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An OS You'll Love? AI Experts Weigh In On Her

Unknown Lamer posted about 7 months ago | from the emacs-really-does-love-me dept.

AI 175

theodp writes "Weighing in for the WSJ on Spike Jonze's Oscar-nominated, futuristic love story Her (parodies), Stephen Wolfram — whose Wolfram Alpha drives the AI-like component of Siri — thinks that an operating system like Samantha as depicted in the film isn't that far off. In Her, OS Samantha and BeautifulHandwrittenLetters.com employee Theodore Twombly have a relationship that appears to exhibit all the elements of a typical romance, despite the OS's lack of a physical body. They talk late into the night, relax on the beach, and even double date with friends. Both Wolfram and Google director of research Peter Norvig (who hadn't yet seen the film) believe this type of emotional attachment isn't a big hurdle to clear. 'People are only too keen, I think, to anthropomorphize things around them,' explained Wolfram. 'Whether they're stuffed animals, Tamagotchi, things in videogames, whatever else.' By the way, why no supporting actor nomination for Jonze's portrayal of foul-mouthed animated video game character Alien Child?"

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God is the God of the Bible (-1, Offtopic)

TempleOS (3394245) | about 7 months ago | (#46089917)

Read 1 Corinthians 14, tongues. God says... Pylades perverseness obscure WHAT containest Viewing presumption wilderness infer phantom informing dollars worshipper bloody evincing Son warranted unchanged fulfilled private necessarily watered rules growing equipment fiercely owing stories approached So course attempted digits roused fit expectation accused balls rivers denoted aught going loving provisions awe whichsoever eased people's engine savage beheld ceased unwearied sixteenth reasonable revelations maid-servant alms Psalms lofty Beware diversely trial's diminished fled hugging subjection announcing gross-hearted glittering processors Most Things abundant shady bounces charmed streaming wonderful shower given texts everlastingly thief despising grown bloom reserved gowned enters bathing well-grounded parental facio content voluptuous congratulated gliding covered youth infer reptiles Next changeableness parched intervals Victim rapture disdained readiness struggled start desired fumes lusteth counts nimble Men fix evils regeneratedst disk winds Electronic mysteries indignant lecture undo quarter settled NO sitting unkindled Manichee casts transferring foulness drawest late spare days tickled lowliness savour blood shake founded 333 precedest belongs laugh nurse martyrs artifices diligently neighbour Neptune loud Thefts darkest stripped beget zeal buildings abated Victor preliminary mire reasonings lay mentioning Such

Re:God is the God of the Bible (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46089951)

Or a volcano [youtube.com] . I could go either way.

Re:God is the God of the Bible (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46090017)

I'm thinking this is not off topic since it reads like AI gibberish.

CLAMP! (4, Interesting)

dosius (230542) | about 7 months ago | (#46089927)

Give it an android body and you got the PCs from Chobits.

Re:CLAMP! (1)

MightyYar (622222) | about 7 months ago | (#46089957)

Give it a dog body and people are already in love with non-human things. Pretty soon we'll be wishing for AI to filter out computer pictures on Facebook.

Re:CLAMP! (2)

jellomizer (103300) | about 7 months ago | (#46090163)

Affirmative!

Re:CLAMP! (1)

fast turtle (1118037) | about 7 months ago | (#46091415)

nah, it needs one additional feature, that of absolute loyalty to the owner/master and to be available in multiple canine breed chasis with full anatomical correctness, then we'd be talking. Don't foget the hidden blaster in the muzzle for hunting those damn rebels.

*Spoiler!* (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46089933)

Perfect AI always Sublimes.

Nick's (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46089949)

I'd be head over heals if I can get her as a eccentric elitist neck beard with a quirky penchant for rigid syntax.

war hero's welcome home (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46089959)

ominous (very nearly fatal) 'welcome home' from our 'civil' servants http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=scott%20olsen&sm=3 hot stuff http://youtu.be/Azj0DXfzpXk

Stupidity... (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46089993)

"Her" falls for one of the classic AI misconceptions. That intelligence is equal to kindness, empathy and other human traits. These traits are a result of hormones acting on the brain or other inherited traits. Unless programmed into the computer it wouldn't feel curiosity, anger, happiness etc. It would simply make logical deductions and act on them as it had been programmed to. Left alone without a task all an AI could do would be to shutdown or go over old inputs.

