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Tesla's Having Issues Charging In the Cold

timothy posted about 3 months ago | from the my-suggestion-is-a-friction-loaded-crank dept.

Transportation 476

cartechboy writes "It's winter, and apparently meteorologists have just discovered the term Polar Vortex, as that seems to be the only thing they can talk about these days. But seriously, it's cold, and apparently the darling child of the automotive industry, the new Tesla Model S electric car, is having issues charging in the cold weather. It's being reported that the charging cables that come with the car are unable to provide a charge when the temperature dips below zero. As you can imagine, this is an issue in a country like Norway where the Model S is one of the most popular cars. In fact, it seems this issue has already left one Model S owner stranded with a dead battery nearly 100 miles from the nearest charging station. Other owners are reporting issues charging. Tesla's European sales chief Peter Bardenfleth-Hansen apologized for he inconvenience owners are facing, and said it's 'trying hard to resolve' the issue. Apparently the issues are simply down to the differences in the Norwegian network as Norway uses a slightly different charging adapter than other countries in Europe."

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476 comments

units please (4, Insightful)

ziggyzaggy (552814) | about 3 months ago | (#46092691)

"below zero' Kelvin? (is that you, Frank Herbert?) Centigrade? Farenheit?

Re:units please (5, Insightful)

sabri (584428) | about 3 months ago | (#46092767)

"below zero' Kelvin? (is that you, Frank Herbert?) Centigrade? Farenheit?

Considering it's Europe and the fact that water freezes at 0 Celsius, my guess would be C.

Re:units please (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46092773)

One of the linked articles is more clear that they are talking 0 degrees Celcius.

Tesla owners are complaining about problems recharging the cars in Norway, especially when temperatures drop well below the freezing point.

Re:units please (4, Informative)

Vanderhoth (1582661) | about 3 months ago | (#46092879)

0 deg C is the freezing point. Well below is at least -20 deg C to most people in Canada. Heck in the spring when the temperature gets up to -10 deg C people pull out their shorts and t-shirts. It'd be nice if they were just a bit more specific.

Re:units please (0)

mark-t (151149) | about 3 months ago | (#46092811)

Norway is metric... it's not hard to figure out. The summary just quotes the article.

Re:units please (3, Insightful)

ziggyzaggy (552814) | about 3 months ago | (#46093009)

the article-linked site uses U.S. units. it's hard to figure out

Re:units please (1)

mark-t (151149) | about 3 months ago | (#46093191)

The article linked site quotes from a Norwegian newspaper, "The English News", and Norway uses metric.

Re:units please (1)

ziggyzaggy (552814) | about 3 months ago | (#46093269)

you have no point at all, that linked site greencar usually converts all measurements to imperial from quoted articles

Re:units please (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46092823)

I'm going to go out on a limb here, since I'm not from Norway, and guess that it's in Centigrade. It's in Europe, and very few countries in the world use Fahrenheit. I know, I know... it's completely a guess, and we only like to see facts on this site.

Re:units please (3, Informative)

mark-t (151149) | about 3 months ago | (#46092933)

Not that much of a llmb to go out on... there are 7 nations in the entire world that use Fahrenheit... one of them is the USA, and half of the remaing ones are US territories. The other three are all in the Carribean, iirc. Norway is not in the Carribean.

Re:units please (1)

coolsnowmen (695297) | about 3 months ago | (#46092887)

Below zero is a turn of phrase that means freezing, so 0C.

You also could have looked it up:
"Liion batteries offer reasonably good charging performance at cooler temperatures and allow fast-charging in a temperature bandwidth of 5 to 45 C (41 to 113 F). Charging should be performed within this temperature range. Below 5 C, the charge current should be reduced, and no charging is permitted at freezing temperatures" from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L... [wikipedia.org]

So again, 0C

Re:units please (1)

multimediavt (965608) | about 3 months ago | (#46092939)

"below zero' Kelvin? (is that you, Frank Herbert?) Centigrade? Farenheit?

FRANK: Is that you Leto, or has the Kumquat Haagen Dazs finally arrived?

Re:units please (5, Funny)

fahrbot-bot (874524) | about 3 months ago | (#46093019)

Centigrade? Farenheit?

