Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Canada Post Announces the End of Urban Home Delivery

Soulskill posted about 10 months ago | from the nobody-wants-junk-mail,-eh dept.

Canada 226

Lev13than writes "Canada Post is phasing out urban home delivery, raising the price of a letter to $1 and cutting 8,000 jobs to cope with dwindling volume and a projected loss of $1B/year by 2020. About 1/3 of Canadian homes currently get mail delivered to their door. Deliveries will remain weekdays-only and business will be unaffected (at least for now). Much like the USPS, Canada Post is mandated to be self-funded, but 5% annual volume declines and rising costs are taking their toll."

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Slightly misleading. (5, Informative)

PhotoJim (813785) | about 10 months ago | (#45664531)

Buying stamps half a dozen at a time reduce first class rates to $0.85; businesses using postage meters will get $0.75. Not cheap, and still a big increase, but the $1 rate will be paid by a very small number of people too cheap to buy stamps six at a time.

As for home delivery, it'll be sad to lose it but the alternative, the community mailbox a few doors down from most houses, will have one advantage: parcels will be loaded into it for you to pick up. Currently if you're not home you have to drive to the nearest sub-post office to get your parcels. This will be way more convenient.

Re:Slightly misleading. (2)

TWX (665546) | about 10 months ago | (#45664667)

As for home delivery, it'll be sad to lose it but the alternative, the community mailbox a few doors down from most houses, will have one advantage: parcels will be loaded into it for you to pick up. Currently if you're not home you have to drive to the nearest sub-post office to get your parcels. This will be way more convenient.

I see a whole lot of mail returned to sender for being abandoned, or being discarded for being abandoned, in those communal mailboxes. I also see a lot of people only visiting their mailboxes weekly, like how they take out their trash cans for the truck to pick up, so mailboxes will be even bigger targets for thieves as there'll be more payoff for the effort than before.

What I don't get is why they just don't just raise the price of first-class mail. In the US, as a lower-volume mailer I'd be okay with spending a dollar to mail something, I end up mailing something about four times a year. It'd still be cheaper than using UPS or FedEx or the like...

Re:Slightly misleading. (5, Insightful)

CreatureComfort (741652) | about 10 months ago | (#45664809)

I'd rather they raise the rates on all the business class garbage I receive. 9/10 of everything I get local delivered is a sales pitch to "Current Resident".

Re:Slightly misleading. (1)

riverat1 (1048260) | about 10 months ago | (#45664951)

The USPS has some mandates from Congress about how they can raise rates and what they can charge.

Re:Slightly misleading. (4, Informative)

compro01 (777531) | about 10 months ago | (#45665009)

What I don't get is why they just don't just raise the price of first-class mail. In the US, as a lower-volume mailer I'd be okay with spending a dollar to mail something, I end up mailing something about four times a year. It'd still be cheaper than using UPS or FedEx or the like...

Because unlike in Canada where Canada Post control their own rates, postal rates in the USA are controlled by Congress, several members of which have interest in sabotaging the USPS.

Re:Slightly misleading. (-1, Troll)

bussdriver (620565) | about 10 months ago | (#45665743)

Canada's Fascist Prime Minister, Harper has been trying to sabotage their mail service as well. The same playbook in the USA is being played out in other western nations... makes one wonder who is orchestrating all this. It can't be they simply offer horrible ideas to each other at these G8 summits.

Before you think I'm exaggerating, go look up what a Fascist really is and how Harper would have been booted from office if it wasn't for a horrible loophole involving the Queen. He wants to privatize part of the healthcare system because the USA's is just so great...

Re:Slightly misleading. (1)

DizzyDave (134068) | about 10 months ago | (#45666461)

Apparently some of my countrymen are a little vague on the term 'fascist'.

Re:Slightly misleading. (0)

dk20 (914954) | about 10 months ago | (#45666545)

No, he's just your typical "anti government" type.

I think everyone knows the kind, some small office in the middle of the Arctic closes and that was yet another "Harper decision" designed to end Canada as we know it.

Armchair critics, if they know better why is their name not on the ballot form?

Re:Slightly misleading. (3, Interesting)

rahvin112 (446269) | about 10 months ago | (#45665885)

Sabotage? No sabotage isn't postal rates, it's requiring that the USPS prefund 75 years of retirement pension in 10 years. That means in 10 years they have to fund the retirement for employees that haven't been born yet. That's sabotage. Refusing to raise stamp prices to pay for the prefunding requirement is just following through on the real sabotage.

