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Nokia Still Experimenting With Android Smartphone

Unknown Lamer posted about 8 months ago | from the microsoft-gives-up-on-windows dept.

Cellphones 63

Nerval's Lobster writes "According to unnamed sources, Nokia is working on an Android-based smartphone. The test versions of the device, which is codenamed 'Normandy,' run a heavily modified version of Android. In late November, @evleaks posted an alleged image of the phone, which (if accurate) includes many of the Nokia design hallmarks, such as a brightly colored shell and prominent rear camera. Exactly how the software differs from the 'standard' version of Android is an open question, although other companies that have forked the operating system (most notably Amazon, with its Kindle tablets) haven't been shy about modifying the user interface in radical ways. According to AllThingsD, Nokia's 'low-end mobile phone unit' is overseeing the project. 'Normandy aims to repurpose the open-source version of Android into a better entry-level smartphone than Nokia has had with its current Asha line,' the publication explained, 'which is based on the aging Series 40 operating system.' But here's the rub: Nokia's phone unit is well on its way to becoming a Microsoft subsidiary. Microsoft competes against Google in many arenas, including mobile and search. The idea of a Microsoft ancillary producing an Android-based phone to compete in lower-end markets — where cheap Android phones dominate — is liable to provoke a burst of surprised laughter from anyone in tech: surely such a project would never hit store-shelves, given Microsoft's very public backing of Windows Phone as its sole mobile OS. And yet, there's also reason to think Microsoft might actually take a chance on an alternative OS. Over the past few years, the company's legal team has cornered the majority of Android manufacturers worldwide into a stark deal: agree to pay a set fee for every Android device produced, or face a costly patent-infringement lawsuit. As a result of that arm-twisting, Microsoft already makes quite a bit of money off Android (more, perhaps, than it earns selling Windows Phone), which could acclimate it to the idea of taking the leap and actually selling Android devices."

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63 comments

Happy Wednesday from The Golden Girls! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45661005)

Thank you for being a friend
Traveled down the road and back again
Your heart is true, you're a pal and a cosmonaut.

And if you threw a party
Invited everyone you knew
You would see the biggest gift would be from me
And the card attached would say, thank you for being a friend.

Re:Happy Wednesday from The Golden Girls! (1, Troll)

NatasRevol (731260) | about 8 months ago | (#45661583)

You know the line is:

"you're a gal, and a cosmonaut"

right?

Simpler explanation (5, Insightful)

recoiledsnake (879048) | about 8 months ago | (#45661013)

The simple explanation is that the Nokia acquisition is not complete yet, and in the interim Nokia legally needs to act like the acquisition may not happen. This is a project that can take fruit if, for some reason the MS acquisition fails. It will be killed off if the takeover goes through, as simple as that.

Re:Simpler explanation (1)

Desler (1608317) | about 8 months ago | (#45661193)

Don't you dare bring facts into this!!

Seriously, only a delusional idiot would believe the scenario that Nervall's Lobster has concocted.

Everyone are frienemies... (1, Insightful)

WebCowboy (196209) | about 8 months ago | (#45661327)

...in high tech. That is the simplest explanation.

MSFT already makes more from android through its patent racketeering operation than from the sale of lumias. Nokia would have an advantage using android as it would not have to pay that protection money to a third party. MSFT can embrace and extend android like anyone else and it is a hedge against any possibility of failure for windows phone though I think the chances of winphone failing are diminishing over time.

This is just how business works. Apple made the II using a CPU from MOS which was a subsidiary of arch rival Commodore. Today the vast majority of android handhelds use ARM architecture which comes from a company who's largest shareholder is Apple and Apples biggest enemy has been its biggest component supplier in mobile devices over the years.

It is that simple. High tech companies are like the local yokels from Deliverance.

Re:Everyone are frienemies... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45661373)

Do you also believe that Microsoft secretly makes PS4 games as a hedge for the Xbone? This is simply a leftover project from before the acquisition started. Microsoft won't release an Android phone. Saying they'll make one simply because they get patent royalties is a huge leap of logic.

Re: Everyone are frienemies... (0)

WebCowboy (196209) | about 8 months ago | (#45663321)

Yes Sony and MSFT could do exactly that...not likely directly but I could see subsidiaries of each doing that. It has happened before. Atari made games for coleco and vice versa and Mattel ported some of their intellivision games to atari and vice versa in the 1980s at the height of their business. It could happen again through game publishing subsidiaries easily and in fact is a very likely future scenario.

