Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

China's Government Unveils 'China Operating System' To Great Skepticism

Soulskill posted about 9 months ago | from the search-many-of-your-favorite-words dept.

Operating Systems 223

redletterdave writes "The government of China is not too fond of foreign mobile operating systems like iOS and Android, so the country cooked up its own homegrown solution: A Linux-based, open-source operating system called the COS, or China Operating System. But consumers have every right to be skeptical; China is using the recent NSA scandal in the U.S. to push its own product. A government-approved mobile operating system, especially in China of all places, reeks of its own backdoor exploits for governmental spying."

cancel ×

223 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

US Operating System (5, Funny)

Niterios (2700835) | about 9 months ago | (#45990067)

Quick! Someone in the US pirate this and give them a taste of their own medicine!

CHINKOS? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45990129)

Quick! Someone in the US pirate this and give them a taste of their own medicine!

ChinkOS? You have to squint to see the screen. It's almost as unusable as Windows 8

Re:CHINKOS? (4, Funny)

Jeremiah Cornelius (137) | about 9 months ago | (#45990147)

It is restricted for US distribution as too secure, without NIST weak crypto or NSA backdoors.

Re:US Operating System (0)

thoughtsatthemoment (1687848) | about 9 months ago | (#45990155)

Well Linux is considered a piracy by Microsoft already. Can Microsoft drug itself?

Re:US Operating System (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45990351)

It exists. It's a Linux system that can't do anything because doing anything useful in the USA requires paying royalties to patent holders.

Sign me up for 2! (0)

deodiaus2 (980169) | about 9 months ago | (#45990089)

I have nothing to hide, but then I really know that getting cooperation from the Chinese as requested by the West is really going to be a pain in the ass. Well, its about time that I start being a pain in the ass, for up to know, that was a privilege and right of the elite.

Re:Sign me up for 2! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45990411)

Congratulations, your post reads like it was put through Google Translate.

before you go there (3, Insightful)

dlt074 (548126) | about 9 months ago | (#45990133)

remember, people in glass houses should not throw rocks. or something...

at this point i trust our current mobile OS's as much as i trust theirs. at least with theirs i have no doubts i'm being watched.

Re:before you go there (4, Funny)

Jane Q. Public (1010737) | about 9 months ago | (#45990187)

I think it's "People who throw rocks at glass houses shouldn't be stoned." Or something like that.

Re:before you go there (4, Insightful)

DigiShaman (671371) | about 9 months ago | (#45990629)

You're missing the entire point. How can the US be a "beacon of freedom" when we officially are a police state ourselves?! Effectively, our police state is now spreading (or legitimizing) totalitarianism around the world and not just from within. THAT is the problem!.

Re:before you go there (2, Funny)

Mashiki (184564) | about 9 months ago | (#45990879)

Lies. Obama stands for hope and change! It's unpossible that there is even more spying being done now under his government then there was before and the NSA and other letter agencies are acting outside the bounds of law, constitution, and bill of rights.

Re:before you go there (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45991143)

Yes, be a good little prawn and redirect the issue to party A vs party B, or puppets C, D, E vs puppets X,Y, Z.

Re:before you go there (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45991153)

Do you honestly think this would be different had Romney been President? Congress caused this corruption, while the President could have called for change he's not likely to get any until Congress wakes the hell up and realizes that we don't need to be as afraid as our defense strategy suggests. When you are ruled by fear you're never going to move forward.Until we change enough Congress critters to make this a mandate the political climate will remain as it is.

Re:before you go there (1)

dlt074 (548126) | about 9 months ago | (#45990939)

oh, i'm well aware. pots calling kettles black. or something...

Re:before you go there (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45990665)

It mentions that it is open source, so assumingly the source is available to check for said backdoors. but i guess certain groups' with an agenda prefer to just throw out onproven accussations and FUD. I trust the chinese a lot more than the americans at this point, never heard of the chinese secretly going into other countries to get a foreign national. china at least keeps their misdeeds mostly in china and bordering countries

Re:before you go there (1)

EndlessNameless (673105) | about 9 months ago | (#45991029)

I trust the chinese a lot more than the americans at this point, never heard of the chinese secretly going into other countries to get a foreign national. china at least keeps their misdeeds mostly in china and bordering countries

Idiot.

