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Pirate Bay Founder Warg Being Held in Solitary Confinement

Unknown Lamer posted about 4 months ago | from the hacking-is-not-a-crime dept.

Crime 192

From Torrent Freak comes news that one of the Pirate Bay founders is now being held in solitary confinement after Sweden turned him over to Denmark. From the article: "In a recent letter sent to Amnesty and shared with TorrentFreak, Gottfrid’s mother Kristina explains her son’s plight. She says that Gottfrid is being kept in solitary and treated as if he were a 'dangerous, violent and aggressive criminal' even though his only crime — if any — is hacking. Gottfrid’s lawyer Luise Høi says the terms of his confinement are unacceptable and are being executed without the correct legal process. 'It is the case that Danish authorities are holding my client in solitary confinement without a warrant,' Høi explains, noting that if the authorities wish to exclude Gottfrid from access to anyone except his lawyer and prison staff, they need to apply for a special order."

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192 comments

Solitary Confinement (1)

Fluffy the Destroyer (3459643) | about 4 months ago | (#45660589)

I don't know about other countries rules or law but when your sent in Solitary Confinement its usually because of your attitude or certain actions that are done in present... not related to your crime that was judged in a court of law

Re:Solitary Confinement (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45660651)

In Scandinavia it's a common pre-court procedure to deny the suspect of news and other means to by which they might influence or be influenced by the world outside.

And no, Amnesty does not like it.

Re:Solitary Confinement (2)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about 4 months ago | (#45660717)

In Scandinavia it's a common pre-court procedure to deny the suspect of news and other means to by which they might influence or be influenced by the world outside.

Damn, some way in which the USA is better? Fact is stranger than fiction. Well, we used to have something called the Bill of Rights, which was part of the supreme law of the country. Nowadays it's largely ignored, being a 200+ year old relic and all, but perhaps a few minor authorities still have a sentimental attachment to it.

Re:Solitary Confinement (4, Informative)

MickyTheIdiot (1032226) | about 4 months ago | (#45660799)

This really depends on WHERE you are talking about in the USA. There are plenty of cases where the police and the jail system are used as arms of the corporate class.

Re:Solitary Confinement (4, Informative)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about 4 months ago | (#45660915)

This really depends on WHERE you are talking about in the USA.

I was thinking about the part that consists of 50 states and a few territories. I was about to say that at least we don't throw them into pre-trial solitary, but then I remembered Kevin Mitnick [wikipedia.org].

Mitnick served five years in prison — four and a half years pre-trial and eight months in solitary confinement — because, according to Mitnick, law enforcement officials convinced a judge that he had the ability to "start a nuclear war by whistling into a pay phone"

Re:Solitary Confinement (3, Informative)

Jim Sadler (3430529) | about 4 months ago | (#45660969)

I think that in almost all of the US law enforcement has been corrupted into a posture of resisting change and sustaining the status quo at any cost. Beggars on the sidewalks are bad for business and therefore get arrested. Chronic drunks and the mentally ill are also unpleasant and dampen business and therefore get arrested. Wives feel threatened by prostitution and therefore prostitutes get arrested. And it gets worse. Laws may regulate what you can grow for food in your front yard and even in your backyard. Style of clothing can also get you arrested easily. The young folks that like to have their underwear sticking out of the back of their jeans often find out about that. In some suburbs even the paint on your home is subject to approval in advance by the city. The line between perpetuating a certain view of what the city should look like and enforcement of what all people call crime no longer exists. Palm Beach,Florida makes it illegal to feed the poor. Would you believe that? It is a theory similar to laws about feeding the pigeons. The city feels that is the poor are fed it will attract more poor people. And the same county has made it illegal to beg or even hold a sign asking for help.

Re:Solitary Confinement (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45661181)

The land of the free and home of the brave. [insert Muntz Ha Ha]

Re:Solitary Confinement (1)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about 4 months ago | (#45661183)

Palm Beach,Florida makes it illegal to feed the poor. Would you believe that?

No, I do not believe it. I believe that you just made it up. Do you have a citation? Because a Google search finds nothing except a law banning "aggressive begging" (blocking traffic, badgering or pursuing people, loitering next to ATMs, etc.).

