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Sony Announces Game Streaming Service

Soulskill posted about 4 months ago | from the now-everything-can-run-crysis dept.

PlayStation (Games) 144

You may remember Gaikai, a company built on the idea of cloud-based gaming. The idea was that a remote server would run the game and stream all graphics and sound to a player's device, which would allow underpowered or obsolete machines to run modern, graphically demanding games on high settings. In 2012, Sony purchased Gaikai. Now, they've announced at CES that their cloud gaming tech (dubbed 'PlayStation Now') is just about ready for the public. CES attendees will be able to try it out, and Sony will begin a closed beta test in the U.S. later this month. Full release is planned for summer. It will first support streaming to PS3s, PS4s, and certain Sony TV models. Later, it will expand more broadly to various non-Sony "internet-connected devices." Players will have the option to rent games or to subscribe for continued access. Forbes reports, "According to Sony, gamers who own disc- or digital-based games will not have access to those games via PS Now free of charge."

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144 comments

Most updated version != best (2, Interesting)

ackthpt (218170) | about 4 months ago | (#45893341)

"Always play the most updated version of your game." Remove version control from my hands and I'm not sure I'll be happy with that. I've played a few games where the next version was, IMHO, inferior in some aspect I valued.

Re:Most updated version != best (2)

Luckyo (1726890) | about 4 months ago | (#45893553)

In all the honesty, steam largely removes version control from you as well, and few are complaining in the long run.

Re:Most updated version != best (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45893601)

Opt-out.

Re:Most updated version != best (1)

Oligonicella (659917) | about 4 months ago | (#45893633)

Then complain when your version doesn't work with new content or upgraded server software.

Re:Most updated version != best (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45895035)

Hahaha, I hope to god you're not serious.

You ever go through Steam's so called "support"? According to a recent post I read it should be a Human Rights violation.

Re:Most updated version != best (1)

Darinbob (1142669) | about 4 months ago | (#45893783)

Some complain though. Steam has screwed stuff up in the past, with loud outcries from players of a game suddenly discovering new bugs or limitations. I always make sure to disable auto-update of games so that updating is in my control. I think the last official update for Fallout New Vegas added a major bug which is only fixed through unofficial mods (the overpowered legion assassins).

Then there's some weird stuff, game makers doing the equivalent of "director's cut" by changing content after the fact. Ie, the ending of Portal 1 was changed to tie in better with Portal 2.

It would be a lot better if Steam allowed access to older versions. Would provide a history of changes, allow users to undo a bad patch, and get rid of Lucas-style revisionism.

Re:Most updated version != best (1)

firex726 (1188453) | about 4 months ago | (#45894315)

Also useful for mods and early access games.

Kerbal Space Program updates often break popular mods, so you options are to just not update, or wait for the modder to get around to updating it. With Auto-Update on, then when the Dev's push a patch you'll find your whole save game gone or vital parts broken.

Re:Most updated version != best (3, Insightful)

Luckyo (1726890) | about 4 months ago | (#45894359)

Some people complain about everything. The point is that overwhelming majority doesn't.

Re:Most updated version != best (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45893623)

For the small minority of games where that is the case, buy the disc.

Re:Most updated version != best (1)

Darinbob (1142669) | about 4 months ago | (#45893801)

Except that you only have access to either the original unpatched version or the latest patched version, no access to anything in between. But ya, this is steam, you don't own a game you only rent it and should be grateful instead of speaking heretical criticisms.

Re:Most updated version != best (1)

RaceProUK (1137575) | about 4 months ago | (#45896753)

But ya, this is steam, you don't own a game you only rent it and should be grateful instead of speaking heretical criticisms.

That would include the numerous DRM-free games available through Steam? You know, the ones that work without Steam running.

