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Twister: The Fully Decentralized P2P Microblogging Platform

Unknown Lamer posted about 8 months ago | from the not-at&t-approved dept.

Social Networks 169

New submitter miguelfreitas writes "I'd like to offer for discussion with Slashdot readers this new proposal: twister is the fully decentralized P2P microblogging platform leveraging from the free software implementations of Bitcoin and BitTorrent protocols. This is not being pushed by any company or organization, it is the work of a single Brazilian researcher (me). The idea is to provide a scalable platform for censor-resistant public posting together with private messaging with end-to-end encryption. The basic concepts are described in FAQ while more in-depth technical details are available from the white paper. The twister network is running already: the client can be compiled for Linux, Mac, and Android. 2500 usernames were registered in the first 6 days."

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Quick! Give this guy a billion dollars! (1, Funny)

cowwoc2001 (976892) | about 8 months ago | (#45888267)

Tech bubble anyone?

Re:Quick! Give this guy a billion dollars! (5, Informative)

Okian Warrior (537106) | about 8 months ago | (#45888389)

Tech bubble anyone?

From the twister FAQ [twister.net.co] :

The architecture is designed so that other users can’t know if you are online or not, what your IP address is, or which users’ posts you might be reading.

also:

Q: How do you make money out of this? A: I don't.

I like your definition of "Tech bubble" - we can use it as a label to beat down or promote all sorts of extreme views on the internets.

Do you have a newsletter I can subscribe to?

Re:Quick! Give this guy a billion dollars! (5, Funny)

cowwoc2001 (976892) | about 8 months ago | (#45888513)

My definition of Tech Bubble: Your business doesn't have to generate revenue in order to grab an investment for a few billion. All you need to do is combine some popular buzzwords ("MicroBlogging", "Scalable" and "BitCoin").

This guy can sell himself as the next generation of Twitter: "We use BitCoin technologies to enable Scalable Microblogging" :)

Re:Quick! Give this guy a billion dollars! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45888691)

A thousand owners of pointless internet start-ups are marveling at how Miguel Freitas pro-actively integrates synergies.

If it's not an 'experience' (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45888717)

It's dead to me. Like my health insurance.

Re:Quick! Give this guy a billion dollars! (1)

Kremmy (793693) | about 8 months ago | (#45889157)

This doesn't quite qualify. Because of the design of this system, he doesn't actually have any real control beyond the first few nodes and the very beginning of the network. It's a lot like the people who claim we can crash the BitCoin system by overpowering it with force - good luck doing that on an ever-expanding network of hashing nodes. Dude might land an awesome job somewhere that involves him continuing to maintain the codebase, but this is technologically incompatible with the concept of the bubble as it pertains to dotcoms.

Re:Quick! Give this guy a billion dollars! (1)

Sez Zero (586611) | about 8 months ago | (#45889623)

My definition of Tech Bubble: Your business doesn't have to generate revenue in order to grab an investment for a few billion.

This guy can sell himself as the next generation of Twitter: "We use BitCoin technologies to enable Scalable Microblogging" :)

I think you are confusing "tech bubble" with technobabble [urbandictionary.com] .

Re:Quick! Give this guy a billion dollars! (3, Insightful)

cloud.pt (3412475) | about 8 months ago | (#45888597)

Give him bitcoins instead :D
This is definitely my favorite /. article this year so far.

Hopefully it's better than the last one (1)

the_humeister (922869) | about 8 months ago | (#45888331)

Twister, the not so intersting story of some researchers and a tornado. You can't fool me again!

Re:Hopefully it's better than the last one (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45889421)

A porn version of this can be called Naked Twister

Woohoo! (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45888343)

2500 users is impressive. That's about half the size of all Linux desktop users, right?

Re:Woohoo! (2)

madmatty (3468483) | about 8 months ago | (#45888395)

Considering google and IBM corporate environments alone are 90% Linux desktops, your troll fails good sir.

Re:Woohoo! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45888411)

Oh. I thought he was making a fat joke.

Re:Woohoo! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45888431)

Failed? Got you to be butthurt and respond didn't it?

Re:Woohoo! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45888501)

You're the one who has failed. I got a great laugh out of seeing an uptight fanboi try to defend his 3rd rate OS.
 