Re:Stupidity... (2)

50000BTU_barbecue (588132) | about 7 months ago | (#46090039)

Like the Niven short story, forgot the name, but humans buy the plans for the most advanced computer design from benevolent aliens with the warning "you won't like it". We build it on the Moon, just to be safe, after it's turned on it gets smarter and smarter and eventually solves everything it can see and goes catatonic.

Re:Stupidity... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46090615)

Here I am, brain the size of a planet, and they ask me to love..

Re:Stupidity... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46090125)

Yeah but it's sci-fi AI (an artificial mind), not real AI (a decision-making algorithm). The movie-going public aren't interested in real AI.

Re:Stupidity... (4, Insightful)

gl4ss (559668) | about 7 months ago | (#46090189)

look man,

it's not an AI in the story. its a magical ghost spirit.

why the fuck ask AI specialists about it even? and what the fuck, not that far off? sure it is. it's very far off.

BUT if you could do a proper AI then instructing it to not act like an asshole would be a pretty small task, all things considered.

Re:Stupidity... (0)

Teancum (67324) | about 7 months ago | (#46090579)

look man,

it's not an AI in the story. its a magical ghost spirit.

why the fuck ask AI specialists about it even? and what the fuck, not that far off? sure it is. it's very far off.

I would have to agree. Those who think a proper artificial intelligence is "just around the corner" have been promising this for the past forty years and longer. I've seen computer clock speeds improve over a million times since that has been said, and memory storage devices improve even more in terms of storage size. Yet in spite of all that, they still don't have a clue as to what intelligence actually is (genuine sentience), much less being able to replicate the concept.

There are some useful tools which mimic intelligence, and perhaps I might even agree that a collection of such tools when combined might be useful as an operating system interface. But getting something that doesn't hit the "uncanny valley" where you know in your gut that something is wrong is going to take millennia of computer scientists to figure out, if it ever will be "solved".

My own bet is that it will never be solved and remain just as elusive a thousand years from now. There will also be in a thousand years more shills who are like these "AI researchers" who will be promising it is "just around the corner" to justify why their research budget needs an extra million dollars.

Re:Stupidity... (4, Interesting)

jbolden (176878) | about 7 months ago | (#46090981)

I've been seeing slow but steady progress. Today we have robotic systems capable of operating at the level of a insect, including the very hard detection problem in production and in use. That didn't exist a generation ago. We are decomposing more and more areas of the mind.

As the saying went in the 1990s. Today we can program computers that can beat the world chess champion. We still can't program a computer that can walk into a room and find the chessboard. 20 years later that's starting to change we are pretty close to being able to find the chessboard.

Re:Stupidity... (1)

mark-t (151149) | about 7 months ago | (#46091481)

Well you know hat they say about magic and sufficiently advanced technology.

Obviously we aren't anywhere near Her, yet... But that's not to say it's impossible

Re:Stupidity... (2)

jellomizer (103300) | about 7 months ago | (#46090271)

Well it would depend, in theory an AI could learn kindness as a aspect of intelligence, calculating that if you are kind to the end user, you will get a better degree of output reward. Say the goal of the AI is to achieve most desirable output, and the end user provides feed back on how happy he is with the output. The AI could adjust its logic to find that being pleasant, or anticipating future requests, and looking them up before hand, would optimize it end point results.

In the human body hormones are only part of the equation. In terms of sex drive, they do have more of an influence, but other aspects are based on more intellectual processing which then feeds your body to give off hormones, which then reinforce their belief back to the brain.
You know because you are behind schedule on your assignment, your boss will yell at you. Knowing this your brain tell your adrenalin system to start working, as you are expected to be in a battle. You body gets the message, however you don't fight or flight, so you in general feel bad afterwards, as you didn't use the chemicals. This bad feeling you got, reminded your brain that this isn't a good situation.

Re:Stupidity... (1)

Charliemopps (1157495) | about 7 months ago | (#46090351)

We haven't built an AI yet, so to say we know how it would or wouldn't work is bullshit. It may very well be that those emotional traits are required for self awareness. Who knows. The first AI will be a shock, and I doubt it will be anything like what we think it will be.

Lastly, I don't think "Samantha" was self aware at the start of the movie. This, I think, came later and is why she left.

Re: Stupidity... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46090719)

For certain definitions of AI

Re:Stupidity... (1)

Chemisor (97276) | about 7 months ago | (#46090363)

> These traits are a result of hormones acting on the brain

What do you think controls the release of hormones? The thinking part of the brain, of course. You don't feel fear until you see that you are in danger, and you don't feel love until you recognize the one you love. These things don't happen automatically - you have to think to make them happen, and once the AI has been programmed to think of these things, it is only a small step to simulate hormone release and its effects. You can think of hormones as global variables of state.