Re:Most updated version != best (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45894121)

It might not be totally bad. We aren't talking about traditional PC games where you'd have a choice anyway, but console games, where you don't have a choice. For example, as an Xbox/PS3 player, I've had mandatory patches that if refused, would restrict me to offline play. Patching a Call of Duty from a single location makes sense. Patching a Heavy Rain and then immediately realizing that players now cannot play the game at all is better than distributing patches and letting players find out on their own, then waiting for a fix to come.

Boycott? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45893363)

Time for a boycott?

Lack of money will change there thinking very fast.

Re:Boycott? (1)

Kenja (541830) | about 4 months ago | (#45893389)

Tricky... I would have to first by a playstation before I could boycott the service.

Re:Boycott? (1)

ackthpt (218170) | about 4 months ago | (#45893447)

Tricky... I would have to first by a playstation before I could boycott the service.

Maybe you could just download a PS emulator, even a crappy one, and then go on with the boycott. I don't think they'd listen to you. Particularly if there's a bucket of people trying to push past nay-sayers and waiving their credit cards, willing to be among the first to sign up.

It's probably best to camp on the sidelines, watch the parade and then see if it actually ends in a parade of tears. If there's something you have to have and this becomes the only avenue to get it, your stuck.

Re:Boycott? (2)

ackthpt (218170) | about 4 months ago | (#45893393)

Time for a boycott?

Lack of money will change there thinking very fast.

You fossil.

People with that mindset said, "nobody would ever pay $70 (or more) a month for mobile phone service" and then the telecoms and smart phone makers proved that completely wrong. There's, in my opinion, a huge market of players and potential players who don't care and will flock to this. The only thing you can hope for is they will still make physical copies available.

Re:Boycott? (2, Insightful)

meerling (1487879) | about 4 months ago | (#45893525)

No.
Boycotts don't work, unless they are well publicized and have a huge following. Chances are you might never seen one that effective in your lifetime.

There are always petitions. Though companies are great at ignoring petitions, especially internet petitions, unless they get a massive number of signatures.

Something that has a higher probability of working. It's a letter writing campaign. Not email, actual snail mail get a stamp dead tree format communication protocol.
Yes, have people send them physical letters. It only costs each person one stamp, and each one is worth a thousand emails or petition signatures.

Will that get what you want? I have no idea, but it is a lot more likely to get a response than a minor unexplained dip in sales that probably isn't even noticed.

Re:Boycott? (1)

VanGarrett (1269030) | about 4 months ago | (#45894043)

I can't imagine that a deliberate boycott can be necessary. Game companies have a hard enough time keeping their servers up at launch, for vastly underestimating demand, and that's often for just authentication purposes, alone. The demands this kind of service has on its servers is ludicrous (just how many players can any individual machine in the cloud support, anyway?), let alone the problems that arise when you account for latency. I just don't know how they can reasonably accomplish their goals.

Re:Boycott? (1)

DarwinSurvivor (1752106) | about 4 months ago | (#45895809)

Better idea:

1) Encourage lots of people to get the service
2) Wait a few months for them to sink money into hardware and infrastructure due to high demand
3) Hit them with a boycott
4) Anti-profit!

Re:Boycott? (1)

gsslay (807818) | about 4 months ago | (#45896379)

What a radical idea! You need to expand on this "if you don't like it, don't buy it" idea. It could revolutionise modern day consumerism!

Even at a personal level; the number of times I've paid for stuff I didn't want and knew I wouldn't like. If I'd known I had the option of not buying it... well I'd be a rich man without a house full of junk!

O_o (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45893385)

Yeah I do not think I'll be using that I hate lag and those services are laggggggggy as fuck. I want 30ms or less not 300 which reminds of my shitty dial up back in the day on Diablo 2.. 200ms +

Re:O_o (1)

firex726 (1188453) | about 4 months ago | (#45894329)

As I recall OnLive was pretty decent for most instances, and is what Gaikai is modeled after. Only times people really seemed to complain was for really twitchy fighting games, when a fraction of a second really mattered.

What I am not too keen for is GaaS(Gaming as a Service), not a fan of paying a regular subscription fee for a non-MMO game.