Re:before you go there (1)

M. Baranczak (726671) | about 9 months ago | (#45990859)

It's more a question of who will be watching you.

Let me put it this way: if the Chinese government knows about the meth lab in my attic, what the fuck do I care? I'm not in China.

Re:before you go there (5, Insightful)

mrchaotica (681592) | about 9 months ago | (#45990915)

I would trust theirs more. I may be watched by both, but at least China doesn't have police power over me.

You download for four hours. You go now! (1, Troll)

sandbagger (654585) | about 9 months ago | (#45990137)

Given how compromised everything else seems to be what could they be expected to do except to try to have something they can trust. However, that doesn't mean it will ever see the light of day beyond their own governmental computers.

Linux? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45990151)

An entire nation of a billion people that actually manufacture essentially all electronics where this might conceivably be used, and they use Linux? The government of China can't come up with something of their own?

Re:Linux? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45990221)

They took a lesson in "appropriation" from Apple, and BSD*cough*iOS.

Re:Linux? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45990447)

I guarantee you that if they had, your post would be questioning why they didn't just use a proven base.

Re:Linux? (1)

thoughtsatthemoment (1687848) | about 9 months ago | (#45990601)

So you accept the premise that something on top of Linux or another kernel is not something of their own? How about Android or OSX?

Re:Linux? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45990523)

Why should they bother? Linux is there already, and is free. No need to compete, no need to make their own os.

Red Flag Linux (2)

unixisc (2429386) | about 9 months ago | (#45990745)

And they have their own - Red Flag Linux [redflag-linux.com] . Just stage it on top of whatever they run, and they're off to the races

Take away SCO (1)

unixisc (2429386) | about 9 months ago | (#45990697)

Why don't they simply buy SCO, I mean Ximian? Take it all, put UnixWare on Loongson or Allwinner in Beijing University and then put together something from scratch? Make the localization Mandarin only, and then run it? Yeah, I know that SCO was a dog in its day, but on today's hardware, and 2GB RAM, it should fly. Just put it on the Loongson, and watch it fly.

Since it's proprietary, they can build all the backdoors they want. They can drop all the SCO lawsuits in return for being granted rights to all patents that SCO's enemies own. In fact, since it's in China, they needn't do even that. They'll have their own OS that the West will want no part of. In fact, make SCO stand for Standardized Chinese OS, instead of Santa Cruz Operations.

Re:Linux? (5, Insightful)

amicusNYCL (1538833) | about 9 months ago | (#45990743)

An entire nation of a billion people that actually manufacture essentially all electronics where this might conceivably be used, and they use Linux? The government of China can't come up with something of their own?

I'm pretty sure that one of the reasons that Linux exists is so that everyone who wants to develop an operating system doesn't need to start from scratch. Whether the government of China is going to contribute anything back to Linux is another question. Even so, Linux does not belong to any government or nation. It was started by a Finnish guy who now lives in America and has contributors all over the world. If there's ever been a single piece of software that more or less belongs to everyone, it's Linux.

Re:Linux? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45990791)

An entire nation of a billion people that actually manufacture essentially all electronics where this might conceivably be used, and they use Linux? The government of China can't come up with something of their own?

Believe it or not, Finland is still one of the extremely high trust countries worldwide. I guess that is part of their reasoning.

Re:Linux? (1)

gmuslera (3436) | about 9 months ago | (#45990857)

It runs from embedded small systems to supercomputers, so is generic enough to run in most of their existing computers/cellphones/watches/supercomputers/etc. You can start from zero, but it will take time and won't be as tested to be safe as it is Linux today. And they had already contributed to the linux kernel, and had already their own state sponsored distributions [wired.co.uk] . Open source (if you can compile it, and verify that it is really what is in the source) ensures not only that foreing hands hadn't modified it, but that neither national hands did it, if they really don't want to trust in anyone.

Ahem! (4, Insightful)

TheP4st (1164315) | about 9 months ago | (#45990167)


"A government-approved mobile operating system, especially in China of all places, reeks of its own backdoor exploits for governmental spying"
As opposed to the reek of the daily NSA exploits published by Bruce Schneier?
In difference from for example the RSA back door this is open source , so the code is there to review for potential back doors for anyone with the necessary knowledge. I can imagine quite a few will do so only to be able and point fingers and say "see, see! they do it too!" and would be little surprised if there is a government sponsored team doing just that as I write with the hope there will be findings to detract attention from scandals closer to home.