Re:Slightly misleading. (1)

Alex Pennace (27488) | about 10 months ago | (#45666423)

Because unlike in Canada where Canada Post control their own rates, postal rates in the USA are controlled by Congress, several members of which have interest in sabotaging the USPS.

It seems this is not correct. The Board of Governors of the United States Postal Service and the Postal Regulatory Commission set and oversee postal rates respectively [1]. Ultimately Congress can pass a law changing the structure, but that is no different than Parliament overruling Canada Post, so it appears that the distinction you highlighted between the two postal systems does not exist.

[1] http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=United_States_Postal_Service&oldid=585515286#Governance_and_organization [wikipedia.org]

Re:Slightly misleading. (1)

hawguy (1600213) | about 10 months ago | (#45665225)

As for home delivery, it'll be sad to lose it but the alternative, the community mailbox a few doors down from most houses, will have one advantage: parcels will be loaded into it for you to pick up. Currently if you're not home you have to drive to the nearest sub-post office to get your parcels. This will be way more convenient.

I see a whole lot of mail returned to sender for being abandoned, or being discarded for being abandoned, in those communal mailboxes. I also see a lot of people only visiting their mailboxes weekly, like how they take out their trash cans for the truck to pick up, so mailboxes will be even bigger targets for thieves as there'll be more payoff for the effort than before.

I think the reason people only visit their mailbox weekly (or less) is because they get so little valuable mail so there's not much for theives to steal. The only bill I get in the mail these days is my property tax bill from the county (I wish they'd move to electronic delivery, it would save them money (which ultimately saves *me* money), but it can be looked up online by anyone that knows my address, so I'm not sure why someone would want to steal it. The rest of my bills get paid electornically or mailed to my electronic bill pay service (Paytrust).

Look on the bright side! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45665241)

I also see a lot of people only visiting their mailboxes weekly, like how they take out their trash cans for the truck to pick up, so mailboxes will be even bigger targets for thieves as there'll be more payoff for the effort than before.

Then the thieves will be performing a public service by making laziness more costly and painful. I mean if people are gonna steal shit anyway, and they will, might as well have some good come of it.

Re:Slightly misleading. (1)

Xeno man (1614779) | about 10 months ago | (#45665307)

I see a whole lot of mail returned to sender for being abandoned, or being discarded for being abandoned, in those communal mailboxes. I also see a lot of people only visiting their mailboxes weekly, like how they take out their trash cans for the truck to pick up, so mailboxes will be even bigger targets for thieves as there'll be more payoff for the effort than before.

I really have no idea where you get the abandoned mail thing from. My first house I had I only checked the mail once a month so I can pay my monthly bills. Unfortunately the previous owner gave to many charities and received lots of mail from them soliciting more funds. PETA, UNICEF, Child sponsorship, SPCA, Cancer society, March of Dimes, if you can think of it, he probably gave to them at some point. When my box was full, the mail man just crammed more junk mail in there. I swear he was probably punching the mail just to get it in there some days. Anyway, I really have no idea why you think mail would be declared abandoned for sitting there for a few days. Most people just check their mail on the way home from work anyway.

Theft is always a possibility but the reality is that it is not really a problem. Yes there is more mail in once location but it's locked in small groups. By passing the master lock gets you 10 mailboxes. You need to repeat again for another 10. In these rural areas you are going from an unlocked box at the end of a driveway to a locked box down the road at a high traffic area. Theft is really not a concern.

Re:Slightly misleading. (2)

AuMatar (183847) | about 10 months ago | (#45666051)

That happens anyway. I check my mail 3 or 4 times a year when the mailman mentions its overflowing. Its still rare that I get more than 2 pieces of actual mail on those occasions. Everything important is electronic these days.

Re:Slightly misleading. (1)

mythosaz (572040) | about 10 months ago | (#45664687)

Well, the title, Canada Post moves to end-of-street mailboxes to increase efficiency doesn't exactly meet with the media's goal of fear and panic.

Tune in at 10pm to see what household object you own could be killing your children.

Re:Slightly misleading. (1)

realityimpaired (1668397) | about 10 months ago | (#45664707)

On the other hand... they're still raising their prices and offering less service for it.