Come on, fanboi, tell us all about how teh Linux!!!1111!!! is used on a bunch of supercomputers too and how many devices like Alarm clocks and Raspberry Pis run Linux too.
 
You geeks are a real hoot. I'm almost ashamed of myself because it's so easy to draw you guys out. You're like the military retards on IMDb who cry every time a war movie has an inconsistancy. But instead of dressing up in camo for all the world to see you just grow a neckbeard.

Re:Woohoo! (2)

Lumpy (12016) | about 8 months ago | (#45888739)

This explains a lot,
Guys leave this guy alone... He is "special" and he can not actually understand complex things like "puters" or "english"

Nope. (4, Interesting)

RandomUsername99 (574692) | about 8 months ago | (#45888703)

Yes, but your counter-troll failed harder. A company I was working for got bought out by IBM, and I was really excited about it, because from the outside they looked like they were making a huge push towards using linux as their primary OS, and open source software in general. (I ended up working for them for about 5 years.)They managed to get Notes, their primary communication tool, working almost as well on Linux as it worked on Windows... which is not particularly well... but they haven't even ported over many of their basic tools, such as their ticket tracking systems, which are used to track development as well, to Linux. As of a few years ago, they said that they were going to stop attempting to port those tools over. For server operating systems, in many applications, they're still relentlessly pushing their developers to concentrate on coding for AIX over linux.

They've got a bright shiny image put forth from their marketing department as one big unified force pushing for workplace innovation, but the way the company actually works is much more like the government Terry Gilliam's 'Brazil.' Their linux workstation project was an underfunded, disorganized yet highly publicized project put together during their big linux marketing push. I don't even think 25% of the company directly touches linux on a daily basis, let alone the absolutely laughable assertion that 90% of the company uses linux as a primary desktop OS.

Re:Woohoo! (1)

ttucker (2884057) | about 8 months ago | (#45888747)

Forcing everyone to use the new version of Gnome and Unity should drive adoption as well. Soon Linux will dominate the desktop....

Re:Woohoo! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45888819)

I did a one year contracting gig at IBM and I never seen a Linux workstation there. I think you're confusing them with someone else.

Re:Woohoo! (1)

madmatty (3468483) | about 8 months ago | (#45889131)

not in silicon valley laboratories, its mostly linux I love all the MS jock strap sniffing people who jump on these feeds :D

Re:Woohoo! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45889189)

Great, but that one place is not all of IBM. You do know that "the plural of anecdote is not evidence", right?

Re:Woohoo! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45888855)

lmao that's cold

2500 people added to NSA watch list (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45888359)

The more you try to hide what you do, the tighter the noose will get.

Re:2500 people added to NSA watch list (2, Interesting)

Antipater (2053064) | about 8 months ago | (#45888397)

The more you tighten your grip, Clapper, the more star systems will slip through your fingers.

Re:2500 people added to NSA watch list (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45888535)

Well said. People have had GPS devices put on their cars just for being immigrants from certain countries. Don't think the government won't show up at your house to monitor you.

Re:2500 people added to NSA watch list (1)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | about 8 months ago | (#45889071)

True. I'd like to think that if there were a form of unstoppable, truly private communication that terrorists could use the NSA would give up, but that's Defense Distributed-type thinking...more likely you'd just be put on the Very Naughty list and they'll hit you with every tool of surveillance and oppression in the toolbox.

What this will be used for (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45888373)

This seems like something I've heard of before, wasn't it called UseNet? I believe it was. This seems like a great theory that will result in a new platform for pirating among other things.

And yes, I know it's for distributing information without the iron heel of an oppressive government digging into you. And in all fairness, it could be used for that. In reality though, the people most likely to use this aren't actual freedom crusaders.

Re:What this will be used for (5, Insightful)

Okian Warrior (537106) | about 8 months ago | (#45888485)

And yes, I know it's for distributing information without the iron heel of an oppressive government digging into you. And in all fairness, it could be used for that. In reality though, the people most likely to use this aren't actual freedom crusaders.

A genuine, bona-fide, copyright cartel internet shill. Bingo - Got one!