The ultimate goal: (3, Insightful)

jafac (1449) | about 4 months ago | (#45893425)

"Pay per shot".

Re:The ultimate goal: (2)

ackthpt (218170) | about 4 months ago | (#45893455)

"Pay per shot".

Sony will team up with the NSA and they'll be watching how you shoot and what you shot.

Arcades died (4, Interesting)

tepples (727027) | about 4 months ago | (#45893583)

If video game publishers want pay per view, why don't they bring back arcades?

Re:Arcades died (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45895403)

Why bother paying for useless brick & mortar when the customers have nice comfy homes?

Re:Arcades died (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45895475)

If video game publishers want pay per view, why don't they bring back arcades?

Why do you think free-to-play games are all the rage right now? =p

Re:Arcades died (1)

Chris Mattern (191822) | about 4 months ago | (#45896721)

Because this is better. They don't have to pay rent on an arcade. They don't have to pay for much of the machinery. They get to deal in bits, not atoms, and that's always cheaper.

Yep, it's DRM (4, Insightful)

Kunedog (1033226) | about 4 months ago | (#45893827)

Imagine if the Ubisoft always-on DRM were an inherent, unremoveable aspect of the game system rather than just something tacked on to a few individual games after the fact, such that Ubisoft couldn't even begrudgingly neuter it in a patch. Well, this is even worse than that would be.

The game doesn't even run locally. All you get is streaming video/audio and all the lag you'd expect (including controller lag), which is a recipe for disaster in North America (before you even consider data caps).

Let's say you're lucky enough to have a 30mb/s connection. Why would you want to use it to transfer your game's video instead of, uh, a DVI cable, which is capable of 4 Gb/s? The people who developed DVI apparently understood that that 1920 x 1200 pixels w/ 24 bits/pixels @ 60Hz results in bandwidth well over 3 Gb/s. The people who push this stuff seem very, very confused (at best).

Some people consider IPS monitors unsuitable for games requiring fast reflexes (i.e. FPSes) due to their double-digit response times. Internet latency is often worse and certainly more unpredictable than LCD monitor response time, and with this tech it applies to audio and keyboard/controller/etc input too.

Those of us who know anything about bandwidth and compression and (especially) latency can see the enormous technical obstacles facing a service like this, and no one has ever done anything to explain how they intend to solve them. Onlive did everything they could to lock out independent reviewers with NDAs and closed demonstrations. A friend of mine described it as the gaming equivalent of the perpetual motion scam, and IMO that's spot on (except that it would still have the draconian DRM issues even if it worked perfectly).

Streaming games appear designed from the ground up to benefit the game publishers and fuck the customers, exactly what you'd expect from any DRM system.

Re:Yep, it's DRM (1)

tlhIngan (30335) | about 4 months ago | (#45895485)

Remember what happened when Microsoft first announced the Xbone with the always on DRM?

How Sony crucified them over offline play, easy sharing, used games, etc?

And then go an announce the PS4 will never do that?

Well, Sony was right - the PS4 won't do it. They'll put games on their streaming service which do the same thing. Minus the ONE USEFUL feature that the Xbone initially offered - the ability to sell/transfer a game license to someone else! (I.e., used game sale - sure they allowed for the possibility of blocking it or from taking a small part of the transaction fee, but it was possible).

It looks like a backhanded way of doing what the Xbone was originally going to do, and to go around any promises that were made to turn the PS4 into the always-on DRM the Xbone originally had.

Hell, I wouldn't be surprised if PS+ started putting games on there as a way to encourage game sales - my PS4 only has the free PS+ games on it. Because I know Sony will put Knack on it for free sometime soon (I want to play it), so I can save myself $60 by waiting. Of course, if this service comes online between now and then, Sony could very easily make it an online only game.

To be honest, it's also why both Microsoft and Sony need to do well - because each keeps each other honest. When Microsoft decided to err with the DRM, Sony came out and corrected them. When Sony tried to sneak away from music, Microsoft announced they supported it causing Sony to announce a future fix a few days later.

