Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

LulzSec's Sabu To Be Sentenced In New York

samzenpus posted about 10 months ago | from the paying-the-discount-price dept.

Crime 135

DavidGilbert99 writes "Two and a half years after he was arrested at his New York apartment by the FBI, LulzSEc member-turned-FBI informant Hector Monsegur (aka Sabu) is set to be sentenced in the South District of New York court at 4pm local time on Monday where he could face up to 124 years in jail. However, following his cooperation with the US authorities, Monsegur is likely to get a much reduced sentence and could avoid jail completely. His sentencing has been adjourned numerous times for unknown reasons, and if the FBI have any more use for him, then we could see it delayed again."

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

He's posting Goatse for the FEDS now (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45939557)

The next goatse [goatse.cz] link you click on could be your last!

Re:He's posting Goatse for the FEDS now (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45939641)

Oh, no! It's... a generic search engine!

Elephants never forget (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45939575)

Do they drink a lot of coffee? I think so [youtube.com]

Re:Elephants never forget (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45941737)

Wrong article?

We need to make an example of him. (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45939581)

People that hide behind the internet to commit crimes need to be severely punished - it is dangerous precedent and only encourages their fantasies to do otherwise. Online crime = twice the time.

Re:We need to make an example of him. (4, Insightful)

gmuslera (3436) | about 10 months ago | (#45939709)

Meanwhile getting drunk, driving a car and actually killing 4 people doing that gets no jail time at all [huffingtonpost.com] . US law needs justice like a fish needs a bycicle.

Re:We need to make an example of him. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45939783)

Thats nice. That has absolutely nothing to do with the article and should be modded ad such.

Re:We need to make an example of him. (2)

i kan reed (749298) | about 10 months ago | (#45939833)

Precedence has no bearing on sentencing

--anonymous coward, legal expert

Re:We need to make an example of him. (1)

DeathToBill (601486) | about 10 months ago | (#45939895)

Neither does precedent.

Re:We need to make an example of him. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45939825)

What would the sentence be if you were drunk and controlling that car WITH THE INTERNET?!?!?!?

Re:We need to make an example of him. (5, Insightful)

jellomizer (103300) | about 10 months ago | (#45939829)

Justice isn't revenge.
That part is often confused. There is difference between doing a crime by accident or via neglect, then doing it with intent.
Now I am not saying I agree with the judgment for the the drunk driving. As Drunk Driving is major neglect on part of the driver, and should deserve jail time, to pinpoint the seriousness of what he did. That said, those hackers went out to cause harm on a large scale, and they did.
Now just because we personally don't like the guys they harmed, doesn't make it right.

Re:We need to make an example of him. (1)

Immerman (2627577) | about 10 months ago | (#45940105)

>Justice isn't revenge.
Actually it kind of is. The point of our justice system is manifold:
- deter future criminal acts with the threat of punishment (though we could argue as to how successful it actually is at that)
- prevent (or at least postpone) repeat offenses by restraining the perpetrators (again, actual success rates may vary)
- prevent vigilante justice by punishing the perpetrators harshly enough to satisfy those that might otherwise decide to exact revenge themselves

Really that last one is the only one that seems to fairly consistently work as intended, and it's quite important as the alternative tends to be long-standing cycles of revenge and retribution that can last for generations.

Re:We need to make an example of him. (1)

Ravaldy (2621787) | about 10 months ago | (#45941101)

I don't see the definition of revenge in your argument.

- I don't speed because I don't want the fine that comes with it - That's not revenge, it's control
- I don't drink before driving because I don't want to lose my driver's license - That's not revenge, it's control
- I don't kill people because I find it morally wrong and I would not live with myself - That's just morals I was though by my parents and surroundings

The justice system is about control, not revenge. Revenge is you slap me I slap you and that's not what the justice system is about. If it fails in some areas I can assure you is succeeds in many others.

Re:We need to make an example of him. (1)

serviscope_minor (664417) | about 10 months ago | (#45941483)

I don't see the definition of revenge in your argument.

His third point: the one about preventing vigilante justice.