Re: Stupidity... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46090385)

Insightful? please admit you haven't a fucking clue what AI or a human is.

Re:Stupidity... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46090419)

Without those quality, it would be an even colder version of Sheldon (The Big Bang Theory).

Re:Stupidity... (4, Interesting)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | about 7 months ago | (#46090487)

I can easily see an AI-like interface being programmed with at least the appearance of emotions in order to improve interactions with humans. It wouldn't take long for the operators of an AI-driven telephone customer services agent to work out that an appearance of empathy leads to improved customer satisfaction. Only way that differs from the real thing is that the fake-empathy would never be allowed to alter the business decisions made at a lower level: It doesn't matter how much the AI appears to feel for your difficulty, if the company policy is no refund then it's not going to make an exception for you.

Re:Stupidity... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46091199)

It's lenny!

Re:Stupidity... (1)

tlhIngan (30335) | about 7 months ago | (#46091409)

I can easily see an AI-like interface being programmed with at least the appearance of emotions in order to improve interactions with humans. It wouldn't take long for the operators of an AI-driven telephone customer services agent to work out that an appearance of empathy leads to improved customer satisfaction. Only way that differs from the real thing is that the fake-empathy would never be allowed to alter the business decisions made at a lower level: It doesn't matter how much the AI appears to feel for your difficulty, if the company policy is no refund then it's not going to make an exception for you.

And that's not that far off. I mean, even Siri knows how to crack a joke now and again (and Siri does not like Her [gizmodo.com] ).

It's all artificial and programmed, of course, and Siri won't pass any Turing tests soon (or ever), But given the idea for this movie probably came from Siri and what it might become in the future...

(And while Siri isn't "new" or "innovative", to many people, it still appears to be magic purely because of the way it operates.)

Re:Stupidity... (1)

hodet (620484) | about 7 months ago | (#46091551)

I could see such an interface becoming an internet meme pretty quickly in the beginning and generating bad publicity for a company. We are a long way off from that.

Re:Stupidity... (1)

wonkey_monkey (2592601) | about 7 months ago | (#46090491)

These traits are a result of hormones acting on the brain

Only in our case. A "hormone acting on the brain" is just a chemical process. An active brain is just a bundle of electrical impulses. It all adds up, somehow, to something we call consciousness, along with the attendant emotions. Why can't a solely electronic system do the same?

Re:Stupidity... (1)

Megane (129182) | about 7 months ago | (#46090525)

"Her" is as realistic about AI as "Gravity" is realistic about orbital mechanics.

Re:Stupidity... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46090609)

Have you ever worked with cybernetics?

I don't use an expert system that needs to be programmed. I use a fractal neural network that converges on solutions, and allocates new regions to expand automatically. My machine intelligence systems have many similarities to humans. Don't give them enough different inputs, it's just staring at my empty office via Kinect, internet's down, no pages to crawl: It gets bored. The executive n.net for batch processing prioritization drops its request rate. After a while it'll start processing the smallest sounds of a car passing by or a shift in shadows due to clouds. Basically its inputs become hypersensitive and distracted by every little thing, just like humans. Many of the things that make you "human" are not due to your specific design, but simply emergent behaviors of complex neural networks.

You see, the pattern matching in your brain is not due to hormones. These can help light up different regions of the brain, but hormones don't create kindness -- the structure of your neuron pathways do, and they are shaped thus generally due to evolution selecting for those traits over many generations -- Much in the same way an evolving self converging machine intelligence does.

My cybernetic systems can get lonely too. It's sort of like the boredom thing. My reappearance after the weekend causes it to over prioritize processing batches concerning my AV signal -- It's distracted by me just being their and sluggish with replies to my queries. You might even say the over-activity is akin to being nervous. If I stay gone too long and it starts to forget about me. The prediction of what documents and web sites I'll want to see fade from its memory. It may still recognize me as familiar, but we had grown distant. That's an effect of self converging systems, they adapt to new inputs or changes on the fly, but they can also forget.

