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New 3D Printer Can Print With Carbon Fiber

Soulskill posted about 7 months ago | from the harder-better-faster-stronger dept.

Technology 141

cold fjord sends this news from Popular Mechanics: "[M]aking custom racecar parts out of carbon fiber is daunting. The only real method available is CNC machining, an expensive and difficult process that requires laying pieces by hand. To improve the process, [Gregory Mark] looked to 3D printing. But nothing on the market could print the material, and no available materials could print pieces strong enough for his purposes. So Mark devised his own solution: the MarkForged Mark One, the world's first carbon fiber 3D printer. Mark debuted his Boston area-based startup MarkForged at SolidWorks World 2014 in San Diego with a working prototype. The Mark One can print in carbon fiber, fiberglass, nylon and PLA (a thermoplastic). ... The main advantage of the Mark One: It can print parts 20 times stiffer and five times stronger than ABS, according to the company. It even has a higher strength-to-weight ratio than CNC-machined aluminum. ... Mark says that he imagines this machine is for anybody who wants to print in a material as strong as aluminum. Beyond racecars, it could be useful to industries like prosthetics."

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Beats colour.... (5, Insightful)

webmistressrachel (903577) | about 7 months ago | (#46096341)

This is the first materials advance I've seen in ages, bar superficial things like the ability to make ridiculously expensive full-colour prototypes of things that need moulding to make en masse.

Uggh (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46096371)

The first two sentences are chock-full of retardation.

Re:Uggh (4, Insightful)

Algae_94 (2017070) | about 7 months ago | (#46096383)

There must be another CNC than the one I'm familiar with: "CNC machining, an expensive and difficult process that requires laying pieces by hand"

Re:Uggh (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46096477)

Tried machining fibreglass :), dust is a bit of a problem.

And if you machine CF, you cut through the fibres and lose the strength.

To get around that you shape a plastic core using CNC, then you have to lay the CF over the core by hand. This bypasses those problems, you can print the core then precision lay the CF thread by thread.

Another (later poster) got that wrong as well, this *is* as good as hand laid for most applications.

Re:Uggh (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46096493)

Unless this layers carbon fibers + resin + hardener making the epoxy bond immediately, chopping them up to put in filament to be deposited by heat destroys any strength CF has.

The people at Makerbot definitely will not be losing sleep over this.

Now, sintered Iconel in a home unit... now that is when to worry, because metal can make useful, non-kitchy items.

Re:Uggh (4, Informative)

KingOfBLASH (620432) | about 7 months ago | (#46096775)

Unless this layers carbon fibers + resin + hardener making the epoxy bond immediately

Actually it does. Check out the video on the website:

Re:Uggh (0)

gl4ss (559668) | about 7 months ago | (#46096987)

it just looks like a normal fdm printer to me.

and filament with cf bits in it is already available too..

Re:Uggh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46097109)

"[M]aking custom racecar parts out of carbon fiber is daunting. The only real method available is CNC machining, an expensive and difficult process that requires laying pieces by hand.

For a site with nerds this is greatly over excoriated, once you make a "mold" the remaining process of layering in the carbon is so easy even a caveman can do it.

The molds require a CNC machine which is obviously automated, if you don't have one or can't afford one , you can make a template using clay/plaster or whatever else [I use a combo of wood, metal mesh, clay and or plaster to get the shape] and then taking the part to a foundry [depending on the size of the piece I can actually do that myself as well] to have the mold made into metal.

It isn't a ridiculously impossible process. The 3c-printing tech is a coll idea itself, but /. editors continue to write long drawn out articles filled with waste..

Re:Uggh (1)

modecx (130548) | about 7 months ago | (#46097509)

More jump cuts and less substance than a Micheal Bay movie. That's an impressive development in itself!

Re:Uggh (1)

Lodlaiden (2767969) | about 7 months ago | (#46097697)

More jump cuts and less substance than a Micheal Bay movie. That's an impressive development in itself!

