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Evad3rs Announce iOS 7 Jailbreak For Latest Apple Devices

timothy posted about 4 months ago | from the taketh-and-giveth-away dept.

IOS 110

hypnosec writes "Evad3rs, the famous iOS jailbreak team, has announced an iOS 7 jailbreak that will work in all iDevices including iPhone 5S, iPhone 5C and iPad Air running iOS 7.0 through to iOS 7.0.4. The iOS 7 jailbreak was announced without much of a hype, unlike the one for iOS 6. 'Merry Christmas! The iOS 7 jailbreak has been released at http://evasi0n.com/! All donations will go to @publicknowledge, @eff and @ffii,' tweeted evad3rs." Reader FrogBlastTheVentCore adds a note of caution: "They recommend restoring your device to iOS 7.0.4 if it has received OTA updates before attempting to jailbreak."

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110 comments

God (-1, Offtopic)

TempleOS (3394245) | about 4 months ago | (#45760995)

C:\TAD\Text\BIBLE.TXT n the house, which is called by my name, to defile it. 32:35 And they built the high places of Baal, which are in the valley of the son of Hinnom, to cause their sons and their daughters to pass through the fire unto Molech; which I commanded them not, neither came it into my mind, that they should do this abomination, to cause Judah to sin. 32:36 And now therefore thus saith the LORD, the God of Israel, concerning this city, whereof ye say, It shall be delivered into the hand of the king of Babylon by t

Re:God (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45761059)

Cool story bro. Which fairy tale is that from?

iOS 7.1 (1)

ZorinLynx (31751) | about 4 months ago | (#45761005)

iOS 7.1 is probably coming next month... now surely whatever exploit was used will be analyzed by Apple and double-patched for the final 7.1 release.

You'd think they could have waited just a little bit more!

Re:iOS 7.1 (2)

TrekkieGod (627867) | about 4 months ago | (#45761053)

iOS 7.1 is probably coming next month... now surely whatever exploit was used will be analyzed by Apple and double-patched for the final 7.1 release.

You'd think they could have waited just a little bit more!

They may have downloaded the beta, realized the exploit had been patched, and released the jailbreak as a result, before a bunch of people update to 7.1 without thinking.

Pure speculation on my part, but the point is that we should wait to see if they say something about it before complaining that they were impatient. There may have been good reasons.

Re:iOS 7.1 (2)

Servaas (1050156) | about 4 months ago | (#45761057)

Considering it doesn't work on the beta it seems likely that Apple has already patched whatever hole they used.

Re:iOS 7.1 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45761111)

Works on 7.1b2, but must be a restore rather than OTA Update.

Re:iOS 7.1 (1)

Fnord666 (889225) | about 4 months ago | (#45762579)

Considering it doesn't work on the beta it seems likely that Apple has already patched whatever hole they used.

I don't have a device to try it on, but the included readme.txt says

SUPPORTED FIRMWARES:

- iOS 7.0, 7.0.1, 7.0.2, 7.0.3, 7.0.4, 7.1beta1, 7.1beta2

Re:iOS 7.1 (1)

noh8rz10 (2716597) | about 4 months ago | (#45761073)

If they did that then apple would patch it in 7.1.1! My question is, is this tethered or untethered?

Re:iOS 7.1 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45761127)

Obviously, untethered.

Re:iOS 7.1 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45761229)

RTFA for your answer.

Re:iOS 7.1 (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45761093)

Why would anyone buy a computer that's designed specifically to prevent you from getting root? Even Windows is better than that.

Re:iOS 7.1 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45761165)

To prevent malware from gaining access and spreading on people who don't understand what root is.

Re: iOS 7.1 (4, Insightful)

RyuuzakiTetsuya (195424) | about 4 months ago | (#45761245)

Because the things you can do in user land are far more interesting to a lot of people that it is worth the trade offs in terms of stability, usability and security. Being able to customize the shit out of springboard, the keyboard, etc are really nice and fun but the charm of the OS isnt that I feel nice and fuzzy being in idiot mode, it's that I really don't feel the need to hack at it.

Don't get me wrong, I would love to customize the shit out of ios and run non App Store apps but I generally don't feel I need it to make the thing a nice place to live.