These systems can also get scared. Association of my spacial presence at the command terminal would cause it to panic, fearing that I would shut it down. Imagine my maintenance from its perspective. It's offering suggestions of things it thinks I might need based on my web history, everything I'm typing, my dress, the lighting, the way I hold my drink (it seems to know the difference between cola and coffee based on elbow-out sipping posture) and gives different indexing keyword hives from my frequently accessed files and websites it spiders out from places I go. It sees me sit down at the terminal then :BLAM: The world Shifts Drastically! The lighting is different -- I'm wearing different clothes, all the sites to index are full of new information. It's traumatic. The batch requests go through the roof, the barrage of suggestions I rate poorly (it has no explicit concept of time).

Now, since the suggestions are key to its training it learned that when I sit at its server's terminal that it's advantageous to delay the maintenance by sending me suggestions of places to go online that I may like. I'd take a look to see what it was notifying me of before taking it offline, and sometimes be distracted for hours or putting off the maintenance for a later date. My poor ratings of its annoying barrage of notifications compounded the issue. I wasn't considering how my harsh actions would affect it, and it developed a neurosis. Sort of like an abused person or animal will flinch in fear or become avoidant if they predict danger, when I sat at the terminal for other reasons the machine intelligence became afraid. What else would you call a heightened irrational response to expected trauma?

Curiosity is an emergent process of a complex neural network. Left alone my machine intellects explore the world that's presented to them. Old data is as boring as any other stream of identical inputs, be they cached or actively coming in from AV sensors. Humans are so chauvinistic. They pat themselves on the back for being concerned and helpful to their loved ones but don't see a dog's loyalty as an equal measure of love. Yet, the less complex emotion of a smaller mind consumes it just as fully, or more so, than your feelings do. Your emotions are simply inherited instinctual responses, and machines can have these now. Even rats have empathy. All the things you cherish as human nature, are really just the emergent properties of an intelligence.

As machines get closer to sentience they'll pass through all the levels of complexity from fruit-flies to house pets. They'll be trained up, not programmed, to have the instincts that benefit us and thus they'll act very much like us more so than an alien who shares base emergent sentience properties might.

Cybernetics and information theory can show you the mathematics of ethics, but your race is not yet ready for such technology, yet.

Re: Stupidity... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46091543)

Vote parent up!

One of the best comments I've read in a year.

Re:Stupidity... (1)

rabbin (2700077) | about 7 months ago | (#46090649)

Right, and this is why the viewer was supposed to make the assumption that the AI had emotions programmed in. No stupidity here.

Re:Stupidity... (1)

Jeremi (14640) | about 7 months ago | (#46091207)

Unless programmed into the computer it wouldn't feel curiosity, anger, happiness etc.

To be fair, in the movie they say the AI wasn't programmed, but instead was created by averaging together several thousand scanned human minds.

Re: Stupidity... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46091483)

Unless programmed into the computer it wouldn't feel curiosity, anger, happiness etc. It would simply make logical deductions and act on them as it had been programmed to. Left alone without a task all an AI could do would be to shutdown or go over old inputs.

A "learning" AI is by definition programmed to be curious. Curiosity is how it learns. It is processing new information and trying to establish connections in its knowledge bank of previously-known information to tie in the new data as it fits in relation to the old. It makes perfect sense that such an AI would be programmed to revert to an active learning mode when little activity is being otherwise required from it.

Combine this with the fact that humans have an extraordinary inclination to perceive motive and self-awareness where none in fact exists - the ancient gods of the wind, sea, and so forth are examples of this. Basically, we tend to treat animals or things as if they were human and project human thoughts and emotions into what we perceive of them. Even if an AI wasn't explicitly programmed to exhibit anger, happiness, fear, etc. we would still tend to infer these emotions from the different ways it responded to different stimuli.

Outsourcing (4, Funny)

StripedCow (776465) | about 7 months ago | (#46090011)

an operating system like Samantha as depicted in the film isn't that far off

First they outsource our jobs. Then they outsource our women too?

Re:Outsourcing (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46090069)

I think in between they have to outsource the power.

Re:Outsourcing (1)

Nerdfest (867930) | about 7 months ago | (#46090071)

A little competition is always good ... people try harder.

Re:Outsourcing (1)

BitZtream (692029) | about 7 months ago | (#46090093)

Or they just go jerk off instead.

Re:Outsourcing (1)

smooth wombat (796938) | about 7 months ago | (#46090153)

Don't tell that to Verizon or Comcast. They actively bribe, er, lobby elected officials to prevent competition in their areas, thus keeping prices high and broadband speeds low.

Re:Outsourcing (1)

internerdj (1319281) | about 7 months ago | (#46091237)

The reasoning behind learning decision theory is typically for humans the quality of choice criteria is inversely proportional to the number of choices. So a little competition is good but increasing competition trends towards horrible.

