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Company That Made the First 3D Printed Metal Gun Is Selling Them For $11,900

samzenpus posted about 9 months ago | from the print-and-shoot dept.

Technology 182

Lucas123 writes "Solid Concepts, which last month revealed the first fully-functional, metal 3D gun, announced today that they're putting 100 limited-edition models of the 1911 .45 caliber pistol on sale for $11,900 each. Solid Concept demonstrated the gun by initially firing 50 rounds through it. Since then, the company said it has fired nearly 2,000 rounds through the pistol without a single malfunction. Unlike the very first 3D printed gun — the single-shot, plastic Liberator — Solid Concepts says is not trying to promote the right to bear arms under the Second Amendment. Its purpose in printing the firearm was to demonstrate its ability to turn out precision, durable parts that could withstand the massive pressure created by firing a bullet. People who purchase one of the limited-edition guns will also have the chance to tour Solid Concept's Texas facility to see their gun being printed, and to join their lead additive manufacturing engineers on the range for the first test firing of their limited 1911 gun."

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Ironically, the first Highway Robbery committed (5, Funny)

retroworks (652802) | about 9 months ago | (#45744751)

by 3d printed guns happens without the firing of a single shot.

seriously (1)

marcello_dl (667940) | about 9 months ago | (#45744801)

even in real robberies there is no need to shoot every time, I guess... danger number one is mishandling IMHO.

Anyway, right to print arms FTW (for the wealthy)

Re:seriously (2)

TheCarp (96830) | about 9 months ago | (#45745225)

I seem to remember reading claims that a large number of guns used in robberies are actually not even loaded; and thus are little more than props. Without bullets it is no more of a weapon than a rock (which is still a formidable weapon... quite an expensive, precision crafted rock)

Re:seriously (1)

DexterIsADog (2954149) | about 9 months ago | (#45746371)

Even unloaded, a gun is much more a weapon than is a rock. The sight of a gun-waving robber will induce people to do all sorts of things a rock-waving robber would not. Imagine the irony of serving a life sentence for felony murder because you brandished an empty gun, and the responding police opened fire, negligently killing a bystander. You then own that murder.

Re:Ironically, the first Highway Robbery committed (1)

Charcharodon (611187) | about 9 months ago | (#45744863)

In what way? By printing a gun from 1911? I'm thinking the patent on that ran out more than a few years ago, which just happens to be why the 1911 is so popular. Anyone can make their own version, even if it is an exact copy of the original.

Re:Ironically, the first Highway Robbery committed (3)

gl4ss (559668) | about 9 months ago | (#45744899)

yeah so you can get a machined version much cheaper.

incidentally, you can by cnc machines and cnc lathes for making it for cheaper than the metal printer used for this.

but they are making a good point about how it can be used for rapid prototyping of durable parts OR for making parts that can not be machine. I mean, how the fuck would you machine a honeycomb structure inside an object?? which is the real point why 3d printed car parts are going to be a big thing, because you can manufacture parts that have a different structure!

Re:Ironically, the first Highway Robbery committed (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45745105)

It isn't about the price of the printed gun, it is about exclusivity. This gun is a limited edition, and will be from the set of the first 100 metal guns ever made by using a printer. That is bound to give the gun some value that exceeds the sum of its parts.

Re:Ironically, the first Highway Robbery committed (2)

CastrTroy (595695) | about 9 months ago | (#45745373)

This is what they should really be spending their money and effort on. Printing 3D objects that can't be made in traditional methods. 3D Printing will never be better than traditional methods for items that can be done using traditional methods. And that's not just because we haven't given 3D printing enough time to catch up. It would be like a laser printer catching up with an offset printing press. Impossible. We should instead focus on getting 3D printers to print up objects that can't be produced by other methods.

Re:Ironically, the first Highway Robbery committed (1)

Bill, Shooter of Bul (629286) | about 9 months ago | (#45746131)

I think the initial promise of 3d printing is having something that can produce prototypes or low numbers of items made cheaper.

Re:Ironically, the first Highway Robbery committed (3, Funny)

TheloniousToady (3343045) | about 9 months ago | (#45744919)

I think the "highway robbery" in this case comes from charging $11,900 for a pistol. Then again, nobody is putting a gun to anybody's head to buy one.