Re: iOS 7.1 (1, Interesting)

phantomfive (622387) | about 4 months ago | (#45762525)

it is worth the trade offs in terms of stability, usability and security.

This is, quite frankly, a false tradeoff. You can get the same stability, usability and security in several ways (like not running as root by default, like requiring extra steps to become root as with Android, etc), WITHOUT taking freedom away from users who would want it.

Remember, everyone has freedom of speech until they want to say something that is forbidden, but those times are when speech protections are most important.

Re: iOS 7.1 (0)

PNutts (199112) | about 4 months ago | (#45763143)

He's talking about iOS. Focus.

Re: iOS 7.1 (2)

RyuuzakiTetsuya (195424) | about 4 months ago | (#45764853)

This is, quite frankly, a false tradeoff. You can get the same stability, usability and security in several ways (like not running as root by default, like requiring extra steps to become root as with Android, etc), WITHOUT taking freedom away from users who would want it.

No, it's not.

That kind of interaction isn't free. Not as in beer and not as in freedom. You've now got to devote resources to supporting these features, documenting these features and helping users when they fuck up. Granted, yes, you could just leave users out in the cold when everything goes all pear shaped... However, that's kind of psychotic.

The freedom you want isn't free for the vendor. Not free as in beer and depending on device driver agreements, etc. may not be free as in speech. Granted that's a separate issue all together.

The "Free as in freedom" crowd had 30 years to bring UI and UX to this stage but no one really cared enough to actually do it. Instead we got everyone disagreeing with each other about KDE or Gnome.

Re: iOS 7.1 (2)

phantomfive (622387) | about 4 months ago | (#45764891)

It takes more effort for the vendor to attempt to lock these devices down than it would to leave them open.

The "Free as in freedom" crowd had 30 years to bring UI and UX to this stage but no one really cared enough to actually do it. Instead we got everyone disagreeing with each other about KDE or Gnome.

I see, you just wanted to rant irrelevantly about open source, and thought this was a reasonable place to do it. Be gone, troll.

Re: iOS 7.1 (2)

RyuuzakiTetsuya (195424) | about 4 months ago | (#45765079)

It takes more effort for the vendor to attempt to lock these devices down than it would to leave them open.

Aside from supporting the functionality, making sure all the APIs work nicely, having customer support in case the whole thing goes wrong...

I see, you just wanted to rant irrelevantly about open source, and thought this was a reasonable place to do it. Be gone, troll.

No, I *love* open source. Open source isn't the same movement as Free Software movement. The FSF had decades to get this right, but never did. It wasn't even on their radar.

Re: iOS 7.1 (1)

phantomfive (622387) | about 4 months ago | (#45765103)

Aside from supporting the functionality, making sure all the APIs work nicely, having customer support in case the whole thing goes wrong...

You're either drunk, an idiot, or have no idea what is involved in this thing.......seriously, are you even a programmer? Do you know what is involved in programming an OS? Have you even looked at the iPhone/Android APIs? Your ranting seems mainly orthogonal to reality.

Re: iOS 7.1 (1)

RyuuzakiTetsuya (195424) | about 3 months ago | (#45767053)

I am a programmer, but my language of choice lately seems to be PHP. So I'm not banking on my taste or ability as any sort of authority.

If everything *can* run as root, then what might break? What the hell becomes a massive regression?

Free software isn't free as in beer when you've got to support it commercially. Have you ever worked with other human beings before? Do you know that people who really don't want to be power users exist and most of them are buying computing devices?

Re: iOS 7.1 (1)

phantomfive (622387) | about 3 months ago | (#45767357)

If everything *can* run as root, then what might break? What the hell becomes a massive regression?

Not everything needs to run as root, nor should it, unless the user specifically wants it to run it as root. Go look at the Android model sometime, you can see that becoming root is not easy, but it is reserved for the user. Your idea of 'support it commercially' is so inapplicable here that it mainly shows you haven't looked deeply into the subject, you are just whining.

Re: iOS 7.1 (1)

BitZtream (692029) | about 3 months ago | (#45767433)

It takes more effort for the vendor to attempt to lock these devices down than it would to leave them open.

Says the guy who has never done any sort of customer support for a commercial product in his life.