Competition is keeping both honest, and it looks like sales are steady enough to do that in the near term (4M units for the PS4, 3M for the Xbone). Sadly, Nintendo looks to be the odd man out (4M units, but a year head start).

Re:Yep, it's DRM (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45896871)

Remember what happened when Microsoft first announced the Xbone with the always on DRM?

Yes, MS said that it was the ONLY way to play

Sony isn't saying streaming will become the only way to play. The difference is choice. You can choose to not subscribe to the streaming service and continue buying disc-based games, or the full digital version

From TFS:

Forbes reports, "According to Sony, gamers who own disc- or digital-based games will not have access to those games via PS Now free of charge."

>

This pretty much implies the disc-based or digital-based games can be played without phoning home.

my PS4 only has the free PS+ games

...you do realize all your "free" PS+ games become unplayable if you subscription expires right (though if you resubscribe, you'll get to play them again)? So you're already on Sony's DRM. If you're going to complain about "Sony would never do that", you could have complained the second after Sony crucified MS

Re:The ultimate goal: (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45893861)

"Pay per shot".

We already have that. They're called Casinos.

A big part of the problem is that game makers (and most companies in America) are for-profit. Their whole existence is to create profit for the owner/shareholders.

If we switched to a "break even, do what you love because you love it" model, there might be some changes...

Re:The ultimate goal: (1)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | about 4 months ago | (#45894887)

and the Casinos are controlled by out side party's.

also you can win big with a bet per pull that is way less then a cost of a game.

Access games you purchased for free? (1)

jesseck (942036) | about 4 months ago | (#45893433)

Who would bother to ask Sony if they could play games they purchased free of charge? I would be surprised if Sony allowed that- the whole idea of this is a new revenue stream.

Re:Access games you purchased for free? (1)

ackthpt (218170) | about 4 months ago | (#45893581)

Who would bother to ask Sony if they could play games they purchased free of charge? I would be surprised if Sony allowed that- the whole idea of this is a new revenue stream.

1. Set the hook

2. Reel them in

...

Profit!!!

Re:Access games you purchased for free? (2)

Darinbob (1142669) | about 4 months ago | (#45893825)

All they need is a horde of younger players who love the idea who will shout down any older person who dares to object. That's how we got to the state where DRM is accepted and applauded in video games, so the publishers are now just squeezing tighter.

Re:Access games you purchased for free? (1)

MachDelta (704883) | about 4 months ago | (#45894049)

You're missing context. When the PS4 was first announced, one of the questions people had was "backwards compatibility?" to which Sony replied "Not natively, but just wait for our streaming service!" Thus, it was widely speculated that, to both fulfill a fan feature wish AND bootstrap a new service, Sony would support adding previously-purchased games to your streaming account.

I wonder if... (4, Funny)

TsuruchiBrian (2731979) | about 4 months ago | (#45893463)

I wonder if I can use Gaikai to play a game I've always wanted on my PS3 called "watch a fucking MKV file"

What video providers use MKV? (0)

tepples (727027) | about 4 months ago | (#45893561)

Other than YouTube WebM, which major legitimate video provider uses MKV? I thought it was used for format shifting, copyright infringement, and infringing format shifting [tvtropes.org] . If video providers have embraced Matroska since I last checked, please clue me in.

Re:What video providers use MKV? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45893673)

Why do you dismiss YouTube and why does it matter if a corporation has backed MKV or not? It's objectively the best container format available. I use it for everything that I record.

Columbia Pictures (1)

tepples (727027) | about 4 months ago | (#45894361)

Anonymous Coward wrote:

Why do you dismiss YouTube

Because PlayStation 3 and PlayStation 4 systems can already view YouTube even without MKV support.

why does it matter if a corporation has backed MKV or not?

Sony owns a movie studio. A company that owns a movie studio would be more likely to back a format used by other movie studios.