If they pistols don't sell, though, maybe they can figure out how to print 3D gold Krugerrands from lead. In fact, maybe that's why they've already got "lead additive manufacturing engineers".

Re:Ironically, the first Highway Robbery committed (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 9 months ago | (#45745019)

Faking gold is tough: It's about twice as dense as lead; but is almost comically unlike tungsten or uranium (more or less your only options on density) in every other respect.

Re:Ironically, the first Highway Robbery committed (1)

CastrTroy (595695) | about 9 months ago | (#45745205)

I've often wondered about this. Let's say you want a fake gold bar. You could start off with something that's the same density as gold (a cheaper metal alloy of the correct density), and then just coat it in a thin layer of actual gold. Sure there is going to be some real gold there, so it's not completely fake, but it has to be cheaper than making an entire gold brick. Sure they would find out if they every cut the brick in half, or melted it down, but you could be way out of town by the time that happened.

Re:Ironically, the first Highway Robbery committed (1)

Scannerman (1136265) | about 9 months ago | (#45745433)

I You could start off with something that's the same density as gold (a cheaper metal alloy of the correct density), and then just coat it in a thin layer of actual gold. Sure there is going to be some real gold there, so it's not completely fake, but it has to be cheaper than making an entire gold brick. Sure they would find out if they every cut the brick in half, or melted it down, but you could be way out of town by the time that happened.

Density is easy to measure, nothing is the same density as gold, and the metals that are heavier are really tough to alloy (or even more expensive). so you end up with a sandwich structure - that again is pretty easy to detect, I've worked with ultrasound on this, but there are a number of material properties you can easily measure so most fakes are really easy to detect.

Most people who buy gold are well aware of the various tests - if not they would run out of money quick. They also tend not to buy from people who just walk in.

Re:Ironically, the first Highway Robbery committed (2)

Karth (14680) | about 9 months ago | (#45745443)

There's significant evidence that someone has been injecting tungsten filled "gold bars" into the world gold market. They're the correct weight, they displace the correct amount of water, the only way to tell is that the electrical resistance is something like .01% off. And cutting them in half, of course.

Re:Ironically, the first Highway Robbery committed (1)

DexterIsADog (2954149) | about 9 months ago | (#45746443)

Actual link to real facts below. "significant evidence" is one attempt in the past 10 years, detected by the dealer on receipt because of an obvious weight discrepancy? This must be some new definition of significant with which I am unfamiliar; trend identified by a single data point.

http://www.perthmintbullion.com/us/blog/blog/12-03-26/Fake_Bars_-_The_Facts.aspx

Re:Ironically, the first Highway Robbery committed (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45745465)

That's why pretty much everyone who buys bar gold/silver will drill a small hole through it in several places and then run chemical tests on the shavings. They do this as a condition of the purchase.

Re:Ironically, the first Highway Robbery committed (1)

Bob the Super Hamste (1152367) | about 9 months ago | (#45745549)

It has already been done, mostly at the retail level. Stupid people will have a gold plated lead bar while the smarter ones will cast gold around tungsten. There was a story last about one turning up in New York city and I think there had been a number of other instances of it happening in Europe previously.

Re:Ironically, the first Highway Robbery committed (1)

TheCarp (96830) | about 9 months ago | (#45745351)

Except Kurgerands are not pure gold coins, they are coins with an oz of gold in them, but that gold is alloyed to make it less soft and more worthy of use in circulation (as $1000+ coins jingle around in many pockets)

I would think this gives you some more leeway when it comes to its properties, at least enough to fool many buyers.

Re:Ironically, the first Highway Robbery committed (1)

jittles (1613415) | about 9 months ago | (#45745151)

In what way? By printing a gun from 1911? I'm thinking the patent on that ran out more than a few years ago, which just happens to be why the 1911 is so popular. Anyone can make their own version, even if it is an exact copy of the original.

My guess is the cost of the 1911 itself. You can buy a top of the line 1911 for under $2k. So this 3D printed one for almost $12k should be the golden gun from a Bond movie.

Re:Ironically, the first Highway Robbery committed (5, Interesting)

TWiTfan (2887093) | about 9 months ago | (#45744905)

If someone tried to rob me with a plastic 3D printed gun, part of me would be tempted to resist just on the decent chance that they would blow their own hand off rather than shooting me.