Obligatory *Michael...
But can you still get $12 a seat for the showing?

Re:Uggh (1)

sd4f (1891894) | about 7 months ago | (#46097773)

Irony is, 3D printing is CNC.

Re:Uggh (1)

EvanED (569694) | about 7 months ago | (#46096517)

This one is also pretty spectacular: "But nothing on the market could print the material, and no available materials could print pieces strong enough for his purposes."

i don't get it (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46096373)

It isn't going to have the strength of carbon fibre done properly so its useless for the types of applications where that strength matters and it isn't going to have the distinctive CF look so its useless for aesthetic applications.

Re:i don't get it (1)

rmdingler (1955220) | about 7 months ago | (#46096441)

It's a nice leap forward. With Dell and Makerbot spreading the tech around, I expect innovations like this to improve exponentially.

It won't be long before the technology is incredibly improved and ridiculously inexpensive.

Popular Science: Make Your Own Drone at Home.

Re:i don't get it (2, Insightful)

dAzED1 (33635) | about 7 months ago | (#46096451)

First result from me when I google "useful things with a 3d printer" is an article which includes a garlic press, cherry pit remover, and door hook. All these things require more strength than what consumer-level 3d printers can actually muster. Getting more strength in the process is indeed an issue, so...permit me to disagree that there isn't someplace worthwhile between ABS and true carbon-fiber...

Re:i don't get it (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46096687)

I've had hands-on experience with a 1x RepRap that was shoddily built, 1x RepRap that was well-built, and one older MakerBot.
All most definitely could produce things with the strength to properly do a garlic press, cherry pit remover, or door hook... though the RepRap would make something that LOOKS rubbish, it would most definitely have the strength.

Re:i don't get it (4, Interesting)

csumpi (2258986) | about 7 months ago | (#46097167)

Yes, that' what I thought, too. Until I built a 3d printer, spent time to calibrate it and learned how to use it.

Now I can make things much much stronger than a garlic press.

Re:i don't get it (1)

camperdave (969942) | about 7 months ago | (#46097645)

Must have been an April fools article. Since when is a garlic press useful? Nevertheless, all of those thing can work just fine with ABS plastic, since they are primarily compressive loads.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8PijBtGqLhs [youtube.com]

Re:i don't get it (1)

RabidReindeer (2625839) | about 7 months ago | (#46098903)

Must have been an April fools article. Since when is a garlic press useful?

In my case, since last night when I made dinner. A garlic press smashes cell walls in a way that results in more intense flavor (and less graininess) than simply mincing.

Nevertheless, all of those thing can work just fine with ABS plastic, since they are primarily compressive loads.

That part I'm more skeptical about, since I have a plastic potato ricer: something very definitely compressive. And I always worry that the handle or plunger will snap when I feed it an especially stubborn load. The handle is more of a shearing load, but the plunger is pure compression.

Re:i don't get it (5, Insightful)

oscrivellodds (1124383) | about 7 months ago | (#46097095)

It may not have the strength of CF done properly, but it will be much stronger than the alternatives like ABS and PLA. There are plenty of applications where that "between" strength is useful. The claim is that it is stiffer and stronger than 6061 aluminum. That means you don't have to go into a machine shop to cut a bunch of 6061 aluminum- you can print a part and get similar characteristics. The 3D printer doesn't care how complex the design is- it will produce it at much lower cost than a machine shop full of mills and guys who know how to run them.

Re: i don't get it (3, Insightful)

O('_')O_Bush (1162487) | about 7 months ago | (#46099097)

If it is as strong as aluminum, it may be suitable for 3D printing AR-15 lowers. You think the moral panic around 3D printing crappy guns that only work a few times is bad, imagine the news field day when we can print the registered part of an AR and have it be just as durable or more so than existing polymer lowers.