Yes people, let's not support this because we all know what sorts of unsavoury activities will be found there! It just kills me that someone might be doing something I don't like on the internet, and there will be no way to stop it!!!

There's no value in any of the other activities that might go on - none whatsoever.

Re:What this will be used for (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45888709)

Strawman arguments are lies.

Re:What this will be used for (1)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | about 8 months ago | (#45889105)

Yeah do we really want freedom if the price is COPYRIGHT INFRINGMENT!? Oh noes! Better lock ourselves in the panopticon before somebody gets to hear a shitty pop song without paying for it!

Re:What this will be used for (1)

alex67500 (1609333) | about 8 months ago | (#45889395)

This seems like something I've heard of before, wasn't it called UseNet?

How soon can I start getting my movies / tv series through that delivery method? The 140 character limit is going to be an interesting challenge.

Re:What this will be used for (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45889793)

"Pirating" vs "distributing information without the iron heel of an oppressive government digging into you". The difference is just a matter of perspective.

Registered? (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45888383)

How do you register a username in a fully decentralized environment?

Re:Registered? (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45888403)

By shoving a Tux butt plug in your rectum and chanting "Hail Stallman" 500 times.

Re:Registered? (5, Informative)

Clyde Machine (1851570) | about 8 months ago | (#45888413)

The software is built off the blockchain model of the Bitcoin protocol. A key pair is recognized in the blockchain as being associated with a specific username, and it's there for all nodes to agree upon.

Re:Registered? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45888999)

Which means you can do a "double spend" attack to appropriate a specific username?

Re:Registered? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45889435)

so if your username/password are hacked, say goodbye.

Re:Registered? (1)

fisted (2295862) | about 8 months ago | (#45890095)

so if you're too stupid to keep your login data private, say goodbye.

FTFY, and yes.

Re:Registered? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45888417)

The same way you claim a bitcoin in a fully decentralzed environment: You say, "this is mine", and wait for enough people to agree with you.

You put it in a block in the chain (3, Informative)

Okian Warrior (537106) | about 8 months ago | (#45888561)

How do you register a username in a fully decentralized environment?

In like manner of BitCoin registering a transaction in a fully decentralized way.

1) You make the claim to a username with a set of encryption keys.

2) The daemons accept the transaction and insert it into the block chain.

From then on, the only person who can claim to be that username must present credentials based on the encryption keys. Keep those safe, and no one cal masquerade as you on the system.

Re:You put it in a block in the chain (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45888929)

then how do you stop some bot taking many usernames every second? (doesn't say in the FAQ, and it could be a real problem if multiple bots try to generate many usernames each)

Good point! (3, Interesting)

Okian Warrior (537106) | about 8 months ago | (#45889027)

then how do you stop some bot taking many usernames every second? (doesn't say in the FAQ, and it could be a real problem if multiple bots try to generate many usernames each)

That's an interesting and insightful point.

I'm going to forward it to Miguel and the people over at the Twister [google.com] forum (unless you'd like to do it - I'll hold off for a couple of hours in case you do).

This is exactly what they need. A nascent project looking for feedback from smart, informed, and motivated users.

Re:Good point! (1)

Atzanteol (99067) | about 8 months ago | (#45889367)

Perhaps they could make it computationally expensive to create a new identity somehow - like when you solve bitcoins. Something short enough that a motivated user wouldn't mind waiting but which would be expensive enough to stop mass creations.

Re:Good point! (4, Informative)

Jane Q. Public (1010737) | about 8 months ago | (#45889459)

"I'm going to forward it to Miguel and the people over at the Twister forum (unless you'd like to do it - I'll hold off for a couple of hours in case you do)."

Then perhaps you'd like to post this as well:

Twister will never see widespread adoption if users have to compile it for their platform. Unless and until pre-compiled binaries are available, most people will avoid it like the plague.

Re:Good point! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45889941)

There is an .apk on the download page for an Android client which appears to 'just work'...