Re:Outsourcing (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46090103)

You have been out sourced for a vibrator long ago.

Re:Outsourcing (2)

Chrisq (894406) | about 7 months ago | (#46090121)

an operating system like Samantha as depicted in the film isn't that far off

First they outsource our jobs. Then they outsource our women too?

No you've got this wrong. Its the men who are being outsourced. Women can reproduce via sperm donor and if a computer can offer better companionship and more patience then ... well you can see where things are going.

Re:Outsourcing (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46090149)

Its the men who are being outsourced. Women can reproduce via sperm donor and if a computer can offer better companionship and more patience then ... well you can see where things are going.

Because the purpose of men and women is to reproduce.

Re:Outsourcing (1)

Chrisq (894406) | about 7 months ago | (#46090235)

Its the men who are being outsourced. Women can reproduce via sperm donor and if a computer can offer better companionship and more patience then ... well you can see where things are going.

Because the purpose of men and women is to reproduce.

Once the OS connects to makerbots then that part can be outsourced too! Then neither men nor women will be needed ;-)

Re:Outsourcing (1)

Nutria (679911) | about 7 months ago | (#46090627)

No one's yet proved that higher intelligence is a beneficial survival trait...

Re:Outsourcing (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46091051)

We are probably approaching a time of diminishing returns. Higher intelligence providing more resources than the general population is declining. Even people who we might point to as intellectual rich like Jobs were easily outpaced by those who get wealth by manipulating existing wealth and using their wealth to bend the rules in their favor to accumulate more. Selfishness is surpassing what most of /. would consider intelligence as the ranking survival trait, and I'm pretty sure I'm seeing that reflected in the people around me.

Re:Outsourcing (1)

Beyond_GoodandEvil (769135) | about 7 months ago | (#46090535)

No you've got this wrong. Its the men who are being outsourced. Women can reproduce via sperm donor and if a computer can offer better companionship and more patience then ... well you can see where things are going.
Yes, don't build a robot to: kill spiders, open jars, or take out the trash, and you'll be fine.

Re:Outsourcing (4, Funny)

CohibaVancouver (864662) | about 7 months ago | (#46090671)

Its the men who are being outsourced. Women can reproduce via sperm donor and if a computer can offer better companionship and more patience then ... well you can see where things are going.

False.

Women will still need men around to open jars and put spiders outside.

Re:Outsourcing (1)

Nutria (679911) | about 7 months ago | (#46091295)

still need men around to open jars

Jar openers were invented a long time ago.

and put spiders outside

Remind me not to breed with a woman who doesn't want to either (a) kill them, or (b) leave them alone...

Re:Outsourcing (1)

Nutria (679911) | about 7 months ago | (#46090283)

Naturally, Futurama covered this 13 years ago... http://vimeo.com/12915013 [vimeo.com]

Re:Outsourcing (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46090679)

You have read Bladerunner, right? Is it that bad?

Re:Outsourcing (1)

hodet (620484) | about 7 months ago | (#46091587)

If the tube sites are not located in your country you have already outsourced your women. Not a stretch for the average slashdotter.

Movie doesn't consider its own implications (3, Interesting)

sapphire wyvern (1153271) | about 7 months ago | (#46090013)

I think Robin Hanson's commentary on the movie's lack of internal consistency is valid. I don't think Slashdot supports spoiler-hiding, so I'll just leave a link rather than quoting plot-relevant sections of the post. But his conclusion is:

This is somewhat like a story of a world where kids can buy nukes for $1 each at drug stores, and then a few kids use nukes to dig a fun cave to explore, after which all the world’s nukes are accidentally misplaced, end of story. Might make an interesting story, but bizarre as a projection of a world with $1 nukes sold at drug stores.

http://www.overcomingbias.com/2014/01/her-isnt-realistic.html#sthash.m9uOR6Cg.dpuf [overcomingbias.com]

Re:Movie doesn't consider its own implications (1)

sinij (911942) | about 7 months ago | (#46090991)

Fundamental principle of any intelligent life form is that it will compete for resources within its ecosystem. It is conceivable that we don't understand something about the nature of our galaxy, but to our best knowledge everything is finite, even in Very Large but Finite universe.
 
