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Twitter Will Track Your Browsing To Sell Ads

timothy posted about 4 months ago | from the awareness-is-key dept.

Advertising 120

jfruh writes "Remember how social networks were going to transform the advertising industry because they'd tailor ads not to context or to your web browsing history, but to the innate preferences you express through interactions and relationships with friends? Well, that didn't work with Facebook, and it turns out it's not working with Twitter either. The microblogging site has announced that it's getting into the ad retargeting game: you'll soon start seeing promoted tweets that are chosen based on websites you've visited in the past. The innovation, if you can call it that, is that the retargeting will work across devices, so you can be looking at a website on your phone and see promoted tweets on your laptop's browser, or vice versa."

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120 comments

Nice.... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45649709)

Good thing I never used either FB or Twitter.
And I never will be going to.

Re: Nice.... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45650371)

Yeah it must be awesome to have no friends. Enjoy living in your mom's basement playing call of duty and throwing your life away sucker

Re: Nice.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45652497)

I'm not the OP, but I imagine he like me spends time more of his time in real life with real life friends than interacting with FB bots or Twitter bots.

Oh, wait, you don't actually think those "people" you interact with on FB or Twitter are real, do you?

Re: Nice.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45652689)

no proly just nsa bots, but they ARE very friendly

Re: Nice.... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45650493)

In every article about Twitter or Facebook there's done idiot who brags about not using then. Good for you, man. Want a cookie?

Re: Nice.... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45650501)

I think the point is he doesn't want a cookie...

Re: Nice.... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45650675)

Now you are being sarcastic! Oh wait, maybe it was the OP who was being sarcastic?

Re:Nice.... (3, Informative)

findoutmoretoday (1475299) | about 4 months ago | (#45650753)

Good thing I never used either FB or Twitter.

if you have seen any FB icon, you're on FB

Re:Nice.... (1)

lordbeejee (732882) | about 4 months ago | (#45651897)

Good thing I never used either FB or Twitter.

if you have seen any FB icon, you're on FB

If he really has no facebook&twitter because account, chances are that he is running ghostery and no icons will be seen nor will he be tracked in that way.

Re:Nice.... (2)

Kazoo the Clown (644526) | about 4 months ago | (#45652447)

There's several copies of me on FB. If you can't keep them from collecting data on you, overload them with redundant and irrelevant information.

How does one prevent this ? (4, Interesting)

middlemen (765373) | about 4 months ago | (#45649745)

I have a genuine question. Assuming one uses Twitter from the phone, how does one prevent the Twitter app on the phone to scan the browsing history ? If they cannot scan my browsing history they cannot give me ads.

On another note, if there are companies who can scan tweets (such as stocktwits) to give you sentiment analysis, why cant Twitter do the same ? Have they realized that they just have a bunch of web developers who know only Javascript and can't do text processing using it ?

Re:How does one prevent this ? (2)

Jason Levine (196982) | about 4 months ago | (#45649785)

On another note, if there are companies who can scan tweets (such as stocktwits) to give you sentiment analysis, why cant Twitter do the same ? Have they realized that they just have a bunch of web developers who know only Javascript and can't do text processing using it ?

Even more so because Twitter has direct access to their databases while all other developers must work through the Twitter API. Don't get me wrong: It's nice, but if you need to analyze massive amounts of data, it can be slow to transfer it from Twitter to your application.

Re:How does one prevent this ? (3, Informative)

brunes69 (86786) | about 4 months ago | (#45649817)

This isn't even a permission an App can request on Android. Not sure about iOS.

This is not how Twitter is going to do this anyway. They are doing it via the little "Twitter" links everywhere on the web. These will track your page views, and then the instant you sign into your twitter account on that browser, they will know every page you visited. It is no different than how Google knows the pages you visited.

You can block it in two ways... either a) never sign into twitter in your browser unless in Incognito mode, or b) Block third-party cookies and trackers using Ad Block. I do the latter.

Re:How does one prevent this ? (1)

safetyinnumbers (1770570) | about 4 months ago | (#45650273)

Google Chrome allows easy creation and switching of user profiles.

I've wondered whether I should have a separate profile for each social site as a way to isolate them.

I turn off 3rd party cookies, but I heard that there was an exclusion for sites that you had logged into and received cookies from.

Meaning, 3rd-party ad site could not send you cookies, but Facebook still could if you'd signed in to it earlier.

