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A Year With Google Glass

Soulskill posted about 10 months ago | from the making-other-people-hate-you-on-sight dept.

Google 292

Mat Honan, a writer for Wired, has posted an article detailing his takeaways from long-term use of Google Glass. He makes particular note of how the device's form factor is much more offensive to others than the actual technology contained within. For example, his wife wanted him to take pictures and shoot videos of their child's birth, but not with Glass: "It was the way Glass looked. It might let me remain in the moment, but my wife worried it would take her out of it, that its mere presence would be distracting because it’s so goddamn weird-looking." It can get unpleasant when strangers are involved: "People get angry at Glass. They get angry at you for wearing Glass. They talk about you openly. It inspires the most aggressive of passive aggression. ... Wearing Glass separates you. It sets you apart from everyone else. It says you not only had $1,500 to plunk down to be part of the “explorer” program, but that Google deemed you special enough to warrant inclusion (not everyone who wanted Glass got it; you had to be selected). Glass is a class divide on your face." Honan found most of the default software to be handy, but the third-party software to be lacking. Glass also facilitated his unintentional switch from an iPhone to an Android phone. He ends the piece by warning of the inevitability of devices like Glass: "The future is on its way, and it is going to be on your face. We need to think about it and be ready for it in a way we weren’t with smartphones."

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True quote (2, Interesting)

war4peace (1628283) | about 10 months ago | (#45831963)

"The future is on its way, and it is going to be on your face. We need to think about it and be ready for it in a way we weren’t with smartphones."

You can't fight time.

Re:True quote (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45832085)

Maybe in 30 years, and even then it won't work the way google wants it to. Come on, this is this decade's "Segway" , a solution in search of a problem.

It's more like this decade's tablet. (0, Flamebait)

mosb1000 (710161) | about 10 months ago | (#45832613)

It's more like this decade's tablet. You can tell it's coming, but that doesn't mean a poor innovator like Google can just slap something together and throw it out there. It's going to have to be done by someone who actually knows that they're doing.

Re:True quote (2, Informative)

TWiTfan (2887093) | about 10 months ago | (#45832207)

The future is on its way, and it is going to be on your face.

No, it's not going to be on *MY* face.

Re:True quote (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45832245)

The future is on its way, and it is going to be on your face.

No, it's not going to be on *MY* face.

OK, grandpa, don't worry. You can keep your fax machine until they pry it from your cold dead hands.

Re:True quote (4, Insightful)

TWiTfan (2887093) | about 10 months ago | (#45832411)

Jumping the gun a bit, aren't you? Or did you call everyone who didn't believe that 3D TV would catch on a Luddite too?

Re:True quote (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45832479)

And you can keep your cuecat2.0 until someone yanks it off your face and smashes it on the ground.

Re:True quote (0)

war4peace (1628283) | about 10 months ago | (#45832337)

There are still people who cling to their dumb phones, my wife included. However, ignoring technological (and social, for that matter) advance doesn't make it go away. In the long run, it kind of makes *you* go away.

Re:True quote (4, Insightful)

TWiTfan (2887093) | about 10 months ago | (#45832449)

However, ignoring technological (and social, for that matter) advance doesn't make it go away.

Not every predicted advance catches on. Sometimes a new technology doesn't catch the public fancy the way pundits think it will (such as 3D anything), or it just turns out to be a passing fad (VRML anyone?), or it's just impractical (remember those flying cars we were all supposed to be driving by now?). And Google Glass has yet to prove itself catchy, long-lasting, OR practical.

"Class Divide"? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45831989)

No dumbass, we just don't like you aiming a camera and microphone at everywhere you look.

Re: "Class Divide"? (4, Insightful)

O('_')O_Bush (1162487) | about 10 months ago | (#45832081)

Yea, I was going to point out that his 'class divide' theory was nothing more than ego masturbation. In reality, people don't like having video cameras for Megacorp pointed at them at every interaction or passing by of a glasshole.

Re: "Class Divide"? (0)

mikecase (1991782) | about 10 months ago | (#45832419)

And yet, they still shop at Megacorp's big box stores with cameras filming them as they walk down every aisle.

Re: "Class Divide"? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45832495)

There's a huge difference between a corporation recording us as we walk down their aisle... and people pointing a camera and microphone at us anytime we talk to them in a coffee shop.

Glassholes don't seem to understand the difference, or accept that others feel there is a difference.

Until they do, it's not US that's not "getting it". It's the glassholes.