Re:Ahem! (1)

Marxist Hacker 42 (638312) | about 9 months ago | (#45990505)

All they need is to create a wag the dog incident by invading Taiwan.

Re:Ahem! (1)

thoughtsatthemoment (1687848) | about 9 months ago | (#45990753)

Or simply lend money to Bush for him to invade Iraq.

Re:Ahem! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45990909)

Touché.

Re:Ahem! (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45990585)

"As opposed to the reek of the daily NSA exploits published by Bruce Schneier? "

No, as "in addition to" you twat. The US Govt being evil doesn't change the fact that the Chinese govt is a thousand times worse.

Re:Ahem! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45990931)

Please use the metric system to perform the measure and then compare. I'm guessing using common USA's units is confusing you.

Re:Ahem! (1)

murdocj (543661) | about 9 months ago | (#45991043)

You're asking people to break out of Slashthink... pretty unlikely.

Re:Ahem! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45990761)

Yup, China comes out looking better and better compared to America (well, actually America is the one dragging itself further down towards the level we expect from china) But at least China is pretty honest and unapologetic about it

As opposed to (5, Insightful)

JavaLord (680960) | about 9 months ago | (#45990171)

A government-approved mobile operating system, especially in China of all places, reeks of its own backdoor exploits for governmental spying."

As opposed to an operating system created by an American corporation, which reeks of its own backdoor exploits for governmental spying.

I'll take both! (1)

DigitAl56K (805623) | about 9 months ago | (#45990731)

I wouldn't be complaining, this is great! Diff all the common code. Hopefully you'll turn up the Chinese backdoors readily, and maybe they've also been smart enough to close some of the US ones, identifying those also.

Both for firewalls too? (2)

ron_ivi (607351) | about 9 months ago | (#45990951)

And wonder if it makes sense to use as a firewall in front of a US-friendly one.

Seems a pair of firewalls ought to be configurable so unless *both* have a back door you're safe.

Re:As opposed to (4, Interesting)

girlintraining (1395911) | about 9 months ago | (#45990739)

As opposed to an operating system created by an American corporation, which reeks of its own backdoor exploits for governmental spying.

As opposed to an operating system created by a [somewhere you don't live] corporation, which reeks of...

I think we're getting mired in our own nationalism instead of looking objectively at the facts. Mandarin and Spanish are both spoken more in the world than English. And China has billions of people. We only have millions. Why, exactly, doesn't it make sense for them to develop their own operating system? We're getting stuck on this circle-jerk about the NSA, privacy, etc., but the argument being made here is primarily economic, not political. And economically, it makes sense; The only question on my mind is... why did it take them so long to start?

Re:As opposed to (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45990793)

The American way to dominate things is through brutish, ham-fisted actions. "It sure would be a shame if we had to liberate your country next year." as the joke goes. What China does is corporate espionage. They will and do steal all the source code, engineering documents, and any other intellectual property they can and put your business in the dirt by undercutting you on your own work.

Between the two, at least you can see the Americans coming and can do something about it by causing a public ruckus or getting a congresscritter in your pocket. With China there is no recourse except to desperately try to convince people that paying ten times as much for the same product is in their best interests.

Re:As opposed to (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45990819)

In addition to not as opposed to. Stop trying to create these strawmen arguments.

Re:As opposed to (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45990973)

opposed - (of two or more things) contrasting or conflicting with each other.

It's Open Source at least... (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45990189)

When all the Shell Infrastructure Windows servers got shut down at Venezuela directly from Redmond after the compayy's subsidiary there got nationalized, we learned a valuable lesson: closed source software is an error, at least at any government instances.

At least the Chinese OS is open source, so it could be audited by the users. I'm not saying they can't place a piece of code in the mobile phones or computers after the community audited it, but to me it looks like a step in the right direction...

Re:It's Open Source at least... (1)

unixisc (2429386) | about 9 months ago | (#45990795)

There is nothing in China forcing the government there to abide by the GPL. They can close all the source if they want. What is RMS gonna do - go to Tiananmen Square?