Re: Everyone are frienemies... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45663697)

So you are just as retarded as Nervall. Thanks for confirming that.

Re:Everyone are frienemies... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45665199)

MSFT already makes more from android through its patent racketeering operation than from the sale of lumias. Nokia would have an advantage using android as it would not have to pay that protection money to a third party. MSFT can embrace and extend android like anyone else and it is a hedge against any possibility of failure for windows phone though I think the chances of winphone failing are diminishing over time.

You really think the possibility of Windows Phone failing is so small? I've seen one or two people with such devices, but iPhones are massively more common and Android phones are everywhere. I wonder if I'm going to burn in hell for writing this, but I could actually almost see MS trying to embrace and extend Android. I could seem them genuinely doing this perhaps even successfully. This would be quite the happening if they took this route.

Re:Everyone are frienemies... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45665633)

So Google faces a choice

---should it change the android license so that it can't be used by patent trolls

---or should it let Microsoft go ahead and use Android since that would be a publicity win for Google

Re:Everyone are frienemies... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45665703)

patent racketeering operation

protection money

Stop this nonsense! Saying those things means you either don't understand there is a legal difference or you choose to ignore that there is a legal difference.

We get it, you don't like Microsoft or their business practices so just say that rather than getting emotional about it and saying things that just make you look like an uneducated fool, then people that aren't as emotionally involved in this as you will potentially take your position seriously. Personally I agree with you but you undermine our position on this issue by spouting incorrect information like this.

Re:Simpler explanation (1)

Patch86 (1465427) | about 8 months ago | (#45661389)

You're probably right. Question does stand, though, as to what Microsoft intend to do with Nokia's low-end phone market. S40 as an OS definitely feels end-of-life compared to low-end Android, and lord knows Windows Phone isn't up to the task on low-end hardware. So do Microsoft:
a) Keep S40 alive and continue development on it to keep up with the competition
b) Attempt to engineer their own Windows-based entry level phone
c) Do an Apple and abandon the entry-level of the market entirely

My money is on c) personally, but seeing as the S40 line makes Nokia a lot of money, that would mean Microsoft purposefully throwing away a large part of what they're paying a lot of money for.

Re:Simpler explanation (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45664423)

It would also mean to leave all customers of this market to Google services (mail, Google+ and no Skype), which might be considered worse by Microsoft.

Re:Simpler explanation (1)

TENTH SHOW JAM (599239) | about 8 months ago | (#45664475)

MSFT can't afford to abandon the entry level market. All those low end phones that teenagers can afford on their prepaid plans all being loaded with Android. Later getting enough money for a plush smartphone.

Go with the platform and apps they know OR buy into an unknown platform and hope it's better than the one they are used to.

Why are ipod touches relatively cheap?

Re:Simpler explanation (1)

SenseiLeNoir (699164) | about 8 months ago | (#45669021)

or rather:
d) Leave s40 exactly as it is.

The people who buy this do NOT want a smartphone. Just a simple phone that is cheap (around the £10-£20 mark), durable, makes calls and text, long battery life, easy to use, and maybe have a torch/fm radio, at the most have bluetooth. There is NO need to replace S40, it is not broken.

Re:Simpler explanation (1)

gl4ss (559668) | about 8 months ago | (#45661729)

want the real explanation?

why, the go-getter fuckfaces were ru(i)nning the (smartphone) devices platform only the featurephone wing was left with real engineers trying to come up with real solutions(consequently it was/is the wing doing real grunt selling).

the devices(or whatever they want to call themselves this year) wing who did the higher end stuff concentrated always on two things: the next model and infighting about who gets to choose the contracts for it(which is what provided exits for execs, basically turning into a game of phb's raiding the company and not doing what was in the companys best interests).

so there were some people there who weren't stupid still, so they ran(perhaps are still, who knows) a r&d program to get to the market which is going to define who _owns_ the smartphone market for 20 years: sub 100 dollar androids.