Re:Solitary Confinement (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45661289)

The several cases I have heard about were over-zealous city workers demanding health inspection permits in order to give away food to the poor. Try these search terms to see several examples: homeless health permit

Re:Solitary Confinement (1)

nedlohs (1335013) | about 4 months ago | (#45661429)

Which doesn't make it illegal to feed the poor, that just means you need a permit to do so. As long as those permits aren't ridiculous then why is that a problem? Silly sure...

I need a permit to drive on a public road, does that mean it is illegal to drive?

Re:Solitary Confinement (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45661377)

You're right about the prostitution, btw. I was very lucky to have discovered it before getting suckered into marriage which is, when you think about it, often times once the honey-moon period is over, an even more expensive way to NOT get sex! when you need it!

Re:Solitary Confinement (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45660823)

Well, it is probably not as bad as my comment made it look like, the thing is: in theory it is not so bad because as mentioned in the summary a special order *is* required, and just like actually keeping people confined pre-trial it there is a mandatory periodic overview where the prosecutor has to make his/her case why these restrictions are needed. Which sounds pretty reasonable - the problem is reality: rubber stamping judges who probably aren't as impartial as they ought to be due to the snug relationship between judges and prosecutors (judges are often former prosecutors and they all know each other by first name and are members of the same clubs).

Re:Solitary Confinement (5, Informative)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | about 4 months ago | (#45661023)

California makes a lot of use of 'not solitary confinement' as a way to combat prison gangs.

It involves prisoners being kept in single cell for 20 hours a day, with four hours allowed for exercise in a small yard and no communication permitted with other prisoners. Entertainment is not provided. Even books are not permitted, and these conditions can continue for years at the discretion of the head warden. Note that this is not legally solitary confinement, because *that* could be legally considered a form of torture if conducted for so long. Legally, it's simply a means to isolate suspected members of prison gangs.

In much the same way that certain other branches of the US government decided that waking inmates up every hour to verify they are not dead is only a means of preventing suicide, and not intentional sleep deprivation. Because that would be torture.

There's very little outrage about the California situation, because there is very little public sympathy for prisoners, and politicians fear being attacked by their opponents as 'soft on crime.'

Re:Solitary Confinement (-1, Troll)

mythosaz (572040) | about 4 months ago | (#45661085)

...a punishment largely avoidable by not being a gangbanger.

Re:Solitary Confinement (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45661147)

Or suspected (but innocent) gangbanger. Or someone that the authorities don't like but conveniently label as a gangbanger in order to torture. I mean it's not as if authorities would ever be so petty as to apply such punishments to petty crimes like, oh I don't know, (alleged) copyright infringement is it?

But hey, if you've nothing to hide you've nothing to fear, right?

Fuck you, you jackbooted apologist.

Re:Solitary Confinement (5, Insightful)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | about 4 months ago | (#45661191)

Or insulting guard. Or protesting against other ill-treatment. Or being targeted by another prisoner looking to start a fight. There's no judicial oversight or accountability involved, as the prisoner is, well, a prisoner. A warden simply announces 'that guy is a troublemaker, throw him into the isolation cell.'

Re:Solitary Confinement (2)

houghi (78078) | about 4 months ago | (#45661559)

On the other side, there are luckily agencies that do not lie and just admit they torture.

Re:Solitary Confinement (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45661617)

kept in single cell for 20 hours a day, with four hours allowed for exercise in a small yard and no communication permitted with other prisoners. Entertainment is not provided. Even books are not permitted, and these conditions can continue for years at the discretion of the head warden

Cool, can we also poke these people with cattle prods? USA! USA! USA!

Re:Solitary Confinement (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45661037)

It's only ignored by pussies too passive to fight for it. That document only lists your rights, if you want them you still have to defend them and fight for them. You still have to stand up for yourself, the law is in your favor, if you're willing to fight for it.

Re:Solitary Confinement (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45661167)

And have millions of dollars to do so.

Freedom ain't free.

Re:Solitary Confinement (0)

Splab (574204) | about 4 months ago | (#45661219)

To be fair, the guy is charged with hacking into the police central servers, he is and should be considered a threat to national security (including terrorism).

Re:Solitary Confinement (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45661293)

if your police is handling matters of national security I hope you live in a small country...