No, open devices that get screwed up and returned because the user did something stupid they saw on some website cost far more than you realize. This is where 90% of support costs come from.

Re: iOS 7.1 (1)

phantomfive (622387) | about 3 months ago | (#45767599)

What is it about iOS that brings out retards like you? Where are you getting your numbers? Do you really think Android support costs are 900% more than iPhone support costs? Did you think about what you are saying at all?

Re: iOS 7.1 (1)

RyuuzakiTetsuya (195424) | about 4 months ago | (#45764885)

that's also not to mention that the kind of user interaction that you'd get by featuring freedom is either more modals(whee, everyone remember UAC in Vista?), or having the entire device run as root or ...

The UX tradeoff isn't worth it. Have everything place nice in user land or get the fuck off my phone.

On a tablet or MID, there's less incentive to make things ultra stable, but iOS is still a nice place for most users to live.

Re: iOS 7.1 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45763789)

...or you can add basic functionality like ad-blocking, a better keyboard, delete crummy built-in apps (Stocks ffs)

Re:iOS 7.1 (4, Insightful)

Cinder6 (894572) | about 4 months ago | (#45761327)

Honestly, as an iOS user, I don't really see the need. I have jailbroken in the past and just didn't see much that was worth the effort or the inevitable wait for official updates. For those that do want/need/"need" root, then this is a good option (or just buy an Android device).

There are a few cool apps/tweaks on Cydia, but userland iOS also has tons of cool apps. For the vast majority of iOS users, jailbreaking isn't necessary.

Review Guidelines tell you what iDon't (2)

tepples (727027) | about 4 months ago | (#45761711)

A leaked copy of the App Store Review Guidelines [pineight.com] listed several things that no iOS app is allowed to do. For example, there's no public API for seeing which wireless access points are available, making network troubleshooting apps impossible. Nor can a developer create an app launcher that's more accessible to individuals with disabilities. Nor is there any web browser that implements HTML5 features that Apple deliberately left out of Mobile Safari.

Re:Review Guidelines tell you what iDon't (1)

BitZtream (692029) | about 3 months ago | (#45767451)

... Yet, I have an app that does just that, and shows me signal strength ... and its on the app store ...

New app launchers are a stupid idea in a consumer device for the masses. Contrary to what you think, you're silly retarded customized keyboard isn't that great. Consistency is FAR more important than customizability to everyone except people like you who think that customizing their phone is something everyone does.

Its a phone, the rest of us don't give a shit about the crap you do, we just use the phone.

Re:iOS 7.1 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45763541)

For iOS users that might be true.
As an iOS power-user, I want my tweaks and the ability to code my own, if I feel like it. I don't like dropbox, I use git for my syncing needs.
Go play with your sandbox, if you will, I prefer keeping a computer in my pocket? (No, I won't switch to android. It sucks balls if you want to do e.g. music.)

Re:iOS 7.1 (1)

plover (150551) | about 4 months ago | (#45763591)

The need is relative, of course. I have many Cydia apps that I refuse to give up, including several that are bought-and-paid-for. They include an outgoing firewall, tethering, various music and media controls, photos added to my contact list, PrivaCy, and many specific gestures to control things such as wi-fi and Bluetooth, all of which are banned by Apple.

Even more of a factor is that I have no burning need to rush to iOS7. Most apps that require iOS7 simply don't offer anything compelling to me. I'm not all about the social media, so I don't have many of the popular apps like facebook or twitter installed. Honestly, if Windows phone supported the one important iOS database app I use, I'd consider jumping ship entirely (assuming Windows phones can be tweaked and or hacked to do the same things, something I haven't needed to research yet.)

Re:iOS 7.1 (0)

lhunath (1280798) | about 4 months ago | (#45763671)

It's really not so much about "all the cool stuff Cydia offers".

It's all about freedom and control. A non-broken device is effectively a leased piece of hardware where the owner tells you what you can and cannot do with it. It's like renting your house rather than owning it. Sure, it's nice that maintenance is taken care of for you; but most of us actually prefer to know that the thing we live in/with is controlled by us, not somebody with a different agenda whose interest in your happiness and satisfaction is nothing more than a side-effect of their interest in profit.