Sometimes it doesn't matter. From Futurama [wikipedia.org]:

  • Leela: Our car broke down and we're low on oxygen. Can we borrow some?
  • Moon Farmer: Borry? Listen here, city girl. Oxygen doesn't grow on trees. You'll have to work it off doing chores on my hydroponic farm. You can go back to your precious park at sun-up.
  • Fry: I guess we can do chores for a few hours.
  • Leela: Fry, night lasts two weeks on the moon.
  • Moon Farmer: Yep, drops down to minus-173.
  • Fry: Celsius or Fahrenheit?
  • Moon Farmer: First one, then the other.

Re:units please (1)

tgd (2822) | about 3 months ago | (#46093055)

"below zero'

Kelvin? (is that you, Frank Herbert?)
Centigrade?
Farenheit?

Does it matter, relative to the story?

Re:units please (3, Informative)

ziggyzaggy (552814) | about 3 months ago | (#46093241)

yes, many people in the world would be much more concerned about electric car with 32 degree F problem versus one that appears at 0 degrees F (-18 degrees C) Since the problem appears at 0 degrees C, that isn't very cold at all. It was -26 degrees C last night here

Re:units please (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46093103)

"below zero'

Kelvin? (is that you, Frank Herbert?)
Centigrade?
Farenheit?

That's absolute zero my friend.

Those damn Norwegians and their proprietary weather systems.

Who Cares? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46092703)

Why is every Tesla fart reported on ./?

Re:Who Cares? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46092743)

Because they are awesome from a technological standpoint? And there is a large crossover between computer geeks and people who like cars?

Re:Who Cares? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46092975)

Because they are awesome from a technological standpoint?

Howso, please? They're brilliantly marketed, but I fail to see how they're technically awesome. What do you consider impressive about them? Be specific.

And there is a large crossover between computer geeks and people who like cars?

Disagree. You might as well say, "There's a large crossover between jocks and people who like cars." You know, fast cars, loose women, etc. lol stereotypes.

Re:Who Cares? (5, Insightful)

DarkOx (621550) | about 3 months ago | (#46092955)

Because many of us are interested. Tesla, love'em or hate'm are trying to sell a pure electric car without the compromises at a price at least a segment of the mass market can afford. There are ton's of technical hurdles to doing that and its interesting to watch theory and design encounter real world conditions.

Tesla is somewhat unique in this area too, Yes there is all electric Leaf and that strange i-Miev thing but neither of those comes anywhere near offering the range and performance characteristics of what most of us Americans expect from our ICE powered vehicles, in other words they make compromises, where as most Slashdoter's would be quite pleased with the Tesla compared to their current ride, provided it continues to live up to expectations.

Re:Who Cares? (4, Insightful)

pr0fessor (1940368) | about 3 months ago | (#46093135)

The name Tesla also holds a special place in geek culture. Choosing that as name for an electric car manufacture puts a greater expectation on the product.

Re:Who Cares? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46093137)

My car ran out of gas the other day when I was way, way out in the boondocks in freezing Norway. Not a gas station within 100 miles. Is slashdot going to report on that? Oh no, that's not a Tesla, and we're only interested when Tesla cars run out of gas, oops, I mean electricity.

The question was why is every Tesla _fart_ coming up on slashdot. The news on Tesla, GM, or Edsel really needs to be saved for important issues, and not just someone running out of fscking gasahol.

Re:Who Cares? (1)

icebike (68054) | about 3 months ago | (#46093221)

most Slashdoter's would be quite pleased with the Tesla compared to their current ride, provided it continues to live up to expectations.

Its interesting that living up to the expectations is something the Tesla pretty much takes in stride, and all we hear about are the corner cases of Tesla glitches.
Fires after devastating crashes, charger issues, etc.

Similar (and worse) problems in ICE vehicles are scarcely mentioned, Gas line freezes, gas tank ruptures, just refusing to start in cold weather.
There seems to be a media preference for reporting problems, no doubt fueled by all the advertising done by the big auto makers. Of course nobody will admit this, or that advertising influences their story in any way, and yet they will sandwich this news between car ads from 4 or 5 different automakers.

So geek interest plus big-auto nay-saying to dealership hostility all conspire to make sure you hear every bad thing regardless of how small.

Re:Who Cares? (1)

icebike (68054) | about 3 months ago | (#46093065)

Why is every Tesla fart reported on ./?

Because its firggin obvious no internal combustion engines have starting problems below freezing.