Re: "Class Divide"? (2)

DrLang21 (900992) | about 10 months ago | (#45832557)

Personal experience here. Those cameras are usually not on. My mother-in-law had her credit card stolen and it was used at Walmart. When she asked for the footage of the checkout area during the time it was stolen, they said the cameras were only ever on two days out of the week.

Re: "Class Divide"? (1, Offtopic)

MachDelta (704883) | about 10 months ago | (#45832497)

Interesting that you used the term "intersection" - look up next time you're at a traffic intersection, and count the number of cameras pointed down at traffic. In a lot of first world nations, chances are pretty good you'll see red light cameras or cctv or both. We all know that it's essentially impossible to go about public places without being caught on some kind of camera these days, so it's interesting to see that placing the camera in an ugly enclosure on someone's face crosses some kind of perceived line. If anything, it tells us not that we dislike being recorded, but that we can't stand to be reminded of it.
If this technology has any kind of future, subtlety will be key.

Re:"Class Divide"? (5, Insightful)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about 10 months ago | (#45832113)

"Class Divide"?

You're thinking of socio-economic class. This is a little different. It separates the class of people stupid and rude enough to walk around wearing Google Glass from the class of people who aren't.

Re:"Class Divide"? (5, Insightful)

DrLang21 (900992) | about 10 months ago | (#45832117)

I wish I had mod points. This is the fundamental problem with Google Glass. One of the things that allows polite society to function is that, generally, if we make a slip of the tongue or do something stupid that we immediately regret it will be soon forgotten. Public life is only semi-public in that it is contained to a small area. However, as we are already starting to see, when everything is captured and recorded for prosterity, no one ever forgets and society is extrodinarily slow to forgive despite the fact that most everyone has been just as guilty at some point in time.

Re:"Class Divide"? (1)

buswolley (591500) | about 10 months ago | (#45832177)

The class divide reasoning was bogus and made me more than a little angry.

Re:"Class Divide"? (5, Insightful)

barlevg (2111272) | about 10 months ago | (#45832237)

This isn't my issue with it either. My (irrational) hatred for Glass-wearers is along the same vein as my disdain for people who have their cell phones out at nice restaurants while their dining companions are with them (often with their own cell phones out). Glass is a statement that you can't bear to be disconnected from the internet for fifteen fucking minutes while you enjoy a nice meal, a walk outside, or a social event. But yeah, it's not jealously.

Re:"Class Divide"? (5, Insightful)

CastrTroy (595695) | about 10 months ago | (#45832383)

Personally, I think this goes for all electronics. The number of people who seem to think it's required to video record or take hundreds of photos (using camcorder, tablet, phone, digi-cam, or Google glass) every single thing that happens is kind of bothersome. My wife gets annoyed because I don't take enough photos of the kids when we're doing things, but personally I just try to enjoy the moment, and not let electronics get in the way. I'd rather just truly enjoy the moment then not really enjoy the moment because I was futzing with the camera and be able to see the moment later.

Re:"Class Divide"? (5, Interesting)

RavenLrD20k (311488) | about 10 months ago | (#45832627)

I feel your pain. I'm an amateur photographer with all the high end equipment I need to capture beautiful shots (I prefer landscapes and still life). I absolutely abhor being told by my wife or parents that I'm going to be the designated photographer for an event, and, after losing yet another explosive argument where they won't accept "No" as an answer, I will often "forget" my camera equipment accidentally on purpose, and remind them that I said flatly...no. I'm going to an event to partake in it! Just by being behind a lens of any kind, be it smart phone, Digital Cam, Film Cam, Google Glass... I'm no longer a participant; I'm relegated to an objective observer, and my family doesn't understand why it pisses me off so much.

Re:"Class Divide"? (2)

TheRealMindChild (743925) | about 10 months ago | (#45832371)

Hey, no. That is cool. I'll just hide it in a button [ebay.com] . Do you feel more comfortable now that you can't tell if I am recording you?

Re:"Class Divide"? (0)

Adam Colley (3026155) | about 10 months ago | (#45832409)

Tough titties, your rights end at my head.

Re:"Class Divide"? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45832467)

Of course.

Just as we have a right to think you're an asshole.

Hipster logic (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45832001)

"I'm going to wear these obnoxiously ugly glasses that happen to record everything I see. People object to my presence, but that's fine, because I totally spent one and a half thousand dollars on this accessory that marks me as a smug upper-class, privacy-invading nerd. Google Glass is here to stay (and don't forget I was into it before it was cool)."