Re:We need to make an example of him. (2)

Ravaldy (2621787) | about 10 months ago | (#45941873)

I understand the 3rd point but it's not revenge, its still control AKA justice.

See this scenario: Man murders neighbour's family. Revenge would be for the justice system to murder his family. Instead we punish him to avoid further damages to society. Am I wrong in still thinking there's a clear line between revenge and justice?

Re:We need to make an example of him. (1)

dryeo (100693) | about 10 months ago | (#45942035)

The justice system satisfies the revenge urge good enough that the neighbours don't kill the murderers family.

Re:We need to make an example of him. (1)

Ravaldy (2621787) | about 10 months ago | (#45942595)

So the line here is that no extra people die. Doesn't sound like revenge any more. Revenge avoided.

Re:We need to make an example of him. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45942935)

>>>Justice isn't revenge.
>>Actually it kind of is.
>I don't see the definition of revenge in your argument.

I don't think he said that justice is the exact definition of revenge. He seems to have been saying that justice can act as a surrogate for revenge.

Re:We need to make an example of him. (1)

MarkvW (1037596) | about 10 months ago | (#45943179)

Semantics.
Society aims for retribution. Revenge is a kind of retribution.

Re:We need to make an example of him. (1)

LordLimecat (1103839) | about 10 months ago | (#45942285)

Sort of forgot the namesake reason behind the justice system:
  * To render a punishment because it is deserved

I think theres a word beginning with the letter J which describes this facet.

Re:We need to make an example of him. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45940431)

It always amazes me that you as a country allow children to drive and then wonder why things go wrong. Presumably there's some logic behind not allowing them to drink legally until 21 yet they can drive at sixteen? Seriously?

Re:We need to make an example of him. (1)

Joce640k (829181) | about 10 months ago | (#45941775)

It should really be the other way around. Drink at sixteen/eighteen and not drive until they've got over the initial "wow I'm drinking!" phase (two or three years later).

Re:We need to make an example of him. (0)

gl4ss (559668) | about 10 months ago | (#45940599)

look man that's exactly the fucking problem with your fucking legal and moral system.

shooting someone in the face on your porch == accident ??

drinking 12 beers and driving?? a fucking accident??? are you fucking kidding me. that's like saying that shooting at a choir is an accident because you didn't know if it was going to kill someone.

now sabus crimes.. what was the end result? some people needed to do a bit more of work they were hired to do anyways.

Re:We need to make an example of him. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45941355)

Wow, just wow. You're such a complete idiot.

Re:We need to make an example of him. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45941301)

...but when a politician causes harm on a large scale ... well ... no problem!

Fuck your justice system, it doesn't work.

Re:We need to make an example of him. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45941587)

It is STILL virtual harm!

There is a HUUUUGE difference between killing people and pissing off some companies sysadmins trying to fix some servers. At least they are still alive, unless a silly DDoS burned down the damn mainframe and them with it!

If they had attacked hospital systems, you'd maybe have a point, but even they weren't that shitty, they had access to some NHS stuff and told them about it instead of doing anything. (apparently)

Re:We need to make an example of him. (1)

jellomizer (103300) | about 10 months ago | (#45941745)

Well lets look at an other way.

Person who does malicious (It is wrong, they knew it was wrong, that choose to do the wrong) attacks, brings harm to society, and if they get off too easy they will just keep doing it again.

Person who is negligent (It was wrong, they didn't really think about), brings harm to society, however often they will learn their lesson with a smaller punishment, and be more productive in the future.

Re:We need to make an example of him. (1)

isorox (205688) | about 10 months ago | (#45939853)

Meanwhile getting drunk, driving a car and actually killing 4 people doing that gets no jail time at all [huffingtonpost.com] . US law needs justice like a fish needs a bycicle.

This goes with pretty much every other aspect of life in america, I don't see why you're shocked.

Re:We need to make an example of him. (1)

Sarten-X (1102295) | about 10 months ago | (#45939871)

Yes... what a shame it is that we choose not to condemn our children for their mistakes, but rather sentence them to probation for a decade instead.