More drastic isolation of browser instances is another option (I've wondered about sandboxie but not tried it).

Re:How does one prevent this ? (1)

Wootery (1087023) | about 4 months ago | (#45650427)

I wonder if browser profiles would be enough.

One also has to worry about things like Evercookie [wikipedia.org]. I'd like to think browser-profiles are built to defeat EverCookie, but whether they actually do I don't know.

Re:How does one prevent this ? (4, Informative)

mlts (1038732) | about 4 months ago | (#45650429)

I use sandboxie, and find it well worth using. With additional "supercookies" and methods to save state, having all Web browser data saved on a different volume, and is completely purged when done, no matter how many hidden files are written, is a good method of protecting privacy. Doesn't take much doing either. One can force a browser to run in a sandbox, or just right-click on it, select "run in sandbox", pick the sandbox you want it in, and go.

This is also coupled with "click to play" for Flash or other stuff, and using AdBlock for an extension, so the browser doesn't have to deal with most of the nasty stuff.

I also run a different browser for banking that I do general browsing. The more separation, the better.

People firewall their computers, might as well have a layer of security (sandbox or VM) against untrusted code that hits their machines directly.

Re:How does one prevent this ? (1)

mrchaotica (681592) | about 4 months ago | (#45650859)

Although it may be good enough for stopping Twitter, the trouble with Sandboxie is that it still relies on Windows, which cannot be trusted for other reasons. IMO, if you're going to the trouble of sandboxing everything anyway, you might as well just skip straight to Qubes OS [qubes-os.org].

Re:How does one prevent this ? (1)

mlts (1038732) | about 4 months ago | (#45651429)

There is always the next step up -- a VM. It sounds like a lot of pointless steps, but with VMWare's Unity, the Web browser appears as another application on the taskbar, except marked with a color around it.

I do agree sandboxing might take a little bit of work, but it isn't that much for the protection gained. Similar with a VM. Even when not in VMWare's Unity mode, it is just a window to click on.

Long term, this complete sandboxing functionality should be in the OS. BSD's jail(), SELinux, AppArmor, and Window's low privilege mode all are steps in the right direction, but what is needed is separation of not just the browser from the OS, but separating each window/tab from each other, so a compromised window can't affect banking data on another tab, and in no way, the compromised window can get a user context [1] or higher. This has to be a cooperation between the Web browser application and the OS, as if the Web browser has a bug in it allowing malware to gain access, this is limited as much as possible. This way, there are at least two layers before a rogue plugin has control of the machine.

[1]: If a user context is gained, that is almost as good as admin access. From there, ransomware can run to encrypt files, Trojans can be dropped, keyloggers started, BitCoin miners launched, and DDoS attacks started. None need root/admin access.

Re:How does one prevent this ? (2)

mrchaotica (681592) | about 4 months ago | (#45651607)

There is always the next step up -- a VM.... Long term, this complete sandboxing functionality should be in the OS.

Did you read my post? Running everything in (separate) VMs is exactly the point of Qubes OS, with the advantage (compared to Windows or VMWare) of being Free Software.

Re:How does one prevent this ? (2)

mlts (1038732) | about 4 months ago | (#45651803)

Yes, Qubes is useful. I was pointing out how to accomplish a fraction of the security of said OS with existing tools.

In a perfect world (i.e. no installed base), that would be how all desktop operating systems would be. The ideal would be a type 1 hypervisor, a backend deduplicated filesystem, copy on write capabilities, and so on. Someone fires off their office suite in one VM, save a file to a shared directory only visible to that VM and the mail client VM, and so on. Essentially not just virtualizing the memory space like conventional operating systems do, but completely duplicating libraries and all userspace.

In addition, the application VMs can be encrypted, only decrypted when used, and once done, the keys purged. This way, if a laptop is stolen while it is being used, not everything is compromised.

Only downside of this is that it does take a learning curve. I was trying to point out a solution that is better than nothing -- stick the Web browser in its own box, well away from anything sensitive.

Re:How does one prevent this ? (1)

mrchaotica (681592) | about 4 months ago | (#45651981)

Yes, Qubes is useful. I was pointing out how to accomplish a fraction of the security of said OS with existing tools.