Re:Solitary Confinement (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45661395)

> (including terrorism).

Inigo Montoya would like to have a few words with you...

I know that politicians and the media have just about succeeded in redefining "terrorism" as "absolutely anything or anyone we that don't like for any reason whatsoever" but I had hoped that the general slashdot population would understand that the word actually has a very specific and quite limited meaning. "hacking into police computers" does not equate to terrorism any more than "driving over the speed limit" equates to plotting to assassinate the president.

Re:Solitary Confinement (1)

Culture20 (968837) | about 4 months ago | (#45661399)

Yeah, why allow a suspect to build a good defense by any possible (legal) mean? The suspect is clearly guilty due to the arrest.

Re:Solitary Confinement (5, Insightful)

Hatta (162192) | about 4 months ago | (#45660711)

In the real world, solitary confinement is often used as extrajudicial punishment by unaccountable authorities.

Re:Solitary Confinement (2)

EasyTarget (43516) | about 4 months ago | (#45660899)

In the real world, solitary confinement is often used as extrajudicial punishment by unaccountable authorities.

Too true..
Watch 'Cool Hand Luke' or 'The Great Escape' if you want to see powerful examples of how it is used to try and control 'troublemakers'.

Re:Solitary Confinement (2)

amalcolm (1838434) | about 4 months ago | (#45660991)

Whilst what you say maybe correct, "The Great Escape" was hardly a documentary. Not sure about "Cool Hand Luke" ... too long ago :(

Re:Solitary Confinement (4, Interesting)

fnj (64210) | about 4 months ago | (#45661305)

While entirely true that The Great Escape was not a documentary, it was based on a non-fiction book of the same name by Paul Brickhill, who was in fact involved as a POW in the very real Great Escape, though due to claustrophobia he did not participate in the actual tunneling or the escape itself.

The characters in the film were based on real men and composites of real men. The character "Cooler King" Virgil Hilts, played by Steve McQueen, whom we see sent to solitary multiple times, was based on David M. Jones, who participated in the Doolittle Raid, survived same and escaped captivity at that time, only to be shot down in North Africa and sent to the very real Stalag Luft III. He actually led the digging team on the real tunnel "Harry".

On balance I believe The Great Escape is about the closest thing to an accurate depiction of such an arresting historic episode as you can get in a dramatic film.

Re:Solitary Confinement (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45660767)

I don't know about other countries rules or law but when your sent in Solitary Confinement its usually because of your attitude or certain actions that are done in present... not related to your crime that was judged in a court of law

The only other time solitary confinement is typically imposed for an inmate/prisoner/detainee is if the person's life would be endangered by being amongst the general prison population. Are the other inmates threatening to kill or otherwise harm Gottfrid?

Re:Solitary Confinement (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45660937)

Once again, someone learns far too late: If your entire plan is to willingly piss off people in power because you think you know the "right" social order better than they do, make sure you have an exit strategy FIRST. Otherwise, you'll learn that people in power don't like being taunted and disrespected any more than you do, and they actually have the ability to do things to you in meatspace.

Re:Solitary Confinement (2)

fnj (64210) | about 4 months ago | (#45661359)

Once again, someone learns far too late: If your entire plan is to willingly piss off people in power because you think you know the "right" social order better than they do, make sure you have an exit strategy FIRST. Otherwise, you'll learn that people in power don't like being taunted and disrespected any more than you do, and they actually have the ability to do things to you in meatspace.

And regardless of their high and mighty air of superiority, they don't mind violating human rights in the least - whereas if the Pirate Bay founder ever violated anybody's human rights, I am not aware of it. He may have violated non-real "property" rights codified in law, but that is not at all the same level of offense.

Re:Solitary Confinement (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45661215)

I don't know about other countries rules or law but when your sent in Solitary Confinement its usually because of your attitude or certain actions that are done in present

Yeah, that's it. For sure. No doubt that this guy's just a "difficult" inmate. Wake TFU, dude.

are you kidding? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45660599)

Hackers like this are able to launch missiles with just a pay phone. Keeping him in the general population would be suicidal.

Re:are you kidding? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45660671)

Hello Trollsuit, fuck off.

