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Canadian Music Industry Calls For Internet Regulation, Website Blocking

Unknown Lamer posted about 6 months ago | from the copyright-trumps-human-rights dept.

Canada 198

An anonymous reader writes "Canadian law professor Michael Geist reports that the Canadian arm of the RIAA is calling for new Internet regulation, including website blocking and search result manipulation. While the Canadian music industry experienced increased digital sales last year (sales declined in the U.S.) and the Ontario government is handing out tens of millions of tax dollars to the industry, the industry now wants the government to step in with website blocking and ordering search companies to change their results to focus on iTunes and other sales sites."

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198 comments

Drowns CRIA in poutine. (4, Insightful)

Chas (5144) | about 6 months ago | (#46036169)

So, basically a gun to people's heads while the other hand rifles through their pockets.

Greed. The one thing that's in truly infinite supply.

Re:Drowns CRIA in poutine. (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46036219)

You've just described government as a whole. All government is a gun to your head with a hand in your pocket.

Re:Drowns CRIA in poutine. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46036343)

And now the government is being used to give out welfare to scummy corporations that wouldn't succeed in a real free market where you can't have monopolies on ideas. What a surprise!

Re:Drowns CRIA in poutine. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46036953)

Please. There is no such thing as a legal free market in any of the industrialized nations.

Hmm (1)

ADRA (37398) | about 6 months ago | (#46036177)

Google: buy back to black

Seems that search engines somehow work without out already... who woulda thunk it.

What about youtube? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46036187)

I get most of my mp3s here: http://www.youtube-mp3.org/ [youtube-mp3.org]

Re:What about youtube? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46036987)

The quality is so eeeeeeeeeewwwwwwwwwwww! Better off using cassette tapes.

Buying music? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46036199)

Do people really still do that? All the music I listen to is 100% free to download.

Discovering free to download music (1)

tepples (727027) | about 6 months ago | (#46036563)

All the music I listen to is 100% free to download.

How do people usually find out about these recording artists who offer their own professional-quality music for download at no charge? Virtually none of the music played on FCC-licensed U.S. FM stations is free as in speech or free as in beer, and I doubt CRTC-licensed Canadian FM stations differ.

Re:Discovering free to download music (3, Informative)

Em Adespoton (792954) | about 6 months ago | (#46036789)

All the music I listen to is 100% free to download.

How do people usually find out about these recording artists who offer their own professional-quality music for download at no charge? Virtually none of the music played on FCC-licensed U.S. FM stations is free as in speech or free as in beer, and I doubt CRTC-licensed Canadian FM stations differ.

Well... there you have it. People who are still limiting themselves to FM transmissions are missing out.

For the rest of us, new music is promoted through social media and "if you listen to this, you might also like...." on streaming radio. Just using Google does amazingly well too.

And then, of course, there's the fact that CBC Radio 2 picks up a lot of independent music, and provides links to the band's websites on their site, along with a historical playlist so you can find the songs/artists you listened to earlier in the day on FM, if you're into that.

Streaming in a vehicle (1)

tepples (727027) | about 6 months ago | (#46036877)

Well... there you have it. People who are still limiting themselves to FM transmissions are missing out.

Then how should people listen to anything other than FM in a car or bus without having to pay hundreds of dollars per year to a cellular carrier for a mobile data plan?

Re:Streaming in a vehicle (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46037041)

I haven't used FM radio in a decade, and I don't use a data connection for music either. I just have an extensive collection, and it went from CD players to mp3 CDs to mp3-player variants and USB drives in the car deck.

Sure, then I have to preemptively go out and research and look around for good music that I actually like (*gasp*). I know this isn't for everyone though, as clearly there is a huge market for telling people what they like.

Re:Streaming in a vehicle (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46037525)

There's a wonderful device, perhaps a decade and a half old, commonly called an MP3 player (although more accurately termed a mobile digital media player (M-DMP), portable media player (PMP), or similar). It's a portable electronic device with which one may store and play back digitally-encoded audio tracks, including music, podcasts, audio books, etc. These devices can store between hours and months of audio, depending on their storage capacity, and can often offer continuous playback for a full day before needing to be recharged (since many are equipped with rechargeable batteries).

The device will, however, only play tracks that you load onto it, so it's a little weak in terms of music discovery (unless you load it with tracks by artists that you consider candidates for addition to your listening collection). You can use it to evaluate artists recommended to you by your friends, by your "friends", by strangers, by "strangers", or by rutting rhinoceroses, or by any other person, place, thing, or idea with which/whom you communicate, provided you load the music onto the device ahead of time. Because gasp there are other ways to get noise into your ear-holes besides reception of frequency-modulated radio waves or by use of a mobile's data plan. Who'da thunk it?