Re:We need to make an example of him. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45940085)

Yes... what a shame it is that we choose not to condemn our children for their mistakes, but rather sentence them to probation for a decade instead.

Sorry, but "affluenza" as a defense screams of complete bullshit and expensive lawyers to me.

Waaa, I'm rich and coddled and don't know right from wrong so I can't be held accountable for my actions.

Unless there's a corresponding "poorfluenza" defense, it's just a rich get getting off without any real consequences, using a made up medical condition, which a poor kid in the same situation would never get.

That you've never been held accountable for your actions and learned that they have consequences doesn't excuse you from the law.

Because a poor black kid who hasn't grown up with the benefit of a good education and rich parents will in no way be given any concession for the fact that they couldn't possibly know better.

This is rich kids getting a different look at justice than everybody else.

Re:We need to make an example of him. (1)

Sarten-X (1102295) | about 10 months ago | (#45940245)

A high school student I know got drunk, drove, and killed a fellow student when he decided that a living room would make a good parking spot. His public defender worked him to a five-year probation sentence and a few hundred hours of community service, as I recall.

"Affluenza" is indeed a problem, but despite the claims of the grieving father, I don't see it being a major factor in this case. Penalties for juveniles are lighter out of mercy, regardless of socioeconomic status. Where this kid's family may have helped is in convincing the judge that a trip to a rehab center (on their half-million-dollar dime) is better for society than a trip to jail.

Re:We need to make an example of him. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45940657)

Penalties for juveniles are lighter out of mercy, regardless of socioeconomic status.

Except, of course, that's completely untrue in practice, and kids from lower income locations are over-represented in the justice system.

I don't buy for a minute that this isn't just a matter of who can afford the best lawyers or get off because they can afford their own rehab.

A poor black kid would be serving a life sentence. A rich white kid gets probation.

Re:We need to make an example of him. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45940799)

You inserted color in a place it really doesn't belong. The outcome would be the same for a poor white kid, a poor chinese kid, or a poor hispanic kid. Notice what the common thread is there? Rich kids with rich parents hire rich lawyers who play golf with rich PAs and judges. That's really the bottom line. It doesn't hurt that their affluence allows them to offer an alternative (expensive rehab center) that a poor kid would not have.

Re:We need to make an example of him. (1)

RivenAleem (1590553) | about 10 months ago | (#45939873)

What you are missing is intent. The guy who gets drunk and kills people, never really meant for it to happen. Why should you punish someone for something what, when you really thing about it, was just an accident.

The amount of planning and execution that went into the lulzsec attacks shows that it was planned meticulously. It is impossible to ignore how this vicious criminal had clear intent to embarrass high ranked people.

This cannot go unpunished.

(do I need sarcasm tags?)

Re:We need to make an example of him. (0)

Viol8 (599362) | about 10 months ago | (#45940033)

"The guy who gets drunk and kills people, never really meant for it to happen. Why should you punish someone for something what, when you really thing about it, was just an accident."

Sorry, I've got to disagree here - someone who gets drunk then gets behind the wheel of a car does not just have an "accident". The drink almost certainly contributed to what happened and unless they're complete fools they knew perfectly well what can happen when you drink and drive. I have zero sympathy - if someone runs down someone when driving drunk they should be locked up and the key thrown away. There Is No Excuse.

Re:We need to make an example of him. (1)

kylemonger (686302) | about 10 months ago | (#45941279)

A wrinkle in your argument is that alcohol is a disinhibitor, affecting judgment. A sober person knows better than to get behind the wheel drunk, but a drunk person may no longer have that inhibition. You want to punish the drunk, but the sober person is the one that ends up in prison.

Re:We need to make an example of him. (1)

xelah (176252) | about 10 months ago | (#45941319)

The problem with that is that it imposes huge costs (on the driver, on the drivers family, friends, employer, etc, and on the state) whilst being totally ineffective. Nobody except a handful of murderers (who should be prosecuted as such) drives a car if they believe they're likely to or going to kill someone. Adding a criminal sentence on top doesn't change that.