Re:Columbia Pictures (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45894795)

Sony owns a movie studio. A company that owns a movie studio would be more likely to back a format used by other movie studios.

no! A company like sony would be more likely to use its leverage in the consumer electronics space to force other movie studios to use whatever format they use.

Apple has a hardware division, a company that owns a hardware division would be more likely to back a connector standard used by other hardware companies... ...oh wait!

Re:Columbia Pictures (1)

tepples (727027) | about 4 months ago | (#45894807)

A company like sony would be more likely to use its leverage in the consumer electronics space to force other movie studios to use whatever format they use.

And this is why Sony took the lead in forming the Blu-ray Disc Association and promoting the format through its PlayStation 3 console. Sony and the rest of the Motion Picture Association want you using BDs, not MKVs.

Re:Columbia Pictures (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45894963)

False, if that were true they would not allow streaming of other formats either because transcoding or just using ffmpeg to change the container to one supported by the PS3 is trivial.

Re:What video providers use MKV? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45893693)

I use it when I make backup copies of my movies.

Re:What video providers use MKV? (3, Informative)

EmperorArthur (1113223) | about 4 months ago | (#45893739)

MKV has some amazingly useful and underutilized features. Everyone is (or should be) familiar with how it can do multiple audio/video/subtitle streams. It's chapter functionality is also really nice. The best and neatest thing is it's ability to pull in a separate file for a chapter. So instead of having 30 different TV show files each with the same opening and closing scene, you have those two scenes as separate files which are mixed in on the fly.

Data deduplication is a wonderful thing.

Re:What video providers use MKV? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45896487)

... with the same opening and closing scene ...

I assume you meant title, not opening scene. 'The Simpsons' would be unusual with a unique title for each episode. But many shows have the titles 3 or 5 minutes into the episode. But a closing scene? The end of a show is the credits, where the episode number, director and even line producer change on each episode.

Re:What video providers use MKV? (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | about 4 months ago | (#45896681)

The end of a show is the credits, where the episode number, director and even line producer change on each episode.

Some shows yes, some shows no. It's not unusual for Anime series to have canned credits on the way out which change in no particulars. And guess who actually uses MKV?

Re:What video providers use MKV? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45894299)

Other than YouTube WebM, which major legitimate video provider uses MKV?

People, millions of them. It's not just corporations that make videos you know.

Videos I know (1)

tepples (727027) | about 4 months ago | (#45894419)

which major legitimate video provider uses MKV?

People, millions of them. It's not just corporations that make videos you know.

Corporations make videos that I know. Individuals make videos that I don't know. Corporations have marketing departments strong enough to turn videos into videos I know.

Try 2: It's called economies of scale. I was under the impression that there was more demand for set-top devices for watching movies and television series distributed by major studios than for set-top devices for watching movies and television series self-published by individuals. Besides, services for self-publication of videos created by individuals tend to offer automatic transcoding from WebM to formats that PlayStation devices can play. For example, Google's YouTube service streams video to PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, and other devices supporting MPEG-4 AVC video. So if an individual's video goes viral on YouTube and turns into a video that people know, people can still watch it on PlayStation devices.

Re:Videos I know (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45894735)

I was under the impression that there was more demand for set-top devices for watching movies and television series distributed by major studios than for set-top devices for watching movies and television series self-published by individuals.

The two arent mutually exclusive and MKV isnt exclusive to either category. I store many of my movies in MKV format, back ups in particular.

Re:Videos I know (1)

tepples (727027) | about 4 months ago | (#45894773)

I thought [Matroska] was used for format shifting, copyright infringement, and infringing format shifting

I store many of my movies in MKV format, back ups in particular.

That's what I was referring to. I think Sony left out Matroska support because Sony owns Columbia Pictures, and from Sony's point of view, "back ups" compete unfairly with Columbia Pictures.

Re:Videos I know (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45894855)

That's what I was referring to. I think Sony left out Matroska support because Sony owns Columbia Pictures, and from Sony's point of view, "back ups" compete unfairly with Columbia Pictures.

