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Google Opens Asian Data Centers But Shuns China and India

Unknown Lamer posted about 4 months ago | from the google-announces-shuttering-of-u.s.-datacenters dept.

Businesses 75

judgecorp writes "Google has opened data centers in Singapore and Taiwan to serve the boom in Asian Internet users. But it canceled a $300 million data center project in Hong Kong to focus on the Taiwan site and the smaller one in Singapore. Officially the problem was lack of space in Hong Kong, but China's repressive attitude to the Internet (and the history of the Chinese hack on Gmail in 2010) must have contributed to the move."

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75 comments

good for them (3, Interesting)

O('_')O_Bush (1162487) | about 4 months ago | (#45659665)

This sounds like exactly the right move, except for maybe not being able to serve the Chinese market like they might have in Hong Kong.

Re:good for them (2)

iserlohn (49556) | about 4 months ago | (#45659789)

This is not good for Hong Kong as it is the only place in China (apart from maybe Macau) that has a free press and significant protection on civil liberties. It's not like HK has any leverage on the decision process in Mainland China.

Re:good for them (4, Insightful)

bobwalt (2500092) | about 4 months ago | (#45660031)

It is more like Hong Kong's much touted liberties are more illusion than reality. What freedoms Hong Kong has only exists at the whim of China's central government. Indeed, Beijing has made it clear they will not let Hong Kong go too far. China has never really understood freedom of the press that is why they made such a concerted effort to hack US newspapers. They just do not believe a country can allow a press that is not controlled by the government. They had hoped to find proof that the US government has total control of the US press, I guess they didn't find it.

Re:good for them (1)

iserlohn (49556) | about 4 months ago | (#45661135)

I don't dispute this. The Chinese government doesn't seem to hide it well as well.

However, having the rights on paper and on the statue books is better than not. It curbs the most excessive abuses and raises the bar in the amount of effort needed to short-change the People.

Re:good for them (1)

bobwalt (2500092) | about 4 months ago | (#45666063)

It does not matter what laws China has on the books as their government feels it is above the law.

Re:good for them (2)

wvmarle (1070040) | about 4 months ago | (#45662423)

Mainland has to be very careful in their manipulating of the HK politics, as the general HK public doesn't like them doing this. They're indeed going quite far nowadays, and the situation is getting out of hand. Protests against this meddling are getting more and more radical as well.

Re:good for them (1)

Type44Q (1233630) | about 4 months ago | (#45662859)

They just do not believe a country can allow a press that is not controlled by the government.

Apparently neither do we, considering our own intelligence services discretely took over mainstream media [wikipedia.org] during the Civil Rights Movement (and the rest, as they say, is history [sic])...

Re:good for them (1)

bobwalt (2500092) | about 4 months ago | (#45666039)

Getting some newspaper publishers' support for anti-communism is quite a bit different from government control. I don't recall newspapers shut down and their publishers jailed during the Civil Rights Movement and I remember reading quite a bit about it in the newspapers at the time. In fact without publicity Martin Luther King's non violence movement would have never worked. However, it is true that for a long time both the CIA and much of the State Department were populated by Cold Warriors and felt anything anti-communist was justified. It is also interesting to note, however, that it did come to light which never would have happened in China.

Re:good for them (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45664387)

I don't know why I read comments to stories on China. They're always so idiotic. I know, people want to think that China has infinite infrastructural and coercive power. In fact, they do not. The central government has constraints, and makes compromises all the time. This doesn't make them a good government, it makes them participants in the real world. Some of those constraints have to do with how they handle their colony of 15 years, Hong Kong. It isn't so simple to say that their rights and lives exist only at the whim of the central government.

You know, I don't know why I read comments at all.

Re:good for them (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45665869)

They had hoped to find proof that the US government has total control of the US press, I guess they didn't find it.

Since I don't believe anyone can still be that naive these day, I must say you must be a shill, the US isn't controlled by its government, it's controlled by its banks, which controls the corporations, and the US media is controlled by a few corporations that belong to the same group that runs the banks.

Who owns the media? [12bytes.org]

Re:good for them (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45660087)

Something else refreshing, an article writer who still knows that Taiwan is not under the rule of the PRC.