If you actually want to achieve something instead of just spreading the misery then you need to make sure that drink-driving is punished with as high a probability as possible, whether anyone is harmed or not. Pouring your tax revenue in to that instead of large-scale imprisonment is a much better idea.

Re:We need to make an example of him. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45940039)

Except it wasn't "just an accident", he was drunk, he was speeding, he recklessly endangered his own life and the lives of others and 4 innocent people died. Even if he didn't mean to kill people, his irresponsible and dangerous actions were the direct cause of their deaths, not an accident.

Re:We need to make an example of him. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45940101)

What you are missing is intent. The guy who gets drunk and kills people, never really meant for it to happen.

If he didn't have the intent, why didn't he leave his car keys at home?

Re:We need to make an example of him. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45940495)

He had the intent to drive (reckless when drunk, no question about it), but not the intent to have an accident and kill someone. Is that not obvious?

Re:We need to make an example of him. (1)

gmuslera (3436) | about 10 months ago | (#45940109)

Getting drunk and driving, meaning it or not, lead to a lot of innocent people killed, in fact, twice as much as in boston bombing in this particular case. The lulzsec attacks, in the other hand, had no life victims, falls more into the definition of pranks, or if you want, graffitting, than on the definition of crimes (unless you are in a country where the national intelligence sector wants the monopoly on that kind of crimes, and actually does orders of magnitude worse crimes).

Re:We need to make an example of him. (1, Informative)

Sarten-X (1102295) | about 10 months ago | (#45940177)

I see no sarcasm. I see a valid argument.

The teenager who got drunk wasn't mature enough to be aware of the severity of his actions. That's why we have a juvenile system in the first place. Even if, while sober, he intended to get drunk and drive recklessly, he probably couldn't understand the risk involved. That's why his sentence is only 10 years' probation rather that jail time. It's a sentence that fits reasonably well with several counts of accidental manslaughter and a DWI.

On the other hand, Sabu indeed clearly set out to cause harm to others. Granted he may have considered it a noble cause, but that's beside the point. Crimes committed in the name of vigilantism are still crimes, and Sabu was mature enough to know the ramifications of his actions.

Re:We need to make an example of him. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45940395)

Yeah, and then there's this [wikipedia.org] .

Fuck you and your sympathy for affluenza. Get back with me when your pimp is threatening to kill you and your mother, and you're a teenage girl.

Re:We need to make an example of him. (2)

easyTree (1042254) | about 10 months ago | (#45941693)

The teenager who got drunk wasn't mature enough to be aware of the severity of his actions.

*Buzzer sound* Thanks for playing.

If this teenager is deemed fit to drive a deadly weapon and thus assume the responsibility for all the split-second choices he's expected to make wisely, he's fit to be held accountable for choosing to drink before driving.

Re:We need to make an example of him. (1)

Immerman (2627577) | about 10 months ago | (#45940191)

Hmm, somebody knowingly chooses to incapacitate themselves and then operate a deadly weapon in a public space? Right, no reason to punish them, it's not like they've ever done it before, or will ever do it again.

Okay, *maybe* they'll be "scared straight" by the fact that they killed someone, but they still willfully chose to pursue their own amusement over the safety of everyone around them, and that was no accident, in fact they have almost certainly made that choice time and time again before the odds caught up with them. Let them escape unscathed and what are you saying about the values of society?

Re:We need to make an example of him. (1)

citizenr (871508) | about 10 months ago | (#45942263)

What you are missing is intent. The guy who gets drunk and kills people, never really meant for it to happen.

Yes, I run around with scissors all the time, I didnt mean to pierce someones belly with it!

Re:We need to make an example of him. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45940217)

I think the fact the defendant was a minor combined with lack of intent to harm has most to do with it...

Re:We need to make an example of him. (1)

Ravaldy (2621787) | about 10 months ago | (#45941031)

Although I'm sure that drunk car driving case is not the only one I'm sure it accounts for a tiny fraction of what actually happens to drunk drivers. Thousands more drunk drivers are caught everyday and prosecuted as expected. I think picking the one stained case out of the bucket makes the justice system look far worst than it really is.