Re:Registered? (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45889037)

They have a complicated bitcoin like system to approve user registry, and provide incentives to "mine" in order to keep the system moving and deliver messages. It seems a bit odd to me - why bother with all that complexity and instead build into the system a way to quickly determine false aliases? Your user name is whatever you say it is, your identification uses standard signed credentials. Your "identity" in this system is your user name and post history. That's your identity - if the user name changes, your post history doesn't. So the important part can't be spoofed. A good client can easily cache "known" aliases - if I'm "@Dave" on this system, then folks will trust me as @Dave. If another "@Dave" posts, I can weed him out or assign him "@Dave1" or something else. All actual addressing, references, etc. should use public keys as identifiers - if you're addressing someone only they can read it. These keys are then translated into aliases based on the user's advertised alias or the local client's cache preferences.

Centralized internet is coming to an end (4, Insightful)

gmuslera (3436) | about 8 months ago | (#45888419)

Secure, auditable, and distributed or downright personal servers should be the way of the future after we seen the abuses (from governments and companies) that enables to have everything centralized in few places. Of course, is pretty hard to get that for big numbers of people, as they are as group easily manipulable, but at least for the people that want security and privacy, must exist some options.

Miguel Freitas genius (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45888453)

Hey Miguel

thanks for such creation!

BR
SteP

Ouch (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45888477)

I'm sorry such initiative got so stupid comment ...

That 's a nice idea, like BitMessage ...

Re:Ouch (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45888539)

I'm sorry such initiative got so stupid comment ...

That 's a nice idea, like BitMessage ...

Agreed!

NNTP? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45888489)

If only there was a protocol for replicating posts across multiple servers & providers.

Compare to Freenet? Tor? i2p? GnuNet? etc (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45888533)

So how does this improve on the dominant "darknet" technologies? What about all the lesser (failed?) p2p darknets like Antz, Mute or GnuNet?
TD;DR of course. This is /.

Re:Compare to Freenet? Tor? i2p? GnuNet? etc (2)

gmuslera (3436) | about 8 months ago | (#45889977)

Better compare it with Diaspora [diasporafoundation.org] or Movim [movim.eu] , that are more in the same league, descentralized social networks. at least for the upper layer. If you want to go to the transport protocol, is afaik the bitcoin network protocol, so no darknets or i.e. Tor implied there. And as based on bitcoin, should imply no anonimity neither (what is a good thing in a social network)

Same problem Bitcoin will have (4, Insightful)

Rosco P. Coltrane (209368) | about 8 months ago | (#45888543)

The blockchain will soon grow disproportionally large. Right now it's probably managable, but you know what? I'm not downloading tens of gigabytes of blockchain just for the plessure of reading lols on decentralized blogs.

Nice idea though...

Re:Same problem Bitcoin will have (2)

Connie_Lingus (317691) | about 8 months ago | (#45888641)

not even for the cat pics and videos?

Re:Same problem Bitcoin will have (4, Informative)

miguelfreitas (3488261) | about 8 months ago | (#45888697)

It is only about 100 bytes per user registration, plus a fixed overhead of about 50MB per year. Should be pretty manageable for any low-end desktop.

Re:Same problem Bitcoin will have (3, Informative)

gbjbaanb (229885) | about 8 months ago | (#45889855)

But that's 100MB per million users, it all adds up.

FYI, twitter has 883 million users.. that's a lot of 100 bytes. 88 gigs worth of them.

Re:Same problem Bitcoin will have (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45890087)

This service won't get more than a few 10s of thousands of users. So your concerns are highly exaggerated.

Re:Same problem Bitcoin will have (4, Interesting)

Nerdfest (867930) | about 8 months ago | (#45888767)

There's a funded KickStarter in progress called Trsst [trsst.com] that has very similar goals, but uses a different approach. It's not quite as distributed as this, but avoids the monster blockchain problem.

Re:Same problem Bitcoin will have (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45889275)

My favorite thing about any startup, app, business, whatever that builds itself on "xyz, but secure" is that the potential for fail is so amazing. Firstly, a genuine question, are there any examples of copying other businesses and making something out of it, "but secure?" More importantly, the business itself fails when the "security" is cracked.

Re:Same problem Bitcoin will have (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45888829)

No way we humans can solve this problem! Let's pack up and shut the Internet down.

Yep, absolutely no way so let's not try to give it another thought.