Re:good for them (2)

tlhIngan (30335) | about 4 months ago | (#45661071)

This sounds like exactly the right move, except for maybe not being able to serve the Chinese market like they might have in Hong Kong.

China's just more open about it than other Asian countries, to be honest. Practically every Asian country censors the Internet, and many often have very bizarre laws regarding commerce and the like. None have free speech (and have the power to arbitrarily jail and execute people).

The only reason we hear about China is they're more open about it. But practically everyone engages in the same practices and human rights violations that China does, they just do it behind closed doors and make it illegal to tell anyone about it.

And they're good at it too - a lot of them can put up a pretty face to attract foreign money, while at the same time screwing over the foreigners. It's actually quite a good display of diplomacy.

Re:good for them (2)

iserlohn (49556) | about 4 months ago | (#45661203)

I don't buy this argument at all. The extent of Chinese censorship and the fact that they have clones of all of the major internet services inside the great firewall of China is evidence enough to disprove it.

Re:good for them (2)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about 4 months ago | (#45664343)

I love this one. China is a more open, and hence more admirable, country because it admits how oppressive it is. Yay for openness! All the other (East?) Asian countries do the same thing, but are just so much better at it that they manage to conceal all evidence. No, honest, I know it's true even though they keep it a secret. BTW, if it's a secret, how do you know about it?

Re: good for them (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45669427)

Dude, what are you talking about?
The only sites I have ever been blocked from using in Japan are sites that purposely block other countries, for example Hulu.com. (and they have a Japan market site). those are easy to get around with vpn. There are also plenty of sites operating domestically that criticize the government, etc. - In English and more so in Japanese. the government doesn't control the ISPs, and didn't try to block VPN service or proxies.

Re:good for them (2)

wvmarle (1070040) | about 4 months ago | (#45662397)

Hong Kong is not China. For all practical purposes it is a different country. Different legal system, different laws, different culture, even different official language.

What the mainland government thinks about the Internet is quite irrelevant on this side of the border. Hong Kong has a very high level of freedom of expression, and our Internet is more free than that of certain "free" countries like the UK with its mandatory "anti-porn" filters.

Re:good for them (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45663205)

HK has the freedoms you mention only until the PRC decides to rescind it. There is already enough of a track record of PRC interference in HK affairs since the British lease expired.

Re:good for them (2)

wvmarle (1070040) | about 4 months ago | (#45666709)

UK has those freedoms until the UK government decides to rescind it. Oh wait, they did already.

have you been to hong kong? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45659669)

There literally isn't enough space.

Re:have you been to hong kong? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45659805)

"Move mountain fill sea," then put the data center on the artificial island. Use the surrounding water for cooling.

LOL (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45659673)

Does that come with or without the NSA tap?

best to keep away from countries that spy and hack (4, Insightful)

dAzED1 (33635) | about 4 months ago | (#45659709)

It's a good thing the US government hasn't done anything like that to Google, eh? Moral high ground, and all...

Re:best to keep away from countries that spy and h (1)

Desler (1608317) | about 4 months ago | (#45659731)

Stupid editorializing like that is what you get when people put nationalism before human rights. The other side is always needing to be painted as worse than the home team to to keep the plebes in check.

Re:best to keep away from countries that spy and h (3, Interesting)

Sockatume (732728) | about 4 months ago | (#45659753)

This is probably going to sound really stupid, but imagine for a moment that you're a company called Loolge, and you've been court-ordered to allow your home government's security agency - let's call it the NAS - access to the vast archives of information you hold on your enormous international customer base. One day a large, rival nation - Nicha - hacks into your servers and gains access to some of that prized information.

Wouldn't the NAS mandate that you immediately and permanently stop doing business in Nicha, lest there be another breach?

I can think of a thousand holes in this but it kind of demonstrates how playing ball with someone like the NSA makes all Google's previous "do no evil" actions seem suspect.

Re:best to keep away from countries that spy and h (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45659823)

Wouldn't the NAS mandate that you immediately and permanently stop doing business in Nicha, lest there be another breach?

Why would they? It would provide them a direct line to Chinese data.

Re:best to keep away from countries that spy and h (0)

rmdingler (1955220) | about 4 months ago | (#45659847)

Joe Sixpack needs to go to work, come home to supper, make love to his wife once a week, wax patriotic and believe there is some evil country out there he should be glad he doesn't hail from. Much like organized religion, it would seemingly occur to more folks that nationalism is a handy tool to keep the masses happy with their station.

