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What do we get? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46080221)

More international warez! And malware!

Re:What do we get? (1)

xclr8r (658786) | about 6 months ago | (#46080237)

More international warez! And malware!

Or the prequel to Firefly.

Re:What do we get? (4, Interesting)

rosseloh (3408453) | about 6 months ago | (#46080635)

More international warez! And malware!

I don't know if this deserves to be negative - I had to do a really dumb malware removal on a POS system, and the majority of the trouble was coming from software that was branded Baidu. Here in the middle of the great plains, at a Mexican Restaraunt.

It had several hidden portions that hijacked the browser, too, not to mention popup ads. Most cleanup tools didn't work on it, either - we ended up getting down and dirty with it and removing things manually as we discovered them.

I don't really know why I mention this, apart from to say that I dislike Baidu and I'm not at all surprised at any accusation of them being malware-ridden.

Re:What do we get? (1)

Krojack (575051) | about 6 months ago | (#46081541)

So what you're saying is we should block anything Baidu at our front door now while we can? I'm all for it.

Re:What do we get? (1)

Guppy06 (410832) | about 6 months ago | (#46081071)

But Baidu is less likely to be in bed with the NSA, so there's that.

Re:What do we get? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46081655)

^ c'mon +1 Funny right?

Captcha: comply

Re: What do we get? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46086057)

this is about having the same power. ther si one button. until now 9nl usa nsa could puwh it. now the chinese want it. if I need to chose? id dumpnthe meme radioactive russian overloard meme -aka- chernobyl (distration of radioactive new york city from 3 miles away) and embrace a much more older thousand year CULTURE.

Question (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46080233)

Will that be with or without censorship?

Re:Question U.S. censorship? (2)

pigsycyberbully (3450203) | about 6 months ago | (#46080591)

Will that be with or without censorship?

You mean like the U.S. censorship? and U.S. Internet providers self-censorship? Let's put this straight. What country kills people randomly. What country locks people up indefinitely without trial. What country tortures prisoners. What country spies on its own people monitoring everything its people do. The answer is the U.S., people in glass houses should not throw stones. 1980s: There’s been a bomb in Oxford Street! and in the days before Al Qaeda, there is only one prime suspect. The U.S.A. sponsoring terrorist as always. The U.S.A has sponsored every terrorist organisation in the world. One way or another throughout its short history the U.S. has attempted to kill you. http://www.the-philosopher.co.... [the-philosopher.co.uk]

Re:Question U.S. censorship? (1)

ed1023 (861273) | about 6 months ago | (#46080649)

I think that your logic can be applied to any major power absolute power corrupts absolutely. http://yro.slashdot.org/story/... [slashdot.org]

Re:Question U.S. censorship? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46080787)

And yet none of this has to do with censorship. I think you have some sort of grudge or personal problem and are trying to fit in a rant about your favorite rage topics in this unrelated context.

Re:Question U.S. censorship? (1)

pigsycyberbully (3450203) | about 6 months ago | (#46081417)

And yet none of this has to do with censorship. I think you have some sort of grudge or personal problem and are trying to fit in a rant about your favorite rage topics in this unrelated context.

Do not worry about it you have a problem processing information. You have a learning disability the brain is a very complex organ, learning is a very complex process. Because of your problems I have simplified it. Thoughts lead to words. Words lead to actions they are all interlinked this means my previous post makes sense to people who can link them mentally. Try this it is less complicated do you understand it? Communications Decency Act (CDA) Trading with the Enemy Act. The Protecting Cyberspace as a National Asset Act. Combating Online Infringement and Counterfeits Act (COICA). Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA). Protect Intellectual Property Act (PIPA). Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (CISPA). Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA). Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act (CALEA) Mass surveillance. Before somebody writes about it being too simplified it's not meant for you.. It's for him.

Re:Question U.S. censorship? (2)

LostInTaiwan (837924) | about 6 months ago | (#46081853)

Yes, US is guilty of everything you listed. We can talk about all the past and present failed US policies. We can openly criticize the policies. For those of us who live in the US, we can even openly organize to remove the politicians in questions. That is the difference between democratic nations and authoritarian countries.

Like the old saying, "The price of liberty is eternal vigilance." US has certainly slipped but it is still far ahead of China is terms of basic civil rights for all.

Re:Question U.S. censorship? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46083775)

Kills people randomly? Hardly random at all but can be unfortunate for any innocent bystanders standing around near the target. At least the US targets someone usually worthy of the effort instead of setting off bombs to indiscriminately kill everyone in the vicinity. Locks up people without a trial? I can only assume you are talking about Guantanamo? The inmates there were collected during military actions that in another era would have been called war. They could have all been shot out of hand if the military applied the Vienna conventions definition but instead they were treated as POW's and POW's normally get detained until the end of hostilities which has not really happened yet. And bemoaning the treatment of a few hundred militants to describe US actions is petty and very short sighted. And your ideology on the world is more dangerous than any terrorist ideology. You complain about the effects rather than the cause which ultimately means you excuse the actions of the people committing the acts that generated the response.

Re:Question (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46083885)

Considering it still doesn't includes the UK I think it's without.

Hey! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46080243)

Wanna get some money? Learn mandarin and get a job! Instead of using Chinese zombified computers to steal bitcoins though my poor sweet mother's infected windows XP while she used the dahm Facebook!

Wrong targets (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46080307)

They need to open in Saudi Arabia, Iran and North Korea.

"Search giant" (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46080345)

They are only a giant because their government does not allow anyone else to participate. I'm not sure how they are hoping to translate this business model to countries not ruled by paranoid kleptocracies.