Re:Discovering free to download music (2)

pr0fessor (1940368) | about 6 months ago | (#46037499)

I've not purchased anything from a major recording label in years mostly because I can hear it on the radio or stream services {not really free you have to put up with advertising but no cash out of my pocket}

I have purchased music from indie artists or local band that I wanted to support. I also listen to them much more frequently than radio or major label bands. Most of the major label acts don't appeal to me.

Even if piracy stopped today I don't think their sales would go up, those people pirating music are probably not going to be their customer anyway. They'll just flip through the channels on the radio or ad supported streaming services until they find something that fills the time.

Re:Buying music? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46036721)

Pirating music is why we have so much crap like Justin Bieber and other junk bands, and no more Nine Inch Nails or other creative artists.

In the past, a band could look ugly as all get-go, but they didn't have to exist by how they looked or how they played on stage. They went to the studio, cranked out an album, and they could exist on the proceeds.

Now, because of pirates just like you, the good bands that might not have the stage presence are swept to the side for musically-challenged entertainers who put on a good show, but do little else.

So, thank you for hosing the real musicians, and allowing people who are just performers and rely on others to put the words in their mouths and notes in their instruments to prevail.

I highly recommend visiting SXSW in Austin. You will see that the overall quality of music in general has hit the skids. What once was a four-piece band with people who produced their own material, looped their own tracks, and had an extensive gigging rig is now a hipster banging away on an acoustic guitar about his cat, perhaps an iPad plugged in for a backing track.

The good thing is that all isn't lost... Go to Europe, and a lot of bands end up becoming house acts at various venues, and that is how good music is surviving this dark age.

Re:Buying music? (-1, Flamebait)

ButchDeLoria (2772751) | about 6 months ago | (#46036861)

Nine Inch Nails is shit.

Re: Buying music? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46036865)

Pirates that are PAYING for streaming services are somehow afoul of the law? Let me know how this legislation works for you... noone could possibly visit a site that isnt listed in Google right?

Re: Buying music? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46036917)

It's implied that if they are pirates, they aren't paying.

Re:Buying music? (2)

SirGeek (120712) | about 6 months ago | (#46036879)

Sorry, but your argument is wrong.

Most "Owned" Bands (i.e. on a Major Record Label) do NOT make their money on the CD Sales. They make a pittance. They make most (if not ALL their money) on tours.The reason we have things like JB, is they sell their souls to the music industry and allow them to be totally manipulated and peroform cookie cutter music that you can't tell from the other 20 performers of that style of music.

As for the "ugly" comment, You're telling me that a performer like Ted Nutgent.. I mean Nugent can't sell tickets ? Sadly he does.

If you want REAL musicians, Look up an Indie artist. There are a bunch. And some are even geeky. You have Marian Call [mariancall.com] , The Double Clicks [thedoubleclicks.com] , Molly Lewis [tumblr.com] , Jonathan Coulton [jonathancoulton.com] , Paul and Storm [paulandstorm.com] , and others.... Support them and support their music.

Re:Buying music? (0)

tepples (727027) | about 6 months ago | (#46036921)

If you want REAL musicians, Look up an Indie artist.

I was under the impression that doing so required either A. having Internet in your car ($$$ per year) or B. having the time to sit around on your computer and find indie artists that FM radio won't play.

Re:Buying music? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46037625)

Well, yes, if you don't want to be spoonfed shit from the radio, then you'll have to invest the time to find less-promoted artists that you enjoy. If I've got the choice to listen to top-40 or to spend a couple hours a month finding more obscure music that's more to my tastes, then I know which choice I'm making.

From the other side, I'm already paying $$$/year to have the phone I like, since that phone isn't available from any carrier without a data plan. I may as well use it, since I'm paying for it anyhow.

Re:Buying music? (1)

Merk42 (1906718) | about 6 months ago | (#46036941)

Sorry, but your argument is wrong.

Most "Owned" Bands (i.e. on a Major Record Label) do NOT make their money on the CD Sales. They make a pittance. They make most (if not ALL their money) on tours.

Isn't that what GP is saying? Since they make the majority of money on tours, studios focus on bands who "put on a good show, but do little else"

Re:Buying music? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46037633)

Nope. Studios make the money from record sales. They would prefer musicians that never left the studio.
The artists seldom make folding money from onything other than touring and merchandise sales.

Re:Buying music? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46037161)

I never said anything about pirating music. I'm talking about the plethora of artists now uploading their music to sites like soundcloud. You can listen to it, and download it for absolutely no charge. In fact, most times they aren't even SELLING their music, just giving it away.