So its necessary to point out every liability about this new fangled electric car so that buyers put that silly idea out of their head. Besides, big auto will take advertisements in your newspaper, blog site, etc when you have Tesla failure stories. Now double check those jumper cables, then go crank it over while I spray some ether down the intake.

Re:Who Cares? (1)

0123456 (636235) | about 3 months ago | (#46093179)

Because its firggin obvious no internal combustion engines have starting problems below freezing.

It's not a 'starting problem', it's a 'refuelling problem'. I've refuelled my car at 40 below zero before, with no problems.

And it starts at 30 below zero if I forget to plug the heater in, though it's not very happy about that.

Re:Who Cares? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46093235)

Because its firggin obvious no internal combustion engines have starting problems below freezing.

Someone haven't driven a diesel in sub zero temperatures without a block-heater.

The charging issue is a problem but not an unsolvable one. The battery just has to be warmed up before charging.

Self-solving problem (5, Funny)

i kan reed (749298) | about 3 months ago | (#46092721)

People disincentivized into buying electric cars, increasing CO2 emissions, raising planetary temperatures until electric cars work.

Re:Self-solving problem (1)

multimediavt (965608) | about 3 months ago | (#46092871)

People disincentivized into buying electric cars, increasing CO2 emissions, raising planetary temperatures until electric cars work.

Is that how Dick Cheney logic works?

Re:Self-solving problem (1)

Talderas (1212466) | about 3 months ago | (#46093091)

But then temperatures rise, electric cars become prevalent and then temperatures drop and they cease working. Then we have to break out all the gas powered cars until the temperature rises enough that electric works again.

Re:Self-solving problem (1)

i kan reed (749298) | about 3 months ago | (#46093117)

Since we're pretending this isn't just a joke:

I think you're overestimating the rate at which life on the planet can consume atmospheric carbon dioxide. It's actually quite slow, compared to which burning fossil fuels can put it out.

Someone's got a hate on for Tesla (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46092723)

What's with all the anti-Tesla articles?

Re:Someone's got a hate on for Tesla (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46092769)

News you don't like is still news.

Re:Someone's got a hate on for Tesla (0)

mark-t (151149) | about 3 months ago | (#46092863)

It's less about news that we don't like and seems more like news that doesn't like Tesla. Which can be hard to call unbiased and objective.

Re:Someone's got a hate on for Tesla (2)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 3 months ago | (#46093013)

Really? This is the first submission I've seen that includes articles from greencarreports.com that aren't completely apologetic to Tesla.

Not to mention, just because you don't like the facts the news presents doesn't mean it's not news.

Re:Someone's got a hate on for Tesla (1)

smooth wombat (796938) | about 3 months ago | (#46093099)

But it's okay to report on a flaw in an Intel chip or a software patch which breaks a person's system, right?

This has nothing to do with being biased. It's reporting on a known issue which affects those who bought a Tesla, just like people who bought that certain Intel chip or installed the patch.

Re: Someone's got a hate on for Tesla (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46093181)

It's just brain gas from people who are jealous of actual Tesla owners.

Whenever I hear about electric car failures (-1)

Ukab the Great (87152) | about 3 months ago | (#46092781)

I am reminded why most lifeforms has been storing energy chemically, as opposed to electrically, for billions of years.

Re:Whenever I hear about electric car failures (4, Interesting)

xlv (125699) | about 3 months ago | (#46092835)

newsflash: batteries generate electricty from stored chemical energy

Re:Whenever I hear about electric car failures (1)

ziggyzaggy (552814) | about 3 months ago | (#46093087)

but batteries depend on a current carrying path from anode to cathode for the "half -cell" reactions take place. Not quite like most living things

Re:Whenever I hear about electric car failures (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46093163)

Nope. They don't generate electricity, they store energy. Learn more Thermodynamics. Additionally: Some batteries store power as EM fields. A high density battery (gang) of capacitors is known as an ultracapacitor, but it's just a battery.

Re:Whenever I hear about electric car failures (1)

DarkOx (621550) | about 3 months ago | (#46092845)

How do think a battery works exactly?

Or is this years model S using some sort of super capacitor now?

Re:Whenever I hear about electric car failures (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46092847)

I am reminded why most lifeforms has been storing energy chemically, as opposed to electrically, for billions of years.