Re:are you kidding? (2)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about 4 months ago | (#45660743)

Troll? You're just ignorant about his allusion. Maybe you should drop the flamebait until you at least know something.

Re:are you kidding? (1)

Endloser (1170279) | about 4 months ago | (#45661535)

Someone doesn't get jokes... Do a little reading on Kevin Mitnick and what authorities thought he could do by whistling into a phone.

Re:are you kidding? (0)

utnapistim (931738) | about 4 months ago | (#45660829)

> Hackers like this are able to launch missiles with just a pay phone.

Hackers like what?
The man was not a hacker, but a software developer: he co-created a website, and apparently the software used to run said website.

Re:are you kidding? (2)

Minwee (522556) | about 4 months ago | (#45660923)

And the most dangerous hacker in the world [cnet.com], whose greatest skill was asking people nicely to give him things, was put into solitary for eight months for fear that he might use a pay phone to politely request a nuclear launch.

Maybe you just missed out on some of the required reading for this class.

Re:are you kidding? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45661101)

You do realize this has been said about several hackers. Kevin Mitnick was accused of being capable of launching missiles using his cellphone.

It's a joke, which you missed; and reference to the stupidity of many people employed in the process of interpreting law. Their ignorance or perhaps stupidity does not excuse them from their generalized comments.

lol captcha
> merchant

Re:are you kidding? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45661217)

You do realize this has been said about several hackers. Kevin Mitnick was accused of being capable of launching missiles using his cellphone.

It's certainly an exaggeration, but by today's standards, some of the early systems did have some astonishing vulnerabilities that were not fully appreciated.

Re:are you kidding? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45661199)

Hackers like this are able to launch missiles with just a pay phone.

They throw the phone?

Re:are you kidding? (2)

east coast (590680) | about 4 months ago | (#45661495)

Actually, I heard they caught him rattling a saber against the bars of his cell and he was threatening to make the guards "walk the plank" and "kiss the gunner's daughter."

Why they'd let him in the prison with a saber, I'm not sure.

Lucky Ducky (5, Funny)

kamapuaa (555446) | about 4 months ago | (#45660601)

Solitary confinement in a Danish prison - doesn't that just mean he gets the jacuzzi all to himself?

Re:Lucky Ducky (5, Informative)

Sarten-X (1102295) | about 4 months ago | (#45660669)

According to the article, he's not allowed free access to mail or his books, and he's stopped making daily calls to family.

Re:Lucky Ducky (1)

Cenan (1892902) | about 4 months ago | (#45660677)

Basically yes. And knowing the police here, they're probably more afraid of him than trying to punish him. We have a huge problem with people in prison getting their hands on cell phones. A few months ago it was even documented on camera how friends of inmates would walk up to a prison wall shared with an alley in Copenhagen and throw cell phones across.

Warg + cell phone + solitary = somebody's missiles will launch.

Re:Lucky Ducky (1)

EasyTarget (43516) | about 4 months ago | (#45660933)

Warg + cell phone + solitary = somebody's missiles will launch.

then your current .sig

--
We need a -1 [Contains FUD] option

Hummm.. We certainly do.

Re:Lucky Ducky (2)

johnjaydk (584895) | about 4 months ago | (#45661365)

Solitary confinement in a Danish prison - doesn't that just mean he gets the jacuzzi all to himself?

The danish arrest house I walked past today is so ancient and run down that he's likely to get a shower in his cell whenever it's raining. At this time of year it's going to be a really cold shower.

The thing we have going with solitary confinement is a disgrace. Solitary confinement for months is standard procedure for anything above shoplifting.

He should have blown up the world's economy (5, Insightful)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about 4 months ago | (#45660619)

He should have blown up the world's economy, using criminal fraud. No criminal prosecution, or even investigation, despite enormous harm to millions and likely criminal action. Evil hackers? Give 'em solitary for life.

Re:He should have blown up the world's economy (3, Insightful)

kruach aum (1934852) | about 4 months ago | (#45660927)

It is interesting how much more intelligence is feared than malice and stupidity.

Re:He should have blown up the world's economy (1)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 4 months ago | (#45660975)

It is interesting how much more intelligence is feared than malice and stupidity.

Well, humans do have a tendency to fear and want to destroy things they are incapable of understanding...