I call for (2)

easyTree (1042254) | about 6 months ago | (#46036217)

a magic pony that lays gold eggs.

Re:I call for (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46037245)

You can get your magic pony that lays gold eggs. Unfortunately is vanishes as soon as you wake up, along with all the gold eggs.

Re:I call for (1)

easyTree (1042254) | about 6 months ago | (#46037399)

Then I will lobby to make it illegal to not provide me with a magic golden-egg-laying pony each time I wake.

Good luck with that (4, Insightful)

sandbagger (654585) | about 6 months ago | (#46036221)

They get a tax subsidy in Canada, new copyright legislation protecting broken-in-principle DRM and now they want search engines -- which make more money than them -- to be subservient to their industry. Wonderful.

Re:Good luck with that (4, Insightful)

Dunbal (464142) | about 6 months ago | (#46036477)

No one is buying blank cassette tapes or CD-ROM/DVD's anymore. Waaaaa we need more money!

Re:Good luck with that (1)

Sockatume (732728) | about 6 months ago | (#46036523)

Don't they get money for MP3 player and memory card sales? It strikes me that nothing will make people think piracy is okay, like being billed for the music in advance through a tax on the device they buy.

Re:Good luck with that (1)

Guspaz (556486) | about 6 months ago | (#46036809)

According to the CBSA: Yes, there is a tax on iPods. Or a tariff, more precisely.

Re:Good luck with that (2)

Em Adespoton (792954) | about 6 months ago | (#46036825)

Don't they get money for MP3 player and memory card sales? It strikes me that nothing will make people think piracy is okay, like being billed for the music in advance through a tax on the device they buy.

The point is, if you're paying the tariff in advance and it's legal to copy, it's not piracy; it's legal copying of music available under copyright law to citizens of the country (and is already paid for through kickbacks to ASCAP et al). The people who lose out are the indy artists who aren't signed up to get a cut of the tariff -- because their material IS being pirated, but nobody realizes it. Of course, these are the groups who usually give away their music for free and make money in other ways.

Re:Good luck with that (4, Funny)

Jason Levine (196982) | about 6 months ago | (#46036901)

Don't you see? Any money you don't spend on new music from them is a lost sale. Those lost sales mean you must be pirating music instead because you wouldn't be using the money for food or something nonessential when you could use it to buy more music. Lost sales like that will cause the record executives to starve to death (after they go through their caviar stockpile). How dare you not open your wallets and empty the contents into the recording industry's bank accounts!

another colony of the corepirate nazi band of 85 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46036229)

2nd choice promised land candidates? again the ordinary folks have no notion of what the crown royals are up to? another colony of the corepirate nazi band of 85? honest abe; http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=honest%20abe&sm=3

They need to keep teens apart too (4, Interesting)

hawguy (1600213) | about 6 months ago | (#46036351)

If they are really worried about piracy, they need to keep teens apart -- one of my teenaged relatives has a half dozen or so usb drives laying around with songs he's traded with various friends -- She's got a music library of over 10,000 songs (though oddly, she only seems to listen to 10 of those, over and over again). They trade entire music libraries at school, thousands of songs at a time. So no matter how tightly they lock down the internet, music will continue to be traded.

I'm a lost cause, the mainstream industry isn't likely to get much of my money no matter what they do. I'm well out of my teen years, and about the only albums I buy are for small regional artists, and I usually get them at concerts or direct from the artists. I already own several hundred CD's from the groups I listened to in my teens and 20's, and rarely hear a mainstream group I want to buy a CD from today -- Pandora and Spotify are good enough.

Re:They need to keep teens apart too (2)

wasteoid (1897370) | about 6 months ago | (#46036429)

They should eat graham crackers to quell their unhealthy carnal urges.

Just make music trading paraphernalia illegal (4, Funny)

denis-The-menace (471988) | about 6 months ago | (#46036475)

Just make music trading paraphernalia illegal

This is the TRUE solution. CD/DVDs, USB sticks and drives, computers.
All of if has to go. Shutdown the libraries. Burn the contents.

We MUST go back to the 50s where all music came from the good old music labels. They know good music and how to make it.

The church of Profits commands you!
It for the good of unborn artists in the future. /S

Re:Just make music trading paraphernalia illegal (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46036621)

We MUST go back to the 50s where all music came from the good old music labels. They know good music and how to make it.

And in a world where everyone has the storage and processing power of a supercomputer in their pockets, mandate that all content must be streamed from the cloud.