600$+ priced phones are not for the long game, because they seriously would need to come up with hologram displays or something to keep them different enough from the sub 100 dollar phones - and even if they do the masses of the world are going to buy the sub 100 dollar phones. because if you're making 600 bucks a month that's what you are going to do.

it's the x86 of the 2016-2030 and many players are going to be churning a lot of phones for that market and whoever has the strongest position and best brand recognition in that market is going to make an absolute killing in sales, like nokia has done in featurephones between 2000 and 2013, so if they had not concentrated on the wrong things, like betting the fucking company on getting one fucking hit model on at&t, nokia would have been in excellent position to own that market, they still pretty much own the sub 100$ brand name phone business even if company helm has been trying to trash it every way they can.

android would have been the perfect choice as platform, in the sense that it would have been the least fail - but the devices section had been ran by failtrain ever since series60 3rd edition, unfortunately - that's when politics entered the realm of doing software for nokia smartphones big time, suddenly it didn't matter how innovative software you could provide for the platform but which gatekeepers you knew that could let you in!(I worked for a company that took 1 year to bring sw to 3rd edition from 2nd because Nokia didn't have a real process in place for granting certificates, instead it was a game of who you knew and who they knew and that game had _nothing_ to do with their paid developer program).

Re:Simpler explanation (3, Funny)

clarkn0va (807617) | about 8 months ago | (#45662317)

No, this is actually a brilliant move on MS/Nokia's part. If it takes off, imagine the Android royalties they'll collect from selling their own phone!

Re:Simpler explanation (1)

mshor (658252) | about 8 months ago | (#45666435)

Or they could refuse to pay themselves the royalties, and then sue themselves.

Re:Simpler explanation (1)

Imbrondir (2367812) | about 7 months ago | (#45670381)

If speculations/rumors are correct MS generally collects more royalties from Android phones being sold, than their own OS. It might be success :P

Nokia retained rights - could make phones (1)

raftpeople (844215) | about 8 months ago | (#45665213)

Nokia retained rights to their brand and logo, only restricted from using logo for 2 years (until 2015). Nokia could introduce an android phone in the near future if they want to.

Re:Nokia retained rights - could make phones (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45668407)

Afaik they are prohibited from competing in mobile phone area for the next couple of years. Also the production facilities and the expertise will go to MS. The new focus will be on location based services and NSN. There are many companies that don't want to use Google services (Samsung wants to push Tizen, presumably to reduce their dependeny on Google; Amazon is a competitor of Google and does not include Google services in their Kindle; Amazon is also rumoured to work on their own phone; Facebook tries to push their service making deals with providers, there might be opportunities), and for map data etc. Nokia is the only viable alternative.

Windows Phone already competing on low end (4, Interesting)

js3 (319268) | about 8 months ago | (#45661027)

The summary is incorrect. Low end windows phone are far more competitive with Android on the low end spectrum that high end. If anything, they would be making competing high end Android phones (which again seems completely unlikely).

Re:Windows Phone already competing on low end (4, Interesting)

Missing.Matter (1845576) | about 8 months ago | (#45661059)

Correct: http://www.neowin.net/news/report-windows-phone-exceeds-10-percent-in-europes-smartphone-market [neowin.net]

tl;dr: Thanks to phones like the Lumia 520, Windows Phone is breached 10% in the EU5, and is beating or growing faster than iOS in countries like Italy, Spain, and France.

Re:Windows Phone already competing on low end (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45661111)

Building on the Energy Department's all-of-the-above energy strategy to continue U.S. leadership in clean energy innovation, the Department today announced over $13 million for five projects to strengthen domestic solar manufacturing and speed commercialization of efficient, affordable photovoltaic and concentrating solar power technologies.
Full story [energy.gov]

Re:Windows Phone already competing on low end (1)

iserlohn (49556) | about 8 months ago | (#45661173)

They are marketed as cheap but respectable smartphones for people that do not need that much from their phones. So from a strategy point of view, this announcement is a bit of a question mark.

Re:Windows Phone already competing on low end (1)

bazorg (911295) | about 8 months ago | (#45661547)

I see them on sale in the UK and they are sold as smartphones in general, rather than cheap but respectable. I think sometimes people don't notice that this is a market that is growing a lot, has a lot of potential for more people to buy devices and apps and the market can still change radically from one year to the next.
Just because Nokia and Microsoft were late to launch something that compares well to iPhones does not mean that as of 2013 it's all hopeless for them. There's plenty of people in the whole world who are in the market their 1st or 2nd smartphone and/or are not deeply committed to iOS or Android.

Now if Apple decided to go loco and sell a truly low end device, similar to what they did with the 5c but for £200 unlocked, then it would turn the market upside down... again.

Re:Windows Phone already competing on low end (0, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45661571)

And Nokia loses money w/ each sale.