Re:We need to make an example of him. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45940081)

Making an example of some one defies the very principle of fairness. If Justice is blind, it would be to strive for the greatest fairness of all. Court room justice is done too appease society, not the victims. The victims should come first.

I support the stance of any crime that does not deprive life or liberty (kidnapping, rape, stalking, etc.), should have a maximum of 5 years of prison, and if judged beyond that a fine based on personal wealth or mandatory volunteering (not some easy high schooler volunteering either) where they can work to pay off victims.

Re:We need to make an example of him. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45940677)

This doesn't apply to pretend fairness, which is the goal in the US system.

Re: We need to make an example of him. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45940111)

Agreed wholeheartedly. This guy probably use that terrorist Linsux operating system to commit these crimes, too.

This is no time for leniency, DOJ!

The cost. And the cost! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45939635)

While I can't speak to Sabus conscience, I have to wonder if he now think cooperating was the best course of action. The FBI pretty much owns him. For all intents and purposes, he is their slave. And he still has yet to be sentenced. I don't know what a fitting punishment would have been for exposing HB Gary Federal and the other ilk, but like most other tech 'crimes', it would have been wholly unproportional.

That said, just how long can the FBI do this to someone? If they have him dead to rights, legally, open and shut case, can they legally just keep postponing sentencing like this? At what point does this become close, or even violations of the 4th and 14th amendments?

I have no love for the FBI, Sabu, or HB Gary Federal and those other scumbags out there, but what originally looked like tech caper lesson on what not to do as a 'hacker', is turning into a pristine example of how the Feds will strip away your life if you're, and use whatever there is left of you as an indentured servant.

Re:The cost. And the cost! (2)

dugancent (2616577) | about 10 months ago | (#45939797)

The legally can since he agreed to be an informant. If he told them to piss off, the case would have been over months ago.

Re:The cost. And the cost! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45939809)

Yep, like they used to say at boarding school; if you're going to bend over and spread your cheeks, better make sure you've got plenty of lube.

Re:The cost. And the cost! (1)

DeathToBill (601486) | about 10 months ago | (#45939931)

He has a choice; he can spend 124 years in prison now, if he wants.

Re:The cost. And the cost! (1)

DeathToBill (601486) | about 10 months ago | (#45939953)

I mean, it's not like they're saying, "Help us or we'll lock you up for not helping us." They're saying, "You committed a crime and the punishment for that crime is 124 years in prison. But help us and we'll see if we can shorten that a bit."

Re:The cost. And the cost! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45940343)

Uh, I hope this is ironic.

That's what *they* are saying. *They* make the rules in *their* interests and apply them similarly.

Re:The cost. And the cost! (1)

LordLimecat (1103839) | about 10 months ago | (#45942327)

They can say lots of things, that doesnt make them remotely true.

Pretty sure thats why everyone has always said "get a lawyer before saying anything". 124 years sounds farfetched, regardless of what reporters / the prosecution were saying.

More use for him? (1)

aviators99 (895782) | about 10 months ago | (#45939639)

If he's already helped enough to get from 124 years down to possibly "avoid jail completely", what will happen if they have "more use for him"? They should start paying him. A lot.

Re:More use for him? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45939729)

They should start paying him. A lot.

I think that would be the lulziest outcome for this whole saga!

Re:More use for him? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45939857)

If he's already helped enough to get from 124 years down to possibly "avoid jail completely", what will happen if they have "more use for him"?

Then I'd guess they'll suddenly remember a few reasons why his previous help wasn't helpful enough. They've got absolutely no incentive not to milk the guy dry now that they have him.

Re:More use for him? (0)

TWiTfan (2887093) | about 10 months ago | (#45940291)

A pimp doesn't pay his bitches.

Re:More use for him? (4, Insightful)

gl4ss (559668) | about 10 months ago | (#45940897)

well, that there is even debate that the possible sentence is between _zero_ years and 1.5 lifetimes should be enough to tell that something is quite fucked up in the legal system.

you shouldn't be forced to provide evidence for your prosecution and this pretty much is it - and if the crime really is so horrible as to require 124 years then one shouldn't be able to snitch out of it in the first place. fucked up on so many levels.