Re:best to keep away from countries that spy and h (1)

swillden (191260) | about 4 months ago | (#45663517)

I can think of a thousand holes in this but it kind of demonstrates how playing ball with someone like the NSA makes all Google's previous "do no evil" actions seem suspect.

Only if Google has played ball with the NSA. AFAICT, there is not evidence of that. It appears that the NSA has spied on Google without Google's knowledge or participation, though.

Re:best to keep away from countries that spy and h (2)

Tim12s (209786) | about 4 months ago | (#45659759)

If the US can take a fibre copy of an entire Google data-centre/backup then so can any other country/organisation. That means that expect more than just the US having copies and keeping very very quiet about it. If they don't, then I am sure that certain countries are going "thats a good idea" and its a race between the Google team locking down their inter data center coms.

Any country that hosts a google datacentre and any fibre operator that has a managed service contract could be considered "compromised".

https://www.google.com/about/datacenters/inside/locations/ [google.com]

Really? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45659717)

Do you honestly think you can determine the motives of a massive multi-national corporation based on a couple of news stories that were floating around a while ago?

Do you not think there might possibly a few other factors you don't have the first idea about?

Doesn't shun China (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45659751)

Taiwan is China. It may be slightly more "independent," but it is still Taiwan, Republic of China, and doing business there still helps the Communist regime retain its grip on power and further destabilize the world economy.

Re:Doesn't shun China (5, Informative)

iserlohn (49556) | about 4 months ago | (#45659883)

Taiwan's political institutions are not tied to the People's Republic of China. They are remnants of the Nationalist government (KMT) after their defeat in the Civil War.

Hong Kong and Macau were both colonial outposts of Britain and Portugal respectively. These have been handled back to China and are government under a "One Country, Two Systems" approach, classifying them as Special Administrative Regions (SARs) each with a mini-constitution called the "Basic Law". In theory, a high degree of autonomy is guaranteed, but in practise, there is always political pressure being applied to intervene in all kinds of matters. A resident of the SAR has about the same rights as a person in North America or in Europe, and at least until now, the appearance normality has been maintained after the handover back to China.

Re:Doesn't shun China (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45664311)

Hong Kong was not handed back to the People's Republic of China. It was handed over. Prior to 1997 it was never a part of the People's Republic of China.

Re:Doesn't shun China (0)

JeffAtl (1737988) | about 4 months ago | (#45659915)

Taiwan is not China. That is like saying that the USA is England.

Re:Doesn't shun China (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45665891)

Taiwan is China, just like your garage is part of your house.

Re:Doesn't shun China (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45666883)

just like your neighbor's garage is part of your house

Re:Doesn't shun China (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45667147)

LOL US idiots who killed everyone and stole the land from native the first place now think they are the icon and expert of freedom, yapping about land rights.

STFU until you idiots return Hawaii to the natives. Or stop sucking up to the Saudis who are beat women to death because they show their face on the street.

Re:Doesn't shun China (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45660115)

Taiwan is China. It may be slightly more "independent," but it is still Taiwan, Republic of China, and doing business there still helps the Communist regime retain its grip on power and further destabilize the world economy.

Good Lord, you are an idiot.

So what's HK got to do with Chinese Attitude? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45659787)

HK [wikipedia.org] is a separate autonomous state. It has a separate border control and people basically live the free life over there.

Chinese oppressive government has got practically nothing to do with them. Speculating otherwise is just pure nonsense.

Re:So what's HK got to do with Chinese Attitude? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45659881)

HK [wikipedia.org] is a separate autonomous state. It has a separate border control and people basically live the free life over there.

Chinese oppressive government has got practically nothing to do with them. Speculating otherwise is just pure nonsense.

You expect Americans to understand these subtle distinctions?

Re:So what's HK got to do with Chinese Attitude? (2)

JeffAtl (1737988) | about 4 months ago | (#45659963)

You expect Americans to understand these subtle distinctions?

Those "subtle distinctions" are distinctions without a difference. Hong Kong's foreign policy comes directly from Beijing.