Re:It's Open Source at least... (1)

murdocj (543661) | about 9 months ago | (#45991055)

Well, if he does, we know how that's going to turn out. Oh yeah, guess the Chinese government is worse than the United States.

DavrOS (2)

Sponge Bath (413667) | about 9 months ago | (#45990195)

Endorsed by Daleks everywhere as an alternative to NSA tainted American products!

Re:DavrOS (2)

Roger W Moore (538166) | about 9 months ago | (#45990573)

The Daleks dropped that when they found that DR-DOS made them run a lot faster.

Re:DavrOS (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45990673)

A)bort, R)etry, E)xterminate?

The Great Back Door of China (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45990197)

Great Wall...Great Firewall...etc

Re:The Great Back Door of China (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45990311)

Instead of deploying patches to close security holes, they'll deploy patches to open security holes.

Audit? (2)

twocows (1216842) | about 9 months ago | (#45990199)

If it's open source, then just audit it. Find what pieces are different in what ways and review those sections. I guess that's easier said than done, but still.

Re:Audit? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45990247)

Who says china will open source it? What power do you think the GPL has in China?

Re:Audit? (1)

NuAngel (732572) | about 9 months ago | (#45990371)

The article here on Slashdot you should've just read before commenting says "open sourced."

Re:Audit? (1)

unixisc (2429386) | about 9 months ago | (#45990823)

Open sourced as in - it's easily available for the Chicoms to copy. Once they're done, they don't have to make any of the source code of the end product public. They can just release it as closed source and all their phone makers will just have to swallow it.

Re:Audit? (1)

war4peace (1628283) | about 9 months ago | (#45990249)

What I wanted to say as well. Slashdot conveniently ignored the term. Let me put it here again: OPEN SOURCED.

Should be on low-end tablets in months (2)

Animats (122034) | about 9 months ago | (#45990217)

This should start appearing on low-end tablets within months. Especially the ones that use the Allwinner CPU. 100% China-controlled technology at last.

Where do you download the source?

So, is this based on SELinux? (1)

Eunuchswear (210685) | about 9 months ago | (#45990253)

A government-approved mobile operating system, especially in China of all places, reeks of its own backdoor exploits for governmental spying.

"Especially in China"

Did Cold Fjord write the blurb?

Re:So, is this based on SELinux? (0)

cold fjord (826450) | about 9 months ago | (#45990663)

No, it was redletterdave, as noted in the header.

I might have included this bit.

.... Chinese officials have begun wiretapping each other’s bedrooms and showers out of distrust. Even China’s president was wiretapped by a member of the country’s own Communist Party. -- Meet COS [readwrite.com]

Should be a fascinating read (3, Interesting)

Weaselmancer (533834) | about 9 months ago | (#45990259)

Can't wait to have a look at it. We know there will be backdoors and other goodies in it. Should be absolutely amazing to see what it monitors, how it does so, whom it calls home to, and so on. Let's see what China considers an ideal piece of software.

I think this will be a powerfully interesting piece of software to study. We'll learn a lot from it, I'll bet.

Will there be a chinese Snowden? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45990263)

I guess the main difference between China and the US is that the US has the lure whistleblowers back for punishment while I suspect that China is much more efficient in remediating leaks.

Eh. (4, Interesting)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 9 months ago | (#45990267)

I'm skeptical of this system because it is at least the second (after 'Red Flag', possibly more of them than that, certainly a lot more if you count 'nationalist linux forks' generally, rather than just Chinese ones), and past attempts havent exactly set the world on fire with their success.

More generally, though, I'm skeptical largely because (at the present time) you basically have to shop like Richard Stallman (and possibly even harder than he does, if some TAO-level group has designs on you) to have a chance in hell to even see all the security-relevant software/firmware that goes into your system in anything other than a mixture of OSS components, proprietary userspace applications, and firmware blobs (often doing not-even-a-debugger-knows-what on the various totally undocumented application-specific processors hanging off various busses). So long as that's the case, even if your OS is FOSS and you've audited the hell out of it (odds are you haven't) and you have a robust security model designed to keep applications in check (obligatory XKCD [xkcd.com] , odds are that it will all come to nothing because your lowballing vendor has a BSP full of proprietary shit, your GPU vendor won't offer anything but a binary blob unless you abduct the entire Board's families and threaten to return them one slice at a time, and you don't have a clue what various surprisingly punchy microcontrollers and very-low-end ARM cores attached to dangerously useful (and mostly unexamined) busses are doing in their own memory spaces.

