley Wark (1)

khakipuce (625944) | about 9 months ago | (#45649277)

"Wesley Wark"

Wow, I really misread that name...

Always (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45649295)

It's always the quiet ones the ones that get you.

Don't Blame Canada... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45649327)

Blame Stephen Harper and his minions - not even Canadians trust him. And now that Rob Ford is the headliner, Harper will magically dust Duffy and Wallin under the carpet never to be heard from again. And no, I haven't forgotten about the contempt of Parliament thing.

What price freedom? (1)

garyoa1 (2067072) | about 9 months ago | (#45649423)

Little by little they thumb their noses at freedom. Slowly the door swings shut.

Unintentionally Funny Comment (1)

hduff (570443) | about 9 months ago | (#45649433)

"'There's not that much known about Canadian intelligence.'"

Re:Unintentionally Funny Comment (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45649639)

Post #4 with the same joke...

this all goes back to WW II (1)

joneil (677771) | about 9 months ago | (#45649917)

The collusion & co-operation between Canadian and American intelligence agencies can be traced back to "Camp X" during World War II. Google it yourself to see, but Sir William Stephenson, who was I think head of British intelligence at the time, was a Canadian who was friends of both Churchill and Roosevelt, and head of Camp X.

  Just go get yourself a copy of the book A Man Called Intrepid, which was publish 4 or 5 years ago, and if you read it, none of this should come as any surprise to anyone at all. Canada does "fly under the radar" as far as world view is concerned, which sometimes makes us a perfect place or partner for intelligence for the big guys, but I can tell you, this country has very sharp teeth of it's own. You just never hear about it, which is exactly the way they want it.

Other Unknowns (1)

the eric conspiracy (20178) | about 9 months ago | (#45650497)

"'There's not that much known about Canadian intelligence.'"

Clearly they also don't know that Canada became the 51st state during the Cold War. Kept secret so they could do stuff that we can't get away with.

It's known in the intelligence community as the Maple Leaf State.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>