Re:More use for him? (1)

SethJohnson (112166) | about 10 months ago | (#45940985)

They should start paying him. A lot.

Just because he was involved in some petty computer mischief with some other hooligans does not mean he has top-of-the-job-market skills. In fact, because he got caught by the FBI by accidentally exposing his IP address would indicate he isn't an elite player. The dudes out there operating out of the FBI's reach are the ones deserving to be 'paid a lot.' They likely are being paid a lot, too.

Re:More use for him? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45941175)

I'm just saying that if whatever he gave them is worth over 100 years it must have some incredible value. Somewhat tongue in cheek.

Re:More use for him? (1)

aviators99 (895782) | about 10 months ago | (#45941195)

I'm just saying that if whatever he gave them is worth over 100 years it must have some incredible value. Somewhat tongue in cheek.

(Oops...on a different computer and forgot to login).

He needs to get a good reduction... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45939651)

...with a good reduction of sentence law enforcement will be sending a strong message to hackers breaking the law. Rat out everyone and everybody wins.

stupid sentences (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45939657)

At least if you kill a bunch of people you only get a couple of years in prison.
You just have to convince them it was a spur of the moment thing.

HEY! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45939839)

Who the fuck cares about west virginia.

Re:HEY! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45939979)

Much more than people who care about Slashdot, that's fore sure.

Aaron Swartz.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45939847)

Aaron Swartz was nailed to the cross of Big Brother. He was going to prison for over two decades and this guy got nothing?!?!?! Shows you where justice is really at.
 
RIP Aaron~!!1

Re:Aaron Swartz.... (2, Informative)

Ralph Wiggam (22354) | about 10 months ago | (#45940943)

Aaron Swartz was offered a plea deal to serve 3 months.

Re:Aaron Swartz.... (1)

gnasher719 (869701) | about 10 months ago | (#45941353)

Aaron Swartz was offered a plea deal to serve 3 months.

For admitting having committed a crime when he did something that he and many didn't consider being a crime, with the alternative offer being tens of years in jail if he dared fighting a career obsessed prosecutor. And while three months in jail isn't too bad, the consequences for your life when you come out are quite devastating.

Re:Aaron Swartz.... (2)

Ralph Wiggam (22354) | about 10 months ago | (#45941495)

The consequences for normal people going to jail are bad. Aaron Swartz would have been hailed as a hero and had his pick of jobs.

My point is that writing "he was going to prison for over two decades" is misleading at best. He was going to trial by choice. Even if he had gone to trial, realistically he would have gotten at most a year or two.

Re:Aaron Swartz.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45942909)

Aaron Swartz was offered a plea deal to serve 3 months.

For admitting having committed a crime when he did something that he and many didn't consider being a crime,

And when Mohammed Jihad Ikeeliu slit his sister's throat for going on a date with a guy she liked, he did something that he and many didn't consider being a crime. Yet a career-obsessed prosecutor tried to put him in jail for twenty years...

Re:Aaron Swartz.... (1)

PRMan (959735) | about 10 months ago | (#45943193)

For admitting to a felony, a lifetime sentence of not being hired by anyone ever.

Re:Aaron Swartz.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45943661)

Exactly! Just like Kevin Mitnick and Kevin Poulsen!
 
Oh, wait...

Update: Sabu's Sentencing Delayed (5, Informative)

DavidGilbert99 (2607235) | about 10 months ago | (#45939937)

Just in from New York - Sabu's sentencing has been delayed once again without explanation http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/lulzsecs-sabu-be-sentenced-new-york-1432049 [ibtimes.co.uk]

Re:Update: Sabu's Sentencing Delayed (1)

arisvega (1414195) | about 10 months ago | (#45940321)

Disgusting and repulsive manipulation of the legal and penal system, that borders on being plain corrupt. Consider the precedent and the example it sets.

Yet another dissapointing fail for this country.