Hand operated CNC? That's a new one. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46096421)

CNC machining, an expensive and difficult process that requires laying pieces by hand

I think someone doesn't know what they are talking about. I don't know if you can CNC machine carbon fibre - maybe you could make a carbon fibre reinforced solid block and CNC machine that - but most carbon fibre parts are made by that expensive and difficult hand-made process of laying sheets of woven fibres and epoxying them into place.

Re:Hand operated CNC? That's a new one. (1)

Horshu (2754893) | about 7 months ago | (#46096475)

Maybe they're talking about the mold that gets CNC'ed?

guns (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46096423)

what about GUNS can this thing make GUNS i thought 3d printers made GUNS?

Seriously though, "3d printing" is like "the cloud" - you can just label any new tech CLOUD / 3D PRINTER and every dork/investor gets a stiffy.

Jon Smith selling the SmithWidget and SmithCo is more "ads that matter". Give me the paper that illustrates the breakthrough, not the guy who's trying to make money.

Er... what? (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Psychopath (18031) | about 7 months ago | (#46096437)

"The only real method available is CNC machining, an expensive and difficult process that requires laying pieces by hand."

CNC means Computer Numerical Controlled, which isn't remotely similar to laying out sheets of resin-bonded carbon fiber by hand. Or are they forming blocks of fiber made out of a lot of bonded sheets, and then CNC-milling them into shapes? That seems like a pointless waste. Very confusing sentence, there.

Re:Er... what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46096487)

I suspect that's making molds with CNC, then laying the carbon fiber?

Re:Er... what? (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46096547)

Nuclear power is an option. You see you can use Neutron Ablative Machining to to lay down carbon nano tube in an entangled arrangement. It's actually a pretty strait forward process once you learn to control the Neutron energy. But what do I now I only come from a future where we didn't assassinate Hitler. Idiots.

Re:Er... what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46096657)

But what do I now I only come from a future where we didn't assassinate Hitler

Me too. In my world Hitler killed himself

Re:Er... what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46097493)

Of course, keep believing that. Oh, and don't bother trying to look on the dark side of the moon. Evils- I mean Elvis Presley definitely not doing cocaine with Hitler and Abraham Lincoln there. You'd be stupid to even try to find that. Just be a good sheep and obey authority.

Re:Er... what? (1)

chill (34294) | about 7 months ago | (#46099217)

Pfft. Everyone knows it is Bigfoot and JFK who reside on the far side of the moon. Poser.

Re:Er... what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46096883)

I come from the past where we had grammar.

Re: Er... what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46097111)

I cone from a parallel dimension where gl*bn$ckÂ. ÂLOZ

Re:Er... what? (1)

Ferrofluid (2979761) | about 7 months ago | (#46097093)

I know you're joking, but how can an ablative process be used to deposit material? They're kinda the opposite of each other.

Re:Er... what? (1)

camperdave (969942) | about 7 months ago | (#46097275)

When two items are close together, what's ablated on one side, is vacuum deposited on the other... but with neutron beams.

Re:Er... what? (1)

tinkerton (199273) | about 7 months ago | (#46098553)

I know you're joking, but how can an ablative process be used to deposit material? They're kinda the opposite of each other.

You have to run it in reverse obviously

Re:Er... what? (5, Informative)

NoKaOi (1415755) | about 7 months ago | (#46096593)

"The only real method available is CNC machining, an expensive and difficult process that requires laying pieces by hand."

CNC means Computer Numerical Controlled, which isn't remotely similar to laying out sheets of resin-bonded carbon fiber by hand. Or are they forming blocks of fiber made out of a lot of bonded sheets, and then CNC-milling them into shapes? That seems like a pointless waste. Very confusing sentence, there.

There are two ways carbon fiber is generally done...you can CNC a part (usually out of foam, sometimes wood) and then wrap it in carbon fiber, or for repeatability you can CNC a mold and hand lay the carbon fiber in that. Yes, the sentence was poorly written for the layperson, but if you've worked with composites before you'd know what it means.