Re:Hipster logic (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45832017)

So you've been against smartphones from the start, since they have the same recording capabilities, right?

Re:Hipster logic (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45832155)

Yes, because everyday we see people with smartphones glued to their faces with an outward facing camera that's always on.

Re:Hipster logic (3, Insightful)

ArcherB (796902) | about 10 months ago | (#45832347)

Yes, because everyday we see people with smartphones glued to their faces with an outward facing camera that's always on.

So typed the guy from a notebook while a camera is pointing at his face.

You can relax. Those Glass people are probably not recording you. I hate to be the one to break it to you, but you are not that interesting. Even if it were on, you would more than likely be the part that is fast-fowarded over or simply edited out.

Re: Hipster logic (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45832521)

You're right. 99% of the time nobody is interesting. But of you capture 100% of that time on video you will catch that moment and exploit it online.

Re:Hipster logic (1)

DrXym (126579) | about 10 months ago | (#45832435)

I expect any smartphone user who pointed the camera of their device in people's faces in the way that glass does every second it is worn would experience the same reaction.

Re: Hipster logic (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45832093)

Troll logic: I'm going to spout lies about a tech prototype I don't own and spread FUD that belies my own insecurities about people I try to disparage by calling hipsters.

Re: Hipster logic (2)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about 10 months ago | (#45832293)

I don't own

Thus you're asserting the OP's superiority by stating that he isn't stupid or obnoxious enough to buy something like that.

spread FUD

Outright ridicule is not spreading FUD.

belies my own insecurities about people I try to disparage by calling hipsters

Dream on. Ridicule is often heaped on people simply because they're ridiculous.

Re:Hipster logic (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45832121)

Nail, head hit. I view Google Glass as someone shoving a camera and a mic in my face, in my friend's faces, and anyone at my dinner table. There are enough invasions on personal privacy as it is, and a Google Glass wearer gives the same feeling to people around as a known snitch does to other prisoners locked up with the person.

I will be glad when restaurants start showing Google Glass wearers the door. Even the places with the "No shoes, no shirt, no service" signs.

Re: Hipster logic (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45832213)

If the sign says "no shirt, no shoes, no service, no video recording allowed" then it's perfectly natural to ask them to remove their glasses.

Bully! (5, Insightful)

mythosaz (572040) | about 10 months ago | (#45832009)

When I wear it at work, co-workers sometimes call me an asshole. My co-workers at WIRED, where we’re bravely facing the future, find it weird. People stop by and cyber-bully me at my standing treadmill desk.

You've got a standing treadmill desk, and it's GLASS people make fun of?

This guy's already living the douche life.

Re:Bully! (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45832025)

The article writer is oblivious.

I think they WANT to believe that people think they are an asshole for being "of a higher class" or "richer" or whatever.

The article writer doesn't seem to grasp that it has to do with the camera & microphone. Perhaps they don't WANT to grasp it.

Re: Bully! (1)

iamhassi (659463) | about 10 months ago | (#45832351)

The fact that people accept the treadmill desk that don't accept glass tells you that glass is on a whole other level of doucheness

Re:Bully! (1)

El_Muerte_TDS (592157) | about 10 months ago | (#45832373)

People stop by and cyber-bully me at my standing treadmill desk.

If people walk by, physically, in real world, his desk... they send him not so nice instant messages? Can't they cyber-bully him from behind their own standing treadmill desk? You know, outside of his FOV.

Re:Bully! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45832433)

Going by the absurd mental gymnastics this guy shows (they don't hate me because I'm invading their privacy, it's because they know I'm richer and special-er than them! Yeah that's it!) it's not the glass or the treadmill; the guy is, to put it as politely as I possibly can, a fucking asshole.

The best part? (5, Funny)

grub (11606) | about 10 months ago | (#45832019)


The ads are more relevant to his interests than ever before!

Re:The best part? (1)

wonkey_monkey (2592601) | about 10 months ago | (#45832621)

But are now mostly for special medical "punch in the face" insurance.

The future is on its way (5, Insightful)

areusche (1297613) | about 10 months ago | (#45832021)

Go f*ck yourself Matt Honan. I should invent a "Glasshole Killer" hat which projects a bright IR light onto the user's face effectively blinding the device's recording capabilities.