It's already cheaper to send most packages either UPS or Purolator ground ship. Canada Post wins out on actual letters or post cards, but for how much longer? Hardly surprising though... I can't remember the last time I got anything in the mail except for the insurance renewal and my investment statements... everything else is electronic or delivered by courier these days.

Re:Slightly misleading. (1)

the eric conspiracy (20178) | about 10 months ago | (#45664805)

Interesting. In the US the post office is more economical than UPS. In fact a lot of the time UPS drops off packages at the post office for last mile handling. I'm starting to get Sunday delivery of packages from Amazon now, routed through the post office.

Re:Slightly misleading. (2)

compro01 (777531) | about 10 months ago | (#45665029)

I'm sure Canada Post is just fine with you using Purolator rather than parcel post, given that they own Purolator.

Re:Slightly misleading. (2)

Guspaz (556486) | about 10 months ago | (#45665161)

It's already cheaper to send most packages either UPS or Purolator ground ship.

Hidden irony: Canada Post owns Purolator.

Re:Slightly misleading. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45665285)

I've had nothing but bad experience getting packages from Purolator. If I'm not home they leave me a notice and take the package back to their depot outside the city. Then I have to call them to arrange for a new delivery time and date, then wait at home for the delivery. Not to mention that half the time they get the whole thing wrong and I end up wasting my time waiting at home...

With Canada Post they leave the package at the outlet closest to my house - usually a pharmacy or corner store a few blocks away - and I can go and pick it up at my convenience.

Screw the few dollars saved, we're not Americans, money's not on top of our value system, quality of life is, I'll gladly spend a few more bucks for the convenience of Canada Post.

Re:Slightly misleading. (3, Informative)

davecb (6526) | about 10 months ago | (#45664933)

They don't at our cottage, where this is already in place. Instead, the boxes are about half as big as necessary, and the driver sticks a card in the box. You get to drive in to town to pick them up at the post office.

Re:Slightly misleading. (1)

mpetch (692893) | about 10 months ago | (#45665061)

An interesting foot note is that Purolator is 90%+ owned by Canada Post.

Re:Slightly misleading. (5, Interesting)

nblender (741424) | about 10 months ago | (#45665275)

wrong. I've had one of these community mailboxes for years. I don't mind going across the street to get my mail. What I mind is my parcels don't get deposited in the box because there are only 2 parcel boxes per community mailbox. The 'sub post office' you mention is a drug store 8km from my house. The post office depot is in the back corner of the drug store, kitty corner to the doors. The aisles are all set up so you have to zig-zag through the store past all sorts of impulse-buy type merchandise and finally past the perfume counter staffed by sales people who are eager to spray a fragrance into the air as you walk through it. Then you have to stand in line with a dozen or so other disgruntled citizens who are there to pickup their parcel as well. The parcels are stored in the back room and the haggard worker (singular, one only) has to do a linear search for each parcel. Picking up my parcels is like lining up for meat in cold-war era east-germany.

The other minor issue that I have is the CP worker doesn't come to the door with parcels that need to be signed for; even though they are supposed to. They just fill out a card and leave it in my mailbox. On occasions where I know my wife was home and home all day, I would check my ZoneMinder setup and see the postal truck pull up at the box across the street, and then pull away, with no attempt to even come to the door. When I get home, there's a notice in the box that says "Attempted delivery failure - No answer" and it means I have to line-up for bread again.

I wonder why CP is losing money?

Re:Slightly misleading. (1)

Cruciform (42896) | about 10 months ago | (#45666089)

My canada post delivery guy in Toronto was stealing the games being sent to me for review. But since he marked them as "delivered" (eg. dropped on the doorstep) they told me it wasn't their fault.
Except I worked right by the front door, and kept it open in the summer for fresh air. If the guy had even set foot in the driveway I would have heard his footsteps on the gravel, and if he came to the doorstep I'd have been looking right at him.

Re:Slightly misleading. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45665341)

Not necessarily too cheap, but don't use them fast enough before the next hike.
Unlike US stamps, the stamps are only good for their face values. You have to buy extra ones to make up for the increase in price since you last bought them.

Re:Slightly misleading. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45665697)

...perhaps in 1990, but welcome to the present, bucko. The stamps don't even have a value printed on them anymore, and haven't for the past several years, at least. They're good until you use them, no top-ups necessary.