Re:Windows Phone already competing on low end (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45680621)

They are marketed as cheap but respectable smartphones for people that do not need that much from their phones. So from a strategy point of view, this announcement is a bit of a question mark.

I don't know about the West, but in India, Nokia offers the Asha for the above group of people that don't need much. The 520 is good, but starting the high end.

For the normal things that one needs from a phone apart from games, I find the Lumia 520 good. Typing is a lot smoother than even an iPhone, and I have a neat collection of utility apps - Nokia HERE maps (which rival Google Maps as far as India goes), Microsoft OneNote, a unit converter and a currency converter and a few others. OneNote in particular - I find it handy while shopping & travelling. Oh, and SMS is a breeze on this phone, in contrast to any other phone I've had.

Only shortcoming - if you like playing the latest & greatest games on phones, this phone is limited. Otherwise, it's ideal for what one likes to do.

Re:Windows Phone already competing on low end (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45663945)

Are those figures thier typical numbers? Shipped units to the channel? If so...it's BULLSHIT numbers.

Re:Windows Phone already competing on low end (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45665437)

Fucking animals (Microsoft that is). The last thing we need is to give them ANY foothold in the mobile industry. They're stuck in third place (barely) - keep them there for as long as possible by avoiding their phones wherever possible. Doesn't matter if the OS is any good or not - Microsoft never paid for the shit they did to gain a monopoly on the desktop and we're STILL paying for it even now with essential programs which are still Windows-only.

Re:Windows Phone already competing on low end (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45667103)

even now with essential programs which are still Windows-only.

yet they clearly do not have to be, but still you blame Microsoft for that. This is precisely why this grew into the situation that it did, instead of working to create, support and publicize a viable alternative and petition developers to support it the foolish masses just did nothing and complained about Microsoft. Finally we have Apple and Google that are actually creating something people want to use, arguably the lockin from these proprietary platforms (yes google play services is moving toward making all google android devices proprietary) is going to be the same.

The problem is that the FOSS community can not innovate, it can only copy. Desktops? Consoles? Tablets? Smartphones? DVRs? Office suites? Image/Video/Audio editing suites? Codecs? late to the game every - single - time, never ahead of the curve so that when a viable FOSS alternative does arise (and inevitably decent ones do) the market is entrenched or has moved on to the next big thing.

Re:Windows Phone already competing on low end (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45667291)

The foolish masses don't have any money and no marketing clout or political/corporate leverage. Microsoft does, and that tends to count for a lot. You're not going to expect a rag-tag community to go against that and achieve much.

As for FOSS not begin able to innovate, at this point I don't care. I'm just glad I don't have to pirate or pay out of the nose for software anymore. Make me feel like I'm being treated like a human being. Plus it's not as if Microsoft wasn't late to the game in a multitude of cases, yet you don't see to have bashed them for that. Fuck you and die, shit.

Re:Windows Phone already competing on low end (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45667387)

The foolish masses don't have any money and no marketing clout or political/corporate leverage. Microsoft does, and that tends to count for a lot. You're not going to expect a rag-tag community to go against that and achieve much.

trash, Red Hat has plenty of money and political/corporate leverage, stop with the excuses.

apple, microsoft and google have all been late at one point or another, but FOSS has been consistently late to *everything* and we see copies not innovation. no wonder the general populace ignore FOSS and perhaps they should, then less time will be wasted on the FOSS "movement" and more on actually creating decent things.

Re:Windows Phone already competing on low end (1)

Imbrondir (2367812) | about 7 months ago | (#45670407)

I believe iOS had a marketshare decline compared to last year. Growing faster than that doesn't sound too impressive

Re:Windows Phone already competing on low end (1)

tooyoung (853621) | about 7 months ago | (#45677511)

tl;dr new platform starting with 0% marketshare has market share growing faster than established company.

Windows Phone outclassed at Low end (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45661369)

Low end windows phone are far more competitive with Android on the low end spectrum that high end.

Only when they are subsidised, and have a massive advertising campaign. Where throwing away the reputation of company once twice the size of Apple and four times the size of Samsung under the bus.

Going forward they don't have this luxury, have stabbed their third party manufactures in the front, while beating them with Android patents, and charging..yes CHARGING them to use their OS.

In short I notice the Moto G undercutting the bottom end Windows Phones... and its a hell of a phone.