Re:Ironically, the first Highway Robbery committed (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45745207)

on the decent chance that they would blow their own hand off

Can that even happen?

You can fire a bullet without a barrel. Just fixate the bullet somewhere and hit on the back of it with a nail.
To be able to make the gun explode one would have to make it sturdy enough and too tight to make the barrel stop the bullet from exiting and the rest of the gun tight enough to not just release a gas jet in any other direction.

So on one hand you will have to make the gun with to bad precision and too weak, otherwise the failure won't happen. On the other hand you have to make it with high precision and sturdy, otherwise the hazard won't occur.

Re:Ironically, the first Highway Robbery committed (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45745353)

You can fire a bullet without a barrel. Just fixate the bullet somewhere and hit on the back of it with a nail.

No you can't. The casing will just explode.

Re:Ironically, the first Highway Robbery committed (1)

Talderas (1212466) | about 9 months ago | (#45746269)

Let me guess. You also believe that throwing live ammunition into a fire is extremely dangerous?

The chamber of the gun is extremely important to the firing of the bullet. While you will ignite the powder inside the casing by striking it correctly, the pressures from the explosion will take the easiest path to escape which just happens to be through the brass casings. There's a chance for minor injuries but what you usually end up with is a peeled back casing and the slug sitting where the bullet was left. The chamber and barrel are needed to contain the explosive power and force it forward to project the bullet.

Re:Ironically, the first Highway Robbery committed (5, Funny)

Greyfox (87712) | about 9 months ago | (#45745545)

I know what you're thinking. You're thinkiing "His gun's made of plastic! It's going to explode in his hand the moment he pulls the trigger!" Well to be honest, I'm not even sure myself. So the question you have to ask yourself is, do you feel lucky, punk? Well? DO YA?!

Re:Ironically, the first Highway Robbery committed (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45745975)

Once my uncle and I got robbed by two people, one of whom had a gun, but the gun looked so rusted it probably didn't work. When I noticed I was tempted to fight the guy, but the other was behind me robbing my uncle and I didn't want to risk him having a knife or something.

When they were leaving they made as if to shoot us to scare us. They laughed as I flinched, but in reality I wasn't scared for myself, I was just expecting his hand to blow off.

Oh well a cell phone and a gold necklace aren't worth risking your life over anyway.

Build-it-yourself (1)

N3tRunner (164483) | about 9 months ago | (#45744761)

I look forward to our factory-free future, despite its many inherent dangers.

Nope (1)

mozumder (178398) | about 9 months ago | (#45744807)

The important thing about this project is that it shows how expensive 3-D printing actually would be in a commercial grade product with reliability requirements.

This is very different from the mushy jello that consumer 3-D printing makes.

Re:Build-it-yourself (2)

TWiTfan (2887093) | about 9 months ago | (#45744913)

Fortunately, you can still buy a factory-made .45 for a few hundred dollars. 3D printing has a long way to go.

Re:Build-it-yourself (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45745223)

Fortunately, you can still buy a factory-made .45 for a few hundred dollars. 3D printing has a long way to go.

I think the point is not everywhere in the world....

Now can they print ammunition.

Re:Build-it-yourself (1)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 9 months ago | (#45745965)

Fortunately, you can still buy a factory-made .45 for a few hundred dollars. 3D printing has a long way to go.

I think the point is not everywhere in the world....

Now can they print ammunition.

... which is still going to be orders of magnitude cheaper and easier to do the good ol' fashioned way.

Re:Build-it-yourself (1)

parkinglot777 (2563877) | about 9 months ago | (#45746073)

"A long way to go" does not eliminate the issue that at some point in the future, it could become dangerous. Those who pro-gun will not see it as dangerous but rather benefit from it. Those who anti-gun may already have a panic attack. Those who are in the middle may concern about the issue depending on how far they are between pro and anti.

Fail (0)

oic0 (1864384) | about 9 months ago | (#45744777)

Well its cool and all that some company that wants to specialize in fabricating one off parts can use their machines to make a functioning gun, but this is hardly news worthy. The price of the machine that did it could probably buy an entire tractor trailer full of AK-47s.