Re:Same problem Bitcoin will have (3, Insightful)

sandertje (1748324) | about 8 months ago | (#45888837)

Which will be fixed when 'light' clients à la MultiBit appear. They synchronize within a few seconds.

Re: Same problem Bitcoin will have - those who ign (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45888883)

There are alternatives like Askemos [slashdot.org] . Developed for a long time already. Older than bit-coin/torrent. Working, proofen.

Maybe we should ride the wave. But why?

Two years ago maybe. No longer. Either people "get the idea" or they will eventually develop it again.

Re:Same problem Bitcoin will have (5, Informative)

Okian Warrior (537106) | about 8 months ago | (#45888887)

The blockchain will soon grow disproportionally large. Right now it's probably managable, but you know what? I'm not downloading tens of gigabytes of blockchain just for the plessure of reading lols on decentralized blogs.

Nice idea though...

Apropos of nothing, where are you getting this meme?

I only ask because it doesn't happen to be true [bitcoin.it] , yet it's an oft-repeated meme that everyone seems to put forth as the BitCoin "killer" flaw.

tl;dr Here's the relevant passage from that link:

It is not required for most fully validating nodes to store the entire chain. [...] the size of the unspent output set is less than 100MiB, which is small enough to easily fit in RAM for even quite old computers.

If one wanted to kill an idea, if one wanted to wage a propaganda war on an extreme viewpoint or tool, here is one way to do it.

  • 1) Assume people know the basics of the system, but not the details.
  • 2) Construct a "problem" consistent with the basic knowledge
  • 3) Loudly advertize that "problem" and let others pick up and repeat it

It certainly seems plausible given the basics. Every transaction will add to the blockchain, and we process a whopping-big number of financial transactions every day! The blockchain will soon become unmanageable, and BitCoin will fail!

I've seen this in other arenas, including politics. Al Gore invented the internet [snopes.com] for instance. He didn't, he never said that he did, but he did say something vaguely similar. It certainly seems plausible that this is what he did say, and boy what a gaff! It makes him look sooooo silly!

We should promote our own agenda this way - the UK spam filter, for instance. What right risible meme can we invent that is close enough to reality that people would find it plausible, repeat it, and use it to label the filter as badly conceived?

Let's use the the same techniques our opponents use. Human psychology, for the win.

Re:Same problem Bitcoin will have (1)

DerekLyons (302214) | about 8 months ago | (#45889909)

It is not required for most fully validating nodes to store the entire chain.

That's the theory - how is it working out in practice? That's the real question.
 

If one wanted to kill an idea, if one wanted to wage a propaganda war on an extreme viewpoint or tool, here is one way to do it.

Of course, you display the same methodology in supporting your idea - positing simplified and idealized circumstances and then treating said meme as reality.
 

Let's use the the same techniques our opponents use.

You're already doing it - your blinders are just too tight for you to see it. People rarely notice logical flaws when they accrue to their favor.

Re:Same problem Bitcoin will have (1)

Hizonner (38491) | about 8 months ago | (#45890031)

That's the theory - how is it working out in practice?

It hasn't been enough of a problem in practice for anybody to bother to write the code to shrink the storage.

You do realize that Bitcoin is an actual deployed system that carries a huge transaction volume, right? That's the practice.

Re:Same problem Bitcoin will have (1)

Okian Warrior (537106) | about 8 months ago | (#45890113)

If one wanted to kill an idea, if one wanted to wage a propaganda war on an extreme viewpoint or tool, here is one way to do it.

Of course, you display the same methodology in supporting your idea - positing simplified and idealized circumstances and then treating said meme as reality.

Let's use the the same techniques our opponents use.

You're already doing it - your blinders are just too tight for you to see it. People rarely notice logical flaws when they accrue to their favor.

Whaddaya mean - "not see it"? I'm doing it actively, with that intent in a carefully thought-out manner. I'm literally experimenting with propaganda techniques, using this forum for feedback and in anticipation of the upcoming election (November). I'm trying to learn how to manipulate public opinion.

Is that bad?

tl;dr: Whoosh!