I can just back up to a supported format or just use PS3 Media Server. If they had the agenda you propose then they wouldnt allow streaming of any non-DRM content or possibly no streaming from any unofficial sources at all.

Re:What video providers use MKV? (1)

TsuruchiBrian (2731979) | about 4 months ago | (#45896191)

Copyright infringers use mkv because it is arguably the best container format with the fewest restrictions. They have no reasons to use inferior products. The people who follow the rules are stuck with the shit that microsoft, sony, and apple feed them. They are designed to lock people into proprietary technology in order to secure revenue. These formats are designed to restrict rather than empower people.

Re:I wonder if... (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | about 4 months ago | (#45896723)

I wonder if I can use Gaikai to play a game I've always wanted on my PS3 called "watch a fucking MKV file"

You can use PS3MediaServer to "watch a fucking MKV file", but it will require your PC to be on and transcoding. Works on other players as well, including the Xbox 360. And it's free. Happy new year.

Everyone knows that v1.2 of Doom is the right ver. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45893477)

It was the first version with the "Nightmare" skill level, as well as not having yet removed the swastika room. Many, many little changes were made to Doom up until v1.9, which was the final one.

If I put in my pressed CD of Tomb Raider for Saturn today, it will run *exactly* like it did back then. Any bug fixes and changes that they made (and they did do it, a lot) later is not for me. Half-assed nostalgia sucks. I want the real deal, exactly like it was back then.

Streamed gaming is just wrong, just like "the cloud". It's somebody else's machine.

Re:Everyone knows that v1.2 of Doom is the right v (3, Informative)

vux984 (928602) | about 4 months ago | (#45893575)

It was the first version with the "Nightmare" skill level, as well as not having yet removed the swastika room. Many, many little changes were made to Doom up until v1.9, which was the final one.

Aha I just played through Doom 1 and I was damned sure when I lowered that particular patform that it formed a swastika and was confused by its slightly different shape. I wondered if I misremembered it. Thanks for clearing that up.

As for streamed games relative to versions that ship has sailed. Steam only sends you the latest version, and sure you can disable updates but what does that really get you exactly? You can't easily go backwards or install an old version later, and you usually need the new version to do any kind of multiplayer.

And the same stuff applies to disc based console games too. Sure you have the disk... 1.0 but if 1.2 was the best and 1.9 is the current... you have 1.0 or 1.9... good luck ever getting 1.2 on your xbo?? or ps??.

Even so I dislike intensely streamed games for many scenarios. But it might not be all bad for certain competitive genres if the lag is reduced enough -- as it can dramatically reduce cheating.

Playstation now Thin Client (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45893507)

"first support streaming to PS3s, PS4s, and certain Sony TV models".

So, essentially streaming current gen Playstation quality games to your home, without requiring you to purchase any Playstation hardware!? Sony is going to 0wn current gaming console wars and truly bring high-end quality gaming to the masses if Playstation Now takes off!

I can imagine this being integrated in to all sorts of non-Sony devices (mobiles, tablets, low-end laptops etc) as you would only need to port the 'thin' Playstation Now client to get the games to work.

Re:Playstation now Thin Client (1)

ackthpt (218170) | about 4 months ago | (#45893597)

"first support streaming to PS3s, PS4s, and certain Sony TV models".

So, essentially streaming current gen Playstation quality games to your home, without requiring you to purchase any Playstation hardware!? Sony is going to 0wn current gaming console wars and truly bring high-end quality gaming to the masses if Playstation Now takes off!

I can imagine this being integrated in to all sorts of non-Sony devices (mobiles, tablets, low-end laptops etc) as you would only need to port the 'thin' Playstation Now client to get the games to work.

Building the hardware, packaging it, distributing it, dealing with customer service, returns, etc. Is probably wearing on them. They're still going to have some issues with support on non-Sony hardware, though only supporting a limited list of standard drivers and hardware is a time-honored tradition.