Re:Fail (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45744835)

Exactly, industrial stereolithography such as this was there long before the 3D printing craze took off. The novelty of home 3D printers is that they are affordable to the common man. This machine isn't.

Re:Fail (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 9 months ago | (#45745045)

In some of the world's lousier neighborhoods, it'd probably buy you the AKs and a supply of conscripted children to operate them, the serious metal printers are Not Cheap.

(Also, company PR emphasizes that 'no machining' had to be done to the printed parts; which is impressive; but also allows room for assorted heat treatment, surface coating, and other things you do to metal without machine tools)

The really exciting thing about this... (5, Interesting)

jcr (53032) | about 9 months ago | (#45744781)

If you can print a gun, you can print many other kinds of machinery. The day may not be very far off when you can start with half a ton of aluminum and stainless steel powder, and print yourself a Ferrari with a V-12 engine.

-jcr

Re:The really exciting thing about this... (3, Insightful)

Nimey (114278) | about 9 months ago | (#45744845)

Expect new and exciting patent/copyright laws when that starts to become a reality.

Re:The really exciting thing about this... (0)

mishehu (712452) | about 9 months ago | (#45745037)

While I don't doubt your statements, it's probably a little further off than you might think still. Consider this: this 1911 gun still costs between 10 and 20 times the normal cost for a 1911 manufactured using conventional methods these days. As the price difference shrinks, I suspect the cries for more draconian laws (not just patent or copyright) will get louder and louder.

Re:The really exciting thing about this... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45745301)

Printing off an ebook costs nearly as much in toner and paper as just buying the damn thing. (Excluding high-cost specialty publications of course.) A fancy car is not entirely, but mainly about status. Print a knockoff and you lose that status. (It would still be fun to drive though.)

Re:The really exciting thing about this... (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about 9 months ago | (#45745325)

Considering how much of our cars today already is made of plastic and what ridiculous prices come attached to them, I think that time of some new and exciting patent laws ain't as far away as you might think. Because those parts CAN already be printed by consumer 3d printers.

Re:The really exciting thing about this... (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45746485)

Back in the Top Gear UK series 2 http://www.topgear.com/uk/tv-show/series-2 circa 2003, there is a short spot where they showed a conversion kit for a Toyota MR2 to be changed into a Ferrari 355. The car kit looks stunning and in no way could you tell the donor car was a MR2.

They go on to state that Ferrari put the shop out of business in less than a month. There are other replica car kits out there but they make such changes as to not infringe copyright, as in http://www.mr2kits.co.uk/kit-packages.html

If it happened in 2003, it can happen today if not even more easily.

Nathan

captcha: satisfy

Re:The really exciting thing about this... (1)

rmdingler (1955220) | about 9 months ago | (#45744889)

This. As to the initial offering price tags: If only you can wait... The AMPEX-VRX 1000, the first commercially successful video tape recorder, sold for 50,000 dollars in 1956. I remember paying $89 for the movie Platoon on VHS in the 80's.

Re:The really exciting thing about this... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45745251)

How about $200 for A Christmas Story?

Re:The really exciting thing about this... (1)

TWiTfan (2887093) | about 9 months ago | (#45744929)

It's an interesting proof of concept. But costs are going to have to come way down (perhaps with scale) for it to be very practical. 3D printing seems better suited to one-off parts rather than general manufacture. If you're going to build a million copies of something, it's probably always going to be cheaper just to build the traditional custom manufacturing equipment rather than using a general-purpose 3D printer.

Re:The really exciting thing about this... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45745197)

Early adoption is expensive? Who woulda thunk it?
 
  it's probably always going to be cheaper just to build the traditional custom manufacturing equipment rather than using a general-purpose 3D printer.
 
It's always going to be cheaper to write a letter and let some guy on a horse carry it around instead of tying copper wires to dead trees and making a talking box on both ends.
 
Your insights into this issue are truly great.

Re:The really exciting thing about this... (1)

HighOrbit (631451) | about 9 months ago | (#45744997)

IIRC, that was the goal of RepRap: a machine that could replicate itself. That raises some Sci-Fi come true issues. To paraphase an old meme: Image a cluster of self replicating machines :)

I see some safety issues related to the strength of the metals. I would be interested if somebody put the printed metal material through some metalurigal tests to see how strong it is versus traditionally cast/machined parts.