Re:So what's HK got to do with Chinese Attitude? (1)

Austrian Anarchy (3010653) | about 4 months ago | (#45660139)

You expect Americans to understand these subtle distinctions?

Those "subtle distinctions" are distinctions without a difference. Hong Kong's foreign policy comes directly from Beijing.

As does command of their military, since 1997. [wikipedia.org]

Re:So what's HK got to do with Chinese Attitude? (2)

grumpyman (849537) | about 4 months ago | (#45660665)

It's not subtle at all. HK is not exactly an autonomous state but it is very unique. It is part of China and top officials are "elect/appointed" from central. BUT the law in HK is based on English common law. And see the judges names: I don't think any Chinese has last names like Mortimer, Riebiero, Hartmann, Walker...etc. Learn something new everyday.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Law_of_Hong_Kong [wikipedia.org]
http://www.judiciary.gov.hk/en/organization/judges.htm [judiciary.gov.hk]
http://rbbadger.files.wordpress.com/2010/03/p201001110174_photo_1012560.jpg [wordpress.com]
Back to the subby title I agree it's total BS and pure speculation, actually it's just "normal" /. sinophobic.

Re:So what's HK got to do with Chinese Attitude? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45662985)

Wow, you are either naive or you just don't read good.

Re:So what's HK got to do with Chinese Attitude? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45663005)

Maybe he is just a retard?

Re:So what's HK got to do with Chinese Attitude? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45659929)

Because it won't last? The Chinese government only promised not to interfere up to 2047. It is still unknown whether PRC will "assimilate" HK after that time.

Re:So what's HK got to do with Chinese Attitude? (3, Insightful)

JeffAtl (1737988) | about 4 months ago | (#45659949)

No, Hong Kong is not a "separate autonomous state". Hong Kong takes its marching orders directly from Beijing. Hong Kong has the illusion of autonomy only as long as it does not contradict the wishes of Beijing.

Hong Kong knows to keep and low profile and not rock the boat or the mainland will eliminate the extra freedoms that they currently enjoy.

As a thought exercise, consider what would happen if HK decided to enter into a defense treaty with Taiwan. What do you think would happen?

Re:So what's HK got to do with Chinese Attitude? (1)

iserlohn (49556) | about 4 months ago | (#45661267)

HK cannot enter a defence treaty with Taiwan. As you said it is not a separate autonomous state - it doesn't have any power in defence. It does have limited foreign policy power, but only related to trade.

The real test is the plan to allow for the election of the Chief Executive in HK by the popular vote. Right now all of the candidates have to be first vetted by BJ through a selection committee of 800 BJ loyalists (out of a population of nearly 8 million). The plan for the popular vote of the entire Legislative Council and for the Chief Executive is something that BJ is actively trying to undermine.

Re:So what's HK got to do with Chinese Attitude? (1)

wvmarle (1070040) | about 4 months ago | (#45662505)

Population of HK is just over 7 mln, and election committee was expanded to 1200 before the latest elections that saw Leung Chun-Ying elected CE. Please get your facts right. And while by far most election committee members are Beijing loyalists, not all are.

Why would you build anything in Hong Kong (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45659799)

The land value there is insane due to the population density.
Or is there some reason I'm missing why you would one of these in on of the most populated areas in the world?

I though the UK owned the HK SAR? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45659901)

Did they lose another war? India. Falklands. Egypt/Arabia, Zud Afrika, and The Colonies, to name but a few. What's it got left colonywise?

Re:I though the UK owned the HK SAR? (1)

wonkey_monkey (2592601) | about 4 months ago | (#45659935)

I though the UK owned the HK SAR?

Did they lose another war? Falklands.

Stunning grasp of history you've got there, champ.

Re:I though the UK owned the HK SAR? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45660109)

Kicked Argent's Arse! (just barely) EXOCET could have done it all in and nearly done did the deed. Hold your head up, UK!

TFA is confuses Hong Kong with Mainland China (2)

divec (48748) | about 4 months ago | (#45659931)

A data centre in Hong Kong would have been a turnaround for Google, since it very publicly pulled out of the country after attacks on Gmail which it blamed on the Chinese government in 2010.

This is incorrect -- Google pulled out of Mainland China, not Hong Kong. The author seems unaware, but Hong Kong has different laws from the Mainland, including data privacy and free speech. In fact, since Google pulled out of mainland China, www.google.cn actually shows a redirect link to www.google.com.hk .