Re:Slightly misleading. (2)

travisco_nabisco (817002) | about 10 months ago | (#45665841)

I don't know where you have been for the last few years because stamps in Canada no longer have a face value for domestic letter mail. They have a 'p' on the stamp and is sufficient postage for mailing one standard letter envelope even if the rate goes up since you purchased the stamp.

Re:Slightly misleading. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45666165)

I hate to break it to you Jim, but you get to share the parcel box with everyone else so 2 parcels in the same day means someone is going for a drive. And as someone who already has a community box, 90% of the time the carrier just says fukit and leaves a can't deliver notice. In fact getting packages is so bad I can log into the canada post parcel tracking system if I know something is coming and see it tagged as "could not deliver" 6 hours before my carrier actually delivers mail.

Re:Slightly misleading. (2)

sunderland56 (621843) | about 10 months ago | (#45666587)

the community mailbox a few doors down from most houses, will have one advantage: parcels will be loaded into it for you to pick up.

If the item fits in the box, sure. If it is larger than a loaf of bread, well, you're driving.

Re:Slightly misleading. (1)

CohibaVancouver (864662) | about 10 months ago | (#45666627)

Not cheap

Au contraire.

Boggles my mind that I can put a few pieces of paper in an envelope, put that envelope in a box half-a-block from my house, and then a few days later it will be pushed through a slot in someone else's house 4000 km away - All this for under a buck.

Seems ridiculously cheap to me.

Seems to be another death spiral in the making (0)

cold fjord (826450) | about 10 months ago | (#45664601)

There seem to be a lot of them in the news lately. Some, like this, are created by disruptive technologies like the internet. Others by bad government planning. (See: ACA) Others by the economy has businesses. This will only force more change in the future, which will likewise create more opportunities, and more death spirals. Will we end up in Utopia, dystopia, or something in between? Whatever it is, it will be different.

Re:Seems to be another death spiral in the making (0)

TheGavster (774657) | about 10 months ago | (#45664685)

Death spiral or technological change? No industry will last for all time; churn from new industries emerging helps to keep a crop of fresh minds at the helm of society. Modern efforts to bail out shrinking companies are directed by oligarchs seeking to hold onto the reins of power, under the guise of helping the little guy.

Re:Seems to be another death spiral in the making (0, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45664745)

Some, like this, are created by disruptive technologies

Horseshit. Pensions are the cause of this mess, same as for the USPS. These outfits have pensioners collecting full freight for 30+ years after retiring in their mid 50's. This particular death spiral has nothing to do with disruptive technology and everything to do with abusing the public treasury.

Re:Seems to be another death spiral in the making (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45665041)

Someone sounds jealous!

Yours truly,
A retired postal worker

at least canada has health care for all the ACA (1)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | about 10 months ago | (#45665799)

at least canada has health care for all the ACA in the usa is a bridge to it and they need to remove jobs from health care

Some people won't bother to pick up mail (2)

mark-t (151149) | about 10 months ago | (#45664611)

Especially people who are disabled or elderly and are very well accustomed to having mail delivered right to their door...

So any mail they get through normal post will just sit and accumulate in their box... essentially turning these community boxes into a litter farm.

Re:Some people won't bother to pick up mail (1)

Nos. (179609) | about 10 months ago | (#45664665)

If someone is unable to travel in some form (walk, scooter, wheelchair, etc) a few houses down, then its very likely you have some form of assistance to help with other daily tasks. This will just be another task for those assistants to do a few times a week (at most).

Re:Some people won't bother to pick up mail (1)

Cro Magnon (467622) | about 10 months ago | (#45664881)

It could still be an issue. I don't know how close those community boxes will be. If they're a few houses down, you might be right. If they're farther, someone who can live independently but is old, might have trouble. I drive my mom to the grocery store weekly, but she's used to getting her mail daily.

Re:Some people won't bother to pick up mail (1)

Nos. (179609) | about 10 months ago | (#45665047)

I've lived in a couple neighbourhoods with these in them. I've never seen the box be more than a block away.

Re:Some people won't bother to pick up mail (3, Interesting)

nbauman (624611) | about 10 months ago | (#45665343)

I have arthritis. I can walk 4 blocks to the supermarket and back, but by the time I get home it's painful. But what am I going to do? I want my independence.