Re:The really exciting thing about this... (2)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 9 months ago | (#45745949)

I would be interested if somebody put the printed metal material through some metalurigal tests to see how strong it is versus traditionally cast/machined parts.

They already did. They fired 2000+ rounds through the gun. Pretty good test. Now, the TFA doesn't mention if they used proof loads (larger amounts of powder used to test guns by giving one the assurance they can handle larger than expected pressures). But 2000 rounds is starting to get you into territory that suggests the gun is reasonably strong and safe.

Re:The really exciting thing about this... (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 9 months ago | (#45745905)

How are you going to print Naugahyde? Or rich Corinthian leather for that matter?

Re:The really exciting thing about this... (1)

jcr (53032) | about 9 months ago | (#45746437)

Well, there are medical researchers printing skin, so leather should be possible.

-jcr

Re:The really exciting thing about this... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45746003)

Interestingly, if you read the summary, this is exactly what the company was setting out to prove with this demonstration.

Re:The really exciting thing about this... (1)

Scannerman (1136265) | about 9 months ago | (#45746075)

If you can print a gun, you can print many other kinds of machinery. The day may not be very far off when you can start with half a ton of aluminum and stainless steel powder, and print yourself a Ferrari with a V-12 engine.

-jcr

Totally practical, you could do most of it now, (large parts are difficult) The trouble is it would cost a lot more than just going to a dealer and buying one.

I've been using various plastic part additive manufacturing methods (mainly SLS / SLA) for a few years now. It works great when you want one of something or ten of something: A gun sized object may cost you a couple of hundred dollars a part, so Its much cheaper than spending $10-20,000 on the tooling, but when you have that tooling the cost falls to pennies.

People (including some of my customers!) tend to look at a mass produced item and think that a comparable specialised piece of equipment should cost about the same. Its not so. Even a Ferrari is 'mass produced' from the manufacturing method point of view.

Pretty sure it's not the first (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45744783)

last month revealed the first fully-functional, metal 3D gun

I'm pretty sure it's not the first fully functional, metal 3D gun.

Re:Pretty sure it's not the first (2)

TWiTfan (2887093) | about 9 months ago | (#45744935)

I'm still waiting on the first fully-functional 2D gun.

Re:Pretty sure it's not the first (4, Funny)

retroworks (652802) | about 9 months ago | (#45745159)

Wait a little longer, and you can get a 4d printed gun awhile ago.

Re:Pretty sure it's not the first (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45745315)

I want my 11D gun so I can shoot alternate versions of myself. There can only be one!

Re:Pretty sure it's not the first (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | about 9 months ago | (#45745191)

There's the WW2 Sten, for suitably "it'd hurt if you bashed someone with it" values of functional.

Re:Pretty sure it's not the first (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45745355)

Why to be limited to a Sten ? Print a B-17 instead!

A 1911 for how much ??? (1)

Rosco P. Coltrane (209368) | about 9 months ago | (#45744785)

I look forward to buying the first 3D-printed AK47 for $15k. I mean, who the hell would want a normal $30 one: they're so last century...

Re:A 1911 for how much ??? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45744815)

I look forward to buying the first 3D-printed AK47 for $15k. I mean, who the hell would want a normal $30 one: they're so last century...

Forget the gun, how about 3d printing bullets ?

Custom bullets ? (1)

advid.net (595837) | about 9 months ago | (#45744937)

Forget the gun, how about 3d printing bullets ?

Customized bullets with the name of the victim ? Or the reason the victim was shot at ?

That's not for me, I'll stick with jewelry and fitness accessories printing... :-)

Re:Custom bullets ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45745173)

Forget the gun, how about 3d printing bullets ?

Customized bullets with the name of the victim ? Or the reason the victim was shot at ?

That's not for me, I'll stick with jewelry and fitness accessories printing... :-)

Everyone is going gun-ho over the 3d printed guns. But guns without ammunition are useless.
I think the 3d printing of ammunition is much more dangerous than some 11000$ kalashnikov knockoff replica.

Re:Custom bullets ? (1)

CastrTroy (595695) | about 9 months ago | (#45745317)

Or, you know, you could just use a regular bullet, and engrave the message on it. No need for a 3D printer.