It's about wanting to do something with this computer in your pocket that's more powerful than a mainframe when I was a kid, and not having to wonder whether Apple's sandbox will agree to it. It's about wanting to run a daemon on start-up and being able to. It's about wanting to ssh into your phone when you left it at home and get the thing off of it that you need. It's about it locking up and you being able to see why. It's about breaking the display but still being able to put VNC on it and use it like the powerful computer that you payed for minus the display. It's about POSSIBILITY and FREEDOM to do as you please with the thing you payed 750$ for.

Console vs. HTPC (0)

tepples (727027) | about 4 months ago | (#45761683)

Why would anyone buy a computer that's designed specifically to prevent you from getting root? Even Windows is better than that.

For the same reason people buy game consoles instead of home theater PCs: it's in a convenient form factor, it's affordable, it's where the apps and media are, and maintenance is less complex.

The iPhone was first to market among the new breed of pocket-size computers. A lot of people bought an iPhone 3G (or bought an original iPhone and upgraded it to iOS 2, which introduced the App Store) before Android became widely available. Back then, the alternative was a laptop. And a lot of people bought an iPod touch in the three years between 2008, when iOS 2 came out, and 2011, when Google finally approved a 4" Wi-Fi-only device (Samsung's Galaxy Player) for use on Android Market (now Google Play Store). At the time, an iPod touch was a lot cheaper than an unlocked Android smartphone, especially for people who didn't need yet another phone line. And there are still plenty of games and other apps exclusive to the App Store, and music and movies that are on iTunes but not Google Play. Finally, if no applications can use root, then developers aren't tempted to require root, and computer security is easier for non-geeks to reason around.

Re:iOS 7.1 (1, Interesting)

ZorinLynx (31751) | about 4 months ago | (#45762245)

I used to think this way, and avoided buying iOS devices for a while because of this thinking.

Then I realized, iOS devices are more like appliances and less like "computers". They're meant to do a specific task well. They're not meant to be general purpose computing systems.

If I need a real computer, that's what my laptop is for. It's FAR more capable hardware-wise than my phone or iPad. The phone and iPad are both good at what they do, and incredibly stable and reliable. Both times I've jailbroken them, I never really ended up doing much with the jailbreak other than running console emulators, which work better on the laptop anyway.

Re:iOS 7.1 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45761103)

iOS 7.1 is probably coming next month... now surely whatever exploit was used will be analyzed by Apple and double-patched for the final 7.1 release.

You'd think they could have waited just a little bit more!

Was wondering the same thing. I hope they still have a couple of aces up their sleeve for that case.
Apparently, the JailBreak works on the latest 7.1 beta as of yet.

The timing is indeed very odd, especially considering that there was no really public "warning".

Re: iOS 7.1 (1)

appleguru (1030562) | about 4 months ago | (#45761371)

Could be a test? They're using LLVM obfuscator, presumably to make their exploits harder for apple to reverse engineer.

Maybe they want to see if apple can figure it out and patch it in time for 7.1?

The exploit was stolen and sold... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#45766425)

They found out about this and rather than allow someone to profit from their hard work they spoiled it by releasing quickly. Make more sense now?

Nice, but... (0)

Just Some Guy (3352) | about 4 months ago | (#45761123)

I love the idea of jailbreaking. Love it. I fully support your right to install whatever you want on the hardware you bought.

But.

So there's no confusion, "jailbreaking" is exactly identical to "finding and exploiting a security vulnerability". By definition, someone is using an unpatched problem to root your device and replace the system software with their own version. The fact that you can jailbreak your iPhone means that another party is able to compromise mine.

Again, I support everyone installing whatever they want on their devices. I'm not thrilled that this can be done on an iPhone by hacking deep into the system through a chunk of broken code somewhere.

Re:Nice, but... (1)

Greyfox (87712) | about 4 months ago | (#45761193)

Or that there's so much broken code that they manage to keep finding new ones? Back in the 90's one of the contracting gigs I did was auditing the C standard library source for Data General, as part of their B2-secure certification process. Fast forward a decade or so and you never see anyone doing that. Someone I mentioned this to said it's because automated tools catch the same problems that people reading the code do, but there's plenty of code out there that obviously has never had those automated tools run against it. Hiring people to audit your code is expensive, licensing security-scanning software and developing processes to scan your code for exploits is expensive, saying you're sorry after someone exploits a security hole in your code is cheap. If no one ever does, or you never actually find out it's happening, it's free.