Re:He should have blown up the world's economy (1)

dragon-file (2241656) | about 4 months ago | (#45661253)

Not only that, but human fear that which they cannot control. Intelligent people aren't stupid enough to just go with what people tell them.

Re:He should have blown up the world's economy (2)

odie5533 (989896) | about 4 months ago | (#45661053)

Many of the people working in the financial institutions knew what was going on. They just didn't see anything wrong with doing it.

Re:He should have blown up the world's economy (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45661313)

It is interesting how much more intelligence is feared than malice and stupidity.

Don't be idiotic. Only an Ayn Rand acolyte believes that, and then only until they've passed the age of blind naivete.

People generally understand that an intelligent criminal has greater capacity to cause harm than does a stupid criminal. You got modded up to +4 insightful because a bunch of moderators like to feel they are persecuted because of their superior intelligence. That's childish preening at its silliest.

Re:He should have blown up the world's economy (1)

kruach aum (1934852) | about 4 months ago | (#45661631)

From the multiple ad hominems I take it you disagree. But then in the one sentence not containing an unwarranted attack, you write

People generally understand that an intelligent criminal has greater capacity to cause harm than does a stupid criminal.

which seems sympathetic to my point. I'm not sure why you are so angry, but I'm glad that you agree.

Re:He should have blown up the world's economy (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45661485)

No criminal prosecution, or even investigation, despite enormous harm to millions and likely criminal action.

This is unrelated to the crime committed. It doesn't matter if you crash the world economy, commits tax evasion, is caught with a bag full of marijuana or sexually harassed someone. The important factor is if you are rich or not.

at least he's not in the terrible US of A (1)

coyote_oww (749758) | about 4 months ago | (#45660629)

Where they might, um, not put him in solitary.

Re:at least he's not in the terrible US of A (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45660869)

yeah but instead he'd be subject of prison rape right? Seems to be a common sentiment among 'murricans with internet that it's something almost every criminal should suffer.

Re:at least he's not in the terrible US of A (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45661283)

The moral of the story? If you're going to be a criminal in America, be a gay rapist. Then they can't punish you because, worst case, you get thrown in jail with lots of rape-bait.

America - supporting gay rape since 1347

Re:at least he's not in the terrible US of A (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45661223)

Brad... excuse me, Chelsea Manning disagrees.

Business as usual (2)

Ben C. (2950903) | about 4 months ago | (#45660647)

Governments like making an example out of hackers. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kevin_Mitnick [wikipedia.org]

Re:Business as usual (5, Informative)

BitZtream (692029) | about 4 months ago | (#45660895)

I really wish you kids would stop discovering Mitnick and worshiping him like a hero.

Lets get some facts about Mitnick straight.

He wasn't a fucking hacker, he was a socially inept douche back who actually was capable of lying his way into accounts of people who didn't know that giving your password out to some random guy that calls you is a bad idea.

Nothing he did was even a little bit impressive. Ever. Again, let me repeat since it might not have been clear: NOTHING HE EVER DID WAS EVEN A LITTLE BIT IMPRESSIVE.

Well ... except for one thing: His ego that happened to be the size of Africa. Mitnick was made an example because he is an ignorant arrogant prick who kept acting like he was a bad ass even thought the cops and lawyers were frying his ass for doing it, so they just made it as unbelievably bad on him as they could.

If you knew anything about the ACTUAL history of hacking and not what you read because some old dude told you about this guy that was 'the first hacker' as far as the american public was concerned ... you'd know he wasn't the first. He wasn't any good. And people with far better talent than him also went to jail for long periods of time. The only difference is that Mitnick's ego made him talk and act like he was a bad ass ...

Other guys, the ones who ACTUALLY did shit, you didn't hear about, neither before or after they got caught (for those who did get caught).

So anyway, back to my point. When you young'ens pull out the Mitnick name, its makes us old guys realize you're an ignorant cluebie who's name dropping trying to impress us with your knowledge of Internet lore ... We instantly see through you and that you're a fake douche trying to pretend you're something you're not.

Mitnick was a fucking douche, learn the real history and stop treading on his name. It'll be far less embarrassing for you.

Re:Business as usual (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45660983)

The only one who should be embarrassed is your mom. She so Nasty...