Re:Custom bullets ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45745845)

Sure, if you REALLY want to risk engraving shit on to live rounds.

Re:Custom bullets ? (1)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 9 months ago | (#45746015)

Sure, if you REALLY want to risk engraving shit on to live rounds.

Done it a million times.

Don't be such a chickenshit.

Re:A 1911 for how much ??? (3, Informative)

fl!ptop (902193) | about 9 months ago | (#45745427)

I mean, who the hell would want a normal $30 one

I own both a Springfield Arms 1911 and a Romanian AK (it's a 74, not a 47, meaning it takes 5.45x39 ammo instead of 7.62x39 like the 47 does). I paid $900 for my 1911 (brand new in the box) and I saw them at the last gun show I attended for up to $1500. I paid $1000 for the AK, 5 magazines and 1000 rounds of ammo. It is set up just like it would be in theater, and has hardly been used (muzzle wear and throat erosion are very low). The AK's I saw at the last gun show ranged from $650 up to $2000. Where are you getting them for $30?

Re:A 1911 for how much ??? (1)

redmid17 (1217076) | about 9 months ago | (#45745525)

Probably a third world, war-torn country if I had to guess

Re:A 1911 for how much ??? (2)

hey! (33014) | about 9 months ago | (#45745899)

The AK's I saw at the last gun show ranged from $650 up to $2000. Where are you getting them for $30?

You live in rich country full of gun collectors who drive up the price for nice examples. In Africa, AK-47s can be had for around $300 [reference:http://blog.foreignpolicy.com/posts/2007/06/12/looking_for_a_deal_on_ak_47s_go_to_africa#sthash.IpUFO50V.dpbs].

It's also possible that at certain situations (e.g., after a proxy war) markets in very poor countries may be flooded with very cheap weapons, with ak-47s selling for as little as $6 [reference http://archive.is/5gesc%5D [archive.is] . However this is obviously not a sustainable price; it only reflects a glut on the local market. Also, these aren't places you'd want to live, despite the occasional gun purchase bargain.

Re:A 1911 for how much ??? (1)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 9 months ago | (#45746051)

The AK's I saw at the last gun show ranged from $650 up to $2000. Where are you getting them for $30?

Crazy Achmed's Firearm and Shovel Emporium

as the killing stops we begin to heal & feel a (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45744803)

print out some 3d spirit bugs. free the innocent stem cells. read the teepeeleaks etchings or watch the movie http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gqUvhDG7x2E

How does it come off the build plate? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45744817)

How the hell do they get that stuff off the build plate!?! I have a Printrbot and sometimes I need to use a paint scraper and a lot of yanking to get ABS to separate from painters tape. Seriously, does anyone know how this stuff comes off the plate?

Re:How does it come off the build plate? (1)

penix1 (722987) | about 9 months ago | (#45746391)

I don't own a 3D printer but I would imagine that cooking parchment would work.

http://recipes.howstuffworks.com/tools-and-techniques/parchment-paper-questions.htm [howstuffworks.com]

Simply tape it down to the plate and print on it. In theory (yes, my theory) that should allow you to easily remove the ABS and it shouldn't stick to the paper. Of course, I disclaim any and all liability should this fuck up your machine or project.

if they say ummm and or and over & over (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45744975)

they are lying

Call For New Legislation: (2, Funny)

Hartree (191324) | about 9 months ago | (#45745059)

We must immediately restrict the availability of this 3D printing technology to prevent $11,900 cheap knockoff copies of firearms from flooding the streets!

I cannot wait to see... (1)

ctrl-alt-canc (977108) | about 9 months ago | (#45745061)

...the first fully functionant 3D replica of the Trinity device [wikipedia.org] . When a celebrative limited edition working model will be available ?

For that price (1)

wisnoskij (1206448) | about 9 months ago | (#45745227)

Just buy yourself a 3D printer and print your own crappy guns.

Re:For that price (1)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 9 months ago | (#45746065)

Just buy yourself a CNC mill and print your own real guns.

FTFY.