It will take hell or hight water to get "Glass" onto the people that spend god awful amounts of money on fashion and tech toys. The glasses are ugly looking AND imply that you're being recorded. There is resistance for a reason. The glasses need to be completely innocuous for this entire fashion/tech concept to take off. "

Re:The future is on its way (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45832115)

My car gets 40 rods to the hogshead and that's the way I likes it!

Re:The future is on its way (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45832175)

No problem: the NSA will mandate that everyone wears one. I don't know if you may call it "hell" or "high water", probably both. Hell for anyone who cares about privacy. High water for any remaining notions of democracy in this country.

Re:The future is on its way (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45832247)

I read a lot of stupid paranoid dog shit on the internet, but this takes the cake.

Re:The future is on its way (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45832569)

Anonymous Coward, you've been tracerouted to account DogNugget248, and your GroupThink score has been debited. When your score reaches zero, you will be scheduled for a therapeutic visit to one of our PoliCorr holiday camps.

Re:The future is on its way (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45832575)

Yeah! Google would NEVER! Give information to NSA or the government... Well, unless they asked for it of cause...

Re:The future is on its way (4, Insightful)

ArcherB (796902) | about 10 months ago | (#45832263)

All these people so worried about being recorded in public are already being recorded in public!!! Look around you. Do you see that camera in the corner that is always on and always recording? Other than mobility and the fact that user has to audibly say, "record" on Glass, what's the difference?

Re:The future is on its way (1)

areusche (1297613) | about 10 months ago | (#45832395)

I do notice the billions of cameras and that pisses me off also. This isn't a step forward, but a step back.

Re:The future is on its way (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45832397)

Being mobile is the biggest thing. I don't like the idea of the guy in the urinal next to me filming my junk with just a quick glance, or having my entire dinner filmed (with audio) by the guy sitting across from, friend or not.

Fuck that. If someone walks up to me google glass, they get a laser pointer to the eye.

Re:The future is on its way (0)

StripedCow (776465) | about 10 months ago | (#45832401)

The difference is that a company with greedy shareholders has its slimey hands on your images.

Re:The future is on its way (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45832483)

Those cameras aren't monitored by a human so they're unlikely to be uploaded to youtube. Also those cameras don't have microphones.

"Think of the children" (1)

sysrammer (446839) | about 10 months ago | (#45832485)

Once it gets into the hands of the pubescents out there, any social norms may be thrown out the window. Today's kids grew up w/ the likes of FB/twitter/etc, and saw no problems with sharing everything about their lives on the 'net. Today, many or most do not care that they are constantly broadcasting their location to the ether, with GPS accuracy (I might add, as most of us put up with the fact that we broadcast our locations to cell towers at all times). Tomorrow's kids, once price and availability for Glass (or something like it) are more consumer oriented, will glom onto it as a favorite new toy. There will be lots of apps and utilities; new social sites designed for Glass such as FacePalm (tm) that the kids will flock to (until their parents learn how to use it); and they will create their own games and memes.

sr

Hey you kids, quit looking at my lawn!

Re:"Think of the children" (1)

Shadow of Eternity (795165) | about 10 months ago | (#45832589)

yes yes and the written word will lead to the end of civilized society and the downfall of mankind. We've heard this one before, Socrates bitched about it a few thousand years ago and it's neither more original nor more accurate today.

In the moment!? (1)

Austerity Empowers (669817) | about 10 months ago | (#45832023)

My wife has given birth to two children. I am fairly certain I could have been doing a mariachi dance on her forehead, wearing a clown suit while singing the chorus to "My Heart Will Go On" in between bites of a cheeseburger and she wouldn't have noticed, or cared. She'd probably object to me using any networked appliance (including my phone) to take photos of her lady parts, but even that she wouldn't notice until later (and the murder case might even make slashdot, as the google glass may have been the murder weapon).

The people who made it abundantly clear what I could and could not photograph, and what I could not video tape (i.e. anything), were the hospital staff. I suppose that should my children have later developed Autism, ADHD, or bad grades in algebra, that I would use the video footage to sue them. They would definitely forbid google glass.

Re:In the moment!? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45832161)

what happens when we have the ability to record memories or tap the visual cortex to extract scene information from the brain? Am I going to have to sign NDAs for my own memories?

Re: In the moment!? (2)

DustinB (220805) | about 10 months ago | (#45832227)

There is a Black Mirror (tv show) episode which portrays this scenario. It's a frightening idea.