Re:Nice, but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45761233)

Alternatively, it could simply be that in any multi-million line code base, even if you have run security review tools, and reviewed all code, there will still be minor errors that slipped in.

Re:Nice, but... (5, Insightful)

Just Some Guy (3352) | about 4 months ago | (#45761247)

Regardless of where the code is or when it was written, I have a root-level vulnerability that makes my phone insecure. I wish jailbreaking were both unneeded (because you could easily install your own software through official means) and impossible (because there weren't any security holes to exploit).

Re:Nice, but... (2)

Overzeetop (214511) | about 4 months ago | (#45761265)

" The fact that you can jailbreak your iPhone means that another party is able to compromise mine."

Well, yes. Though in a more global sense, practically every open OS on the planet, and most closed ones, are also "vulnerable" in this way. Linux doesn't require "jailbreaking" to load your own kernal patches - it's already "vulnerable" in the sense you're promoting.

And given that this essentially requires a very specific set of circumstances to achieve, including physical access to the hardware, it isn't the kind of vulnerability that causes me to lose sleep.

Re:Nice, but... (2)

Just Some Guy (3352) | about 4 months ago | (#45761321)

It'd definitely harder now, and I see that as a very good thing. Remember the drive-by website [sophos.com] that was basically a remote root exploit? There's a vast difference between requiring physical access and operator permission, and being able to root a system through the owner visiting a web page.

Re:Nice, but... (1)

liquidrocket (3439123) | about 3 months ago | (#45765951)

In general, many of these bugs (both in iOS and Android) do not necceserily require physical access, even if that is the easiest way to use them. Ultimately they are just a regular app without any special permissions that, once up and running, use a traditional privilege-escalation type of exploit to gain root privileges on the device and complete its job.

Sure... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#45766505)

They just require Restore Mode and other things like code running on an attached computer to run. No problem right? lol

Re:Nice, but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45761297)

At least it is done in the open so you are aware of it and can decide not to buy the product if it bothers you. another upside to it being out in the open is the likelyhood of a quicker solution (now i dont use iphone so im not too updated on their exploit patching times, so this second upside may be nonexistant)

This is the entire problem with a monoculture like i*-products, there is not alternative that "mostly replaces" the one you have if its insecure (though Apple do have some overlap between different productlines, but its still limited compared to the classic gray-box pc market for example), you are at the mercy of the culture-provider (and that is for many people just fine, lots if things you dont need to worry about).

But im still on and old nokia flipphone, so what do i know :)

Re:Nice, but... (2)

ArbitraryName (3391191) | about 4 months ago | (#45761363)

The fact that you can jailbreak your iPhone means that another party is able to compromise mine.

If they have physical control of the device, yes. Why would you trust any device you lost physical control of?

Re:Nice, but... (2)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | about 4 months ago | (#45762281)

So there's no confusion, "jailbreaking" is exactly identical to "finding and exploiting a security vulnerability". By definition, someone is using an unpatched problem to root your device and replace the system software with their own version. The fact that you can jailbreak your iPhone means that another party is able to compromise mine.

Technically, you are correct (the very best kind of correct). However if you followed jailbreaking more closely you'd realize a couple things.

1) There is no single exploit involved. With the iOS 6 jailbreak, they had to chain a whole sequence of things together to get root on the device.

2) In the end, it requires physical control over the device. As I understand it, the iOS 6 jailbreak required an exploit that allowed you to side load an app onto your device. That app, running on your device, then did all the heavy lifting of putting the jailbreak into place - which required additional exploits to allow the app out of its sandbox.

So what you say is true; but it's not something I'd lose any sleep over. I think the people who do need to be concerned are actual jail breakers - they need to be sure they're getting the jailbreak from "legitimate" (so to speak) sources.

Re:Nice, but... (1)

plover (150551) | about 4 months ago | (#45763623)

Furthermore, while the jailbreak is considered "untethered", that only means you can reboot the phone without requiring a USB cable to a host computer (an important requirement in my book.) But as far as I know most jailbreaks still initially require the user to connect a USB cable to the device to load a special boot loader that injects the exploit.