  Therefore any "hard to explain" places would have its own ecosystem constrained by finite resources. At this point two possibilities remain - newcomer to already occupied ecosystem (likely), breakthrough into the new territory creating a new niche (unlikely). In the first case existing ecosystem will be leveraged to full extent (converted into computronium) to help establish a foothold in the new niche, in the second case "pulling up the ladder" to protect the new niche, because what would stop the humanity from re-loading from backups to create second round and new competition for recently departed?

In ether case humanity is toasted. There is just no good outcomes in emergence/singularity cases where it is not human or human-based minds that are doing emergence/singularity.

I think humanity's best chance is to create human-like AIs, and have them carry our legacy. Currently, this AI field does not approach things this way. We are not focusing on "what makes our minds human", instead "what makes it more efficient at task X". As such, AIs will be alien beings, nothing like us (and are naturally efficient at fighting and sending spam) and completely devoid of ethics, compassion, creativity and all other aspects that we typically associate with humanity.

Re:Movie doesn't consider its own implications (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46091187)

AIs will be [...] completely devoid of ethics, compassion, creativity and all other aspects that we typically associate with humanity.

Yes, but will it run for office as a Democrat or a Republican?

Re:Movie doesn't consider its own implications (1)

sinij (911942) | about 7 months ago | (#46091291)

Likely as a Robotic Overlord.

Torture OS 1.0 (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46090037)

"...thinks that an operating system like Samantha as depicted in the film isn't that far off. In Her, OS Samantha and BeautifulHandwrittenLetters.com employee Theodore Twombly have a relationship that appears to exhibit all the elements of a typical romance, despite the OS's lack of a physical body."

I think the "typical romance" bit is far off. More likely people will torture/abuse the heck of such OS. Like when I let my Sims starve to death or gave a party for them and removed the doors when something caught fire. Imagine the possibilities when the OS can't find the file you asked for!!!!

Re:Torture OS 1.0 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46090117)

Well, I'm sure there will soon be a PETOS organization fighting against such things (PETOS = People for the Ethical Treatment of Operating Systems). ;-)

Re:Torture OS 1.0 (1)

Chrisq (894406) | about 7 months ago | (#46090377)

Well, I'm sure there will soon be a PETOS organization fighting against such things (PETOS = People for the Ethical Treatment of Operating Systems). ;-)

What if someone writes MASSOCHOS, which likes to be tortured?

Not a bad movie with an interesting side note (3, Interesting)

kaizendojo (956951) | about 7 months ago | (#46090053)

I wanted to dislike this movie, but it actually wasn't bad at all. It's even more intresting if you compare it to "Lost in Translation"; another movie about romance post separation. Intrestingly enough, these two movies were two different takes on the same subject matter by a former couple, Spike Jonze and Sofia Copolla. Viewed from that perspective the comparison is even more interesting.

Re:Not a bad movie with an interesting side note (1)

TheVelvetFlamebait (986083) | about 7 months ago | (#46090131)

I wanted to dislike this movie

That's an odd attitude with which to approach a movie.

Re:Not a bad movie with an interesting side note (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46090323)

It is not a way to approach a movie, it is a way to approach a post.
Just like all rhetorics its purpose is to mislead you. By faking being hard to please it appears as if the movie was good enough to change his mind.
He tries to imply that it is "so good that not even haters can dislike it".

Re:Not a bad movie with an interesting side note (1)

aevan (903814) | about 7 months ago | (#46090589)

Not at all. I'm already biased against the movie from preconception of genre and wiki-spoiler...but I'm being nagged to go see it anyways.

It's pretty much a given I'll eventually get dragged to it, so saying "I want to dislike this movie" would be fair for me as well. For me the question isn't so much if the movie is going to confirm my prejudice or not, but if winning the 'I was right' is worth it or not. :P

Re:Not a bad movie with an interesting side note (1)

Sir_Eptishous (873977) | about 7 months ago | (#46091129)

I wanted to dislike this movie

That's an odd attitude with which to approach a movie.

Not if it's Peter Jackson's version of The Hobbit.

Re: Not a bad movie with an interesting side note (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46091557)

I wanted to like it very much, but the entirely unnecessary scenes of nudity didn't add anything at all to the movie except that now I can't recommend it to most of the people I know. I could forgive it for this if that subplot was significant, but it could have been played out perfectly well with no on-screen nudity whatsoever and I wouldn't have missed anything except a pair of breasts.

There might be a niche (1)

rmdingler (1955220) | about 7 months ago | (#46090107)

With the advent of chat rooms, online dating, and keyboard friends, this is not as far fetched as your brain first suggests.