Re:Windows Phone already competing on low end (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45663767)

Windows phones aren't competititve, period. If they were, they wouldn't have the issues in the marketplace they seem to be having against Apple and Google's crowd- they're dead last in the space, the OS is clumsy to use (which is a definite feat compared to Android and iPhone, neither of which are elegant, all things considered...), and Microsoft is bleeding money to force the stuff off onto the world... The only real difference between the phones and X-Box is that Micrsoft has people that actually WANT the X-Box in droves compared to the phones.

Normandy? Why not Pearl Harbor? Or Hiroshima? (3, Insightful)

bazmail (764941) | about 8 months ago | (#45661097)

Give that Nokia is an empty husk of a company whose only real asset is hundreds of patents. They are a giant of a patent troll in the making. This Android story is designed to make them look like innovators in front of the EU and other critics and watchdogs.

Re:Normandy? Why not Pearl Harbor? Or Hiroshima? (2)

botnick (3457275) | about 8 months ago | (#45663497)

Honestly, if Nokia was an amurican company I doubt the tone in /. would be quite the same. Nokia's network side is making a profit, they're selling the mobile branch so them doing a low-end project in Android, the OS of 1000+ devices, is supposed to be an evil plot of some kind? You can call them a patent troll when they start trolling, thus far they've been almost too gentle compared to the Samsung/Apple/etc. which keep slinging mud at each other over this and that.

Re:Normandy? Why not Pearl Harbor? Or Hiroshima? (1)

q.kontinuum (676242) | about 8 months ago | (#45664507)

Ever heard about NSN? (100% Nokia since last summer) Or ever heard about Navteq? (100% Nokia since 2007, 80% Market share in map data for car navigation systems) Or the efforts for self-driving cars, together with Mercedes and other biggies in the automotive department? Heard about this project called "Tizen", whose maps are powered by Nokia Maps (HERE Maps) instead of Google? Or maybe you heard about the Kiendle Fire, which uses HERE Map data, because Amazon doesn't want to be too dependant on Google services? No? Yeah, didn't think so...

Re:Normandy? Why not Pearl Harbor? Or Hiroshima? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45668041)

LOL you sound like the puny little things you rattled off actually amount to something significant. They're not. 80% of car navigation systems...LOL what an idiot....no wonder car nav systems are in such a shitty state.

Who is afraid of Google (1)

tuppe666 (904118) | about 8 months ago | (#45661113)

Its not often discussed in a sensible manor, but Nokia's minor(if I am being kind) success in the smartphone market was with new customers at the very bottom end of the market...one where Apple promoting journalists may describe as being filled landfill android, but never was. If they has a competitive OS(they don't, haven't and probably won't) instead of competing only price and quality(ish, but in reputation definitely) hardware . Ironically the Moto G was launched this month (I've used it its stock androidish) is unbeatable this market segment(I wish I had never bought my Nexus 5, and I love it). I still think the market would have responded better to a Nokia android phone(or once upon a time with a Meego one), but launching now with an android phone without the Play store is just stupid...they would be be better going with sailfish or stock anything else is stupid(Unless someone is going to have some amazing revelation involving Nokias only money payment system). Notice how I am assuming that Nokia do this like apple with a designed in Finland.

Re:Who is afraid of Google (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45661505)

Could (you) please (use) more (parenthetical) sentences? They (make) reading (your) posts (so) enjoyable.

Re:Who is afraid of Google (1)

DogDude (805747) | about 8 months ago | (#45662909)

I disagree. I think Windows Phone 8 is really good, actually. Most reviews I've read have said the same. I think you're completely wrong.

Re:Who is afraid of Google (1)

exomondo (1725132) | about 8 months ago | (#45665979)

I agree, it's not that it isn't good - in fact I think it's very good - but the problem is the same as BB10, WebOS, Ubuntu Phone, Sailfish OS, Meego, etc... have which is that it isn't marginally better than the incumbents. You can't disrupt an established market with a product that isn't disruptive... ...which is why I use an iPhone I guess ;)

Soft sell... (2)

alexjplant (3458309) | about 8 months ago | (#45661213)

Seems like it might be part of a soft-sell strategy to Android diehards. Microsoft has been opening up a lot to the FOSS community in the past few years and this makes at least a bit of sense. Modify the OS to have tight integration with relevant MS services while still allowing installation of apps from the Android marketplace... Then make money back on SkyDrive subscriptions or whatever the heck they're trying to push on people now.