Re:In the moment!? (1)

barlevg (2111272) | about 10 months ago | (#45832273)

It all depends on how those "memories" can be dumped/viewed. If *only you* can view your own memories, then I don't see a problem. Depending on the neuroscience and the technology, this might indeed be how things end up. But I kinda doubt it.

The future is on your face... (1)

roman_mir (125474) | about 10 months ago | (#45832029)

"The future is on its way, and it is going to be on your face. We need to think about it and be ready for it in a way we werenâ(TM)t with smartphones."

- what can you tell a man with 2 black eyes? Nothing, he has already been told twice.

Re:The future is on your face... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45832097)

- what can you tell a man with 2 black eyes?

To get his black ass out of there before I call the cops.

Re:The future is on your face... (1)

roman_mir (125474) | about 10 months ago | (#45832123)

Unless the eyes are on his ass and his ass is hanging out, I can't imagine how you got the colour of that body part from my comment!

Self esteem problem much? (4, Insightful)

xxxJonBoyxxx (565205) | about 10 months ago | (#45832045)

>> Glass separates you. It sets you apart from everyone else. It says you not only had $1,500 to plunk down to be part of the “explorer” program, but that Google deemed you special enough to warrant inclusion

Um...OK. Self esteem problem much?

>> his wife wanted him to take pictures and shoot videos of their child's birth, but not with Glass

Maybe she's one of those "passive aggressive" weirdos who doesn't want video of their private parts uploaded to the Internet. Good luck in divorce court, man.

It will work out fine (5, Insightful)

Todd Palin (1402501) | about 10 months ago | (#45832061)

It will work out fine for all the people that really love technology but don't actually have any real life friends. You know who I'm talking about. No friends = no one to object.

Personally, I'm offended if one of my friends spends more than a few seconds staring at a smartphone in a social situation. Its OK if they excuse themselves from the group, but it isn't if they are sitting with other people and mentally somewhere else. Google glass is the same, but maybe worse because you think they are there but aren't.

Re:It will work out fine (1)

mvar (1386987) | about 10 months ago | (#45832181)

This. Plus the device is an atrocity. Did the author of the article think he'd wear such a stupid looking thing and pass unnoticed? Now if (or when) they manage to implement this technology on normal eye glasses, it will be a different story overall

Technological determinism (2)

Kiyooka (738862) | about 10 months ago | (#45832065)

I think it's premature to assume the ubiquity of google glass. The Nokia Ngage failed, largely due to the highly negative social factor of holding an odd large plastic brick to your head in order to talk ("sidetalking").

make the Glass emit a noice when ever its camera! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45832073)

That is the problem, not that the people wearing them are "elit" but that you have no way of telling if you are recorded or not. Fix that and people will no longer be irritated by it... but it would beep constantly so people would not want to wear them any more. (Like a friend of mine says about his Google glass, The best feature is that now he can take all the pictures of boobs and asses he wants and no one is the wiser.)

make the Glass emit a noice when ever its camera! (1)

justthinkit (954982) | about 10 months ago | (#45832255)

Like a friend of mine says about his Google glass, The best feature is that now he can take all the pictures of boobs and asses he wants and no one is the wiser.

I'm curious, could he be sued by someone who flashed him and he glass-posted it to the Internet? Where is the line drawn?

Re:make the Glass emit a noice when ever its camer (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45832567)

I'm curious, could he be sued by someone who flashed him and he glass-posted it to the Internet? Where is the line drawn?

Get real, dude. You see security camera footage all the time on news programs all the time, don't you? (Mics are available on some security cameras models, by the way.) You see paparazzi pics in the tabloids, don't you? People can record you all day long without your permission.

The people freaking out about Glass are merely oblivious fools, panicking about something that silently became ubiquitous years ago which they even already knew about. You're out in public, FFS. Get over it.

Re:make the Glass emit a noice when ever its camer (1)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about 10 months ago | (#45832443)

Like a friend of mine says about his Google glass, The best feature is that ...

Wait until you start seeing a lot of pictures like that posted to the Internet, with little notes like "I took this with my Google Glass". You think the reactions now are hostile? You ain't seen nuttin yet.

The future will be bland (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45832075)

No privacy, people will speak in the most inoffensive way possible. They already do in America, the character has been sucked out of this country a long time ago. A lot of recording of day to day things no one wants to see again nor should. A lot of fear as well. Google glass doesn't offend me because of its form factor but what it represents. Most older people will probably have the same reaction if you took a smart phone while they were talking to you or in their range, and aimed it at them, making it seem you were recording them in one way or another.