Re:Business as usual (5, Insightful)

fostware (551290) | about 4 months ago | (#45661115)

+1 - Since I have no points :(

Social Engineering isn't hacking... Fortune Tellers and Used Car Salesmen have been doing it for years before networked computers were created...

Re:Business as usual (4, Informative)

mythosaz (572040) | about 4 months ago | (#45661139)

NOTHING HE EVER DID WAS EVEN A LITTLE BIT IMPRESSIVE.

His social engineering skills were impressive.

Sorry about being on you lawn.

Re:Business as usual (4, Insightful)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | about 4 months ago | (#45661141)

It doesn't matter if what he did was impressive at all. The point remains: He did a few things, scared a few people, and was sentenced heavily as a public example, aided by prosecutors who were only too happy to outright lie about the threat he posed to add to the punishment. He may have been just douchebag who succeeded by persistence and luck rather than actual skill, but he was still sentenced and punished as if he were a super-hacker capable of bringing the world to its knees with a phone call.

The objective of prosecutors is to either reach a plea agreement that makes them look good, or to get the harshest sentence they possibly can. They will fight dirty to achieve that, and they can be very good at doing so. In their skillful manipulation of the narrative, a script kiddie who needs a good telling off can turn into a terrorist who caused millions of dollars in damages. Any hope of rehabilitation is thrown out the window.

Re:Business as usual (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45661347)

OK, let me guess, you went to school with Mitnick and he used to bully your ass, am I right?

You got issues bro...

Re:Business as usual (2)

roccomaglio (520780) | about 4 months ago | (#45661489)

How about knowing how to change the phone tables so it looked like the call that was doing this was coming from someone else's house. They would know that someone was hacking, they could trace it back, but the trace would lead to the wrong house. Probably one of the reason he was so well known. If you can hack and no one knows it, you might not get famous.

Re:Business as usual (3, Insightful)

EasyTarget (43516) | about 4 months ago | (#45661605)

I really wish you kids would stop discovering Mitnick and worshiping him like a hero.

Lets get some facts about Mitnick straight.

You would do well to follow your own advice.
Nobody here is idolizing him, we are merely pointing out that he is perhaps the best example of a geek being punished out of all proportion to their actual criminality, and deliberately hounded by prosecutors and law officials who were behaving no better than the lowest sort of playground bully.

That's all; the fact we keep mentioning him is not because we think he was a uberhacker; quite the reverse. The people bullying him were the ones claiming that.

The Nordic "bend over and take" countries (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45660697)

What is it with the Nordic countries always willing to be Americas proxy in these copyright/leak cases? Its very sad.

And why are piracy cases being pursued like they were terrorism cases? Nordic countries are more like Gitmo than real nations, willing to whore themselves rather than have backbone. Thor would not approve.

Re:The Nordic "bend over and take" countries (1)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about 4 months ago | (#45660865)

Similarly with the UK helping us invade countries that we decide to attack despite them being no threat to us (*cough* Iraq *cough*). As an American I honestly hate to be insulting towards other people's countries, but why the hell do they play the lapdog to America? Serious question. Perhaps someone more familiar with UK or Scandinavian (actually Swedish, and perhaps Danish, not Norwegian AFAIK) domestic politics can explain it.

Re:The Nordic "bend over and take" countries (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45661689)

but why the hell do they play the lapdog to America?

The most common reason that have appeared in leaked communication between the US and Sweden have been threat of economic sanctions.
The Pirate Bay case is a bit special since it appears as if pressure was put on multiple fronts. The White House specifically asked the minister for justice to do something about the Pirate Bay. He then went on and arrange things with the prosecutor. (It could be interesting to know that it is illegal for the minister for justice to take action in specific cases in Sweden.)
On the other side the police officer leading the investigation was on Warners payroll.

I can't say why Swedish politicians are so willing to bend over for U.S. interests, it doesn't really make sense to me. The only explanation I can find would be if the two cases of ministers being murdered by random madmen over the last decades were arranged by the U.S.

Re:The Nordic "bend over and take" countries (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45660955)

This was discussed in the diplomatic cables @ wikileaks. Our (I'm a Swede) rulers - our foreign minister especially - really like the feeling of being "important allies" to the Americans. (And they don't realize (or acknowledge, since they must know now after the leak) that the Americans are laughing at them behind their back for their servility).