My post office stopped delivering packages, and I have to pick them up at the local post office. Every time I see a slip in my mailbox for a package, it means another painful trip to the post office.

Re:Some people won't bother to pick up mail (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45666607)

So everyone else in canada should pay more for this service?

Ever thought of planning your trips in advance? Perhaps getting some pain killers?
I want my independence by having someone else do everything for me?

Re:Some people won't bother to pick up mail (1)

mark-t (151149) | about 10 months ago | (#45665733)

Not necessarily... what it means is that stuff that isn't necessary, like fetching stuff from a mailbox that couldn't be sent directly to their door, will just sit there... and all kinds of mail, not just junk, will sit completely unopened... bills, addressed mail from friends and relatives, or even stuff from the government will just sit there... because they never needed to ever have to make any special trips to pick up mail before.

Re:Some people won't bother to pick up mail (2)

Russ1642 (1087959) | about 10 months ago | (#45664681)

Oh please. There are already tons of places in Canada doing it this way. The walk to the end of the street to the mailbox isn't going to have that kind of impact.

Re:Some people won't bother to pick up mail (1)

Vanderhoth (1582661) | about 10 months ago | (#45664721)

That's pretty much the way it is for my Dad's community box. Just fliers and junk mail littering the ground. Most people in rural areas have done with out house to house deliver for years here in Nova Scotia. I don't really care one way or the other, I get all my bills online now and pretty much just get junk and christmas cards in my mail box, so nothing that would need immediate attention.

Re:Some people won't bother to pick up mail (1)

Russ1642 (1087959) | about 10 months ago | (#45664755)

That's a good thing in my opinion. Leaving the piles of junk mail at the mailbox as a form of protest will pick up with this system. People will dump it in the outgoing mail or on the ground. Either way it will start costing Canada Post money and then maybe they'll reconsider their position on running that kind of ridiculous business.

Re:Some people won't bother to pick up mail (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45665435)

Erm you know you can leave a note for the postman to not put junk mail in your box, right? That won't stop the "Current Resident" letters or the calendars/newsletters from your MP, but will get rid of all flyers which make up the bulk of junk mail.

Re:Some people won't bother to pick up mail (1)

dk20 (914954) | about 10 months ago | (#45666025)

I live in a newer subdivision (around 10 years old) and have never had "door to door delivery" as it has always been delivered to a "superbox". I sure wish they would put a garbage can there so i don't need to bring the junk home to get rid of it.

Re:Some people won't bother to pick up mail (1)

sdoca (1225022) | about 10 months ago | (#45666403)

I still have delivery to my door and the postal and flyer delivery people respect my "no junk mail" sign. My friend just puts the junk in the outgoing mail slot. I plan on doing the same.

It's Fine With Me (1)

Nos. (179609) | about 10 months ago | (#45664621)

All new neighbourhoods in the last probably 10 years (or more) have had these community mailboxes. This will just be phasing it in to older neighbourhoods. I've been living with them for about 6 or 7 years now and really have no complaints about them.

Re:It's Fine With Me (1)

PhotoJim (813785) | about 10 months ago | (#45664659)

More like 20 years - maybe more. But that only helps your point.

Re:It's Fine With Me (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45664977)

Rural Saskatchewan, right?

Have you ever walked to the mailbox in the middle of winter?

Re:It's Fine With Me (1)

compro01 (777531) | about 10 months ago | (#45665481)

Yes, I have. It's not a big deal. And besides, most people just drop by the mailboxes on their way home from work, so you don't even need to walk from home.

"costs" == "retirees" (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45664631)

yay euphemisms

Retire at 55, collect till 85. Yay public unions.

Keep printing Ben.

Re:"costs" == "retirees" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45665483)

cotisation breaks granted by the govt is the real culprit

I don't understand (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45664639)

I thought with the online shopping boom, couriers and mail delivery would be booming as well.

Re:I don't understand (2)

Xeno man (1614779) | about 10 months ago | (#45664995)

Those are packages. While package delivery is up, letter volume is way down. Over all the post office is still making less money.

Delivering urban homes is hard work. (3, Funny)

gumpish (682245) | about 10 months ago | (#45664651)

Canada Post is phasing out urban home delivery

Well, delivering homes sounds awfully resource intensive and is probably a departure from their charter to deliver mail.