But... batteries store energy as chemical energy.

Re:Whenever I hear about electric car failures (2)

multimediavt (965608) | about 3 months ago | (#46092857)

I am reminded why most lifeforms has been storing energy chemically, as opposed to electrically, for billions of years.

Oh, you mean like this? [vt.edu] Coming soon to an electric car near you! lol

Re:Whenever I hear about electric car failures (1)

Vanderhoth (1582661) | about 3 months ago | (#46092937)

All we need is develop a car that runs on fat cells and we can use the liposuction from North Americans (Canadians included) to run the worlds transportation system indefinitely.

Re:Whenever I hear about electric car failures (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46092951)

And we are shown what a cretin you are.

Cold Batteries (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46092785)

Batteries are having trouble charging in the cold!?! Nah, that never happens! /sarcasm

mom's kind new clear options overlooked still (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46092789)

rock on https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9CKpCGjD8wg&list=PL456D453B409DF8D1

Blaming the cables? (3, Insightful)

hubang (692671) | about 3 months ago | (#46092791)

I'd think the batteries would be the problem. Running serious current through the wires should keep them warm even in cold weather. Plus, conductivity should go up with colder temperature.

Now the batteries on the other hand.... Batteries don't hold charge very well in the cold. It's been one of the two big problems for electric cars since the 19th century.

Re:Blaming the cables? (5, Interesting)

Andy Dodd (701) | about 3 months ago | (#46092921)

Thing is, a number of people have indicated that they have used third-party cables and those have solved the issue.

Re:Blaming the cables? (1)

Mryll (48745) | about 3 months ago | (#46092997)

Hmm maybe the plug/interface on the cable is failing with size contraction somehow?

Re:Blaming the cables? (1)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 3 months ago | (#46093023)

Thing is, a number of people have indicated that they have used third-party cables and those have solved the issue.

Does using a third-party cable void the warranty, or violate the EULA?

Funky cold Medina, did I just say "violate the EULA" when talking about a fucking car? That is kind of depressing...

Re:Blaming the cables? (2)

Luckyo (1726890) | about 3 months ago | (#46093007)

As I understand the chemistry, they do in fact hold the charge just fine. They just become unable to release it as well. Easily demonstrable with a cell phone using similar Li-ION tech - take it outside and let to go to minus 20C and you'll see the charge indicator go low after usage that would normally only use about half of the charge in normal condition. Get it back inside and let it warm up and charge indicator goes back up to show the about half of the charge that remains.

I live in Finland and use one of the older nokia phones that has to survive the cold-warm environment switching on daily basis, so I'm quite familiar with the mechanics.

Re:Blaming the cables? (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46093237)

Now the batteries on the other hand.... Batteries don't hold charge very well in the cold. It's been one of the two big problems for electric cars since the 19th century.

Actually, batteries tend to hold charge very well when cold. Cool/cold and dry is typically the recommended (below freezing or not varies).
The problem is that they aren't very willing to let go of, or accept new, charge when cold - just as most any chemical process slow down when it's cold. This makes it hard to draw current to run the car or to charge the batteries back up.

Edgar Hansen Was Right (1)

multimediavt (965608) | about 3 months ago | (#46092817)

Apparently the issues are simply down to the differences in the Norwegian network as Norway uses a slightly different charging adapter than other countries in Europe.

There is a right way, a wrong way, and a Norwegian way. --Edgar Hansen, Northwestern, Deadliest Catch

Re:Edgar Hansen Was Right (4, Funny)

Shinobi (19308) | about 3 months ago | (#46092899)

Well, as the joke goes here in Sweden:

Why are there no mental asylums in Norway?
It'd cost too much to put walls and a roof over the whole country....

Re:Edgar Hansen Was Right (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46093083)

Not unlike what we say about Georgia in the US:
Too small to be its own country, too big to be its own insane asylum.

Re:Edgar Hansen Was Right (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46093113)

It'd cost too much to put walls and a roof over the whole country....

Wonko the Sane says "You're doing it wrong."

batteries? Inefficient in the cold? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46092825)

I'm shocked I tell you! Well, not really because it's cold out and the batteries aren't charged.

In Norway this is a problem (4, Interesting)

kaliann (1316559) | about 3 months ago | (#46092855)

Yes, it's related to the cold, but it also appears to be related to the specific issues of Norway's grid.