Oh, okay. I was under the impression that Qubes was "existing" (I've seen people on Slashdot claim to use it, but haven't tried it myself). It does have a version labeled "release" on its download page, so I assume it's at least somewhat usable...

Re:How does one prevent this ? (1)

Kazoo the Clown (644526) | about 4 months ago | (#45652527)

It doesn't matter, they can connect the separate sandbox sessions through the login credentials you use at various sites, credentials that are universally tied to an email address. Unless you use a different email address with every separately sandboxed app, you're wasting your time.

Re:How does one prevent this ? (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45650537)

This isn't even a permission an App can request on Android. Not sure about iOS.

There is, actually. READ_HISTORY_BOOKMARKS [android.com]

  To prevent apps from using this (and other permissions) download something like App Ops [google.com] or root your device and use XPrivacy [google.com].

Re:How does one prevent this ? (1)

mrchaotica (681592) | about 4 months ago | (#45650749)

You can block it in two ways... either a) never sign into twitter in your browser unless in Incognito mode, or b) Block third-party cookies and trackers using Ad Block. I do the latter.

The first method would still allow Twitter to build a "shadow profile." It may not be explicitly linked to your Twitter ID, but it's still just as identifiable. Therefore, only your second suggestion is an actual solution, in my opinion.

Re:How does one prevent this ? (1)

brunes69 (86786) | about 4 months ago | (#45651093)

I don't see how. Nothing is retained in Incognito mode. Every time you launch it you have a totally new profile.

The only way they could build said "shadow profile" is based on IP. But they can't tie the IP to a given twitter user name if you never sign into twitter on that device.

Re:How does one prevent this ? (1)

mrchaotica (681592) | about 4 months ago | (#45651393)

I don't see how. Nothing is retained in Incognito mode. Every time you launch it you have a totally new profile.

You make the implicit assumption that you're relaunching often, which may not always be the case (especially if you're using it all the time, instead of only occasionally).

The only way they could build said "shadow profile" is based on IP. But they can't tie the IP to a given twitter user name if you never sign into twitter on that device.

  1. Point 1: The Twitter user name is probably the least important piece of information they're trying to connect.
  2. Point 2: You only have to slip up once in order for your shadow profile and your named profile to get connected, permanently. It's way too risky.

Re:How does one prevent this ? (3, Informative)

roscocoltran (1014187) | about 4 months ago | (#45651671)

The IP is not the only way to identify a browser.

try this link and cry:
how unique is your browser [eff.org]

I talk smart, but my nerd resolution of 2400x1920 gives 15 bits of identifying identification, and firefiox ESR give 10.

"Your browser fingerprint appears to be unique among the 3,665,195 tested so far."

in fact disabling cookies makes your browser more unique. Add the timezone, the fonts, the plugins and your browser quickly becomes more and more unique.

Re:How does one prevent this ? (1)

brunes69 (86786) | about 4 months ago | (#45652065)

I think you are missing the point. If they can't tie this profile to my Twitter handle then frankly I could care less if they build said profile.

Anonymous profiles do not cause a privacy issue, at least not for me. It's irrelevant to me.

Furthermore - this profile is just based on little more than the plugins I have installed and my resolution. I would be willing to wager quite a large sum that the combination of those things is far from unique to myself.

Re:How does one prevent this ? (1)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | about 4 months ago | (#45650961)

I use a squid proxy configured with a list of ad-and-tracking sites to block. There's also privoxy, which is made for that. If you've got a lot of computers and other devices or a whole family to protect, central filtering on the home server-router is easier than maintaining multiple adblock installs plus filters on android tablets, phones and iStuff.

Re:How does one prevent this ? (2)

gstoddart (321705) | about 4 months ago | (#45649819)

I don't use Twitter, so I'm not sure ... but I've got AdBlockPlus on my phone.

But this is just one of the many reasons why I'm not interested in Twitter, and have most of my browsers well equipped with cookie blockers, script blockers, and a raft of stuff to keep things like this away from me.

I have no desire to help advertisers and the like collect more information. And I'm certainly not going to provide it if I can avoid it.

Maybe they can sell me targeted ads for tinfoil or something. ;-)

Re:How does one prevent this ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45649871)

What makes you believe they aren't doing that? Big data means you want loads of data. Its good to be able to analyze all the tweets, its better to be able to analyze all the tweets and the websites somebody visits.