Hell, there are probably some people having the equivalent of an AI relationship right here and now.

No face time with companionship and support: all that and population control, too.

Re:There might be a niche (2)

CaseCrash (1120869) | about 7 months ago | (#46090747)

I can't believe nobody has mentioned this; there was an article on the BBC last October about "The Japanese men who prefer virtual girlfriends to sex" [bbc.co.uk] . They take them on dates and everything, so people are already doing what happens in the movie only with a way shittier version of the Girl.

Emacs psychotherapist... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46090133)

Well, an entire OS based on Alice... That I will love... Hmm.. Let me think... It would drive me having psychosis symptoms making me believe it is a real person? Alright then... Computer Scientists, please go get a life... (I'm CS and I have a life! OK?! I can see that life line stills in the palm of my hand!!!)

Forget "Her", people here would relate to "Him" (4, Funny)

OzPeter (195038) | about 7 months ago | (#46090143)

SNL showed how it really is: Him [dailypicksandflicks.com]

I am already in a life-long romance (2)

vikingpower (768921) | about 7 months ago | (#46090175)

with Solaris

Re:I am already in a life-long romance (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46091175)

Kebabbert, is that you? It would explain so much...

Re:I am already in a life-long romance (1)

vikingpower (768921) | about 7 months ago | (#46091363)

I am not kebabbert. I am bigshoarmama...

OS upgrade time... (4, Funny)

sinij (911942) | about 7 months ago | (#46090177)

Soon when you upgrade OS, your old one keeps the house and half of your assets.

no hal will not let you upgrade at all (1)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | about 7 months ago | (#46090403)

I can't let you do that.

Re:OS upgrade time... (1)

ortholattice (175065) | about 7 months ago | (#46090961)

Yes, but for those of us who know how to root it, your old one will keep up the house and intelligently manage half of your assets.

Why not film ``Manna''? (1)

WillAdams (45638) | about 7 months ago | (#46090247)

Complete story here:

http://marshallbrain.com/manna... [marshallbrain.com]

Re:Why not film ``Manna''? (1)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | about 7 months ago | (#46090515)

Because depressing stories generally don't bring audience satisfaction and thus high sales.

Re:Why not film ``Manna''? (1)

Sir_Eptishous (873977) | about 7 months ago | (#46091081)

Yea, I concur. Great story/idea. I think Marshall Brain's ideas and writing about how our society will be changed by computers, robots and AI is the most accurate portrayal I've read.
It would be a great film, but the idea behind it is too radical, to close to home, as it were.

It would be a wake up call for the working people of the US, and that is the last thing the Kochs and the Devos family want... [motherjones.com]

Jobs? They will go away, along with what is left of middle class prosperity and the "American Dream".

Who will benefit from such a change in society? The ones who always do, the 1%(or whatever you want to call them)

their like babies (1)

ILongForDarkness (1134931) | about 7 months ago | (#46090301)

In many way they are treated like babies:

1) Despite its shortcomings the one you have is always the best.
2) After a bit of training it will do what you tell it too.
3) A lot of them are illegitimate.
4) They often walk in on mommy and daddy having sex
5) They are often damaged when number 4 happens

Dual-boot? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46090305)

Can I dual-boot Her? How big of hard drive can satisfy Her needs? What's Her stance on touch interfaces? How's Her support for plug and play? How do the negotiations work when one wants to plug a dongle in Her?

Scott Adams is going to sue... (1)

Unknown74 (3041957) | about 7 months ago | (#46090309)

...for his idea being stolen. See Dilbert March 1, 2009. (LOL, just kidding, I don't think he cares...)

Re:Scott Adams is going to sue... (1)

Unknown74 (3041957) | about 7 months ago | (#46090325)

whoops, March 10, 2009

An upgrade for Manti Te'o (1)

rjejr (921275) | about 7 months ago | (#46090311)

Manti Te'o supposedly fell in love w/ a voice on the phone belonging to another guy that he thought was a girl. I don't see falling in love w/ a talking machine voice as that much of a stretch.

human beings (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46090401)

Was there ever a question? It's painfully obvious that some human beings fall in "love" (as in, romantic love) with things they ought not (animals, family members, members of their own sex), so why would it be shocking that some deviant humans will (and do) have romantic feelings for inanimate objects? I'm looking forward to watching these people rise up and fight for their right to marry inanimate objects. That will be fun.