Re:Delivering urban homes is hard work. (1)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | about 10 months ago | (#45665201)

originally you could order a house by postal delivery in Canada through the Sears catalog - which you kept in your outhouse.

True story.

That was less than half a century ago.

Re:Delivering urban homes is hard work. (1)

Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) | about 10 months ago | (#45666101)

How wonderfully un-green! Replacing one vehicle on an optimized route with thousands overlapping a small chunk of that route both ways as people swing by on the way home. And this doesn't address moving most of it from walk to drive, or people taking a longer route throuh their subdivisons so they can get the box on the correct side.

How many licks does it take... (2)

magusxxx (751600) | about 10 months ago | (#45664669)

One year the USPS went before Congress to explain why a postage increase was necessary. Two weeks after it was approved the heads split several million dollars worth of bonuses. Wonder how much they're getting this year.

Re:How many licks does it take... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45665091)

You're fucking stupid. We're talking about Canada. RTFS. Fail troll is fail.

Amazon (1)

Dan East (318230) | about 10 months ago | (#45664727)

They heard about Amazon's autonomous drone delivery and thought they'd quit while they were ahead.

Business! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45664737)

We're losing money and customers. Let's offer a shittier service at increased prices! I refuse to see how this won't work.
-Canada Post

Re:Business! (1)

fish waffle (179067) | about 10 months ago | (#45664943)

That is the essence of a traditional business death-spiral.

Depressing (1)

decipher_saint (72686) | about 10 months ago | (#45664815)

It's really easy to imagine just going to a community box if you are an able bodied person with a vehicle but if you're elderly or otherwise have mobility issues ... well let's just say with the lengthy winters and poor snow clearing I foresee two outcomes:

-People not picking up mail for months at a time
-Old people breakin' hips

Ugh...

ePost (3, Interesting)

lazarus (2879) | about 10 months ago | (#45664821)

Canada Post already has something called ePost [epost.ca] , which makes most regular postal mail obsolete now. It sounds to me like they're helping to put traditional postal mail out of business anyway.

I'd like to have no mailbox altogether. The notion that I have a "postal" address (which everybody wants for some reason) that a human being drives a car to so they can fill it with unwanted matter printed on processed dead trees is completely ridiculous. Give me ePost for bills and a local post office for packages and I'm good.

What's your address? 127.0.0.1. Same as yours.

Re:ePost (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45665167)

That's not a mail digitization service, if that's what you're assuming.

You'll still have to go clear the garbage out of your community mailbox every few days to prevent the mail from being suspended, even if all your bills go through ePost (why you would want that instead of it going to normal e-mail is beyond me).

Re:ePost (2)

camperdave (969942) | about 10 months ago | (#45665203)

Give me ePost for bills and a local post office for packages and I'm good.

So how do you get your Christmas cards?

Re:ePost (1)

Guspaz (556486) | about 10 months ago | (#45665209)

The problem with ePost is that my credit card can also be used to simplify and automate bill payments.

Re:ePost (1)

zekele2 (1556449) | about 10 months ago | (#45666015)

ePost is dire, it's barely functional for clients, but for mailers it is verging on being unusable. I've been setting up an ePost Connect service for my employer, and there are weird and unforgivable bugs - such as not being able to send to hyphenated domain names (!) I hate the product as a client too, it mangles bills, sends out notifications late or never, and it is tied to a regular email address so offers no real advantage to having the mailer email you directly. Oh, and my address is ::1 and not 127.0.0.1 :)

This kills on-line businesses (1)

davecb (6526) | about 10 months ago | (#45664891)

On-line ordering depends on cheap physical-world delivery, and this will drive them out of business.

If they cut off mail, we'll either be reduced to post-boxes or parcel delivery. Boxes don't work for parcels, even in apartment buildings, where they used heavily. Parcel delivery has the same problem with boxes: everyone ends up getting a postcard and schlepping off to the local pickup point because the darned boxes aren't big enough to hold the parcel. And big boxes are unaffordable!

Parcel delivery, on the other hand, is insanely more expensive: it loses out on the efficiency of loading up a truck and doing every house on the street, one after another. Parcel guys have to solve the "travelling salesman problem" in their head as they zig-zag across the city. Street-by-street delivery is O(n), parcel delivery O(n!) (and NP-hard in the general case).