Re:Just make music trading paraphernalia illegal (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46036659)

Oh, please A simpler saner solution is to forbid all Digital Analog convertors. There's a digital world and there's an analog world and am no censor.

Re:They need to keep teens apart too (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46036585)

And if she is Canadian, sharing that music would be perfectly legal in accordance with the Copyright Act, so long as you are not providing for "distribution". They charge a fee on media to compensate.

Re:They need to keep teens apart too (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46036707)

I've said this years ago. As hard disk space increases sneakernet will eventually outpace the Internet once again. It's amazing how we went from

Sneakernet because Internet connections were too slow

to

Internet because Internet connections became faster

back to

Sneakernet because disk space is dirt cheap now and trying to search for your songs one by one is inconvenient vs just copying thousands of songs from your friends and having them copy all your songs onto a portable USB flash drive you take around with you anyways.

Now a days you can buy a 128 GB USB flash drive for a few bucks and stick more music on it than you would ever want to listen to. and this problem will only get worse. There is no stopping music piracy, the future will destroy copy'right' in this regard even if the law is still around as a mere formality. The cost of appreciably enforcing these laws to any reasonable extent will be far greater than the benefits gained. You can't put everyone in jail.

Re:They need to keep teens apart too (1)

ButchDeLoria (2772751) | about 6 months ago | (#46036889)

American here, we're 1/9th of the way there.

Re:They need to keep teens apart too (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46037649)

What if the police start launching sting operations against sneakernet pirates? The problem with the sneakernet is that there's no anonymity.

Those canucks are really pissing me off now (1)

bazmail (764941) | about 6 months ago | (#46036359)

As broken as Americas copyright law is, Canada seems to be engaging their retard-afterburners and are really going for it.

Re:Those canucks are really pissing me off now (3, Insightful)

Nemyst (1383049) | about 6 months ago | (#46036457)

Don't put us all in the same basket please. There's the Harper government and the idiots who elected them, and then there's the rest of us who just want them to fuck off and leave the country alone before we turn into the US but worse. There was a time where Canada was a leader in diplomacy, environment, science, copyright, social policies and much more. Now we're slaves to whatever industry Harper is licking the butt of at the time, any other consideration (such as the well-being of the citizens under his charge or the reputation of Canada outside of his cabinet) be damned.

Re:Those canucks are really pissing me off now (5, Insightful)

TWiTfan (2887093) | about 6 months ago | (#46036529)

Now you know how U.S. Americans feel when everyone lumps us all together, as if we're all cool with the corporatist pricks who get elected these days.

Re:Those canucks are really pissing me off now (2)

Dixie_Flatline (5077) | about 6 months ago | (#46036635)

It's slightly easier to bag on you because of the differences in our electoral systems. ~65-70% of the people that voted didn't vote for the current Conservative government. The Parliamentary system coupled with first-past-the-post voting means that highly contested ridings can go to someone that only got 30-40% of the vote.

But being lumped together isn't any fun, I'll grant you. Good luck.

Approval; gerrymandering (1)

tepples (727027) | about 6 months ago | (#46036743)

The Parliamentary system coupled with first-past-the-post voting means that highly contested ridings can go to someone that only got 30-40% of the vote.

First-past-the-post can be made harder to game by simply allowing voters to vote for multiple candidates [wikipedia.org] . Or would you prefer that districts/ridings be constructed such that they're not really contested, as became common with the recent Redistricting Majority Project round of gerrymandering in the United States?

Re:Approval; gerrymandering (1)

Dixie_Flatline (5077) | about 6 months ago | (#46037645)

I'm not saying there aren't solutions, but the simplistic method that we use is obviously critically flawed. :)

Re:Those canucks are really pissing me off now (1)

Em Adespoton (792954) | about 6 months ago | (#46037305)

It's slightly easier to bag on you because of the differences in our electoral systems. ~65-70% of the people that voted didn't vote for the current Conservative government. The Parliamentary system coupled with first-past-the-post voting means that highly contested ridings can go to someone that only got 30-40% of the vote.

But being lumped together isn't any fun, I'll grant you. Good luck.

Plus, in the US, taking up arms in revolution against corrupt government is enshrined in the constitution -- in Canada, we have to ask the Queen of England to intervene.

Re:Those canucks are really pissing me off now (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46036905)

Now you know how U.S. Americans feel when everyone lumps us all together, as if we're all cool with the corporatist pricks who get elected these days.

Not really. The popular meme is that both major US parties are full of corporatist pricks, only different industries

So even if you didn't elect one bunch of corporatist pricks, chances are you wanted to elect the other bunch.