Re:How does one prevent this ? (2)

Boss, Pointy Haired (537010) | about 4 months ago | (#45649879)

They know every website you've visited that has a "Tweet" or "Follow Me" button on it, so could easily target ads based on that - doesn't involved reading your browser history at all.

Re:How does one prevent this ? (1)

Dodgy G33za (1669772) | about 4 months ago | (#45649983)

And this is true even if you don't have a twitter account or use Twitter. It is just in that case they don't know anything about you.

This is why I redirect facebook in my hostsini. looks like I should do the same with the other icon providers. Although I block ads anyway.

Re:How does one prevent this ? (4, Interesting)

gstoddart (321705) | about 4 months ago | (#45650143)

And this is true even if you don't have a twitter account or use Twitter. It is just in that case they don't know anything about you.

And this is why ad blockers, cookie blockers, and script blockers are your friends.

Deny them the data is the best approach.

Re:How does one prevent this ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45652693)

Host files and send all that shit to localhost

Re:How does one prevent this ? (1)

Thanshin (1188877) | about 4 months ago | (#45649905)

I have a genuine question. Assuming one uses Twitter from the phone, how does one prevent the Twitter app on the phone to scan the browsing history ? If they cannot scan my browsing history they cannot give me ads.

1 - Set up a vnc connection from your phone to your home computer.
2 - At home, run Twitter on a virtual machine with no other app installed. (The virtual machine has its own wifi through an usb dongle never used for anything else)
3 - Crack a neighbor wifi and connect to the internet through it.
4 - Connect the virtual machine to one paid and one free vpn services. (passing through your neighbor's AP).
5 - Once you've got that set up, connect to your contact in a country with no extradition treaty with your own country and send him a plain message with what you want to tweet. Your contact shall then write the message in twitter and send you any related message or reply, by ordinary postal service to a numbered nameless po-box, far away from your home. (a different one every two weeks).

Re:How does one prevent this ? (1)

Thanshin (1188877) | about 4 months ago | (#45649925)

In case someone is humor impaired, I feel the need to say that the previous post was a joke.

Obviously you shouldn't crack your neighbor's wifi.

You need to drive around the city cracking a different wifi for each tweet.

Re:How does one prevent this ? (2)

Dodgy G33za (1669772) | about 4 months ago | (#45650007)

I thought you wrote "wife".... put a completely different complexion on the post.

Re:How does one prevent this ? (0)

PopeRatzo (965947) | about 4 months ago | (#45650149)

In case someone is humor impaired, I feel the need to say that the previous post was a joke.

Damn, I'd gotten all the way to step 4.

Re:How does one prevent this ? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45649913)

Patient: Doctor, it hurts when I poke my eye.
Doctor: Don't poke your eye.

Re:How does one prevent this ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45651139)

Patient: I tried that but it hurts even more when I poke my wife's eye.

Re:How does one prevent this ? (1)

Walterk (124748) | about 4 months ago | (#45649931)

Use a third party application (while you can). They don't have the promoted tweets and the like. For Android I recommend TweetLanes [google.com]

Here's how (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45649975)

According to Twitter's official post regarding this:
"While we want to make our ads more useful through tailored audiences, we also want to provide simple and meaningful privacy choices to our users. Twitter users can simply uncheck the box next to “Promoted content” in their privacy settings, and Twitter will not match their account to information shared by our ads partners for tailoring ads. And because Twitter supports Do Not Track (DNT), Twitter will not receive browser-related information (a browser cookie ID) from our ads partners for tailoring ads if users have DNT enabled in their browser. Our Help Center has more information about these options."

If you're concerned about tracking and DON'T currently have DNT enabled, you really should. It appears opting out of "promoted content" will cause them not to show you tailored ads, but doesn't mean they won't store the data (and possibly share that info with others).

Re:How does one prevent this ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45650009)

Actually, it does not have to scan your browser history. It knows what you sites you were on by it's widget being included on virtually on sites on the web. You visist site A, it contains Tweeter's widget that kindly reports to Tweeter that you were there. The only solution is to block all beacons, widgets and the rest of third-party garbage on sites. Ergo, use Ghostery.

Re:How does one prevent this ? (1)

BitZtream (692029) | about 4 months ago | (#45650021)

I have a genuine question. Assuming one uses Twitter from the phone, how does one prevent the Twitter app on the phone to scan the browsing history

Use an iPhone. Stop being the product.