Re:Same problem Bitcoin will have (3, Informative)

gyepi (891047) | about 8 months ago | (#45889161)

As it is explained in the FAQ, the blockchain is not used for distributing user's messages. Only user registration and authentication is based on the Bitcoin protocol. The blockchain only grows in proportion with the number of registered users, with a few hundred bytes per user. Even with a widespread adoption that is still a quite managable size we are talking about.

well... (1)

Charliemopps (1157495) | about 8 months ago | (#45888545)

This is neat. But, I'll be honest, I don't want to compile anything. At the very least give me an android APK or better yet get it on the play store.

Re: well... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45888581)

Had you bothered to read the article and check the website you'd have found the Android APK.

Re:well... (3, Insightful)

CastrTroy (595695) | about 8 months ago | (#45888595)

Not only that, it says "can be compiled for Linux, Mac, and Android". What about Windows? I'm all for using free software, but putting out a product like this and then ignoring the most popular operating system in the world by a long shot seems to be like they're asking for it to fail. It's like like they're only targeting free operating systems, as Mac somehow made the list.

Re:well... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45888783)

Well, Mac is just BSD, which shares a lot of libraries with Linux and Android, so... yeah, it could be a huge undertaking to port to Windows that which happens to run natively on the other three.

Re:well... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45888791)

Not only that, it says "can be compiled for Linux, Mac, and Android". What about Windows? I'm all for using free software, but putting out a product like this and then ignoring the most popular operating system in the world by a long shot seems to be like they're asking for it to fail. It's like like they're only targeting free operating systems, as Mac somehow made the list.

it looks more like unix based OS is a target... which is Mac too

Re:well... (3, Insightful)

rasmusbr (2186518) | about 8 months ago | (#45888879)

Not only that, it says "can be compiled for Linux, Mac, and Android". What about Windows? I'm all for using free software, but putting out a product like this and then ignoring the most popular operating system in the world by a long shot seems to be like they're asking for it to fail. It's like like they're only targeting free operating systems, as Mac somehow made the list.

You have a good point, but I think it is important to understand that Windows is probably only the third most popular OS after Android and iOS at this point if we count installations where the end user has the right and ability to install new software.

Re:well... (3, Insightful)

sandertje (1748324) | about 8 months ago | (#45888881)

Linux, Mac and Android are all UNIX-based. Writing something for Linux is relatively easily portable to Mac or Android. Porting to Windows is another venture alltogether.

Re:well... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45888907)

Not at all, this is a spare time project that he undertook in Linux. From there porting to Android/Linux and Mac(BSD) was relatively simple.

Having just launched it, he hasn't had time to port it to Windows. The code is open, if you care to get it working in Windows I am sure he'd be only too glad to make the appropriate changes.

That said, he plans to port it to JavaScript and simply have it run in a browser, thus making it less dependent on the OS.

Re:well... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45889081)

If you choose to continue you probably must fall into one of the following categories:

  • You are a developer.
  • You are an early adopter (who wants to reserve your nickname).
  • You are a masochist.

Check, check and check for Linux desktop users.

Re:well... (1)

stewsters (1406737) | about 8 months ago | (#45889113)

There is a fix for this problem posted here [ubuntu.com] .

Re:well... (2)

thoriumbr (1152281) | about 8 months ago | (#45889217)

Not only that, it says "can be compiled for Linux, Mac, and Android". What about Windows?

The front-end is HTML5/Javascript. The daemon is written in C++, using a few open source libraries. It would only require a good C++ developer to port it to Windows.

And the entire protocol is opensource, the core technologies are opensource, so anyone with a good knowledge in C++ and any other language can port it to anything...

Re:well... (1)

Bob9113 (14996) | about 8 months ago | (#45889365)

Not only that, it says "can be compiled for Linux, Mac, and Android". What about Windows?

Perhaps, since Microsoft sends security bugs to the NSA before fixing them [bloomberg.com] , this guy just figures it is frivolous to pretend you can have secure messaging on that platform.

Re:well... (1)

Warbothong (905464) | about 8 months ago | (#45889375)

It's like like they're only targeting free operating systems, as Mac somehow made the list.

More likely: the author happens to develop on Linux, Mac and/or Android and once it compiled there, the others came for free. Since adding Windows support usually requires a bunch of workarounds and rewrites, we'll have to wait until the effort's been put in.