I talk with some people who wondered how I ever lived before the internet (well, to be accurate, before the www), where the only way computers tangibly touched my daily lifes were with crappy games. You know, the dark ages. They think they are the blessed ones. For me, it's the opposite, I pity people who never lived before the cloud, social media, the web, what have you. My grandkids will be asking me what privacy will be like, and I will lean back and try to remember. But then I have to remember they will be recording what I say with their contacts or something and I will just huff and tell them to get off my lawn.

Re:The future will be bland (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45832287)

What has happened is that because there are so many cameras, people will respond in as inoffensive a manner as possible because they don't want to wind up as the brunt of the next viral YouTube video.

This isn't just the Internet. There are grave consequences for not being PC enough, and one has to walk on eggshells discussing some topics for fear of others being offended as a primary debate tool as opposed to rational discourse.

Of course, this creates a Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde effect. We are already seeing the effect of kids pushed too far, and what happens when there is any shred of anonymity (just hop on a multiplayer XBox game with a headset, and this point gets driven home quickly.)

Passive/aggressiveness used to be a trait of cowards... now it is a survival trait in the US. This is why the main method of realizing someone is mad is when you don't see their name on your FB friends list, or messages go silently ignored. In the past, someone would just tell you to take a hike. Not these days... silence means a lot more than words now in inferring someone's intentions and opinions.

Even worse, this is starting to create groups of people who are extreme and reactionary. People whom they can say what they see fit without putting their job, possessions [1], and even family in serious jeopardy. This is on all sides of the political spectrum.

I'd rather read/hear free speech that is offensive than crass than predigested platitudes, with the real opinions of people only evinced in tight-knight groups.

Posting AC of course. Ironic that. But, what am I to say... I'm a US citizen.

[1]: Vandalism is a crime that getting caught at is virtually impossible, and it doesn't take much for people to feel justified at trashing someone's vehicle or house.

"Future is on its way"... Nope (4, Insightful)

Spy Handler (822350) | about 10 months ago | (#45832101)

And it's not "inevitable". Just hip fanboi hype.

Problem with Goggle Glass is that it's in your face. It's conspicuous. It may not be recording at the moment, but you don't know that for sure.

It's like, if I'm walking around holding a cellphone in hand with arm stretched out and pointed in such a way that it looks like I'm recording a video, and then started engaging in conversation with people while still in that pose, but now the camera is pointed directly at them, people will get uncomfortable. (unless of course the person I"m talking to wants to be recorded). It's in their face. It's annoying.

Google Glass is kind of like that, all the time.

Another example: you might be walking around in a city where it's perfectly legal to carry firearms in public if you have a permit. And say it's a shall-issue state where anyone can get a permit if they don't have criminal records, so a large percentage of the population does. Now you're in a crowded city area, and you *know* many of the people are packing concealed heat. But it rarely crosses your mind because it's not in your face. Out of sight, out of mind.

But suppose instead of concealed carry, people are walking around openly wearing their Glocks on their hips, AK-47s slung across their shoulder and so on. This is in your face. Your reaction is going to be much different.

Re:"Future is on its way"... Nope (2)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 10 months ago | (#45832199)

Which brings up an interesting point about social expectations. In certain parts of the country (think rural Alaska, maybe Texas and similar areas), firearms are ubiquitous and pretty much ignored. You can hitch hike with a rifle an get picked up (by persons other than the SWAT team).

Most places, however, openly carrying a rifle or shotgun will raise hackles. Which is where we are today with respect to ubiquitous recording devices. Forward another decade or two, let people get used to the things and Google Glass rev 5 will be considered normal. Social expectations will be such that nobody cares except us old folks in the nursing home railing about 'privacy'. The younger generation will think that as relevant as a fax machine.

Humans can adapt to pretty much anything that doesn't kill them.

Re:"Future is on its way"... Nope (1)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about 10 months ago | (#45832349)

Forward another decade or two, let people get used to the things and Google Glass rev 5 will be considered normal.

You're assuming that it ever catches on. Judging from the reactions on this board, where technophobes are pretty thin on the ground, that doesn't seem too likely. Contrast that to many other gizmos where, especially on sites like this, the response is usually overwhelmingly positive. Tell Sergey to play with one of his other toys - this one isn't going to cut it.