Re:Er... what? (1)

epiccollision (1373095) | about 7 months ago | (#46096675)

how do you 3d print carbon fibre??? how is that even possible? and the sentence isn't poorly written in regards to CNC, its just nonsense.

Re:Er... what? (2)

KingOfBLASH (620432) | about 7 months ago | (#46096763)

Try RTFA and go to the website http://markforged.com/ [markforged.com]

You can see a video of the machine in action. It appears that it lays down strips of carbon fiber... Not sure the exact mechanism, the quality, or anything like that, but the machine is printing SOMETHING.

Re:Er... what? (1)

wagnerrp (1305589) | about 7 months ago | (#46097295)

So prepreg? Or is it filament winding?

Re:Er... what? (1)

gl4ss (559668) | about 7 months ago | (#46098361)

to me it just looked like they were printing this stuff "http://www.3ders.org/articles/20131027-proto-pasta-adds-three-new-materials-for-your-desktop-3d-printer.html"

(that's carbon fibre reinforced pla.. stuff that you can put through any reprap).

Re:Er... what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46096611)

That's the same question that always pops in my head when I see nonsensical "3D printed" things. 3D printed metal? Uh, how does that work? 3D printed carbon fiber? Uh, what the fuck are you smoking. The advantage of carbon fiber is laying out sheets of carbon weave and then tying it together with a bonding agent like epoxy. I can't see how that could be 3D printed in any standard sense, or any sense that would make it anywhere near as light and strong as actual carbon fiber.

Re:Er... what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46096791)

. I can't see how that could be 3D printed in any standard sense, or any sense that would make it anywhere near as light and strong as actual carbon fiber.

So, because "you can't see it" means it's impossible? Are you that arrogant, that stupid, or both?

Re:Er... what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46096821)

Then explain it, or are you too stupid? The fact is, this technology is not true 3D printed carbon fiber. It's a plastic/carbon mix like the propellers I use on my quadcopter and I can tell you for a fact they are not as strong as actual real carbon fiber props.

Re:Er... what? (4, Informative)

wagnerrp (1305589) | about 7 months ago | (#46097307)

3D printed metal? Uh, how does that work?

The same way 3D printed plastic works, additive welding, either through traditional welding from a feed spool, or powder sintering.

Re:Er... what? (3, Informative)

KingOfBLASH (620432) | about 7 months ago | (#46096647)

If you read TFS he says specifically "CNC-machined aluminum"

Re:Er... what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46097549)

if you would also read TFS, you would see the quote the GP uses is straight from the summary and is not referencing CNC-machined aluminum as was referenced later int he summary. CNC-maching aluminum has nothing to do with layering pieces by hand, and either that sentence forgot to mention they were talking about CNC-machining molds that CF is then layered into by hand, or they were seriously conflating ideas even more so.

Re:Er... what? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46096671)

I was about to post the exact same thing. That sentence appears to have been written by someone who has no idea what CNC machining is, nor any real idea how things are made with carbon fiber. There are actually a number of different processes used to make things out of carbon fiber, and CNC machining may be used to finish the parts (add holes or trim edges) but it is not used in the basic manufacturing.

What this thing "looks" like it does is use individual CF strands (or fiberglass or nylon) and lays them down or weaves them into the desired shape while (I presume) impregnating them with resin. The info site is remarkably devoid of useful details. The article actually has more info.

Price? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46096459)

Any idea what the asking price for this thing would be?

Re:Price? (4, Funny)

Intron (870560) | about 7 months ago | (#46096891)

The machine costs next to nothing. Now the ink cartridges ...

Re:Price? (1)

mhajicek (1582795) | about 7 months ago | (#46098781)

TFA says $5k.

CNC Machining carbon fibre?!?!? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46096463)

Oh now come ON, how the fuck does anyone with even a passing knowledge of CF production get the summary so fuckign incredibly wrong? CNC would be to create the MOLD. You dont bloody well layer CF by a goddamn CNC and most of the CF for racecars is layered over the mold by hand.