It works (1)

the-matt-mobile (621817) | about 4 months ago | (#45761135)

I just finished applying it to my 4th generation iPad. It took about 10 minutes, which was longer than I expected. It uploads an app to your device, which you then run to apply the jailbreak. If Apple would just include a Dvorak keyboard, my main reason for jailbreaking would be gone. Or rather, it would only be driven by my desire to tinker and not from any real need.

Re:It works (1)

Roger Lindsjo (727951) | about 4 months ago | (#45761163)

How is "desire to tinker" not a real need?

Re:It works (1)

Cinder6 (894572) | about 4 months ago | (#45761335)

How is "desire to tinker" not a real need?

Because "I want to do this" is not the same as "I need to do this."

Re:It works (1)

ArbitraryName (3391191) | about 4 months ago | (#45761379)

How do you differentiate "needs" from "wants" once basic survival requirements are met? Does installing a Dvorak keypad on an iPad allow him to secure food and/or shelter he couldn't obtain another way?

Re:It works (1)

Moridineas (213502) | about 4 months ago | (#45761805)

Seems like there can be some pretty straightforward guidelines.

If you require a dvorak keyboard, and the lack of a dvorak keyboard is a dealbreaker, then it's a need.

If you want a dvorak keyboard and would use a dvorak keyboard if you could (but it's not a dealbreaker), then it's a want.

It's about degrees. If you limit wants/needs to "basic survival requirements" then pretty much the entirety of modern civilization falls into the category of "wants."

Re:It works (1)

ArbitraryName (3391191) | about 4 months ago | (#45762077)

That's my entire point. "Needs" and "wants" are entirely subjective.

Re:It works (1)

Moridineas (213502) | about 4 months ago | (#45763241)

Right, but only if you define a need solely as a "basic survival requirement." I do not agree with this definition.

I would use a simpler definition in the context of cars/hardware/software/housing/etc (none of which are "basic survival requirements")--if it's a dealbreaker, it's a need. If it's not, it's a want.

Re:It works (1)

Moridineas (213502) | about 4 months ago | (#45761181)

I'm a "one app" jailbreak user too. For me, it's BiteSMS. BiteSMS is great--it's a messaging overhaul that implements popup sms/imessage that lets you compose orreply to messages without leaving your current app. You can schedule messages to send in the future, actually see timestamps, etc. Great program. If this is a legit jailbreak and bitesms works, I'll upgrade to iOS7 right away.

Re:It works (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45761405)

I really thought every OS with keyboard input these days had dvorak as an option, once you go beyond serving the north-american continent, if you cant load a different layout you are rather screwed, once you are that far, adding dvorak is hardly much work (and likely would be done for free by volunteers if possible)

Seems odd not to add something that cost so little to include and harms none.

Re:It works (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#45765813)

Probably working on a iDvorak and will then sue all those dvorak users copying them!

Jailbreak with broken Cydia and Mobile Substrate (3, Informative)

Wizy (38347) | about 4 months ago | (#45761195)

This jailbreak is completely broken, and according to multiple other jailbreakers the evasion team took money to include a piracy app store from china. You can see all the fun on twitter as they yell at each other.

Re:Jailbreak with broken Cydia and Mobile Substrat (1)

ArbitraryName (3391191) | about 4 months ago | (#45761731)

Define "broken". It seems to do what it says it does. Why should I care that a Chinese app store that isn't available to me has been included?

Re:Jailbreak with broken Cydia and Mobile Substrat (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45761851)

Because they can also be lifting your credit card numbers and other personal info to a server in the PRC.

Re:Jailbreak with broken Cydia and Mobile Substrat (4, Insightful)

ArbitraryName (3391191) | about 4 months ago | (#45762141)

When you jailbreak you're running random code from the internet that was specifically advertised as a security exploit. I don't know what sort of naive expectations you have.

Re:Jailbreak with broken Cydia and Mobile Substrat (1)

petsounds (593538) | about 4 months ago | (#45764119)

Because they are installing the Chinese store with root access, meaning the code can do whatever it wants with the information on your device and send that information to wherever they want. Jailbreaking always comes with risk, but this basically compromises your device with unknown and unreviewed code. But hey, if you feel like dancing with the devil, go for it.