Re:"Future is on its way"... Nope (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45832403)

No one cares if you have a camera/recording device in your pocket. On the other hand, while I can't speak for Texas, I doubt you'll get a friendly ride if you're pointing your rifle at somebody, even if you say it's not loaded, though you'll probably get a ride nonetheless.

CATCHPA: extort

Re:"Future is on its way"... Nope (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45832279)

Yes, I would feel much safer if the 99% of the population who are honest, peace loving people carried Glocks on their hips to help protect me from the 1% of the population who are psychopaths.

When they can put this in ordinary glasses frames (2)

QilessQi (2044624) | about 10 months ago | (#45832141)

(or at least, frames which look ordinary) then you'll see wider adoption, especially among people who already have prescription lenses. You'd go to LensCrafters or whoever, choose one of the Google-Glass-compatible frames from whatever manufactures are partnered with Google (with bluetooth, speaker, and camera embedded in temple pieces), get your custom lenses ground and overlayed with a transparent embedded heads-up-display, and voila.

I'm guessing that the hardware isn't currently there, or at least not in such a small size, but soon probably.

Re:When they can put this in ordinary glasses fram (3)

Martin Blank (154261) | about 10 months ago | (#45832361)

That's planned for next year when availability is increased. It's the only thing that's kept me from getting them. For those places that don't allow it, I'll keep an extra, normal pair of glasses in my car, similar to what I already do with sunglasses.

Re:When they can put this in ordinary glasses fram (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45832455)

I have another theory that plays on top of any feelings about monitoring. We're pretty comfortable treating cameras in general as eyes. Now imagine if someone has a third eye, and it's not even centered, it's just slightly one of their eyes. Trust based on eye contact is weirdly disrupted and you don't like talking to him.

So we're heading for the singularity, right? (1)

mmell (832646) | about 10 months ago | (#45832151)

"We are Pentium of Borg. Division is futile. You will be approximated."

s/Pentium of Borg/the Google

A lot like early cell phones (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45832153)

Take your Google glass
And shove it up your ass

Of course, I used to feel the same way about cell phone users, but here I am 20 years later and I can't remember how I functioned without a cell. I figured out the point when I stopped feeling hatred towards cell phone users. It was when people stopped talking so much and started texting instead. Eventually, there will be glass-type devices that won't be annoying. But for now, I hate them.

Re:A lot like early cell phones (1)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about 10 months ago | (#45832387)

I used to feel the same way about cell phone users

Get serious. I was far from an early cell phone adopter (which was especially funny when I was designing cell phone chips), but neither I, nor any but a tiny minority, objected to anything about them except the occasional inconsiderate idiot. Don't yack on it when you're in a theater or something, and whether or not you want one, there's little to object to. Contrast that to the outright hostility on a site that's visited by the last people likely to be technophobes. Big difference.

Advertisers dream (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45832163)

Adverts straight to your eyeball, marvellous. SNOWCRASH.

I guess I am not representative. (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45832167)

Personally, I don't give a fig what they look like. They don't look particularly odd to me at all, and I would no sooner welcome someone pointing a cam-corder or smartphone at me for no apparent reason (or especially if the apparent reason was that I was giving birth at the time -- sheesh!)

"Class divide"? Please. $1500 is not a lot of money for plenty of hobbies that are popular among most classes that can scrape together any amount of money at all. How far will $1500 go if you are into working on cars? Riding bicycles? Doing anything that requires a reasonably capable personal computer?

Maybe Google Glass isn't what is turning people off of Google Glass wearers. Maybe it is the wearers that are turning people off Google Glass.

Looking forward to it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45832209)

I am really looking forward to getting my Google glass. I believe what I am going to enjoy the most is watching the angry glares, given from a safe distance, of the keyboard warriors who vowed to kick the ass of anyone wearing glass, yet the closest they have ever gotten to fisticuffs in the real world is a round of Wii boxing before they had to collapse on the couch because they were too winded to go on.

The future is on its way, and it's on your face" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45832211)

Huh? You just described how everyone hates you for wearing it. Why would this be the future if everyone hates it?

Photographic memory (1)

gmuslera (3436) | about 10 months ago | (#45832303)

People is more opposed to google glass not because it gives augmented reality (or at least a sort of HUD) to their users, but because could be recording everything they see. But what about more discrete (and cheaper) lifelogging devices like Narrative [getnarrative.com] or uCorder [ucorder.com] which only goal is to record everything you see? And that is just about video, any smartphone user can record audio without being noticed. And yes, the ones watchiing the video stream could be the NSA or similar ones, but how you know that you are not the carrier right now of the spying device with your phone? Or the camera in your pc/laptop?