If Team China manages to solve these problems(especially acute in cellphones because the cellular baseband which makes wifi interfaces look like GNU-paradise by comparison in terms of openness and robustness), then I'll be damn interested, no matter how much their 'yet another shitty fork of something that they could have just audited' linux-derivate OS bores me. If they don't manage to solve them, or don't even bother, that this is just some balance-of-trade enthusiast crying into his beer about Android's ubiquity in the Chinese smartphone market, who cares?

Re:Eh. (1)

jimmydevice (699057) | about 9 months ago | (#45990675)

Do you write for Cracked?

Re:Eh. (1)

RabidReindeer (2625839) | about 9 months ago | (#45990755)

I'm skeptical of this system because it is at least the second (after 'Red Flag', possibly more of them than that, certainly a lot more if you count 'nationalist linux forks' generally, rather than just Chinese ones), and past attempts havent exactly set the world on fire with their success.

More generally, though, I'm skeptical largely because (at the present time) you basically have to shop like Richard Stallman (and possibly even harder than he does, if some TAO-level group has designs on you) to have a chance in hell to even see all the security-relevant software/firmware that goes into your system in anything other than a mixture of OSS components, proprietary userspace applications, and firmware blobs (often doing not-even-a-debugger-knows-what on the various totally undocumented application-specific processors hanging off various busses). So long as that's the case, even if your OS is FOSS and you've audited the hell out of it (odds are you haven't) and you have a robust security model designed to keep applications in check (obligatory XKCD [xkcd.com] , odds are that it will all come to nothing because your lowballing vendor has a BSP full of proprietary shit, your GPU vendor won't offer anything but a binary blob unless you abduct the entire Board's families and threaten to return them one slice at a time, and you don't have a clue what various surprisingly punchy microcontrollers and very-low-end ARM cores attached to dangerously useful (and mostly unexamined) busses are doing in their own memory spaces.

They have an advantage we don't, though.

They're the ones doing the hardware manufacturing.

If Team China manages to solve these problems(especially acute in cellphones because the cellular baseband which makes wifi interfaces look like GNU-paradise by comparison in terms of openness and robustness), then I'll be damn interested, no matter how much their 'yet another shitty fork of something that they could have just audited' linux-derivate OS bores me. If they don't manage to solve them, or don't even bother, that this is just some balance-of-trade enthusiast crying into his beer about Android's ubiquity in the Chinese smartphone market, who cares?

Red Flag Linux (2)

game kid (805301) | about 9 months ago | (#45990285)

I thought this sounded like a dupe*, but Red Flag Linux [wikipedia.org] is apparently not a Chinese government project as I began to think for some reason**.

*On China's part, not Slashdot's!

**Like, totally not because of the name or anything. ;)

isn't this more like china's linux distro? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45990291)

isn't this more like china's linux distro? calling it China's Operating System is implying that they wrote everything from scratch.

Re:isn't this more like china's linux distro? (1)

Tough Love (215404) | about 9 months ago | (#45990475)

calling it China's Operating System is implying that they wrote everything from scratch.

Sort of like Google calling it Android OS implies they wrote everything from scratch?

Linux is for Communists! (2)

smooth wombat (796938) | about 9 months ago | (#45990305)

Here we have absolute proof that Linux is for Communists. Just as Steve Ballmer said. Only a commie would use free software to write code so they don't have to pay the evil capitalists their 30 pieces of silver.

Re:Linux is for Communists! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45990641)

Well smooth Wombat, you have obviously never lived in a real communist society. If you had then you might be a little wiser before spouting forth a load of total drivel that could have been written by anyone of a thousand people in Redmond.

Perhaps you should also learn a little about the history of Communism and its roots in Victorian England, especially the alcove in a Public(private to you foreigners) school Library(that is older than the USA) in Manchester. Hardly a hot bed of communism.
You sound like a throwback to the McCarthy Era.
Have you ever....

No I have not been a member of the communist party. My politics are a lot to the right of that but I respect the rights of people to have different views and beliefs.

Not everyone in this world is a six-pack Nascar fan from Red-Neck Country (or the Aussie equivalent).