Re:Those canucks are really pissing me off now (1)

the eric conspiracy (20178) | about 6 months ago | (#46037463)

> U.S. Americans

I hadn't really thought of it before, I'm so used to just Americans as the inhabitants of the USA, but you are right - there are also Canadian Americans, Mexican Americans, Costa Rican Americans, Panamanian Americans, Bolivian Americans etc as well all living in their respective countries.

Re:Those canucks are really pissing me off now (1)

Nethemas the Great (909900) | about 6 months ago | (#46036795)

Are you sure you're a Canadian? You don't sound very polite.

Re:Those canucks are really pissing me off now (2)

johnnys (592333) | about 6 months ago | (#46037301)

At least have the decency to mention the important thing the Harper government got RIGHT: Limiting the scope of how hard the CRIA can screw the individual downloader. We see HUGE penalties in the USA for poor people getting nailed for "copyright infringement" but at least in Canada Harper has limited that to $5,000CDN for "all infringements involved" so no-one has to lose their house over downloading a few songs to listen to at home. That is a HUGE benefit and protection to the average person here in Canada who just wants to listen to music. It also forces the music labels to leave the music lovers alone and go after the commercial infringers, since they can't exploit individuals as a "cash cow".

Also note that these copyright changes are all REQUIRED under international agreements that Canada is party to, so you can blame Harper all you want but no-one else could have done any different. IMHO, I think he got the best deal possible out of a crappy situation!

See: http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca... [justice.gc.ca]

(b) in a sum of not less than $100 and not more than $5,000 that the court considers just, with respect to all infringements involved in the proceedings for all works or other subject-matter, if the infringements are for non-commercial purposes.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com... [theglobeandmail.com]

Re:Those canucks are really pissing me off now (1)

Nerdfest (867930) | about 6 months ago | (#46037491)

It's true, the recent changes were not completely bad, although they removed some fair use and made digital lock circumvention illegal.

Re:Those canucks are really pissing me off now (2)

gstoddart (321705) | about 6 months ago | (#46036487)

You know, we're not exactly happy about it either.

It's the Canadian copyright lobby, which is an arm of the US copyright lobby, petitioning government for a pony.

Once in Canada they get their pony, they can then go back to the US or to other countries and demand the same kind of pony.

Since US foreign policy and trade policy largely lets industry writes the briefings and the legislation (often quite literally), this is essentially US industries writing laws for their own benefit.

So, from our perspective, the US copyright lobby is really pissing us off, and it's another example of a business friendly government giving industry sweetheart deals stacked in their favor, and acting like it's a benefit for consumers and a win for the free market -- when in fact it's neither.

Re:Those canucks are really pissing me off now (1)

the eric conspiracy (20178) | about 6 months ago | (#46037353)

Then do your duty to humanity and don't give them a pony.

> US copyright lobby is really pissing us off

Us too.

Private Copying Levy (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46036373)

Canadians still pay a 24 cent fee (used to be higher) on each CD-R sold (not per spindle) because of a private copying levy the CRIA lobbied for. In theory the levy is paid out to musicians as compensation for the assumed music piracy that every CD-R will inevitably be used for, and the CRIA gets to pick who those musicians are. This fee doesn't apply to DVD-Rs, ironically making them a much cheaper alternative. Fortunately their multiple attempts at getting a fee for MP3 players didn't go through.

Re:Private Copying Levy (1)

Guspaz (556486) | about 6 months ago | (#46036903)

Fortunately their multiple attempts at getting a fee for MP3 players didn't go through.

Yes and no: a 5% tariff on MP3 players is currently in place, to be effective as of 2015. Luckily the exception is pretty large; if the MP3 player can be connected to a computer, they're exempt from the tariff.

Re:Private Copying Levy (1)

mark-t (151149) | about 6 months ago | (#46037345)

As you note, the levy is for private copying. However, thanks to the most recent copyright legislation which was pushed through by our current government, Canadians are now paying that levy for something that they can no longer legally do if the work they wanted to copy utilized any kind of technological protection measure which might prevent it from simply being copied too casually.... since such measures are becoming increasingly prevalent as content increasingly moves towards an all-digital format, the levy will end up being for something that Canadians are no longer practically able to legally do, since the laws regarding TPMs do not contain any exception for private copying (even though the government that proposed the bill before it became law was repeatedly asked to insert such an exception into the bill by its opponents).

What's wrong with the Canadian music industry? (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46036389)

One word: Bieber

Re:What's wrong with the Canadian music industry? (1, Funny)

Farmer Tim (530755) | about 6 months ago | (#46036673)

You’re being unreasonably kind to Celine Dion and Bryan Adams.