Recording or not, probably is inevitable some sort of augumented vision in the future, something that would be as visible in your face as Google Glass for several years still. Will it be the future? Not sure, but the future will look like it in the essentials for sure.

Swing and a miss... (1)

Oligonicella (659917) | about 10 months ago | (#45832309)

Wearing Glass separates you. It sets you apart from everyone else. It says you not only had $1,500 to plunk down to be part of the âoeexplorerâ program, but that Google deemed you special enough to warrant inclusion (not everyone who wanted Glass got it; you had to be selected). Glass is a class divide on your face.

More likely: Wearing Glass separates you by telling everyone immediately that you are likely recording them without asking.

Re:Swing and a miss... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45832445)

>Wearing Glass separates you by telling everyone immediately that you are likely recording them without asking.

Ever heard of security cameras? Your permission is not required for your actions to be recorded.

If you ever talk to someone wearing Google Glass.. (5, Interesting)

jdastrup (1075795) | about 10 months ago | (#45832323)

..just hold your own smartphone up by your face, as if you're recording them while you talk to them. Whether you are recording or not, I can't imagine the Glasshole won't be slightly annoyed by what you are doing.

Scenario (3, Funny)

StripedCow (776465) | about 10 months ago | (#45832345)

Imagine you're using your laptop in the subway, some guy wearing Glass sits next to you, peeks at your screen for 1 second, and starts analyzing what you're working on, using his Glass.

PS: I wonder what Glass would have looked like if a human's ears were not located at approximately the same height as their eyes.

All it takes is Google Glass? Doubtful. (1)

_Shorty-dammit (555739) | about 10 months ago | (#45832377)

Somehow I doubt that all would be required to make you forget you're squeezing a baby out is Google Glass. I'm fairly confident in saying nothing would do that, actually.

Not yet accustomed to it (1)

Salgat (1098063) | about 10 months ago | (#45832427)

The technology is too new and foreign for most people to feel comfortable around it. Until this technology becomes more ubiquitous it won't be considered normal and okay. Another issue is that it's an offense to fashion and anything worn that is bizarre enough will receive strange looks.

Rummy got there first (1)

kylemonger (686302) | about 10 months ago | (#45832475)

Bluetooth headsets had a similar dynamic when it comes to setting expectations, as illustrated with some hilarity here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sSV_CvoaCak#t=01m42 [youtube.com] We've gotten used to seeing people walking along apparently talking to themselves; we can get used Google Glass, too.

QR with the URL to lemonparty printed on a mask... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45832541)

Problem solved! ...but you would have to wear a mask all the time...

unpaid spies (1, Interesting)

jcomeau_ictx (696704) | about 10 months ago | (#45832553)

as others hinted, but after skimming the top comments didn't see it spelled out: if you're wearing Google Glass, thanks to the NSA's intrusive surveillance network, you're spying on all of us for free, in fact you paid to do it. that not only makes you an agent of one of the world's most evil governments, it makes you a fool. I can promise you, I won't be passive-aggressive if I see you wearing them, I'll probably be in your face.

You guys are thinking about this all wrong... (5, Interesting)

mikecase (1991782) | about 10 months ago | (#45832599)

I've had Glass for a couple of weeks and the experience has been interesting. I live in a area w/ about 250,000 people and there are probably fewer than five (including myself) who have Glass. I've been wearing them around town to see how people react to them and so far it seems pretty positive. Some people just kind of look at me oddly, but many people recognize what it is and ask me what the experience is like. This is what I tell them: Sure, it's great to have access to (most) of the Google Now functionality without needing to look down at my phone. Text messages delivered to the HUD is handy, as is responding to them via voice. For the most part though, there isn't a whole lot these do yet, certainly not enough for average consumers to care. That said, the potential for business/industrial use is HUGE. Most people's first experience with Glass won't be as a consumer item, but rather as something they use for work. Think construction workers, or people who work in hospitals or laboratories. Many people will be exposed to these via applications in the work environment. You, as a consumer, may not be very interested in Glass, but there are many businesses who want/need something like this for their workforce.

NSA and Google Glass (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45832605)

Imagine NSA infecting Google glass - they will be able to see what you see without you knowing about it :)

Thanks Google

I see you... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45832625)

Just another toy for the NSA!

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