Re:Update: Sabu's Sentencing Delayed (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45940591)

Precedent? It is an everyday activity to delay and delay as much as possible. Frequently people spend months in prison with no sign of sentencing or release in sight. People may be presumed innocent, but that wont stop the legal system from treating them like they are guilty from the start.

Re:Update: Sabu's Sentencing Delayed (1)

Vitriol+Angst (458300) | about 10 months ago | (#45943655)

So of this Sabu character had no skills, but had cooperated, they'd be a free man right now. Good thing he can't spin straw into gold;
this sentence; His sentencing has been adjourned numerous times for unknown reasons, and if the FBI have any more use for him, then we could see it delayed again. Kind of is the evidence of "carrot and stick".

When law enforcement continuously puts people in jeopardy and withholds rights or selectively prosecutes -- that is not justice. And when Prosecutors load up charges in order to scare someone into plea bargaining because they might get 120 years for some crime that may have caused no harm but we've made "hacking something evil" -- well that's a miscarriage of justice.

I'm not TRYING to lose all respect for our judicial system, but it appears more and more just to be an enforcement arm of corporate interests. Not long before people will "work off their sentences." It will be completely legal because people CHOOSE to either do 120 years for downloading a song file, or repair garments for 10 years with little compensation.

I'm not sure if that is worse or better than a debtors prison, but it's sad that someone gets more time because they are more useful.

the sentencing is meaningless. (1, Insightful)

nimbius (983462) | about 10 months ago | (#45939993)

The sentencing is a formality, a boilerplate. It is to send a message to any other would-be ne'er do wells that should you cooperate and come quietly the government will absolve you of your sins. Lulzsec for all their antics were champions of the government transparency inherent in a democracy contrived by the people and for the people.

the lesson from this is that ideas never die. Next time if you want to be a hero, you need to take a good hard look at your life and decide "is it worth it?" in Sabus case his family and children were used as leverage against him by the government to help crush dissent. its something we americans are only accustomed to hearing when informed by our respective media channels of transgressions undertaken by this years "supreme evil dictatorship." Its also worth noting that what the government was threatening Sabu with was nothing short of torture; a lifetime of silence, discipline and remorse for a crime that took no lives.

Sabu gave us hope and he taught us lessons. Edward Snowden played a chessmasters game in his defection and for it our government is left to do nothing more but ensure negative propaganda against him is dissemenated appropriately to all media outlets and further steps taken to mitigate a repeat performance. The only difference between a soviet system, the one we feared for 20 years, and our system, is that every 4 years we're burdened with the task of shuffling off to a school or church to apply our endorsement for a party. there are normally only ever two however. Neither actually operates in the service of its citizenry.

the lesson the government misses is this: just because Lulzsec is gone doesnt mean a mission wasnt accomplished or a task wasnt set into motion. more disaffected citizens and netizens will take their place. Chelsea manning, Julian Assange, and countless others will have paved the road to the hill upon which the casket of imperialist fascism is laid to rest.

Re:the sentencing is meaningless. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45940189)

Makes you sick to your core, doesn't it. The victory of 'democracy' is that the it's great at maintaining the status quo. Nothing short of banning alcohol/pizza/stupidity will get your fellow citizen to mobilize and even then, their choice is limited to "would you like to be punched or kicked?"

There's no way to get fairness within the system. The system needs to go. All appeals to change the system made within the system will fail therefore the system must be routed-around until another system is the de-facto system. Taxation seems to be a large barrier to this - we need some way to express our desire to opt-out. I guess this means outright 'criminal' tax-avoidance such that these resources can be re-allocated to the new system.

Re:the sentencing is meaningless. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45940445)

You complain that the government isn't what you want. But you don't offer any alternative other than destroy everything; sorry, that's not what I want.

Re:the sentencing is meaningless. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45941097)

You complain that the government isn't what you want. But you don't offer any alternative other than destroy everything; sorry, that's not what I want.

Where did he say to destroy anything other than "imperialist fascism"?

Re:the sentencing is meaningless. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45941413)

Where did he say to destroy anything other than "imperialist fascism"?

Depends on what the meaning of "imperialist fascism" is. Care to define it?