Re:"Search giant" (1)

H3lldr0p (40304) | about 6 months ago | (#46080441)

Well that's easy. They'll work to help the government turn into one of those. They have experience in maintaining one, how much harder to could it be to offer up the same "services" to those in power and sit back to watch the results?

the united states isn't a paranoid kleptocracy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46083663)

Americans can't really bash Chinese internet surveillance with a straight face any more...

Re:"Search giant" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46085085)

Hey, anyone can participate as long as they don't participate too well and follow the arbitrary, randomly changing foreign business rules to a letter.

Competition (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46080417)

I for one welcome any more competition in the search engine arena.

Good news (1)

It doesn't come easy (695416) | about 6 months ago | (#46080461)

Google needs competition. That being said, tried all three sites with the same results: "The connection to the server was reset while the page was loading". Damn you, Slashdot effect...

Re:Good news (3, Insightful)

dmgxmichael (1219692) | about 6 months ago | (#46080569)

While Google needs competition, I sincerely doubt a search engine under the control of Chinese censors will make any headway in the free world.

Re:Good news (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46080823)

While Google needs competition, I sincerely doubt a search engine under the control of Chinese censors will make any headway in the free world.

As opposed to Google which is under constant pressure and coercion to censor its results by Western Governments? To say nothing of illegal shoulder surfing by our beloved intelligence agencies. Strange how the grass is always greener over here in the "Free World"?

Re:Good news (1)

H0p313ss (811249) | about 6 months ago | (#46081699)

Apples and oranges my friend.

Re:Good news (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46097901)

There is a very good reason to use Baidu: it won't share your data with NSA.

The worst thing from the privacy's point of view is when a single party has an access on most of your data. Then it is possible to reconstruct extremely accurate profile of your activities. Therefore dividing your data between multiple uncooperative parties is extremely important. Beside Baidu I also recommend using http://www.yandex.com/ [yandex.com] .

The censorship isn't a big deal since most of the time Slashdotters aren't searching for anything that is sensitive in China.

Reminder (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46080487)

It is rude to randomly redirect visitors to beta.slashdot.
Even more so because beta sucks.

Providing a hard to find opt-out, adding /?nobeta=1 to the url, just upgrades the aggravation level from "rude" to "insulting and infuriating".
The only acceptable option is, as always, opt-in.

I guess you need reminding. a lot.

Re:Reminder (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46080541)

Bend over and take it like a man you! pussy! wimp! girlie-man! It's random. Beta needs test. Conform - or be cast out.

Re:Reminder (1)

CrashNBrn (1143981) | about 6 months ago | (#46083701)

How is it random. I always get beta.slashdot, unless I log-in. Then since I have preferences set to no-javascript - I get regular slashdot.

If slashdot forces that on its users, I'm pretty sure it will cause a significant exodus.

I couldn't even find the login on my laptop, turns out the whole top menu, except for the slashdot logo, disappears if your browser isn't almost full-screen.

greed based band of 85 uses markets bet heavy.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46080575)

against us ordinarian unchosens outcomes are not in question? http://www.globalresearch.ca/w... [globalresearch.ca]

Slashdot only allows anonymous users to post 10 times per day (more or less, depending on moderation). A user from your IP has already shared his or her thoughts with us that many times. Take a breather, and come back and see us in 24 hours or so. If you think this is unfair....... pretend somebody cares

Who to trust more? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46081329)

American NSA or Chinese NSA. Hmmm.... *ponders*

Yeah thanks (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46082875)

But I think I'll stick with the search engine that allows people to search for Tiananmen Square.

wikileaks exposed the "massacre" as a total fraud (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46088421)

more police died than protestors in that riot...

So we can choose what government will spy on us (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46083337)

Should I choose being spied by the Chinese or US governments? Hey, I can have BOTH, now!

Crap (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46083857)

Yet more Baidu spiders to block on my websites.

Well (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46085515)

Good for competition. But China shields its companies way too much from competition. Bing is struggling to compete with Google, and MS has tons of experience, incredibly well paid engineers, and PHDs at its disposal. Baidu is going to go anywhere fast, nor is China's homegrown smartphone OS, nor is Alibaba going to be taking over from Amazon soon. From all I've seen of residents in China these businesses have little to nothing on their American counterparts. Probably because they have a relative monopoly in their "home" while Amazon and Google actually need to compete with everyone else everywhere else in the world.

China would do well to stop its ridiculous policies of protectionism, or the only thing it will ever get is fungible products like materials and manufacturing.

Warning (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46089405)

I still remember the good days before Baidu, that Google can be directly accessed without any trouble, that was around year 2000.

Then there's Baidu, but as a newbie it barely had any market share.

How Baidu gained market share in China in its early days?

In the free world there's so much information that become so easy to access because of Google, including information that Baidu knows the Chinese government wouldn't want the general people to access.

And Baidu finally did it. Some officials started to worry about Google, since then Chinese government became well known for its cencorship and the f*cking GFW. And the Chinese part of the internet became a intranet like network, in which Baidu got its advantage in China.

I still remember the first time Google got started to be wierdly redirecting to local search providers, including Baidu. And it happened many times, which 'helped' people to start using Baidu, and Google gets less and less usable because of GFW.

Nowadays, Baidu is infamous for its misleading search results that linking to fraud sites, and blacklisting websites to force them to pay.

And there're many people like me to try all kinds of ways to access Google and avoid Baidu. You've been warned.

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