And where is India... (1)

unixisc (2429386) | about 4 months ago | (#45662943)

I read TFA. No mention of India either in the story, nor the above summary. Why mention India one way or another in the headlines, if the stories have nothing about it?

Re:And where is India... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45666953)

India was probably included when the summary & headlines were drafted, but they decided to change their tax laws and back tax Google $3Bn so Google had to pull out and the story updated postmortem. Slight oversight in editing that's all, nothing see, move along now.

Don't always question the official explanation (1)

kry73n (2742191) | about 4 months ago | (#45659977)

As someone who currently lives in Hong Kong, the official explanation doesn't seem to be too far off. Space is very limited and *incredibly* expensive.

While we have free internet here and many people actually have a Google account, this is just not true for the mainland. China just does not depend on Google so much as the rest of the world. After having blocked access to some services every now and then in the past years, you now have most Chinese rely on domestic services instead of Google/Facebook & Co.

Perhaps recent moves by the Indian Govt. made Goog (5, Interesting)

wisebabo (638845) | about 4 months ago | (#45659983)

http://m.slashdot.org/story/195431 [slashdot.org]

(If you didn't read the article, basically it's how the Indian Govt., seemingly in light of Nokia's purchase by deep pocketed Microsoft, has raised the amount of taxes due from $300M to $3B)

I have no problem with any country imposing whatever taxes they want on any foreign entity wanting to do business in their country. That's what comes with them being a "sovereign" state I guess. What's sure to drive businesses away (and will keep me from bringing my modest company there) is when they impose such taxes/restrictions RETROACTIVELY as was in this and other cases. That's not to mention the lack of infrastructure, corruption, nepotism, and poor education there. (I have just suffered personally from this, I was in Bangalore two days ago where I got serious food poisoning from a McDonalds, evidently some people are cutting corners or aren't properly trained/managed).

I'm sure Nokia is rueing the day they decided to build their manufacturing plant(s) there. While apologists for this may say it's probably just a negotiating tactic, there's another word for it: extortion.

Say what you will about the U.S. and other developed countries at least they pay lip service to the rule of (hopefully non-arbitrary) law for decades (or maybe centuries like in Switzerland). Seen in this light, perhaps Google's decision to likewise stay out of China is a bit less mysterious. A prominent Chinese professor was fired from a top ranked Chinese university for calling on the government to follow the Chinese Constitution and adhere to the rule of law. Evidently he didn't toe the government line (as announced by the newly installed, not elected premiere) that requiring the government to follow their own Constitution was a plot by the western powers to weaken China. (I believe the government didn't even pretend, as in other cases, that this professor was bad at his job; he received generally positive reviews from student evaluations. Of course even if he was terrible, tenure should allow him academic freedom to speak his mind but hey, this is China).

Instead the Chinese government reserves the right to arbitrary use of power. So if you were Google, would you put a substantial technological investment there?

Thank god that Google (Android), Facebook, Twitter, Apple, Intel, Cisco, AMD and I almost forgot Microsoft, are American companies. Can you imagine what the world would be like if China had the power the NSA has? (I guess ARM is not American but their British so that's close. And although I'm American, I'm not remotely white, can you tell by my username? :)

Re:Perhaps recent moves by the Indian Govt. made G (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45660245)

Can you imagine what the world would be like if China had the power the NSA has?

They do, but the whistleblowers didn't make it.

Re:Perhaps recent moves by the Indian Govt. made G (1, Funny)

Sez Zero (586611) | about 4 months ago | (#45660247)

I have just suffered personally from this, I was in Bangalore two days ago where I got serious food poisoning from a McDonalds

While one might argue that any food from McDonald's is poison, I'll be especially careful to avoid those restaurants in Maine. Who knew the northeast was such a pit?

Re: Perhaps recent moves by the Indian Govt. made (1)

wisebabo (638845) | about 4 months ago | (#45661731)

Sorry! Should have referred to it by its now reinstated original (?) name, Bengalaru. :)

I have absolutely nothing against McD. In fact I would dearly love to go to Maine to try McDonalds version of a Maine Lobster sandwich (no kidding, I saw it on the internet so it must be true). I wonder if they are still making it.