In effect, the government proposes we go back to the 18th century, and pick up rare and expensive parcels at a local substation, and pay through the nose for the manual handling that involves.

If you aren't one of the 1% who can have their servants pick up the goods they ordered, you're not going to order anything on-line. You'll go to the store, just like grandpa and grandma. (Of course, the government says they're "conservative", so maybe that's what they intended (;-))

--dave

Re:This kills on-line businesses (3, Informative)

compro01 (777531) | about 10 months ago | (#45665253)

Boxes don't work for parcels, even in apartment buildings, where they used heavily. Parcel delivery has the same problem with boxes: everyone ends up getting a postcard and schlepping off to the local pickup point because the darned boxes aren't big enough to hold the parcel. And big boxes are unaffordable!

Canada Post thought of that years ago. The community mailboxes have sizable parcel compartments (usually two, one "C" size (13.5x30.5x35cm) and one "D" size (30.5x30.5x35cm) for every 18 normal "B" size (13.5x12.5x35cm) mailboxes) built into them. If you have a parcel, they stick it in the parcel compartment and put the key for it in your own mailbox.

Re:This kills on-line businesses (4, Funny)

fish waffle (179067) | about 10 months ago | (#45665449)

..and then you copy the key and have free random parcels forever?

Re:This kills on-line businesses (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45666225)

Maybe that would be the case in the US, but in Canada we don't tend to steal each others mail.

Re:This kills on-line businesses (1)

Dzimas (547818) | about 10 months ago | (#45665273)

Actually, no. The Canada Post community mailboxes have a handful of large compartments in several sizes that are used for package delivery -- the postal worker simply puts the key in your mailbox and you use it to unlock the compartment and then just drop the key into the mail slot afterward. The end result is that if I'm not home, the package from Amazon.ca that I'm expecting is available for immediate pickup from a secure and dry place.

Hey! Listen! (1)

Xeno man (1614779) | about 10 months ago | (#45664967)

Do you guys hear that? That is the sound of Canadians not flipping out and loosing their shit and calling for the end of times due to reduced service.

It's quite a pleasant sound up here in Canada, unlike the noise Americans made a short while back.

Re:Hey! Listen! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45665279)

You aren't Canadien. You're a pitiful troll. Wanna know how I know? Not anywhere in your post did I see one apology or use of the word "eh". Back under your bridge!

Re:Hey! Listen! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45665773)

!

...and loosing their shit...

hey hoser, that's 'cos we gots us some of that immodium (tm) eh!

Re:Hey! Listen! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45665817)

So youre saying meek acquiescence to people whom you pay to serve you is a Good Thing?

Re:Hey! Listen! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45666669)

So tell us about the last time you travelled and were almost gang-probed before getting on the plane, what did you do?

Re:Hey! Listen! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45666207)

The 'meh' attitude doesn't always work to our advantage. Our federal government is a good indication of that -- a pile of evidence showing voter fraud, and nobody gives a shit. What's on TV tonight??

Support blacksmiths! (1)

AndyKron (937105) | about 10 months ago | (#45664973)

We must support the blacksmiths, they're too big to fail! What we need it price support from taxes. Everyone will be required to buy at least two horse shoes each year as well. Those who cannot afford to buy horse shoes will be given horse shoes using tax dollars. Those who choose not to buy horse shoes will by fined $90/mo. That is all.

How did the mail service cope 50 years ago? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45665021)

Anybody?
There were no computers. EVERYTHING was done by hand. How did it work? How did they manage to pay a living wage to the staff?

Re:How did the mail service cope 50 years ago? (1)

green1 (322787) | about 10 months ago | (#45665289)

several differences, without email, or other electronic delivery options, everything had to be mailed, economies of scale helped tremendously.
also unions, they used to pay a living wage, now a postman makes far more with no education than many highly educated professionals. unions have priced themselves out of the market.

Sometimes the end of the block is 2 miles away (1)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | about 10 months ago | (#45665189)

In rural areas of Canada, sometime the "end of the block" is 2 miles away.

In cities filled with multi-story multi-family apartments this might not be such a big deal, but in a rural area this may mean you might as well drive into town (15 minute drive).

Re:Sometimes the end of the block is 2 miles away (1)

compro01 (777531) | about 10 months ago | (#45665415)

Rural areas already run on this system, so nothing is going to change for them. If you're on a farm or such, you head to the town/village to get your mail. If you're in the village/town, you walk a block or three to the boxes (or you drop by the boxes on your way home from work) to get your mail

This is just moving everyone else onto this system.