Some speculation is that the problem involves too-extreme fluctuations in the electricity provided by that grid and a charger-side software-mediated shutoff of charging. If that's the case, then this might be another charger issue that can be solved with an over-the-air "patch" like some of the previous problems.

While this is definitely a concern for Tesla and their Norwegian customers, it doesn't seem to be relevant to cars in North America.

Re:In Norway this is a problem (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46092927)

Because the American power grids are rock steady and it never gets below freezing here.

Re:In Norway this is a problem (1)

PIBM (588930) | about 3 months ago | (#46093089)

And have you seen reports of this problem around here ? Which makes it looks like it really is what they say it is..

Re:In Norway this is a problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46093205)

Just because it also fails sometimes doesn't mean it fails the same way.

Re:In Norway this is a problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46093209)

I think the actual problem isn't that the system stops charging (you need to protect your expensive car), but that it doesn't start back up again until a human intervenes. If you went to bed assuming you'd have a full charge in the morning, only to find that it only charged for 10 minutes before shutting off, you'd think that the charger was broken.

dom

Re:In Norway this is a problem (2)

0123456 (636235) | about 3 months ago | (#46093243)

If you went to bed assuming you'd have a full charge in the morning, only to find that it only charged for 10 minutes before shutting off, you'd think that the charger was broken.

If it only charged for ten minutes before shutting off, the charger is broken.

Well, that's why Edison won (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46092873)

Tesla was having issues charging.

Biased? (1)

Nethemas the Great (909900) | about 3 months ago | (#46092875)

Nope, no bias in the summary at all. I couldn't possibly imagine anything other than a "just the facts" linked article.

Re:Biased? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46093027)

Saying something you don't want to hear is not bias. You Tesla fangirls need to stop gettkng your panties in a knot over any story showing an issue with Tesla.

Re:Biased? (1)

jfengel (409917) | about 3 months ago | (#46093153)

Actually, the linked article is considerably better. The headline of TFA is more accurate: "Tesla Grapples With Charging-Cable Troubles In Norwegian Cold".

The article came to prominence via the New York Times, who published that rather scurrilous piece last year on Tesla, but this was a different writer and the Times' summary of it is reasonably neutral.

Sick of Tesla's Positive Spin on Everything (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46092893)

They should be more like the japanese: underpromise and overdeliver!

It's almost as though cars need winterizing (4, Insightful)

sandbagger (654585) | about 3 months ago | (#46092905)

Weird, eh?

I used to work in Northern Canada where all the US and some of the European manufacturers used to do cold weather testing. (The toolsets and options differ in North America which is why separate testing was done for Europe.) The Asian manufacturers were also doing cold testing there but their labs and warehouses ended up with all of the crappy real estate.

Did anyone seriously think the cold wouldn't be an issue? People need to get out of California and see what the rest of the world is like.

Re:It's almost as though cars need winterizing (2)

Luckyo (1726890) | about 3 months ago | (#46093037)

As noted in the OP, the issue is not so much the battery tech but the Norway-specific cable that doesn't work. It charges in cold weather in other countries using different cables and it charges in Norway using a third party cable. But first party cable in Norway is apparently dysfunctional in the cold.

Reason given is that Norway has a different spec for the cable for specific local reasons.

Re:It's almost as though cars need winterizing (3, Funny)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 3 months ago | (#46093095)

Did anyone seriously think the cold wouldn't be an issue? People need to get out of California and see what the rest of the world is like.

Merely pointing out that a world exists outside California is enough to blow a fair amount of minds, I'm afraid.

Even worse, you can extrapolate that to include, "outside 'Murica" for a large portion of the populace.

OpenBSD + Truecrypt + Rip Anywhere MP3 player (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46092907)

Give me an MP3 player which has the following features:

1. OpenBSD
2. TrueCrypt - choice of encrypting all of device with 1st run and in settings
3. Rip from any device - an extension to the device (like the front part of ST:TNG ship's dish which separates for example) which allows CDs to be inserted and ripped on the fly without a computer connection, and the ability to plug into any electronic device which has the ability to contain audio files, scan for, and rip any audio files - all with the option to convert them to a format of your choosing
4. Complete support of as many audio/image/video codecs as possible.
5. Nothing about the device should be proprietary, neither hardware or software.