Re:What's wrong with the Canadian music industry? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46037731)

He's far more famous in the US where he currently resides then he is here.

Cute to see the CLUELESS trying to hijack laws ... (3, Insightful)

UnknownSoldier (67820) | about 6 months ago | (#46036393)

From the Fine Article ...

Music is becoming a hobby, not a career.

Translation: "We can no longer buy popularity with pop music and no longer manufacture the latest fad of boy-bands or girl-bands. These indie bands can do it cheaper, and that cuts us, the middle man, out of the picture! We don't get our fair share from YouTube, etc."

"Oh Noes! People are using this internet to freely share things and we aren't getting our cut ! Must maintain artificial scarcity of the source else we can't over-charge for numbers! Suckers! Er, mean, 'customers'."

Never mind the fact that the easier it is for people to find music, video, that is akin to free advertising.

Nah, let's shit on our potential customers and treat them like pseudo-thieves because "How dare they share something they value with someone else!"

Only cowards use censorship

Re:Cute to see the CLUELESS trying to hijack laws (0)

dkleinsc (563838) | about 6 months ago | (#46036751)

Music has always been more of a hobby than a career. Most musicians are either amateurs who play or sing for fun (or in some cases academic credit), or semi-pros who get paid to perform or teach but can't afford to quit their day job. And most professional musicians' primary source of income is teaching amateur musicians.

A 3-4 person bar band that is getting at least $2000 a week (and not spending it on booze or drugs or hookers) is more-or-less staying afloat. Everyone else is either broke or has another source of income.

But on the upside, being a good semi-pro musician will get you laid.

Re:Cute to see the CLUELESS trying to hijack laws (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46037717)

$2000/week
- transportation expenses.
- cost of gear
/ 3-4 people

= less than working at McDonald's.

Bootlegging is killing the music industry and making it much more difficult for musicians to make money, and if you look at a golden age of indie music you're probably thinking of the late 80s - late 90s. With the rise of Napster coinciding with the end.

Kiddie porn to porn to IP (1, Insightful)

TWiTfan (2887093) | about 6 months ago | (#46036417)

It was the plan all along. First you establish the ability to block and censor. Then you find an excuse no one can NOT support (stopping kiddie porn). Then you move on to the obvious next level (we must protect our children from porn in general!), then intellectual property (it's illegal!!).

Next up, blocking whistleblower sites and newspapers that publish whistleblower revelations.

Soon enough, all political speech that challenges or threatens the government status quo.

Canada? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46036447)

Wait, I thought we were only allowed to shit on the US around here. I know Canada isn't the land of milk and honey that we all know Europe to be (practically perfect in every way!), or does Canada get dragged down because of their geographic proximity? Please help me: I feel I'm dropping out of the hive mind around here.

Re:Canada? (1)

compro01 (777531) | about 6 months ago | (#46036577)

We get dragged down because the Conservatism pandemic jumped the border back in 2006.

Not a Canadian... (4, Interesting)

Voyager529 (1363959) | about 6 months ago | (#46036469)

...but I thought that the Canadian RIAA had a tax tacked onto blank storage media that was supposed to help pay for the pirated tracks. Did that disappear?

Re:Not a Canadian... (1, Troll)

gstoddart (321705) | about 6 months ago | (#46036695)

Of course not. They want their cake, and to be able to eat it to.

Actually, they want our cake, and they want the government to entrench their business mode, and generally spoil the internet to benefit them.

This is buggy-whip makers trying to get laws passed which says the roads need to be taxed and regulated to support their business model.

And, history tells me, it's US lobbying companies footing some of the bill for this, and 'helpfully' writing the wish-list of things they'd like to see. And, then once they've forced someone else to adopt it, they go back to US lawmakers and say "see, we're lagging behind on regulations like everybody else".

The power of political lobbying is the problem here, because wealthy organizations pay for better access to politicians than the rest of us get.

Re:Not a Canadian... (0)

Nemyst (1383049) | about 6 months ago | (#46036731)

Nah, but they didn't manage to get a tax on internet connections too so they're pissed.

Re:Not a Canadian... (1)

Nethemas the Great (909900) | about 6 months ago | (#46036851)

Just the people buying blank CDs. Blank CDs are a pretty niche thing anymore and certainly not normally used to trade music. Regardless, it's a give an inch take a mile mentality.