Re:Playstation now Thin Client (1)

swilver (617741) | about 4 months ago | (#45894273)

More likely, they fear the $50 quad core android sticks with quite decent 3d specs that you can just plug into the back of your TV. Add a bluetooth controller, and game away.

Heh, heh (1)

msobkow (48369) | about 4 months ago | (#45893533)

So Sony considers the PS3 and PS4 to be "underpowered" hardware, eh? :P :P :P

Re:Heh, heh (1)

ackthpt (218170) | about 4 months ago | (#45893615)

So Sony considers the PS3 and PS4 to be "underpowered" hardware, eh? :P :P :P

Would you rather sell your game to 250 million (or more) potential gamers or only those who bought your hardware?

The timing of this is intriguing.

Cloud gaming = DRM.. (2)

blahplusplus (757119) | about 4 months ago | (#45893547)

... let's just say that right now, this is all just marketing to cover up the fact that game ownership is being undermined and taken away and they are feeding the dumb half to the population PR to shove it down their throats.

Re:Cloud gaming = DRM.. (2)

aiadot (3055455) | about 4 months ago | (#45894805)

It's the ultimate DRM. The only way to make a pirate copy of a cloud only streamed game is to rewrite the game yourself, to hack in their file servers or to physically steal one of their servers hardware with the copy. And cloud gaming is just the tip of the ice berg. Eventually everybody will have a 100Mbps+ low latency networks. It may take another decade or two but I'm sure it will happen, at least in the developed world. And when that happens, local computing machines, such as consoles and computers(and maybe even tablets and smartphones) as we know will pretty much cease to exist in the consumer mainstream marketplace. Everything will be a set up box to stream not only music and video but games and applications.

On a side note I really want that 4K projector that was announced right after the PS Now announcement.

Re:Cloud gaming = DRM.. (1)

TubeSteak (669689) | about 4 months ago | (#45895615)

Eventually everybody will have a 100Mbps+ low latency networks. It may take another decade or two but I'm sure it will happen, at least in the developed world.

Everybody, meet Rural America.
Rural America, meet Everybody.

"Everybody," for values of everybody that are less than 100%

Re:Cloud gaming = DRM.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45896857)

I'm not sure if you realize this but Rural America doesn't actually matter to the entertainment industry. Suburbanites and urbanites have used game stores within easy reach; this is who they're trying to hook.

basically, everyone [who matters] will have a 100Mbps+ low latency network.

Re:Cloud gaming = DRM.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45896483)

I don't share your optimism.

It's a lot cheaper for telcos/ISPs to pay lobbyists to keep their monopolies intact than it is to actually build out network.

Neat! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45893571)

The stupendous new video compression software that will be required to make this a reality will come in handy for fitting 1080 feature films onto a cd.

Latency (5, Insightful)

adiposity (684943) | about 4 months ago | (#45893573)

I have a hard time believing they can overcome the latency problems to my satisfaction. If you can play Frogger on this service than that's some pretty darn good latency.

Re:Latency (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45893635)

this. I don't see why people overlook this every time I hear about a streaming service...

I am sometimes surprised that the games from my youth had the best controller-change-to-pixels-moving latency that I have experienced... I'm hoping the new VR trend might raise the awareness and push the latency down again.

Re:Latency (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45894095)

Because people think the problem is bandwidth. Besides, this is for casuals, the kind of people who somehow do not find it horrible to play at 30 fps. They could be playing by email and wouldn't notice it.

Re:Latency (1)

Daniel Hoffmann (2902427) | about 4 months ago | (#45894295)

It is not the old games, it is your new LCD monitor/tv, most of them have a lot of input lag. Try to play super meat boy on your LCD and compare against an old CRT.

Re:Latency (1)

tcn99 (3489841) | about 4 months ago | (#45894591)

It is not the old games, it is your new LCD monitor/tv, most of them have a lot of input lag. Try to play super meat boy on your LCD and compare against an old CRT.

talence.