Re:well... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45889635)

As the Windows port of Twister doesn't exist, how about using Linux through a VM and running Twister that way. It's a lot faster than waiting around for a Windows port or installing a fresh copy of Linux.

Re:well... (4, Informative)

miguelfreitas (3488261) | about 8 months ago | (#45888723)

APK is already available from download page [twister.net.co] .

Re:well... (1)

Nerdfest (867930) | about 8 months ago | (#45888853)

I think the APK is just a client that gives an Android interface to your server.

Re:well... (2)

miguelfreitas (3488261) | about 8 months ago | (#45888969)

No, the APK includes the server (compiled for Android and running as a local service)

Re:well... (1)

Nerdfest (867930) | about 8 months ago | (#45889001)

Awesome, thanks!

May there be many more (2)

matbury (3458347) | about 8 months ago | (#45888627)

Mmm... social networking and telecommunications on a decentralised network with no way of inserting advertising, profiling users, and no easy way of monitoring their communications (Yeah, that was meant for you, NSA, GCHQ, et al). Let's hope it'll work over Tor. And may it be the first of many...

Hopefully, it'll use interoperable messaging and encryption protocols so that other projects can join the same network easily... and an easy way to generate and exchange public keys. If encryption is controlled by the user, then 3rd parties or service providers (That one's for you Facebook) can't change your privacy settings; you have control. Clients for all operating systems would be cool too.

Does this have support from EFF? Anyone else?

Re:May there be many more (3, Informative)

AdamHaun (43173) | about 8 months ago | (#45889163)

Mmm... social networking and telecommunications on a decentralised network with no way of inserting advertising

Actually, it does. From the FAQ [twister.net.co] :

Can I mine Bitcoins with twister?

Not exactly. The same mechanism used in Bitcoin for mining is also used in twister but for a different purpose, ensuring the order in which user registrations took place (the nickname belongs to whoever registered it first). twister network must incentive users to mine, so block chain may keep advancing. However, unlike Bitcoin, there is no monetary value involved. The twister incentive is: whoever finds the hash collision to validate a new block of transactions will be awarded with the right to send a promoted message. Promoted messages have a certain probability of being displayed by twister client.

Promoted messages? Am I going to be flooded with SPAM?

No, I hope not. I don’t like promoted message any more than you do, but I believe that a fair balance between the allowed volume of promoted messages will not upset the users while providing a good incentive for people to run the twister infrastructure.
Currently there is a maximum of one promoted message to be shown every 8 hours for every client, but the exact policy to be used is meant to be decided by the community.
The mechanism is actually quite democratic. Anyone can start generating blocks to send promoted messages, so this is effectively an advertising mechanism reaching the entire population of twister users. While an entrepreneur may invest in a mining rig to announce his product, a non-profit organization may ask his supporters to use their own personal computers to increase the probability of spreading their message.

Re:May there be many more (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45890231)

Hey look this tard thinks the NSA won't be able to snoop them. Yeah, you tards said the same about Tor and look at how the FBI subverted the network with their own nodes.

Trademark Infringement Lawsuit (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45888629)

As soon as this thing gets big enough for people to start using it, Twitter is going to throw a pile of lawyers at this guy. Twister clearly infringes on Twitter's trademark, as it does the same thing and has a name intended to cause confusion.

Windows? (1)

nam37 (517083) | about 8 months ago | (#45888711)

I understand this is Slashdot, but I find the the lack of a Windows client for a project like this pretty ridiculous.

Re:Windows? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45888797)

Windows is pretty ridiculous. People using it don't give a fuck. Every second spent on porting free software to it is wasted.

Re:Windows? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45889031)

Windows is a notable but minor OS among software developers in the crypto-anarchy scene. Provided the project picks up steam a Windows build will come along soon enough. There are more important things to do right now.

tent.io (1)

Baby Duck (176251) | about 8 months ago | (#45888843)

How does this compare to tent.io?

Re:tent.io (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45889193)

It looks like in "Tent" you still choose one server as a "provider", which you have to trust to store your posts and accurately represent you. I don't see any discussion of cryptographic signing. User auth
To be honest I am not quite sure what the selling point of this Tent thing is. The front page says "like email" a lot, but never "unlike email".