Re:Not a Canadian... $800 ipod nano (1)

onkelonkel (560274) | about 6 months ago | (#46037157)

There is a levy on blank CDs. (I can't remember the last time I bought a spindle of CDs). It used to be about 30 cents a disk, which is insane considering bulk CD-R cost about 25 cents. At least they didn't go full retard and charge for MP3 players. At the time the levy was introduced, MP3 players were about 128 to 256 MB capacity and I can recall fees of $5 to $10 on MP3 players (based on 5 cents/Megabyte) being considered. The music industry would love to collect $800 on a 16GB ipod nano.

Sad, petty individuals undeserving of attention (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46036471)

Why do these people think they deserve to be treated so specially? They're not the only ones who have their work "thieved" (hell, they're considered thieves by a lot of the people they're supposed to represent), and every concession we've made for them in Canada hasn't been enough. At some point you have to accept reality, and stop trying to control it.

Re:Sad, petty individuals undeserving of attention (2)

Em Adespoton (792954) | about 6 months ago | (#46037351)

Why do these people think they deserve to be treated so specially? They're not the only ones who have their work "thieved" (hell, they're considered thieves by a lot of the people they're supposed to represent), and every concession we've made for them in Canada hasn't been enough. At some point you have to accept reality, and stop trying to control it.

Look at it the other way... they keep asking for another pony, and more often than not, they get it. Why would they want to stop asking?

hobby? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46036499)

From the article itself: "Music is becoming a hobby, not a career." Music has become a consumer goods, not an art.

If hobby music is good enough (2)

tepples (727027) | about 6 months ago | (#46036767)

If tools have improved such that hobby music can equal the songwriting and production quality of career music, then perhaps the public would benefit if music were to become a hobby.

RIAA = pig stuck in mud, dying (3, Insightful)

acidradio (659704) | about 6 months ago | (#46036507)

The recording industry, the biggest bunch of middleman thieves ever, is finally losing its free ride. You don't NEED a record company anymore, you can be your own! If they didn't think they were dying they wouldn't be violently throwing tantrums everywhere - lobbying for really radical unilateral changes to the law, suing regular everyday people for "piracy" to the point of bankruptcy, hassling bars/restaurants (usually mom and pop operations, barely making it as it is) into paying commercial licensing fees for music, etc.

A band now can cut their own album and sell it on iTunes, Amazon or a host of other music sites and retain a lot more of the proceeds. Back in the day even large, famous acts were getting stiffed by the record companies! Thanks in part to the way that record companies have pushed musicians up against the wall now for many years the market is now to a point where the artists don't even make money on the albums themselves. Instead they make the money at concerts, both on tickets and on merchandise. An artist now almost has to *give away* the music (many seem to - look on Youtube for all of the "full album" videos) as the loss leader in hopes of getting people to their concert. Artists can post samples on Youtube (at no cost) to drive sales and exposure. The record company middleman has less and less importance in a marketplace like this.

I'm glad to see that more and more musicians are standing up for themselves and taking advantage of the offerings that don't involve RIAA-related entities. If the entity doesn't add value they shouldn't have a role in the marketplace anymore.

Promoting music; avoiding accidental infringement (2)

tepples (727027) | about 6 months ago | (#46036831)

You don't NEED a record company anymore, you can be your own!

If a recording artist is his own label, how would he go about getting his music onto FM or satellite radio or onto the playlists of popular Internet streaming music providers, such as Pandora, Spotify, and foreign counterparts? And how should a songwriter make sure that he didn't accidentally copy parts of a popular song when writing his own? (See, for example, the "My Sweet Lord" lawsuit.) RIAA-affiliated labels add value through promotion and through their affiliated music publishers.

Re:RIAA = pig stuck in mud, dying (1)

Jason Levine (196982) | about 6 months ago | (#46036965)

I still think there's a future for labels, but it's a much reduced one. Instead of the label being the end-all-and-be-all for the band, it will be a glorified advertising agency that a band contracts with. All copyrights will remain with the band and the band will be able to leave for another label and retain their old music. The label will make money as the band makes money. Of course, they won't make nearly as much and this means many record label executives will lose jobs. Excuse me while I mourn their loss... ok, that's enough.

Re:RIAA = pig stuck in mud, dying (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46037303)

They still have to kiss Clear Channel's ass if they want any kind of national exposure or airplay.

What about highways? (2, Interesting)

Dcnjoe60 (682885) | about 6 months ago | (#46036547)

If Canada feels it's important to block public access to the internet because a few commit illegal acts, then why wouldn't they block public access to the highways for the same reason?

If we start/continue to block/disallow everything that can be used for unlawful purposes, pretty soon, everything will be blocked/disallowed.

Media Tax (3, Insightful)

MCROnline (1027312) | about 6 months ago | (#46036567)

I assume that if all these governments from around the globe have successfully 'blocked' all these nasty web sites offering pirated content, then it stands to reason that the recording industries tax on blank media no longer would be appropriate or relevant, so we can have cheaper blank media again?