You're worried about apps reading your browsing history because you are the product, not the customer. Stop buying products who's main selling point is the free OS someone else gave them until you realize why they gave them the free OS in the first place.

Re:How does one prevent this ? (2)

TheP4st (1164315) | about 4 months ago | (#45650473)

The type of tracking in question have nothing to do with what OS you use as it is done via those little social media links that are present all over on nearly every damn website of a reasonably large size.

Use an iPhone. Stop being the product.

Use CyanogenMod. Stop being the product or a tool.

Re:How does one prevent this ? (2)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45650379)

Don't use Twitter? Life will still go on.

Re:How does one prevent this ? (1)

fluffythedestroyer (2586259) | about 4 months ago | (#45650381)

For users who bristle at the thought of another Internet company tracking them, Twitter offered a few options. Users can uncheck the box next to "promoted content" in their privacy settings and Twitter will not match their account to information shared by its partners for tailoring ads, Twitter said...

This should be THE solution if people don't want to be track but...

The company did not say, however, whether it would still hold on to users' data for other purposes.

that I'm not surprised so.. just browse in incognito if your that afraid or if its general browsing, just use a free web proxy. They don't offer ultra speed but to remain annonymous, they are very good

Re:How does one prevent this ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45650397)

HOSTS file. The article clearly states that Twitter plans to share cookies with ad companies. (Exactly what cookies were designed *not* to allow.) The same kind of thing is already happening with Google/Doubleclick, which has a presence on the vast majority of commercial websites. Likewise with Facebook and others who put tracking logos on sites to get "likes", often embedded in an iframe. If you allow them to set cookies (or perhaps even load web beacon trackers) then there's a good chance they know who you are at most websites you visit. Solution: Use a HOSTS file to block contact with ad companies.

Re:How does one prevent this ? (1)

fulldecent (598482) | about 4 months ago | (#45650405)

>> Remember how social networks were going to transform the advertising industry because they'd tailor ads not to context or to your web browsing history, but to the innate preferences you express through interactions and relationships with friends

The major of online advertising spend is based on URLs and Keywords. And a "content network" campaign (URL-based) is already hard enough to set up.

Now I have to design my marketing strategy for online medical certifications based on (is a republican) (upper income bracket) ("likes" hospitals) (shops at Apple store)... forget about it.

hymenless monkeys still sharing their stuff (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45649761)

still not shooting each other.... talk about advanced?

Impending backfire of doom (1, Insightful)

Huntr (951770) | about 4 months ago | (#45649771)

I mean, what happens when 95% of promoted tweets are about porn?

Re:Impending backfire of doom (3, Funny)

ogar572 (531320) | about 4 months ago | (#45649797)

Maybe it will open your eyes to new genres

Re:Impending backfire of doom (2)

gstoddart (321705) | about 4 months ago | (#45649939)

Thereby requiring both eyeball and brain bleach.

Rule #34 is alive and well, and there's some weird stuff out there.

then pay to the user!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45649777)

They should pay something to the user as they are getting money from your internet habits!!!
That would be "The Social Network", the one who pays you to participate in!!
What if all users decide not to use it anymore? like a boicot. That will bring its value down to the ground

Incognito (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45649783)

This is why I do all my browsing in incognito mode now and only have one website open at a time. That and this [youtube.com]

Re: Incognito (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45649861)

Isn't that the

The inflection point for advertising (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45649833)

Is current targeted advertizing providing us helpful information about things we may be interested in or are they stalking us to build psychological profiles so they can manipulate us easier with the latest thing some corporation wants to shove down our throats?

Where is the ad-supported service that respects your privacy and simply asks you to select narrow categories of ads that you would actually be interested in and might benefit from?

Where is the for-fee service that respects your privacy and your desire to never be plagued with the mind virus that is advertizing?

When are we going to vilify the new stalker culture of advertising?

Problem? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45649835)

The solution seems simple to me. If you don't like the terms, don't use the service.

IMHO, Twitter is an inane service anyway.

Re:Problem? (1)

mlts (1038732) | about 4 months ago | (#45650699)

I have a Twitter account, and that was because during the job hunt a few years back, prospective employers demanded one's Twitter ID, and when I stated that there was no point, I was told the interview was over because I wasn't keeping up with the times and spilling my guts to the world on an hourly basis about my floater/sinker ratio when I hit the bathroom, etc.