Re:the sentencing is meaningless. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45940539)

Sabu did nothing, and he certainly didn't give anyone "hope" or teach anyone a lesson. He's just a first class piece of sh|t who turned on his "friends" and sold them out.......no honor whats so ever. I HOPE he's in a cell with a large well hung anal rapist for the next ten years.
These "hackers" are just a blight and claim some kind of moral right to causing damage.

Re:the sentencing is meaningless. (5, Insightful)

Entropius (188861) | about 10 months ago | (#45941295)

Edward Snowden played a chessmasters game in his defection and for it our government is left to do nothing more but ensure negative propaganda against him is dissemenated appropriately to all media outlets and further steps taken to mitigate a repeat performance. The only difference between a soviet system, the one we feared for 20 years, and our system, is that every 4 years we're burdened with the task of shuffling off to a school or church to apply our endorsement for a party. there are normally only ever two however.

You're naive if you believe this.

I live in Washington DC. There are city buses with "Thank you Edward Snowden!" advertisements on the sides, so big you can read it from a city block away, paid for by his supporters. There's an advertisement in the Pentagon subway station that says "Snowden honored his oath -- honor yours. Report unethical actions." with a URL.

Compare this to what happened in the Soviet Union -- you'd never see this in Moscow in the 1960's. Yes, there are things that aren't perfect in the US. Yes, our government does some scary, scummy, tyrannical things. But just because things aren't perfect doesn't mean that we're living in a totalitarian hell.

Re:the sentencing is meaningless. (1)

csumpi (2258986) | about 10 months ago | (#45942437)

+1 (wish I had mod points)

Re:the sentencing is meaningless. (1)

Ralph Wiggam (22354) | about 10 months ago | (#45941777)

Sabu gave us hope and he taught us lessons.

Yes, his posting fake stories on PBS.com and releasing the names of all X Factor contestants was truly an inspiration to us all.

Pow (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45940093)

"You are charged with being smarter than us and exposing our corruption."

Re:Pow (1)

Ralph Wiggam (22354) | about 10 months ago | (#45940959)

If Sabu is so much smarter than the FBI, why is he sitting in a prison cell?

Re:Pow (1)

slashmojo (818930) | about 10 months ago | (#45941333)

Free rent, pizza and hot fbi chicks to interrogate him.. beats the proverbial parents basement.

Re:Pow (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45941441)

Smarter is one thing. There's still the issue of the resources, influence and power of those you face.
Sometimes it works, your country is your own again and Britain goes packing home.
Sometimes you're outnumbered and rot out in a cell.

Re:Pow (1)

PRMan (959735) | about 10 months ago | (#45943219)

Dumb people have lots and lots of guns.

Just call it life! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45941437)

Outrageous! And molesters can run with 7-10...

"His sentencing has been adjourned numerous times for unknown reasons, and if the FBI have any more use for him, then we could see it delayed again."

You explain the unknown reasons further down the line... Because the FBI had a use for him..

Re:Just call it life! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45941617)

Last time I checked, neither the government nor incompetent contractors are in danger of being molested. When they are, these horrible crimes will be punished appropriately.

up to 124 years (1)

jmcvetta (153563) | about 10 months ago | (#45941923)

What crime - any crime - justly deserves 124 years in the gulag? The court apparatus has gotten badly out of control, to the point where it no longer seems interested in maintaining even the appearance of fairness or legitimacy.

Re:up to 124 years (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45942129)

What crime - any crime - justly deserves 124 years in the gulag? The court apparatus has gotten badly out of control, to the point where it no longer seems interested in maintaining even the appearance of fairness or legitimacy.

They're just hoping he'll hang himself.

I Predict WitPro In His Future (1)

DroneWhatever (3482785) | about 10 months ago | (#45942605)

Guaranteed, there are people trying to figure out how to give him a dirt-nap, or figuring out who they can pay to do it. With the sentencing delayed, it appears he is not through making lifelong enemies. I see some witness protection in his future, if not already to some degree (the monitored phone, computer, etc...) ...I am sure the feds would know instantly if something happened or he was on the move.
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?