Re:Media Tax (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46037263)

Nothing is as permanent as a temporary tax.

Canadian what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46036575)

On my Internet the headline reads "Canadian [blocked] Calls For Internet Regulation, Website Blocking".

speaking of lowest motive invasions genocide (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46036607)

we do not http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gqUvhDG7x2E our fake history & heritage is known wwworld wide now (notice the deluge of hired goon storm typers) so pretense is useless again. when byrds have radios in their butts there'll be music in the air at all times? free the innocent stem cells. never a better time to consider ourselves in relation to each other & our new clear options....

I am an artist. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46036639)

I am an artist. I am part of the Canadian music INDUSTRY and I am NOT in favor of what CRIA (Canadian RIAA) is proposing.

Re:I am an artist. (1)

JockTroll (996521) | about 6 months ago | (#46037085)

Well, Nazi factories were full of innocent workers too. Some of them were even slaves. Does not mean they didn't get bombed, torn to pieces, burned to death or buried alive under the rubble. You're not in the same position as those workers in Nazi factories, which would have made you an accessory to the Nazi war machine. You're a legitimate military target. However, rest assured: nothing will ever happen to you or the CRIA: nobody has the courage, the strength or the purpose to do anything against them and therefore against you. Sleep well: the MPAA/RIAA/CRIA has won.

Re:I am an artist. (2)

Em Adespoton (792954) | about 6 months ago | (#46037519)

I am part of the Canadian music HOBBY and I'm not in favour either. The fact that you said "favor" makes me doubt whether you're really Canadian, but I know many musicians, both inside and outside the industry, who aren't in favour. In general, the CRIA is understood to represent RIAA interests and only represent the Canadian recording industry as a hobby themselves.

Two Words (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46036821)

F**k Off

Hooray for state censorship! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46036869)

This is all a round-about way for the Canadian government to gain state-controlled censorship tools over their citizen's view of the internet and nothing more than that. The excuse of 'piracy' is merely that, a rather benign sounding reason to build up these systems of control. I'm sure there's people in the media industry who genuinely believe they are fighting for their own profits and needs, but they're merely pawns for people who have even less respectable reasons than 'we need to stop piracy'. What they really want to stop is unfettered access to information and these organizations provide them a rather convenient excuse.

and I'm calling for the (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46037313)

EXECU.......nah, wait, I'd probably get vanned for that

Block sites? (0)

SilverBlade2k (1005695) | about 6 months ago | (#46037337)

IF ISP's can block certain websites, then why are they now blocking the more disgusting sites out there like child porn sites, or sites similar? I would think that the government would want to eliminate those from the face of the earth before wasting their time on trying to block music and movie pirating sites..

Canadian music INDUSTRY ? Next joke ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46037427)

Anyone in the music biz knows that anything worthwhile
happens in the US, even when the artists are Canadian.

Blame Canada (USA Putz) (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46037433)

In other news, Edward Snowden through his attorney in Moscow has asked Federal Russian Agencies for protection as threats against his life mount.

Likely, the Obama Junta with DoD, DoJ and DoS backing will use the Sochi Olympic Games as a cover for infiltrating USA Green Beret and Seal Team personnel, through NATO countries Olympic programs into Russia to kill Snowden.

Each infiltration will have at least one Green Beret or Seal implant who will on arrival leave the NATO Country Olympic Team and rendezvous in Moscow to hunt then kill Snowden.

President Obama, following his remarks on the NSA disclosures and his proposed adjustments signed a secret executive order directing all USA resources toward the killing of Edward Snowden during the Sochi Olympic Games to be held in Russia.

Jews... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46037573)

Need I say more? Try doing some Google searching on the subject, before the JEWS wipe out all websites that tell you the truth about what they are doing to us all...

No spines and no thinking abilities (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46037585)

Frankly it can't come soon enough that these idiots lose their entire audience by trying to sell crap that's not even as good as what you can get for free online, by treating their paying customers as badly as thieves, and by trying to get everyone to pay to cover for the people who will NEVER pay to begin with.

Their death can't come soon enough, given how eager they seem to be to kill themselves. Fewer and fewer people I know give a rat's ass about music anymore, unless they're young, drunk, and at a party or club (precisely the kinds of people who don't want to pay these days).

More regulation? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46037711)

I thought corporations believed in less regulation.

Freeloaders (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46037715)

Their problem seems to be that their pay sites don't get the top rankings in google search. So instead of paying google for "sponsored results" they want to censor all other results.

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