So, I have one that follows some sanitized corporate sources, and has not been touched since 2010.

If I want to announce something to the world, I'll buy an ad on Facebook.

Sell more ads! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45649857)

Imagine what could be accomplished if instead of pushing more ads that Twatter actually did something useful. All these black holes of brain power and yet nothing beneficial coming out of them. What a waste...

Tailoring ads to browser history (1)

TheloniousToady (3343045) | about 4 months ago | (#45649865)

I'm sure glad they don't do that on Slashdot.

(Note for troll-happy moderators: the above is what we call a "joke". The giveaway is that it includes a common comedic construct we call "irony". Please note that a joke doesn't have to be particularly what we call "funny" to still qualify as such, as illustrated by this example. YMMV.)

Re:Tailoring ads to browser history (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45650023)

Explanation longer than the joke ... fail.

Re:Tailoring ads to browser history (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45650113)

You sure seem to feel it necessary to explain your jokes today. Remember, if you need to explain it, it probably isn't that funny to begin with.

Re:Tailoring ads to browser history (1)

TheloniousToady (3343045) | about 4 months ago | (#45650421)

Note for the humor impaired: The explanation was what we doctors call "the joke". It was inspired by a sequence in "The Meaning of Life". (Search for "what we doctors call" in http://www.montypython.net/meaningmm2.php. [montypython.net])

Left as an exercise for the student: was the above also a joke?

Re:Tailoring ads to browser history (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45651327)

It was still funnier before you explained it. Now that you've explained the explanation, it's even less funny.

Looks like Twitter wants to join Facebook (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45649893)

Into my DNS blocklist with all your domains!

I'm glad they're adamantly opposed to surveillance (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45649921)

... when it's done by the government that is.

When they do it, it's just the way they do business, the way everyone does business, and mmm most of their users don't seem to have any problems with it so they're going to keep on doing it.

Re:I'm glad they're adamantly opposed to surveilla (3, Insightful)

Desler (1608317) | about 4 months ago | (#45650115)

They aren't opposed to government surveillance. They are opposed to the damage done to their images because their collusion with the government was publicly revealed. Had Snowden never leaked anything you would have heard jack-and-shit from these companies about "reform". They would have just continued writing it off as a cost of doing business.

I'm sure I'll get downmodded again like I was yesterday for pointing this out by the clueless numbnuts who fall for these corporate PR stunts.

Time to prevent cross-site access (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45649929)

This type of tracking is simple to prevent. Disallow access to any uniquely identifiable information from 3rd parties when on a domain. It can be implemented in any ad blocker, or other plugin for a browser. It really should be the default settings in browsers. I really must question the motivations of the open source foundations when they are assisting in large scale tracking of users and assisting in hiding it.

Its almost like they are run by the NSA.

Ghostery (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45649977)

Just install Ghostery and problem solved.

How Will I See Ads If I Block Them? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45649989)

I block all ads, all social media buttons, all nonsense. I already pay to use the Internet. I'm not paying again by using more bandwidth and lessening my privacy. Everyone deserves a clean experience. Honestly, there has to be a better way than ads.

adverts are too late (2)

zaax (637433) | about 4 months ago | (#45650025)

and that the main problem with adverts they are using history and history is to late, as most people have moved on to otherthings.

Now prediction advertising....

advertising on faulty assumptions (2)

kisrael (134664) | about 4 months ago | (#45650047)

Man, there's an err of pathos to when similar strategies are applied elsewhere, somehow Youtube noticed I went to a standing desk site, now half my adverts are from there. And also, they don't notice when I've actually bought a damn thing, so more advertising is just down the drain... I guess advertising is such a small % game that they'll take whatever "bump" they can get, no matter how stupid they look.

Re:advertising on faulty assumptions (1)

hubie (108345) | about 4 months ago | (#45650195)

I was looking for some information on the Caché scripting language, and now a lot of my banner ads are for the women's clothing retailer of the same name.

Re:advertising on faulty assumptions (1)

Megane (129182) | about 4 months ago | (#45651369)

What happened to the good old days when advertising meant something was merely "sponsored by" a company, rather than a company trying to get up to your face, wave their arms around, and shout loudly in your ear?