Re:Latency (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45895177)

Most LCDs are pretty good these days. LCD monitors only ever had response time lag, which have been a small fraction of time between frames at 60-80Hz (12-17ms) since the GTG 4ms models started coming out 9 years ago and the 2ms models 7 or so years ago. TVs have historically had input lag as well, occasionally even hundreds of miliseconds, as they have traditionally done more post-processing like colour correction, upscaling, etc, since consumers have been more concious about colour and crispness than they are when buying monitors but originally didn't know about lag. Recently though, since game consoles have been pushing HDTV purchase, they have gotten much, much faster.

Re:Latency (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45893719)

*Sony engineer after reading your comment* SHIT! OHFUCKOHFUCKOHFUCKOHFUCK!!! We didn't think about the latency! Dammit! *Hangs head, dusts off his resume*
Really, if you have latency issues, it's because you have a shitty connection and should consider upgrading anyway. Don't try this using satellite internet, folks.

Re:Latency (1)

adiposity (684943) | about 4 months ago | (#45893787)

I have a great connection, super low latency. Yet, somehow I doubt it can compare to the latency of the wireless signal of my PS4 controller. Packets take time to get from your house to Gaikai servers, no matter how good your connection is, and it's going to be longer than a wireless signal 10 feet away.

Re:Latency (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45895037)

You don't compare the latency. You sum it. You'd still be using your controller, right?

Re:Latency (1)

asmkm22 (1902712) | about 4 months ago | (#45893889)

There is some leniency available here. A lot of TV's have latency in the range of 40 to 80 ms, which doesn't seem like an unreasonable target for a service spitting out a constant UDP stream. Even if it's not 100% as responsive, it would probably still be more than good enough for most games.

The real question is how they plan to sell this kind of service when so many ISP's are moving towards metered service.

Re:Latency (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45894041)

The problem is that this latency is going to be added to your TV's latency.

Re:Latency (2)

timeOday (582209) | about 4 months ago | (#45894217)

Some games will be ruined latency. But then there are others, like Final Fantasy, where you only press a button every five minutes anyways.

Re: Latency (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45894959)

They've been demoing it with driving games (notorious for being sluggish high-latency) not FPS so theyâ(TM)re aware

GaaS in all of it's false glory.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45895231)

I've thought about this before, but I know I'll need something to replace video games sooner or later.

When you make the only way someone can enjoy a game indefintely is to use a video capture card, you loose a porition of the game's value. You loose it's interactivity. That will happen here.

GaaS (gaming as a service or for that matter anything as a service), has a limited lifetime, more so than a product because it requires the service to function. If the service falls out of existance, so does the game. If the assets are around someone can revive it, but if the only remnant of the game's existance is a video, recreating it is much harder and much more likely to never happen.

The way this industry is going, it will become a real VIDEO game service.
As in: "You may as well watch a Let's Play, you'll get the same enjoyment from it (minus the carpal tunnel syndrome and monthly fee), plus a version you can keep that won't change."

I want games I can play when I feel like it. NOT when some UNPLUGABLE auth server decides I can, NOT when some C-level asshole decides it makes them enough money to permit me to play it, and NOT when my ability to play the INTERACTIVE media becomes the equilvent of a DVD special feature.

I want to keep the interactivity I was promised. I don't want to see what I love, and spent most of my time growing up degraded to a mere video. I want to share that experience with others.

I guess the video game industry really is trying to make it's parent industry proud, by systematicly destroying the very thing that made it appealing, and seperated it from the other forms of entertainment in the first place. It's interactivity.

Think that's a good idea? (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about 4 months ago | (#45895743)

If you think that running everything about your game on some server and your computer only acting as some sort of display for it, ask anyone who got the original Final Fantasy XIV where Square Enix did exactly that and collect a few thoughts on how great an idea that is.

Hint: It was so great an idea that Square Enix pretty much trashed the game, redid it from scratch and just recently re-released it, about 2 (or was it 4?) years after its original release.

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