 

MaOS (5, Funny)

orledrat (3490981) | about 9 months ago | (#45990343)

I'm not upgrading. I'm sticking with MaOS. I like my standards open.

Re:MaOS (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45990477)

what

Re:MaOS (3, Informative)

broken_chaos (1188549) | about 9 months ago | (#45990637)

It's a wordplay on "Mao", the guy famous for kickstarting communism in China.

Re:MaOS (1)

wasteoid (1897370) | about 9 months ago | (#45990923)

Your Ma is like your OS - open.

What happened to Kylin? (2)

NuAngel (732572) | about 9 months ago | (#45990349)

So there was that Kylin Linux distro, then Ubuntu Kylin, and "Red Flag Linux," and now... a mobile one? Interesting key word, though, is that the article calls this an Open Source mobile OS. User "war4peace" noticed this, as well. I'll be the first to admit that I am *NOT* a coder, but how many backdoors can you hide in something that is open source? I'm sure it's large and it would take time to go through, but if it is open source it *could* be gone through, right?

Re:What happened to Kylin? (2)

Jeremi (14640) | about 9 months ago | (#45990517)

how many backdoors can you hide in something that is open source?

Quite a few, if you're clever (although of course you only need one). Code that introduces a vulnerability can be very subtle [mit.edu] -- so subtle that even if someone discovers it, they are likely to think it is a bug rather than something that was placed there deliberately.

on the other side of the world (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45990383)

I would prefer to be spied on by a country on the other side of the world than the one I'm living in. I'm never going to pay a visit over there, and they have no cooperation in data-exchange with the country I'm living in. I do not affect them (except possibly buying there cheap things on eBay), I'm just a number. And hence, they have no effect on me. Except possibly being able to provide more targeted ads for the stuff I like to buy from them. A bit like google. My home country (or allied "friends") spying on me however...

Re:on the other side of the world (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45990715)

But, they DO affect you. People wonder why the economy gets into crunches, jobs go away, and if there are jobs, it is barista level or minimum wage. So, that country on the other side of the world you rather have spy on you has its citizens working, getting free college, while you and your friends are trying to compete for minimum wage scraps.

Look at the US solar industry. China came in, slurped critical manufacturing plans, ran out... six months later, panels were coming onto US shores for cheaper than the rare earth cost. Congress did nothing (although when Harley was in trouble, they made sure that anything anywhere near an imported bike was extremely taxed as punishment. Maybe Harley is far more critical to US national security than energy independence, but what do I know.)

So, go and laugh, cheer on people who make China and Russia stronger, and US/European interests weaker. It is only your job, your future, and your kids' hope of a future that you will lose. If you want your daughters and sons to be treated like Roma when they have to emigrate to another country to survive, then be my guest. I prefer to have the country I live in retain a sustainable economy, so my kids don't have to emigrate as refugees like my ancestors did from Germany.

Re:on the other side of the world (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45991017)

Seems like there's actually two requirements here:

1. China/Russia not displacing/replacing all our industrial infrastructure our future generations depend on for jobs.

2. The American citizens' own country giving a shit if China/Russia displaces all our industrial infrastructure, if a next-quarter profit can be made in the stock market by eviscerating it.

#1 we really don't have control over, and have limited arguments against in the context of "free trade". #2 we don't have control over either, since the non-1% are entirely functionally disenfranchised. So, what are you suggesting? A country that at least in terms of stated objectives, cares for the welfare of its people even when that doesn't happen to also be the optimal way to maximize shareholder value? I think you'll find that more in China than in America, at this point.

captcha: hopefuls

Re:on the other side of the world (1)

0123456 (636235) | about 9 months ago | (#45991073)

You could try a country where the government has minimal power to interfere with people creating and running those businesses, rather than sucking up a large part of the economic output and funneling it to their cronies.

Any call for the government to 'protect us' will just make it bigger and more intrusive, and thereby make things worse.

Re:on the other side of the world (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45991179)

Your premise seems to be precisely what China is currently economically disproving.

"My personal economic maximization" simply isn't synonymous with "social economic maximization", particularly with respect to those "future generations" being discussed. I'm not saying we need a proverbial "5 Year Plan", but we need SOME plan.

captcha: extends

input system (2)

phantomfive (622387) | about 9 months ago | (#45990391)

If they get foreign language input systems working in Linux, then who cares? At that point they've already improved the community, which is the beauty of open source.