Only for the dumb people. (3, Interesting)

Lumpy (12016) | about 4 months ago | (#45650279)

If you are not running with adblock on your browsers you deserve to have this crap happen to you. ALL websites need to be treated as hostile (Slashdot included) and you need to run browser extensions that disable and protect you from this crud. Adblock, redirect protectors, privacy reclaimers, etc...

And if you are a good computer person you install all this stuff on every computer you touch.

Re:Only for the dumb people. (3, Informative)

fbobraga (1612783) | about 4 months ago | (#45650571)

And if you are a good computer person you install all this stuff on every computer you touch.

But not in phones...

Re:Only for the dumb people. (1)

Lumpy (12016) | about 4 months ago | (#45650679)

Sadly the phones lack in this regard. Firefox and Chrome on phones are incapable of protecting you. But you can use a blocking hosts file if you jailbreak/root your phone.

Re:Only for the dumb people. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45651427)

Has no one mentioned running Adblock plus (the app) on android with a rooted phone? It can be set to block ads on all connections, wireless data, wifi, ect...

It even blocks most ads in the free versions of apps, save a few that have not been added to their filters yet.

The now-standard 'Web 2.0' business model (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45650739)

1. Brutally sodomize the personal privacy of anyone who comes within a mile of your service and say 'hey baby, I'm sorry' every time you're busted.

2. Sell ads.

- David Gerard on Slashdot [slashdot.org]

Inevitable really. (1)

photosonic (830763) | about 4 months ago | (#45650983)

I remember when cable TV started and there were no ads. You paid a small about every month and you had the blissful ad free environment. We all knew it wouldn't last and that ads would be back at full strength again. That's just the way it works. Get you in on promises of a better experience, then later on change the terms. Do these internet titans have anything better to do with their colossal revenue other than sink it into more ways to see what we do, simply to sell it to advertisers. Twitter was a darling, and now they want to grow up they are eating their parents (us)... for money! Nothing more, nothing less, just a straight up money. Imagine if Twitter was not-for-profit.

Re:Inevitable really. (2)

Megane (129182) | about 4 months ago | (#45651511)

I remember when cable TV started in the US, it was merely a way not to have to fuck around with an antenna and rotator and still get a crappy signal. The "cable-only" channels came later in the early '80s, but only the "movie" channels (HBO, Showtime, etc.) didn't have ads. Must be a difference in how cable TV started in the UK, I suppose.

I've been happily back to antenna for over a decade, especially since it went digital. (It works as long as you don't care to watch live sports, which are mostly on cable/sat-only channels now.)

#twitterwillsoonbehistory (1)

vikingpower (768921) | about 4 months ago | (#45651539)

This is the beginning of the end, much more than the end of the beginning, for Twitter. How sad I may find it - I DO think that this sort of ultra-commercial moves will induce a company that was, until recently, a start-up, to be technology conservator rather than an innovator. Interesting times at Twitter are over....

LOL, HAHA, and FML (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45651723)

LOL, HAHA = display ads for comedy shows
FML = display ads for pharmaceutical drugs to treat depression

If you're a comedian or a drug company then this posting-context-based social media market is booming!

Why don't they just ask the NSA? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45651817)

What we're going to buy. New dark funding source :)

If user will buy $items_used_for_terrorism {
          alert the press! it works! score +1 for justice!
  } else
if user will buy $random_junk { ....

oh crap. I should stop encouraging them.... this is actually starting to make sense from a reciprocal standpoint.

Twitter says ... (1)

Obfuscant (592200) | about 4 months ago | (#45652323)

...you'll soon start seeing promoted tweets that are chosen based on websites you've visited in the past.

No,I won't. I stopped looking at twitter when they started creating fake tweets from advertisers that I couldn't shut off or stop "following", in twitspeak.

And Yahoo Groups has started mixing advertisements in with the group messages as if they were part of the group content.

Re:Twitter says ... (1)

Kazoo the Clown (644526) | about 4 months ago | (#45652653)

Ads in twitter? I don't see any of this. I don't use a general web browser for twitter at all though. FB on the other hand, I do see "suggested posts", and I don't use a browser there either. So it's certainly possible but I've not seen it yet on twitter.

Twitter = waste of time which = waste of money. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45652711)

Only idiots use this shit.

Of course there are a lot of idiots.

Do try hard to see that you are not among them.

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