Re: Perhaps recent moves by the Indian Govt. made (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45662971)

Reinstated? Names like Bengaluru, Chennai & Kolkata are Kannada, Tamil & Bengali translations of Bangalore, Madras & Calcutta. These name changes are as stupid as renaming Germany 'Deutschland' in English. Mumbai is a tad different, since the origins of that name and the name Bombay are different.

Re:Perhaps recent moves by the Indian Govt. made G (1)

jrumney (197329) | about 4 months ago | (#45666347)

I have just suffered personally from this, I was in Bangalore two days ago where I got serious food poisoning from a McDonalds

Tip for healthy eating in the developing world. Stay away from places staffed by 19 year old high school dropouts who couldn't care less if their employer's reputation goes down the toilet (literally). That means hotels and chain restaurants. You're much better off at a roadside stall where the owner/operator's livelyhood depends on their reputation for cheap, great tasting food that doesn't make people sick.

Re:Perhaps recent moves by the Indian Govt. made G (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45668587)

Okay enough is enough..
The case against Nokia has been going on for a long time (over a year, if I remember correctly). It might be a shakedown attempt by the Indian Govt (I say this as an Indian citizen) in order to generate more revenue or line the pockets of the officials involved, but it is very unlikely that the MS - Nokia acquisition deal has anything to do with it. :/

It pains me to see the Indian government being given more credit than they should get. The government officials might be greedy and corrupt, but forward planning is definitely not one of their strengths..

Chinese Hack? (1)

thetagger (1057066) | about 4 months ago | (#45660023)

I assume Google is going to move its datacenters out of the US then, to protest the ongoing US government hacking that is going on?

Really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45660117)

Officially the problem was lack of space in Hong Kong, but China's repressive attitude to the Internet (and the history of the Chinese hack on Gmail in 2010) must have contributed to the move.

Is this a joke? Does the person who wrote the summary even read Slashdot [slashdot.org] ?

Officially (3, Insightful)

TheSpoom (715771) | about 4 months ago | (#45660171)

Officially the problem was lack of space in Hong Kong

...but let's just ignore that and come up with conspiracy theories.

Space in Hong Kong (1)

Slashdot Parent (995749) | about 4 months ago | (#45660229)

I believe them that space was the problem in Hong Kong. Expensive real estate there. My understanding is that the Chinese government does not meddle too much in the affairs of Hong Kong like they do on the Mainland.

That being said, I have a client that is trying to do business in China, and I can confirm that the Chinese government is a total pain in the ass about this. I'm not involved in the details, but basically, you need an e-commerce license that is insanely expensive to sell anything in the Chinese market, and it just wasn't worth it to them. The client has a presence in every other Southeast Asian country.

I imagine that the situation for Google is different, but anyway, I just thought I'd share for no reason since it's irrelevant to Hong Kong.

Re:Space in Hong Kong (1)

JeffAtl (1737988) | about 4 months ago | (#45662225)

And if your business is successful, China can decide to nationalize it or force you into accepting a minority stake partnership agreement. Granted, Venezuela & Russia are also notorious for this type of behavior.

Re:Space in Hong Kong (1)

wvmarle (1070040) | about 4 months ago | (#45662553)

Probably not so much a problem of the cost of the space, good chance that it was more literally. It is really hard to find a single large space in HK, as in one that is large enough to build a Google-scale data centre.

Re:Space in Hong Kong (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45669647)

Surprising that they found space in Singapore. Perhaps they managed to buy an existing tower.

Similar experience (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45661127)

The last company I was at consolidated their Asian data centers in Singapore, it's considered central to more Asian countries with fewer inter-Asian political issues to worry about. Open a data center in China and the Japanese will complain and vice versa whereas as nobody has a problem with Singapore. I would imagine that other companies do the same thing for similar reasons that have solely to do with politics than cost.

Connectivity... (1)

jimpop (27817) | about 4 months ago | (#45676445)

Singapore has EXCELLENT coverage to all of Asia (sans West Asia). From Singapore you can easily serve content to both India and China (with http://cablemap.info/ to see the pipes going into and out of Singapore. In 2015, Singapore will gain improved connectivity to Australia (APX West). Taiwan is similarly situated, albeit further from India/Pakistan/etc.

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  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
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