Complete rip off. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45745249)

For that kind of money you can have a REAL 1911 from 1911. And its value will do nothing but go up. Not be some one off novelty worth squat like any other knockoff copy in 5 years.

this is excellent news (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45745303)

and will provide power to the people against the tyranny of bad govt - everyone should be armed and carrying at all times

Re:this is excellent news (1)

pr0fessor (1940368) | about 9 months ago | (#45745613)

I just had to renew my drivers license the girl in her mid 20s in front of me in line was there to take the driving test it was her 4th attempt and the clerk reminded her that if she failed she would have to start over she said she knows she has started over more than once... that means she failed the driving test at least 11 times.

Six years ago when I renewed my license there was a guy taking the written test for a second time that day {It's an open book test and the book has one page for every question in the same order as on the test.}

Are your certain you want everyone carrying a loaded gun at all times?

Re:this is excellent news (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45745723)

What? Stupid people don't deserve to be allowed to defend themselves?

Re:this is excellent news (1)

operagost (62405) | about 9 months ago | (#45745745)

Einstein never learned to drive. He thought it was too complicated to bother.

Some people are just bad at driving. They might be brilliant mathematicians, engineers, or physicians.

Re:this is excellent news (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45746381)

Not being able to drive and not passing the driving test are two different things. I've passed the driving test, easy-peasy, with flying colors, so I'm technically allowed to drive. Nonetheless, I don't drive, because doing to properly is a difficult, dangerous, and highly skilled task that I don't have the requisite experience and training for (not that I wouldn't be able to learn eventually; my PhD in nuclear physics indicates a modest level of learning ability).

Passing the test doesn't say much (and cars are a lot simpler to operate today than in Einstein's time); certainly no indication that one is remotely qualified to drive --- much less on a road populated with all the other drivers who barely scraped by the test. If you can't drive, that may be because driving is hard for humans. If you can't pass the test, that's because you're significantly mentally handicapped (and shouldn't be applying for a permit to fling a ton of steel and glass around at high speed in crowded areas).

Interesting future (1)

BobMcD (601576) | about 9 months ago | (#45745471)

So 3D printing is reaching critical mass, that much is clear.

What will this do to our economy, where we no longer need to buy anything but printer supplies?

E.g. What happens to China's economy, and how will they respond?

Great job title (1)

jbeaupre (752124) | about 9 months ago | (#45745537)

"Lead additive manufacturing engineers." What a great title for gun makers.

Yes, I know they don't mean Pb. But it would be so much funnier if they did.

Re:Great job title (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45745815)

"Lead additive manufacturing engineers." What a great title for gun makers.

Yes, I know they don't mean Pb. But it would be so much funnier if they did.

Yes, unless they need to abbreviate their job title. In which case their job becomes really LAME.

Colonization (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45745547)

Very good news for folks going to mars and beyond.

Economies of scale? (1)

puddingebola (2036796) | about 9 months ago | (#45745557)

Maybe the price will drop as they print more. I'm fine with them leaving it at $11,900, fewer sales. Google result for "M1911A1 for sale" is a page advertising $419.00. Years ago there was a Bloom County cartoon parodying the scene in the graduate where an adult takes Benjamin Braddock aside and offers him the advice, "Plastics, Ben. Plastics." In the Bloom County cartoon the adult says, "Disposable Handguns." Soon we will have a world with untraceable disposable handguns. Put the pros and cons of this new technology in the scales. I suspect a large net positive, but with some amazing new problems in the future. Things nobody has imagined yet.

WTF (0)

TangoMargarine (1617195) | about 9 months ago | (#45745689)

They're printing 1) an obsolete design from 1911, 2) charging $11,000 for one, 3) (presumably) not releasing the design files, and 4) not in it for the constitutional rights angle.

So this basically boils down to "look what we can do"?* Who in their right mind would buy one of these over a regular firearm? They're more expensive, probably less reliable, and you can't even make them yourself.

* I suspect that this is actually due to a typical shitty, misleading summary.

Re:WTF (2)

halivar (535827) | about 9 months ago | (#45745841)

What, exactly, is obsolete about the 1911? It's still one of the best, most reliable guns you can buy.