Now the idea of 3D printing CF isnt a bad idea - the secret to CF strength is getting the strands in the right direction and the resins used / curing time. I can see how this could work and it is somethign to check out. But holy fuck editors, get the goddamn summary right!

Re:CNC Machining carbon fibre?!?!? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46096473)

Not just that, but the looms and other machines used right now to create CF parts are already "3D printers". This story is just more more "3D printing" hype. So that hipsters with no real self-identity can buy a Makerbot and they think they'll be 3D printing carbon fiber rocket nozzles to fly to the moon.

Re:CNC Machining carbon fibre?!?!? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46096631)

So that hipsters with no real self-identity can buy a Makerbot and they think they'll be 3D printing carbon fiber rocket nozzles to fly to the moon.

Your tone is very dismissive, as if such a thing were not possible.

Re:CNC Machining carbon fibre?!?!? (1)

csumpi (2258986) | about 7 months ago | (#46097185)

with even a passing knowledge of [place any topic here] get the summary so fuckign incredibly wrong?

Welcome to slashdot.

Re:CNC Machining carbon fibre?!?!? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46097279)

I bloody well layer CF by a goddamn CNC 12 hours a day

Re:CNC Machining carbon fibre?!?!? (1)

mhajicek (1582795) | about 7 months ago | (#46098787)

Sure, but I bet the machine cost well more than $5k.

Re:CNC Machining carbon fibre?!?!? (2)

wagnerrp (1305589) | about 7 months ago | (#46097331)

You dont bloody well layer CF by a goddamn CNC

Actually, you do. CNC just means computer numeric control. It doesn't necessarily mean an end mill, lathe, or other traditional machining tool. In many applications, you can robotically layer carbon fiber over your mold. For example, the Boeing 787 [youtube.com] .

Pre-order your pink helium-filled unicorn now! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46096613)

Vapor-hardware is a thing. And you're lookin' at it.

The general Slashdot audience has many "tech-blindspots" and advanced composites is definately one of them.

"Pre-order" has become code for, "Welcome to town, Rube!"

Re:Pre-order your pink helium-filled unicorn now! (4, Insightful)

dbraden (214956) | about 7 months ago | (#46096913)

Vapor-hardware is a thing. And you're lookin' at it.

Except, they are already demo'ing a working prototype at a decent size trade show. That's some pretty thick vapor. I know demos != shipped, but I'm going to give this one the benefit of the doubt since it's very similar to well-understood and already available hardware.

You wouldn't download a car. (5, Funny)

mjwx (966435) | about 7 months ago | (#46096615)

Just you fucking wait.

We're half way to printing a Gallardo.

Re:You wouldn't download a car. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46096661)

We're half way to printing a Gallardo.

Sure, if you set T=0 at the first car (say, 1880). In another ~130 years maybe someone will print a Gallardo, complete with the leather interior...

captcha = racers

Re:You wouldn't download a car. (1)

KingOfBLASH (620432) | about 7 months ago | (#46096699)

For many many years it's been possible to buy parts that allow you to change a car to look like your favorite super car. Just do a quick google for "Kit Car." $10k + an appropriate body to put the kit on will allow you to have your very own knock off.

However, just because you CAN get parts that look like a lambo doesn't mean people run out of their way to get one. I suspect it will be the same. After you pay $10k to print up a Gallardo shell, you still need to install the thing. Which takes time and skill to get right.

And even then, people who know what a real supercar looks like will be able to tell that your knock off isn't real. Just like, despite the fact that you can get a perfectly good Louis Vuitton fake from China, people still buy the real thing.

So it's a non issue. Even if you could print one the labor involved (and cost of raw materials) wouldn't mean you could just "print a gallardo."

What IS interesting is if you would like to customize your car, you will be able to do things you could never do before.

Citation for the kit car thing you say? Sure.