Re:Sometimes the end of the block is 2 miles away (1)

wisnoskij (1206448) | about 10 months ago | (#45665997)

No,
it is delivered to the end of your driveway, sometimes that is several miles away.
If it was switched to the end of the block that would not be too bad for me at least, that is not too much further than just the end of the driveway anyway.
And if it actually accepted parcels, like one posted commented, that would be way way better.

No one runs on the system you describe, it would be impossible. It wound be literally impossible to expect thousands of people, 10-20 minutes away, to drive into a one lane town, every day to pick up advertising flyers. That is not only improbably, and inconvenience, but literally impossible to pull off.

Re:Sometimes the end of the block is 2 miles away (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45666457)

Huh? I live in a rural area and yes we all have community boxes, sometimes a 20 minute walk up/down the hill by the highway. Big boxes you drive into town and pick them up. Nobody has a problem with it. It's rural life, we don't live here for the urban instant gratification but for the quiet life.

No idea where your advertising flyers come from. Pretty much everybody arranges with Canada Post to not receive them.

Re:Sometimes the end of the block is 2 miles away (1)

sunderland56 (621843) | about 10 months ago | (#45666629)

Rural areas already run on this system.

Some do, some don't. Beyond a certain date, ALL new construction - even in cities - got community boxes; but older homes got to keep to-the-door delivery.

This basically just removes the grandfather clause, and converts everyone to the same system. I'm not sure how they will save money by buying and installing tens of thousands of corner mail distribution boxes, though.

A country without a fucntioning post office (2)

drwho (4190) | about 10 months ago | (#45665291)

...is not a country.

Re:A country without a fucntioning post office (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45666029)

I live in an area that already has delivery to a community mailbox. These have been installed in newer subdivisions for the last couple of decades. In other words, what they're proposing to do for all current delivery to the door is what I've already had for years.

It's no big dea (a short walk)l, and it was obvious things were heading that way long ago.

Less paper spam? (1)

ark1 (873448) | about 10 months ago | (#45665357)

Hopefully higher costs -> less spam.

awesome! (0)

csumpi (2258986) | about 10 months ago | (#45665375)

The Canadians are so awesome at everything! Let's copy their health care system, too!

What I want is... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45665827)

What I want is a large recycling bin at every community mailbox.

Speaking as a European : (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45665855)

WTF?

In Europe every letter, every parcel is delivered to your door step no matter where you live. You can optionally specify on request to collect your mail youself. But that's not the default.

And it's cheaper as well with letters almost always delivered next day.

You Americana guys are doing something very wrong.

Re:Speaking as a European : (1)

dk20 (914954) | about 10 months ago | (#45666155)

OMFG, please read the summary before you post.
You at least read the line which states "Canada Post Announces the End of Urban Home Delivery" right?
Did it click in that "Canada post" isn't american?

By the way, I'm pretty sure that Canada is larger then any of the Euro countries and that might be factored into the price of stamps.
Canada is 9,306 km wide, not sure how you would manage "next day" on that.

A marketing dud (1)

J Story (30227) | about 10 months ago | (#45666069)

In marketing, there are well-known positioning areas:

  • "more (goods/services) for more (money)" -- i.e. a premium service
  • "more for the same" and "more for less"
  • "the same for less"
  • "less for (a lot) less

Non-starters are "the same for the same" and "the same for more", because these give customers no added value to their existing service. However, Canada Post has gone even farther by proposing "less for more", which can only work when there are no other options available. By offering less service, and charging more for it, Canada Post is *guaranteeing* that customers will seek other options where they are available. And in the age of the Internet, other options are available.

On the bright side, the Green Party must be pretty pleased. Canada Post's brilliant marketing strategy will save trees by causing snail mail usage not only to continue shrinking, but to plummet.

BRENNAN v. U. S. POSTAL SERVICE (1)

Flammon (4726) | about 10 months ago | (#45666123)

Why is the government delivering our mail anyway. That kind of work is much more efficient in the private sector.

Here's an interesting clip [youtu.be] on the subject.

BRENNAN v. U. S. POSTAL SERVICE , 439 U.S. 1345 (1978) [findlaw.com]

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?