As far as I an tell, Twister uses a distributed hash table to store your messages decentralized between servers, as well as distributing them in a torrent-like swarm. Messages are signed with a key associated with user names through a block chain.

What I said about Twitter (1)

istartedi (132515) | about 8 months ago | (#45889319)

A while ago I said Twitter should be an RFC, not a company. Nice to see that somebody is doing that kind of thing. The catch is adoption. If most people don't adopt, it doesn't work. An in-browser client written in JavaScript would help that, if it's possible. In the 21st century, people have gotten used to the idea that you don't have to download a client for each protocol. Yeah, it sucks to have everything in the browser sometimes; but that's reality.

The REAL problem with this approach (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45889597)

For distributed, peer-to-peer solutions to work well, many users MUST allow significant storage on their own machines. Without such storage, P2P solutions will lack a 'history', making them unsuitable for anything BUT instantaneous services like file transfer and Instant Messaging.

But why not a P2P, distributed forum, for instance. The forum database itself would be distributed (with a statistically appropriate level of redundancy/duplication) across storage on individual users machines. HDD storage has never been cheaper- and better, a user could set some of his/her personal cloud storage space to this use.

But, BUT, there is a real problem lurking out there. Led by Tony Blair's British government (and be in no doubt, Blair has the same iron grip over the UK as Putin does over Russia, regardless of 'official' title), most nations have modified their laws to allow individuals to be prosecuted under almost ANY circumstance when they 'process' the data of another. A 'user' of a P2P distributed forum in the UK would immediately become legally responsible for ANY data from ANY source on that forum. The law has always used the concept of "shared legal responsibility" or "conspiracy" or "common purpose" to prosecute any member of a group the government would like to see destroyed.

Tor node maintainers have suffered exactly this fate, although the fact that tor is an intelligence resource of the West means that the full weight of the police-state has not fallen on those responsible for helping maintain the Tor network. In the UK, police raids on people and companies that 'control' servers used in a general sense by a wide community are so common-place, they aren't even reported today.

It gets worse. The owners of Twitter are partners with the NSA. Anything that encourages the sheeple to use a distributed service instead will cause the Twitter bosses to use their unthinkable financial clout to demand political action against any initiative that confounds NSA full surveillance projects. Zionist owned mainstream media outlets will happily run any number of stories demonising 'people power' facilities on the Internet as "hot-beds of terrorist activity enabled by criminally negligent developers".

Look how many nations allow bit-torrent users to be prosecuted with massive fines and jail time, simply for being a 'member' of a swarm, even if no data actually moves either to or from their machine. No nation requires proof that the user either successfully 'uploaded' or 'downloaded' even one copy of the file in question, if that nation has anti-torrent laws.

So, if as a user of a distributed P2P system, your machine UNWITTINGLY participates in an action that is in any sense considered 'illegal' in your nation, you are now considered fully responsible for that act. So, for instance, you 'help' the 'wrong' people engage in a conversation in the UK, Germany, or most Middle-East nations, you are going to prison. Much moreso if you are 'Muslim'. The UK has imprisoned many British Muslims for simply posting videos showing violence in nations destroyed by Tony Blair. The BBC, on the other hand, is still free to show videos of schools, hospitals and churches being bombed by the RAF in Blair's target nations while the studio guests roar with laughter, and praise those responsible for the slaughter.

NSA full surveillance projects, as praised and promoted by the owners of Slashdot, go hand-in-hand with the actual persecution of those who propose or use practical methods to circumvent such evil abuses of Mankind.

"Fully Decentralized" (2)

rea1l1 (903073) | about 8 months ago | (#45889715)

Nothing is ever "fully decentralized" until the internet itself is a giant mesh network.

Foretold! (1)

carrier lost (222597) | about 8 months ago | (#45889781)

Well, not exactly [slashdot.org]

I'm expecting something like this to topple Facebook.

With a terabyte of storage on a handheld device and a local application, you could replicate FB's service without the ads, limitations and privacy issues.

Congratulations (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#45889913)

Nice work dude ;-)

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