Before you say, "Why would you want to use a device with the MP3 format?" As #4 points out, and you should really know unless you're trolling, if you look at all of the MP3 players currently for sale, most support many audio, image (JPG and more) and sometimes several video formats.

Cable issue not Tesla issue (1)

RichMan (8097) | about 3 months ago | (#46092923)

This is like saying a car is bad because the gas hose does not fit when it gets cold.
It is not an issue with the car.

And "dips below zero" would be a poor threshold.
We have windshield washer fluid that is rated to -50C (-58F) for a good reason.

Re:Cable issue not Tesla issue (1)

0123456 (636235) | about 3 months ago | (#46093207)

This is like saying a car is bad because the gas hose does not fit when it gets cold.
It is not an issue with the car.

That's like saying that when a 3D game won't run because they rely on driver bugs which don't exist in our driver, it's the game's problem. That might well be true, but everyone using our GPU will blame it on us.

Similarly, no-one will care whether it's 'the cable's fault' when they're stranded in the middle of nowhere at 40 below zero and unable to recharge their car.

OWESOME (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46092969)

Yet another product the manufacture didn't bother to actually test in the conditions the average person might expect to use said product.

Meteorologists (4, Insightful)

necro81 (917438) | about 3 months ago | (#46092971)

apparently meteorologists have just discovered the term Polar Vortex

No, meteorologists have understood the term Polar Vortex for decades. Weathermen, newscasters, and ratings-minded producers have only just discovered the term.

Re:Meteorologists (1)

Curunir_wolf (588405) | about 3 months ago | (#46093245)

apparently meteorologists have just discovered the term Polar Vortex

No, meteorologists have understood the term Polar Vortex for decades. Weathermen, newscasters, and ratings-minded producers have only just discovered the term.

It gives the MSM a way to explain extreme cold that can be attributed to Global Warming.

why is everyone always snide about Tesla? (5, Informative)

SuperBanana (662181) | about 3 months ago | (#46092977)

apparently the darling child of the automotive industry

What's with the snide side commentary? Tesla isn't the "darling" of anyone. Snide, obnoxious comments like this are pretty much du jour in any coverage. Everyone's gunning for them, simply because they're odd kid on the block.

A Tesla catches fire after hitting a piece of massive road debris or getiting into a crash, and it's a fucking national emergency, their stock tanks, electric cars are suddenly "unsafe", etc.

Meanwhile: do you drive a Ford SUV made in the 90's? Twice, Ford weakened the roof and support pillars to save money, against the recommendation of their engineers.

Drive a 90's Ford? Their ignition switches were substandard and could short out, causing your car to catch fire at random. 8.6 million vehicles: http://articles.baltimoresun.c... [baltimoresun.com]

Drive a recent GM truck? They've also got a "randomly burst into fire" problem; 370,000 vehicles: http://money.cnn.com/2014/01/1... [cnn.com]

Just google "GM recall fire" or "Ford recall fire" and read page after page of recalls that affect hundreds of thousands if not millions of vehicles.

Re:why is everyone always snide about Tesla? (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46093053)

And yet, any time something bad happens involving Tesla, hordes of folks like yourself immediately charge to their defense. It sure gives the impression that they're someone's darling, anyway...

no mention of freeing the innocent stem cells yet? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46092979)

highly charged oil addict burlesque rhettorhea about almost nothing is not new... ask noam promotion going well https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9CKpCGjD8wg&list=PL456D453B409DF8D1 some still calling this 'weather'? http://www.globalresearch.ca/weather-warfare-beware-the-us-military-s-experiments-with-climatic-warfare/7561

Cold is Hard (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46093033)

My conventional engine pickup won't start when it's cold. Heck, I'm having trouble getting up myself this winter. This old man doesn't really see the issue here.

Cables? (1)

fahrbot-bot (874524) | about 3 months ago | (#46093043)

...the charging cables that come with the car are unable to provide a charge when the temperature dips below zero.

Um, Dear Editors (Slashdot and Green Car Reports), The "cables" can't provide a charge?

Re:Cables? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46093177)

The cables are unable to provide the connection neccessairy to complete the circuit to allow electromagnetic energy to flow. You are picking nits.

It appears that the connectors are shrinking and not forming a positive connection... based on what little information the article provides (mostly the fact that different connectors do work)

Quick to Blame (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46093059)

I'm really tired of these articles popping up before the issue is fully diagnosed. I understand the media's need/want to be the first to break the story, but what story is really here?