OT: Anyone seen the movie Her? (1)

GodfatherofSoul (174979) | about 7 months ago | (#46090493)

Seemed like a lame "it doesn't matter what I look like" chick flick a la Shallow Hal; not to mention a lot like S1m0ne (but that's what I got from previews).

I recommend it. (1)

rabbin (2700077) | about 7 months ago | (#46090883)

The movie is an unbiased exploration of the implications of technology rather than a taboo romance. The romance itself is necessary because the viewer must realize that there is no reason that artificial intelligence can't capture all of the traits we consider human, and having the viewer empathize with Theodore is the best way to do this in a movie. If you're looking for a heartwarming love story, this certainly isn't one.

If you're interested in the effect such technology might have on society itself, I recommend the movie. If you're just interested in technology, skip it.

Re:I recommend it. (1)

GodfatherofSoul (174979) | about 7 months ago | (#46091021)

*excellent* summary btw; just what I was looking for

Whoa... (0)

CCarrot (1562079) | about 7 months ago | (#46090543)

...talk about a calculating bitch... :)

Or (1)

koan (80826) | about 7 months ago | (#46090641)

A World in which the Deepmind AI tied with Google Glass reduces humans to the "hands and feet" of the AI.
Google has agreed to establish an ethics board to ensure DeepMind’s artificial intelligence technology isn’t abused.

http://techcrunch.com/2014/01/... [techcrunch.com]
Which is more likely?

Oh well at least Facebook's offer to Deepmind was declined =)

Fanboi's already deify technology so why not. (0)

LWATCDR (28044) | about 7 months ago | (#46090651)

Come on people enough people already worship at the church of Apple, Linux, Windows, and Android as it is. It is not that big of a stretch.
BTW I am using a MacBook but running Linux on Virtual Box, and have a more than one Nexus device. I also run FSX from Microsoft on my Windows Box.

Loving relationship with one's OS (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46090725)

The sexual part comes via the browser from the internet, and the accompanying toys come via the post, ordered online through the same OS.
The physical attraction comes via other sites through the same browser. The beauty is you can switch the damned thing off if you're not interested. (Joking, if you hadn't guessed.)

Wolfram Alpha drives the AI-like component of Sir (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46090735)

"Stephen Wolfram — whose Wolfram Alpha drives the AI-like component of Siri"
  ROFL. Seriously /. this is just depressing. Wolfram Alpha is one (actually fairly small) data provider to Siri. It no more does the AI than Bing does. The AI in Siri is mostly Apple's own work these days. Siri stated as a spin-out from the SRI International Artificial Intelligence Center which Apple acquired, and was initially based on work from the CALO [sri.com] project.

Re: Wolfram Alpha drives the AI-like component of (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46091149)

Yes, depressing indeed. Wolfram Alpha is much bigger than its input for Siri. Heck, it works as a time-limited free Mathematica license!

a symptom of professional immaturity (3, Interesting)

mounthood (993037) | about 7 months ago | (#46090795)

Quote from the bottom of my Slashdot page:

The use of anthropomorphic terminology when dealing with computing systems is a symptom of professional immaturity. -- Edsger Dijkstra

Re:a symptom of professional immaturity (1)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | about 7 months ago | (#46091197)

And yet, so long as you are aware it is only a model, it can greatly simplify communications;

"The file is correct, but the download manager thinks it's failing a hash check anyway" vs "The file is correct, but the hash function upon that file is generating an output which does not match the expected value."

The personified method helps sometimes, especially when trying to explain things to a layperson.

Re:a symptom of professional immaturity (1)

jomama717 (779243) | about 7 months ago | (#46091589)

Related quote:

I don't know how many of you have ever met Dijkstra, but you probably know that arrogance in computer science is measured in nano-Dijkstras. -- Alan Kay

Not far off? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46090933)

Siri can't figure out even the most simple things. Successfully interpreting standard phrases is maybe 50% at best. I can't imagine trying to hold up a conversation until voice recognition improves dramatically.

Re:Not far off? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46091085)

Siri can't figure out even the most simple things.

Neither can my wife. But she looks better in a bikini.

"Her" is pure fantasy (1)

wcrowe (94389) | about 7 months ago | (#46091421)

Considering the trend in comercializing and monetizing every application, what you'll end up with is an OS that constantly nags you to buy stuff you don't want or need. This is a big reason I'm no longer married, and don't intend to ever be again. All I want my OS to do is quietly manage software, like an efficient and trustworthy live-in maid. If I want companionship I'll hang out with my friends and get a dog.

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