Citation: http://www.kitcarlist.com/lamb... [kitcarlist.com]

Re:You wouldn't download a car. (1, Interesting)

ceoyoyo (59147) | about 7 months ago | (#46097299)

What's interesting is that'd you'd be able to print replacement parts. Autoparts are a big deal. And autobody is a big racket I mean, industry.

Re:You wouldn't download a car. (2)

KingOfBLASH (620432) | about 7 months ago | (#46097357)

Yes but who will install the parts?

Today you can go online and order after market parts from a company specializing in making replacement parts. But if you need to go to the dealership to get your car serviced it won't help because they'll still use genuine parts. Servicing yourself is still an issue unless you are a gear head

Re:You wouldn't download a car. (1)

ceoyoyo (59147) | about 7 months ago | (#46097381)

There are a lot of gear heads. There are also a lot of independent mechanics. More than dealer mechanics, actually.

Re:You wouldn't download a car. (1)

mjwx (966435) | about 7 months ago | (#46097689)

Yes but who will install the parts?

Today you can go online and order after market parts from a company specializing in making replacement parts. But if you need to go to the dealership to get your car serviced it won't help because they'll still use genuine parts. Servicing yourself is still an issue unless you are a gear head

What kind of idiot takes a car to a dealership. Once you're past warranty, you've got to be certifiably insane to go to a dealer.

Dealers services are a rip off and as soon as the dealer is no longer legally obligated to fix anything that goes wrong (statutory warranty) you're a complete fool if you go there and as soon as you mod a car, statutory warranties go out the window. I have a 7 yr old Honda Integra, Honda want $600 odd for a minor service, my mechanic who specialises in Japanese performance cars charges me 175 for a minor including workshop materials.

Re:You wouldn't download a car. (1)

kactusotp (2709311) | about 7 months ago | (#46097313)

Yeah but that is because the bodies are fibre glass, look rubbish and don't perform as well as the cars they are copying (weight strength etc). Building a carbon fibre shell is something else entirely. You are getting most of the benefit that the cars you are copying and you are using the best material. Sure you might not get the strength of a cross woven sheet but it will be a damn sight better than what is available now. And the whole idea isn't of getting a Gallardo for cheap, it is to build an incredible looking car that is unique, one of a kind, and performs better than the current options available to modders.

Re:You wouldn't download a car. (1)

KingOfBLASH (620432) | about 7 months ago | (#46097371)

Yeah but there's a LOT that goes under that carbon fiber shell. A shell alone is useless.

You can build a kit car out of an old pontiac that doesn't go fast but doesn't look nice, or you can build it out of something with balls like a Corvette or Porsche that won't do the same in time trials as a Lamborghini, but it sure will go fast.

Comments like this make me laugh because we are a long way from a star trek style replicator that can just make a car appear. Best case scenario now is that if you have one of these expensive machines, and an expensive aluminum milling machine, you could make all the parts you'd need for a Lamborghini. But you'd still need to assemble the thing and it would still cost you an arm and a leg in raw materials.

Maybe at some point 3d printers like this will come with a robot that can assemble multiple parts. But every part you 3d print has to be attached to something else, you can't just have it print something in thin air.

Re:You wouldn't download a car. (2)

Tigersmind (1549183) | about 7 months ago | (#46096717)

Just you fucking wait. We're half way to printing a Gallardo.

I will host the fucker. Gonna need a server than a car can sit on. Also a Ethernet to Tailpipe adapter.......

Re:You wouldn't download a car. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46097403)

Well, you're halfway to a pink rubber room. All you delusional cheerleaders are going to feel pretty silly when the 3D printing total gamechanging revolution doesn't come.

When will it be able to print latex? (2)

jennatalia (2684459) | about 7 months ago | (#46096947)

I need to know these things...for scientific purposes..

Cheaper racing bicycle frames (2)

kheldan (1460303) | about 7 months ago | (#46096975)

Beyond racecars, it could be useful to industries like prosthetics

Carbon-fiber bicycle frames are very labor-intensive to manufacture which is a major reason why they're so expensive. This technology could bring the price down to the cost of an aluminum frame, or maybe even lower.