Re:The Nordic "bend over and take" countries (1)

Splab (574204) | about 4 months ago | (#45661281)

Get off your fucking high horse and learn to read!

He isn't arrested over some stupid copyright case, the guy is charged with breaking into the Danish Police central servers *and* one of the biggest Danish banks.

The guy is probably looking at some serious time for this.

Re:The Nordic "bend over and take" countries (1)

EasyTarget (43516) | about 4 months ago | (#45661513)

Get off your fucking high horse and learn to read!

Then:

guy is charged with breaking into the Danish Police central servers *and* one of the biggest Danish banks.

And if those charges against him fail he will be further charged with 'treading on the cracks in the pavement' and 'looking at me in a funny way' [reformsection5.org.uk].

You do get the difference between 'charged' and 'convicted'; yes/no? Or did you not learn that in your reading class.

well of course there are definitions (5, Funny)

nimbius (983462) | about 4 months ago | (#45660727)

Dangerous: Violent:: "your son violently thrust production executives and C-levels into a state of abject povery by freely distributing material from poor artists who hadnt the chance to sign up with a label. As a result these suffering destitute former billionaires are reduced to driving a mercedes and eating domestic caviar."
Aggressive: "Your son aggressively refused to roll over and die when we attacked and litigated his userbase, his family, his friends and his civil rights. He was incomprehensively aggressive in opposing our bribery and extortion of his regional and local government officials in our pursuit of the definition of truth and justice"

so you see ma'am, hes clearly a threat
--MPAA

"what he said but hes also a terrorist and he killed two cats that were about to make the kids laugh out loud."
--RIAA

I'm told Danes and Swedes don't like each other.. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45660737)

A Danish friend tells me it is because the Swedes are not very clever.

Re:I'm told Danes and Swedes don't like each other (1)

jones_supa (887896) | about 4 months ago | (#45661237)

A fact that many foreigners may not be aware of, is that Finns also hate Swedes, but I guess it's more in a humoristic way. Swedes are often viewed as faggots, douchebags, stuff like that. Also cheering Sweden in sports competitions is perceived lame. Of course Finland does not actually hate Sweden.

It is probably because the slavic tradition of Finland conflicts with the more cheerful scandinavian atmosphere of Sweden.

Re:I'm told Danes and Swedes don't like each other (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45661711)

"Scandinavia: Where everything is beautiful - even the hate" tbh I don't really know why but for some reason most people I know (Swedes, Danes and Norwegians) think it's more fun than insulting, even when it cuts close to the bone.

Mom is delusional (-1, Troll)

BitZtream (692029) | about 4 months ago | (#45660917)

Mom is really delusional or ... well, his mom is delusional.

If anyone thinks that a founder of TPB's only crime is 'some hacking', you instantly lose all credibility in any sort of rational argument. In all parts of the world I'm aware of, common sense agrees that willfully promoting criminal activity is a crime as well. Anyone arguing that willful copyright infringement was not the goal of TPB is the same kind of person who would take your wallet out of your hands while you were watching and then tell you they never took it from you. The type of liar that is so full of their own lies even they believe everything they say.

No TPB founder is 'innocent', pretending they are just makes you look like a douche.

Re:Mom is delusional (1)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | about 4 months ago | (#45661065)

Hacking, copyright infringement... either way, he is a non-violent offender. So why the solitary?

Idealists like to see the justice system as a center for protecting the public safety and rehabilitating offenders. More often, it's used to satisfy the public's sadistic desire to see suffering and ruin inflicted upon those who wrong them.

Re:Mom is delusional (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45661337)

Hacking, copyright infringement... either way, he is a non-violent offender. So why the solitary?

I cannot comment on Danish law and precedent (although I am educated on the pastries), but if I was ever convicted of something, I'd rather be in solitary than in the general population. Part of that is because I'm an introvert, and part of it is because it would keep me away from the "not quite violent enough for solitary" prisoners.

Re:Mom is delusional (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45661073)

Sharing is caring.