Re:Jailbreak with broken Cydia and Mobile Substrat (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45762023)

So it allows you to access a "piracy" appstore. Is that even a bad thing?

Re:Jailbreak with broken Cydia and Mobile Substrat (1)

Elbart (1233584) | about 4 months ago | (#45765047)

It throws the "It's only for homebrew, I swear"-rationale out the window.

So...a guy willingly goes to jail... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45761211)

...and willingly puts on the shackles, and then tries to break out? Doesn't seem logical to me.

Just because you're at the Hilton... (1)

Overzeetop (214511) | about 4 months ago | (#45761275)

Just because you're staying at the downtown Hilton doesn't mean you want to eat every meal at the in-house restaurant.

Re:So...a guy willingly goes to jail... (1)

PNutts (199112) | about 4 months ago | (#45763231)

Even the hottest girl in the room has a guy that's sick of her.

Nice job! (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45761217)

Kudos to Apple's free security research team! I love knowing that more and more security holes are patched by Apple every release thanks to these guys. And, they work for free! Amazing!

One step closer to perfection, Apple. Keep it up!

DO NOT USE - Super sketchy stuff happening (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45761295)

Read Stefan Esser's Twitter feed [twitter.com] for some off the problems with this jailbreak relating to a mandatory Chinese app store that get installed for some users (featuring pirated apps). They also left other members of the community like Saurik out, which is just odd. I wouldn't trust my devices with personal information with the current jailbreak.

Re:DO NOT USE - Super sketchy stuff happening (1)

OzPeter (195038) | about 4 months ago | (#45761623)

Read Stefan Esser's Twitter feed [twitter.com] for some off the problems with this jailbreak relating to a mandatory Chinese app store that get installed for some users (featuring pirated apps). They also left other members of the community like Saurik out, which is just odd. I wouldn't trust my devices with personal information with the current jailbreak.

While you may agree or disagree with Apples stance on controlling the apps in iDevices, one thing is certain is that "Jailbreaks" are Security Exploits with all the ramifications that that entails.

Re:DO NOT USE - Super sketchy stuff happening (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45762079)

What is so bad about having the Chinese appstore included? Hell, I'd look at that as a feature.

Disclaimer: not an Apple user.

Re:DO NOT USE - Super sketchy stuff happening (1)

phantomfive (622387) | about 4 months ago | (#45762549)

What is so bad about having the Chinese appstore included? Hell, I'd look at that as a feature.

The primary fear is that it would be a high risk vector for malware.
A secondary fear is that it opens the jailbreakers to lawsuits, if there are too many pirated apps on that website.

Re:DO NOT USE - Super sketchy stuff happening (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45763287)

What is so bad about having the Chinese appstore included? Hell, I'd look at that as a feature.

The primary fear is that it would be a high risk vector for malware.

A secondary fear is that it opens the jailbreakers to lawsuits, if there are too many pirated apps on that website.

I get that, I am not thick - but there is the fact that, if you want a safe, malware-free environment, you would not jailbreak the phone to begin with. If you are self-confident enough to jailbreak your iDevice, then you also know how to handle a pirated appstore.

In essence, what I am arguing is that the vast majority of iOS users are not going to jailbreak their gadgets. The ones that are, also don't mind accessing some pirated apps.

Re:DO NOT USE - Super sketchy stuff happening (1)

phantomfive (622387) | about 4 months ago | (#45763377)

Wow bro, there are plenty of reasons to jailbreak your phone without wanting to pirate apps.

Re:DO NOT USE - Super sketchy stuff happening (1)

tlhIngan (30335) | about 4 months ago | (#45764611)

The primary fear is that it would be a high risk vector for malware.
A secondary fear is that it opens the jailbreakers to lawsuits, if there are too many pirated apps on that website.

Well, given how much must be done to have a jailbreak, the fact it was paid for by the Chinese is probably the most interesting part. Very sketchy. Do we need to remind people of all the Android malware that seems to infect Chinese phones?

There's plenty of things that get executed and a lot of it runs are root. If you think Android malware is bad, the fact this is designed for pirated iOS apps has the likelihood of the same thing. And heck, I'm sure pirated Android apps are the same vector on Android.