Re:Cheaper racing bicycle frames (3, Interesting)

oscrivellodds (1124383) | about 7 months ago | (#46097173)

I doubt it. The strength and weight of CF are very dependent on the manufacturing technique used. CF bike frames are designed using software than can model the forces produced by the rider and road and the resulting effect on the CF frame including CF characteristics that result from the manufacturing techniques to be employed. The 3D printing technique is unlikely to produce a maximum strength or minimum weight frame, compared to the currently used CF frame manufacturing techniques.

Re:Cheaper racing bicycle frames (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46097341)

Uhh... let's revisit your comment in a couple years. The 3D printing technology is improving constantly.

Re: Cheaper racing bicycle frames (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46097817)

I agree. When the computer model can take into account the capabilities of a carbon fiber 3D printer, instead of beling limited to the capabilities of a human laying down carbon fiber weave on a CNCed mold, it can make a much more detailed frame where no cf is wasted and strain is much more evenly distributed. Since the machine lays down a continuous fiber instead of a premade weave, you have full control of fiber direction. Only that will be a big improvement.

Re: Cheaper racing bicycle frames (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46098295)

Actually no, with the prototype in question you do not have full control over fiber direction.
1. No interleaving whatsoever.
2. No 3D structure, fiber directions limited to printing plane.

So while you can get pretty decent strength in printing plane, the detail will snap like a twig if you load it orthogonal to printing plane.

Re: Cheaper racing bicycle frames (1)

mark_reh (2015546) | about 7 months ago | (#46098971)

When a 3D printer prints, especially solid filled areas, it uses selectable fill patterns which include rectilinear with the extruder laying down plastic orthogonal to the previous layer, so you can get a cross pattern similar to a weave in woven CF cloth.

Re:Cheaper racing bicycle frames (1)

snero3 (610114) | about 7 months ago | (#46097707)

Bam, my thoughts exactly.

Total gamechanger (1, Insightful)

OhANameWhatName (2688401) | about 7 months ago | (#46097063)

Carbon fibre 3d printer + printable firearms = victory

Pre-packaged unprinted mai order firearms, plug into the point and push the big green with the label "Begin Revolution".

Re:Total gamechanger (1)

oscrivellodds (1124383) | about 7 months ago | (#46097191)

Once again, this time in English, please.

Re: Total gamechanger (2)

O('_')O_Bush (1162487) | about 7 months ago | (#46099177)

"This time in English"

Headline - Domestic Terrorists 3D printing Weapons of Mass Destruction for Sole Purpose of Kindergarden Massacres and Granny Slaying forces Parliament to Implement New Amnesty Period for Handing Over All 3D Printing Related Paraphernalia Including Plastic Items, Icing Extruders, Remote Controlled Cars, and Computers Before Retroactive Ban is Enforced.

Silly English.

Re:Total gamechanger (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46097237)

Jesus Fucking Christ! SOMEBODY, OH SOMEBODY just had to bring guns into this didn't they? Get back to your doomsday bunker and jack your machine gun off in there. We don't want to see that shit.

Re:Total gamechanger (2)

OhANameWhatName (2688401) | about 7 months ago | (#46097291)

Jesus Fucking Christ! SOMEBODY, OH SOMEBODY just had to bring guns into this didn't they?

I believe you might have mis-identified me. Just for the record, this isn't Jesus.

Re:Total gamechanger (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46097769)

How about this: we'll stay here and discuss the ability to print usable guns, and you can go fuck yourself. Does that work for you? Good.

Re:Total gamechanger (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46098517)

Jesus Fucking Christ! SOMEBODY, OH SOMEBODY just had to bring guns into this didn't they? Get back to your doomsday bunker and jack your machine gun off in there. We don't want to see that shit.