Re:Mom is delusional (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45661083)

Innocence really isn't the point, the point is that those crimes usually does not warrant that kind of treatment. Hacking and copyright infringement (or inducement there of). are perfectly fine white collar crime which due to its non-violent nature usually affords you civil treatment and a more or less pleasant stay at a minimum security facility. Solitary is usually reserved (afaik) for violent criminals, cases were on-going criminality is an issue, a threat to the inmates life/the inmate being suicidal or if outside factors could be influential - these factors are supposed to be argued in front of a judge in order to obtain an order for solitary, which the article claimed has not happened.

Re:Mom is delusional (1)

mythosaz (572040) | about 4 months ago | (#45661161)

You're already modded troll. Nobody likes to hear that their beloved Pirate Bay isn't an excuse by entitled people to make money serving ads while they facilitate other entitled people's desire to not pay for the works of others.

Re:Mom is delusional (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45661425)

Delusional?

He didn't live in the US -- when he was running TPB, what he was doing was not a crime in the country he was living in. His taunts were against foreign interests that were attempting to apply their carefully written and paid for laws in his country, and his response was basically "stop trying to bully people for making information available -- that's not a crime here, and should really be encouraged globally."

Then the EU laws changed, and eventually the local laws -- they now look exactly like the MPAA wanted them to.

However, on the computer crimes side, it is alleged that he DID break into some computer accounts, and that's what he's being questioned about. However, he has yet to be charged for that.

ok, so... (1)

BringsApples (3418089) | about 4 months ago | (#45661189)

...Is anyone out there in Denmark doing anything to protest this? I know that the Danes are not to be fucked with when it comes to crimes against humanity, but I wonder how much this matters to the general population. Sadly I suspect 'not much'. Solitary confinement is torture. Torture for a crime with no victim is out of line, and sends a message the someone is in a place of power that shouldn't be.

It might sound silly, but if you're not in Denmark, you can keep this guy in your thoughts. Picture him with a smile, and embrace him internally. It's all that we can do. If you're in Denmark, then protest this torture in whatever way you see fit.

It's For Safety (4, Funny)

organgtool (966989) | about 4 months ago | (#45661195)

I know many people on this site are going to start flapping their jaws (err, fingers) about how subjecting someone to such deplorable conditions for a nonviolent offense is unjust, but most of you don't understand how the prison system works. In the prison system, there is a hierarchy of criminals that control the behavior of all of the other inmates and hackers are always at the top of that hierarchy. As soon as a hacker gets sent to prison, he immediately finds out who is in charge and beats that person within an inch of their life. At that point, the hacker has earned his place at the top. In order to maintain this position, he must rule with an iron fist and beat people on a regular basis just to send a message that anyone that challenges him will end up nearly dead. The hacker is easily the most dangerous person in prison and the warden is simply keeping his prisoners safe by keeping this guy in solitary confinement. It has nothing to do with this particular hacker making some powerful people look bad and possibly marginally reducing the profits of some corporations via his web site, it's about safety.

I've always been in the opinion (3, Interesting)

C_Kode (102755) | about 4 months ago | (#45661471)

I've always been in the opinion that anyone who serves as a figure of authority (this includes government officials) and uses that authority to commit a crime should receive a minimum of double the maximum sentence of that crime in the same manner than you get double the fine for speeding in a work zone.

If they commit a crime that is punishable by 5-7 years in prison using their given authority, then they should get a minimum of 14 years in prison period. No less.

Of course, to get this double sentence, they have to be using their authority to commit the crime. They should also be removed from service and ban from ever working for the public in any form again. (which includes a private sector job that is doing government contract work)

Abuse of power should have absolute ZERO tolerance.

In this case, I believe putting someone in solitary confinement without a valid reason is abuse of power. Whoever made this decision should be removed from power and should have to serve twice as many days in solitary confinement as Gottfrid has.

Which kind of Warg is he? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45661601)

I must reluctantly admit I have been exposed to various mythologies, and have no idea which one of them is The Truth.

It he the kind of Warg that can actually transform himself into the form of a wolf, and potentially maul a prison guard? I can see how you'd need special precautions when dealing with such people. Or is he the kind that can just mentally take over an existing wolf or other animal, (presumably outside the prison where it doesn't endanger guards or other inmates)?

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