Plus, apparently without involvement of Saurik (Cydia), the build they have doesn't work very well, and neither does MobileSubstrate (it's a library Saurik wrote that lets developers do interesting things safely).

And really, anyone really remember Apple's response to jailbreaking - you know, about potentially compromising your phoen, piracy, etc? Geez, do you really want to prove Apple right?

Finally, a pirated app store? Really? Jailbreakers are seen by Apple as pirates and most developers see people who jailbreak as nothing but pirates - even though there are plenty of valid reasons to jailbreak that isn't piracy. This just reinforces the impression that jailbreakers do it just to pirate.

Re:DO NOT USE - Super sketchy stuff happening (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45762773)

That is the problem with jailbreaks on iOS. You first have to pray a hacker finds an exploit, then pray he releases it, and pray there is no backdoors.

With Nexus devices, Google gives you the files and instructions on how to root them.

Already used it (iPad 2) (2)

aussersterne (212916) | about 4 months ago | (#45764515)

Don't see any Chinese app stores. Just Cydia. All working well. Biggest problem: Nothing on Cydia is yet compatible with iOS 7.x, so in a way there's no point unless you just want system access—there's next to nothing that you can install and use. But hopefully that will change in time.

How Do I Install My Own App On A Jailbroken Device (0)

IgnorantMotherFucker (3394481) | about 4 months ago | (#45761307)

Money is tight, so I'm short the Apple Tax to do iOS development. But I have a jailbroken device. What do I do to install my own App, that I developed myself, on my own jailbroken device? I looked into this a while back but could not find instructions.

Re:How Do I Install My Own App On A Jailbroken Dev (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45761487)

Reg your iDevice UDID from 10$ to 90$ and sign you app via xcode with the supplied certificates.
Carefull with registering UDID, you can come across some tricky people. Ebay is an option.
https://developer.apple.com/library/ios/documentation/IDEs/Conceptual/AppDistributionGuide/TestingYouriOSApp/TestingYouriOSApp.html

Re:How Do I Install My Own App On A Jailbroken Dev (1)

phantomfive (622387) | about 4 months ago | (#45762603)

On older iOSes (version 5), you could use ssh tunneling [iphonedevwiki.net], unzip your app (.ipa is a zip file), and run "scp -r -P 2222 Payload root@localhost:/Applications/", that is copy it to the /Applications directory. In iOS 4 you needed to reboot your phone for it to show up. In iOS 6 you need to modify some plist file or something for it to show up.

You can also try the ideviceinstaller command. You might need to sign your app first using ldid. Using the codesign command with your own personal certificate that you generate yourself.

But lets be honest, if you can afford an iOS device you can afford a subscription. It's all a matter of budgeting priorities.

Re:How Do I Install My Own App On A Jailbroken Dev (1)

PNutts (199112) | about 4 months ago | (#45763249)

But lets be honest, if you can afford an iOS device you can afford a subscription. It's all a matter of budgeting priorities.

What if somebody gave it to him?

Re:How Do I Install My Own App On A Jailbroken Dev (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#45766267)

But lets be honest, if you can afford an iOS device you can afford a subscription

Aren't iPhones basically given out as free starter phones with contract?

Re:How Do I Install My Own App On A Jailbroken Dev (1)

PNutts (199112) | about 4 months ago | (#45763261)

Money is tight, so I'm short the Apple Tax to do iOS development. But I have a jailbroken device.

What do I do to install my own App, that I developed myself, on my own jailbroken device?

IIRC $99 bucks to be legit or you could run them in the emulator. Putting them on your own device is not required to do development. Write something cool and you'll have volunteers.

Oh Good (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45762041)

Finally, I can install operating system software from someone untrustworthy whomever so they can have all my secrets. At least with Apple, it's the devil you know.

Evasi0n has issued a statement. (4, Informative)

ArbitraryName (3391191) | about 4 months ago | (#45762261)

Found here [evasi0n.com].

Re:Evasi0n has issued a statement. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45765099)

Even if Evasi0n releases that statement, the Chinese company could be lying or a front for something worse. You have no idea what you are running, even if you were to reverse engineer the binaries. This is involved with a device which has a fairly-secure chain of trust, from a company that gives a shit about user privacy (alternative: Android; I hope you like clicking "allow all"). Anyone who runs this is foolish.

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