All we know is that the car is possibly having charging problems in an isolated area. With none of the variables worked out, or the root of the problem fully diagnosed, why is the media once again so quick to blame the Tesla?

Fix here break there. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46093141)

Am thinking the new Wall Chargers [slashdot.org] and/or the Software update [slashdot.org] are causing problems. When it gets cold electrical junction tended to shrink away from each other. The junctions rarely open but instead loose current carrying ability. Normally though this isn't too big a deal because they under go ohmic heating when the current gets high enough. Some Wattage is lost maintaining the temperature at the junction but it's usually very small and self regulating.(More heat causes less resistance in this case making a self regulating loop) I have even see this happen at room temperature where the junction would heat fixing it self. However, Tesla has made it so that charging system checks for bad junctions and if it detects them it ether turns off or charges slowly. Obviously, this prevents the junction from heating up and fixing it self.

Really? (4, Informative)

xplosiv (129880) | about 3 months ago | (#46093143)

What's next, are we going to post about a gasoline car not starting (am actually trying to help someone jumpstart their ICE right now, maybe I can get featured too)?

Anyways, just last week, someone made the trip from NYC to LA [chargeny.com] in his Tesla Model S, seen temps in the -20F range, and the car was just fine. I'm driving my EV in these same temps, no issues either (ignoring the lower range).

This is not a battery issue as some people seem to indicate.

I call bullshit (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46093165)

...on the slightly-different-connector-excuse, and here's why:

- The voltage is the same (230V@50Hz)
- The connectors are interchangable (The only difference being the layout of the grounding pins, but support for both are required)
- If Tesla has supplied adapters that operate differently based on the socket in use (Scandinavia vs (most of) rest of Europe) they are breaching EU regulations (Yes, those regulations cover Norway, despite not being an EU member)

This is like a paper manufacturer experiencing problems with people using red pens instead of blue on their white cellulose based product.

As much as i like Tesla and their cars, this explanation is just lame.

This is why nobody reads the articles (5, Informative)

T.E.D. (34228) | about 3 months ago | (#46093187)

I'd advise Slashdot readers to take their typical tack, and not read the linked articles. They are crap. However (again, much like Slashdot), the comments can be enlightening.

What I'm seeing there is:

a) This is not about the cold, or winter at all. Its been a problem since they started delivering vehicles in August.

b) Due to all the bad press (from poor journalists such as these) over fires from improperly overcharged batteries, Tesla charging cables now try to detect when a battery is fully-charged and stop the charging process.

c) They do this by looking for changes in the current flow through them.

d) Norway's power grid is so dirty that it is fooling the cables. That's the issue, near as I can tell.

If you live in Norway, stick with proven tech (1, Insightful)

Simonetta (207550) | about 3 months ago | (#46093199)

If you live in Norway, stick with proven technology. Like gasoline engines. Let's face it. Norway is often very cold in the winter. Cold enough that people die from cold unless they have machines to keep them warm. When you live in places that have extreme weather, you HAVE to accept that proven working technology like gasoline-engines-for -transportation overrides any emotional feelings of needing to serve as a test site for so-called green technology. In California it doesn't matter. But Norway's not California. If you fuck up and buy a 'green' car that won't start in the cold, then you die in the cold. Act accordingly. Nobody in California gives a shit whether or not you freeze to death because their technology failed.

    This very expensive automobile has demonstratively failed to meet the needs of people who live north of the 55th meridian. Norwegians should not buy it. Buy a Volvo: Swedes understand cold and their cars can be coaxed to start in extremely cold weather.

    And there is this briefly mentioned problem of the fucking Norwegian electrical connectors not mating with standard electric car connectors... You'all need to find the guy responsible for this, strip him to underwear, and dump out into the snow. Be sure to leave him with an electric heater that has a plug that just quite doesn't fit into the socket needed to stay alive. If he lives, then he won't be doing stupid shit like this any more. If he dies, well, just one more soul sacrifice to the Viking gods.

Very little to do with Tesla. At all. Again. (2)

sl4shd0rk (755837) | about 3 months ago | (#46093233)

FTFA: "The issues are simply down to differences in the Norwegian network that Tesla has not experienced elsewhere"

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