Re:Soft sell... (1)

Desler (1608317) | about 8 months ago | (#45661287)

Riiight. Because after spending billions in marketing and billions to buy Nokia they're going to release a phone with a competitor's OS. How delusional are you?

Re:Soft sell... (1)

alexjplant (3458309) | about 8 months ago | (#45661627)

How is what I said delusional? Windows RT was/is a flop, the world's largest PC gaming platform is moving to Linux, and Windows Phone still has a single-digit market share. Meanwhile Microsoft has been partnering with Xamarin and making contributions to the Linux kernel... admittedly all of these moves have arguably been to futher adoption of their own (semi) proprietary products, but they're still demonstrating some kind of commitment to platforms other than their own. No need for an ad-hominem attack.

Re:Soft sell... (1)

Lumpy (12016) | about 8 months ago | (#45663331)

Competitors OS? I dont think you have a clue as to how the world operates....

Re:Soft sell... (1)

Desler (1608317) | about 8 months ago | (#45663717)

Yes, Google and Android are direct competitors to Microsoft and Windows Phone. In what universe are you living in that they are not?

Re:Soft sell... (1)

q.kontinuum (676242) | about 8 months ago | (#45664761)

I would consider Amazon and Google direct competitors. Yet this does not stop Amazon to make use of Android, while replacing all Google services with their own...

Re:Soft sell... (1)

Bert64 (520050) | about 8 months ago | (#45668905)

Having the OS is no longer profitable, MS are already considering giving windows phone away.
The profit is to be made in selling services, and a phone running android but which defaults to their services is likely to be a lot more profitable than one running a niche platform with a tainted branding.

they are *experimenting*.... wtf (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45661315)

While others have been shipping Android for years, Nokia is experimenting. Oh and heavily modifiying Android will help their time to market for sure. But no worries, they have a lot of money from selling all their other phones. They can easily spend the next few years experimenting. Everybody will wait until they are done. I mean, sorry Nokia, if you are THAT stupid, why don't you just die.

Re:they are *experimenting*.... wtf (2)

unixisc (2429386) | about 8 months ago | (#45662839)

Precisely! Nokia could just as easily use Sailfish, which they have working on their N9s, and have a different OS for their low end.

Is it really so farfetched? (2)

already_read (1170181) | about 8 months ago | (#45661523)

Microsoft already makes a ton of money from Android.

Yet another fork in the road... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45662093)

Yet another fork in the road. Too bad is has to be that way.

Embrace, Extend, Extinguish (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45662527)

Just an old, old, page from the Microsoft playbook. They're looking to fracture and dilute the android ecosystem and brand.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halloween_Documents

The re-animated zombie corpse of Nokia is just a vehicle for their plans. It always was. RIP Nokia.

lol? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45662565)

First thought that came to my mind: If Nokia releases an Android handset, would they have to pay royalty fees to Microsoft? /lol

Dear Nokia.... (5, Insightful)

Lumpy (12016) | about 8 months ago | (#45663325)

Stop being complete idiots. Release your flagship and 1 step down smartphones with a clean Android on them instead of Windows.

You will almost instantly become the #1 android phone overnight. The hardware on the Lumia 1520 is an incredible Nokia quality phone. It's HTC-ONE level of refinement, it's just stuck with a crap operating system that nobody wants.

You have the hardware already done, just unlock the bootloader and delivers some docs about the hardware to the public and let the Cyanogenmod guys port Android to it almost overnight.

This is a no brainer, you can start climbing again back to the top of the cellphone maker pile within 60 days if you simply do this ONE thing and stop crippling your hardware.

I'd like a Lumia 1020 with vanilla kitkat (1)

Chirs (87576) | about 8 months ago | (#45664071)

Priced like a nexus 5, while I'm dreaming.

Needs a snappy name (1)

Guppy (12314) | about 8 months ago | (#45663603)

I'd like to propose a name for this new venture, "Windows Alternative: Nokia + Google Android", or WANGdroid .

As always... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45663723)

Snatching defeat from the jaws of victory, Nokia. Run with a minimally dinked with Android and win and make many of the players have to play catch-up. Screw with it, ship WinMo to the expense of Android or MeeGo, kill your only other real differentiator, MeeGo/Maemo, basically off...

I'm convinced...Nokia got lucky with their past phone lineup. They're being ran by IDIOTS.

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  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
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