May Not be Open Source (3, Informative)

ZombieBraintrust (1685608) | about 9 months ago | (#45990403)

According to zdnet.com it is not open source. However, due to "safety concerns", COS is not an open source system, revealed a 21cbh.com report.

If so then they are likely in non complience with the licenses involved.

Re:May Not be Open Source (4, Funny)

0123456 (636235) | about 9 months ago | (#45990455)

If so then they are likely in non complience with the licenses involved.

I am shocked that the Chinese government would not comply with software licenses.

Re:May Not be Open Source (1)

ZombieBraintrust (1685608) | about 9 months ago | (#45990813)

Of course it could just be a mix of open source and closed source similer to google. The OS is open but the email, phone, and chat services are closed source. With strict goverment control of apps on the market.

Re:May Not be Open Source (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45991177)

I, a single person have written functional OSes for 3 different hardware platforms, it's not hard, the have the resources of China at their disposal. No need to violate any license.

Second, they could have simply bought the rights from someone.

Finally, and most important...

Last I checked, china wasn't bound by US laws, and we know for a fact they don't give a shit about US copyright laws. The GPL only works because we allow it to and support it legally. Sue them for using your precious Linux ... They'll care, really they will ...

Re: May Not be Open Source (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45990465)

Just wait till they get a sternly written letter from Stallman! That will fix it!

Can I ... (1)

PPH (736903) | about 9 months ago | (#45990413)

... get the source, compile it and load it onto a bare hardware phone?

My Linux is better than you Linux (2)

Tough Love (215404) | about 9 months ago | (#45990451)

The debate is no longer about whether Linux should rule the world, but which flavor should.

Root.. (1)

sqorbit (3387991) | about 9 months ago | (#45990559)

Just another OS for someone to release a root kit for.

Yes, but does it run Linux? (1)

davidwr (791652) | about 9 months ago | (#45990587)

Yes, but only if this guy [wikipedia.org] orders it to.

Can only fool once (0)

Trachman (3499895) | about 9 months ago | (#45990645)

Microsoft should have known that once you sell your soul to NSA, it ain't coming back. That is the price for having dual loyalties to the customers. It will be not the Chinese government who will be punishing Microsoft and will not be buying MS products. Be sure that European Union, Russia, Brazil and other countries will lead the open source movement. It will be shareholders who will punish Microsoft.

Any technical details? (1)

RamiKro (3019255) | about 9 months ago | (#45990671)

Is it an Android fork or Gnu/Linux?

If Americans use it... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45990799)

If American use it, and Chinese use SELinux then maybe the NSA will have to ask the Chinese for dirt on us, and the Chinese will have to ask the NSA for dirt on their own people. Yeah I know it wouldn't work that way; but it's funny to think about it.

Polish Competitor (1)

jrmech (2714225) | about 9 months ago | (#45990815)

I heard there was Polish OS a few years ago, too. Not too widely used, but it had a similar acronym....

COS PR Campaign (1)

DarthVain (724186) | about 9 months ago | (#45990889)

Step 1: Make Bill Cosby your spokesperson
Step 2: Bippin and a Bobbin, flippin and a floppen, pudden pops!
Step 3: PROFIT!!!

choices for when buying connected gear (2)

TheGratefulNet (143330) | about 9 months ago | (#45991183)

lets ask ourselves: who is going to spy on us with this gear?

if in the US and its the US spying, that's bad. they can do damage to you.

if in the US and its china spying, do I really care all that much? I would avoid using any payment methods but as for worrying about what I would say online, I'd think that the foreign governments would not really be able to do much to me no matter what I say.

your own local government has the ability to thoroughly ruin your life. to me, that makes them the stronger danger to my privacy and freedom.

Annnd then? (0)

BlazingATrail (3112385) | about 9 months ago | (#45991193)

This new OS has a very easy to use command line. % I'd like the house special chicken and two egg rolls Computer: ANNNDD THHHHEN ? % no and then! Computer: AAAAANDD THHEN?

China OS reeks of backdoor exploits? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45991209)

"A government-approved mobile operating system, especially in China of all places, reeks of its own backdoor exploits for governmental spying"

And companies are only allowed to install NSA approved backdoors ...

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?