Re:WTF (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45745961)

Reliable if kept to John Moses Browning's original military specifications. The modern, tight-as-a-frogs arse slide to frame fit, the insistence of match barrels and bushings, and the stupid nonsense of full-length guide rods has done nothing good for the 1911. Watch a match. Never have a seen a match with 1911s and not several of them fail as a result of their being "out of spec". Original 1911? Very reliable. Touched by a ripoff artist "match" builder. Wouldn't trust it with my life or anyone else's.

Re:WTF (1)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 9 months ago | (#45746267)

What, exactly, is obsolete about the 1911? It's still one of the best, most reliable guns you can buy.

Some people measure obsolescence in actual years, as opposed to years of usefulness.

I'm guessing OP isn't a big fan of rulers, either.

Re:WTF (4, Informative)

tranquilidad (1994300) | about 9 months ago | (#45745929)

There is nothing obsolete about the design.

The M1911 was designed well before 1911 by John Browning and was a standard in U.S. military forces until the 1970s when, some would argue due to political pressure, the U.S. and NATO adopted the European standard 9mm round.

The standard 1911 fires a .45 ACP bullet and is remarkably elegant from a design perspective. Many would argue it's still the best defensive pistol out there. I'm carrying one on my hip at the moment.

The design has been reliable enough that I can take the parts from my current 1911 and put them in a 1911 from the era when they were initially introduced and have a very functional firearm. Today, one can pay anywhere from $400 to $5,000 for a 1911 depending on the manufacturer and I would gladly carry any of them to defend myself.

Just because it was designed over 100 years ago doesn't make it obsolete in any way, shape or form.

Re:WTF (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 9 months ago | (#45746035)

Never, never diss people with lots of disposable income. Help them.

Re:WTF (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45746101)

They're printing 1) an obsolete design from 1911, 2) charging $11,000 for one, 3) (presumably) not releasing the design files, and 4) not in it for the constitutional rights angle.

So this basically boils down to "look what we can do"?* Who in their right mind would buy one of these over a regular firearm? They're more expensive, probably less reliable, and you can't even make them yourself.

* I suspect that this is actually due to a typical shitty, misleading summary.

Umm..

http://www.coltsmfg.com/Catalog/ColtPistols.aspx
http://www.springfield-armory.com/armory.php?clicktype=1911
Oh and one of my favorites!
http://www.kimberamerica.com/1911

This company is only making 100 of them, so yeah of course they are expensive.
The patents on 1911's expired decades ago; any company that wants to make one can.
Also Yes you can make your own. If you had about half a million to invest in machinery and materials. (citation needed)

Re:WTF (1)

TangoMargarine (1617195) | about 9 months ago | (#45746171)

It sounds like they're entirely relying on the collector value to sell these things. Good on them, I guess, because apparently people will pay ridiculous amounts for "collector" shit.

mod Down (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45745769)

declined in market of business and was NetBSD user BSD machines, serves to reinf0rce asshole about.' One Engineering project and arms anXd dick Marketing surveys shower Don't just

Stacked Tolerances (2)

Zanthor (12084) | about 9 months ago | (#45745931)

I'd be very curious as to how much hand finishing is required on these firearms. While the 1911 is a simple design and commonly produced the difference between a weapon cranked out with CNC and finished by an assembly line gunsmith is notably different than the same parts finished by an accomplished smith who understands the finer points of the firearm.

I'd also point out that 2,000 rounds is no testament to durability, rather it's just barely out of what most 1911 enthusiasts consider the break-in period.

Now hold on (1)

Azure Flash (2440904) | about 9 months ago | (#45746061)

Solid Concepts, which last month revealed the first fully-functional, metal 3D gun

Hold on, I'm pretty sure guns existed long before this "Solid Concepts" company, and they were all 3D too. Granted, it's hard to tell if the gun is just hung on a wall, since you only perceive one side of it and it looks flat from a distance, but if you pick it up and rotate it around you'll see that it indeed occupies a volume.

durable parts that could withstand... (1)

LifesABeach (234436) | about 9 months ago | (#45746069)

Maybe these folks can make spare auto parts for cars? I'd love to roll with a MG, Model F with all the parts working.

And while we're on the topic of MG's, "down with Lucus Electronics, prince of darkness."

Ain't about "Freedom" It's about money. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45746313)

Brazen marketing. I can't wait for the IPO. The Republicans who've been in cash throughout the Obama stock market debacle will be lining up to get fleeced for this one/

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