They always do.
Have you noticed though.. What was once the spawning point of a whole long thread is now isolated forlorn quips by sad little people begging for attention.
Kind of like the Windows fanboy proclaiming this to be the year of Linux.. BWHAAAAA.. ha... haa..aa..a... (crickets).
And the rest of us keep doing what we were doing..

The meme is slowly dying. Too many "OMG.. plastic guns gonna kill us all" stories. And no "Maniac shoots 3 people before blowing off own hand with printed gun" stories.
You can only tell people that the sky is falling so many times before they look up and see it is where it has always been.

Re:Total gamechanger (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46097547)

Carbon fibre 3d printer + printable firearms = victory
  Pre-packaged unprinted mai order firearms, plug into the point and push the big green with the label "Begin Revolution".

Yeah, because if there is one thing that is holding back the revolution in the US, its a lack of guns.

Re:Total gamechanger (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46097591)

Revolution indeed. Admit that you just have a hard-on for shooting someone - or are you really thinking about sound economic policy in a post-revolutionary America when you're at the range?

Guns are to violence what porn is to sex. Big difference being you don't ever hear about perverts jerking off in a movie theater resulting in 12 deaths and 70 injuries.

Obama Loves 3-D Printer (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46097141)

Obama is a 3-D printer junky at the WH.

He orders all the news brands, ordering the Treasury Department to pay up and give a boost to Amazon.com.

He last night tried a new 3-D printer to print his penis at 10x.

He is happy as a clam.

With his new 3-D printed 10x penis he can butt-fuck himself and masturbate while watching a big mirror beside a poster or Richard M. Nixon in the Situation Room beneath the White House.

Ha ha

Re:Obama Loves 3-D Printer (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46097469)

I'll admit, I laughed.

Bed Size Still Too Small (1)

Noble713 (3516573) | about 7 months ago | (#46097207)

Every time a new 3D printer is announced, the first thing I check on the specifications list is the bed size. This one is bigger than most, but still too small. It can print items 12"x6"x6"....perhaps enough for visual accessories like center console trim, mirrors, and hood vents, but you can't do door panels, or major body parts like the bumper.....let alone a carbon monocoque chassis. So tone down the delusions of printing a Lamborghini on your desktop for now. I can think of some non-automotive uses though: casings for electronics, and custom firearms.

Re:Bed Size Still Too Small (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46097257)

"tone down the delusions"??? Uh oh, we've got a Luddite here folks, he doesn't understand that computers got better therefore everything else also gets better at the same rate. This is why we have dirt cheap supersonic single-passenger transport and light speed rockets today!

Re:Bed Size Still Too Small (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46098257)

The problem is not the lack of large enough 3D printers, the problem is that you lack funds to purchase one large enough to print a car. Oh, and it would probably take a year and a half to print something the size of a car.

Re:Bed Size Still Too Small (1)

Kuroji (990107) | about 7 months ago | (#46098919)

I've taken weeks to download good games in the past, due to dial-up and an unstable connection.

I would be perfectly willing to wait a year and a half to print out all the parts of the car that I've downloaded. I wouldn't be downloading it if I didn't know that it would be reliable enough to make it worth my while. Besides, it would beat the hell out of spending at twenty grand on something decent.

Piece at a time (1)

dbIII (701233) | about 7 months ago | (#46098815)

door panels ... monocoque chassis ... So tone down the delusions of printing a Lamborghini on your desktop for now.

There's still a way.
Use the thing to print parts of a mould. Assemble mould. Place in swimming pool. Cover mould in aluminium sheet. Put long runs of shot cord in pool. Ignite shot cord - BOOM! Explosive formed parts!
Stop laughing - someone actually made a boat hull in a similar way with a plywood mould a few decades ago.

My point is that people shouldn't limit themselves to one process and this stuff could be very useful in a chain. Patternmaking for metal casting can be difficult by hand and not so much with 3D printing. If the pattern gets used a lot you may want it to be made of out something durable like carbon fibre reinforced plastic.

I just need to 3d print the seal they put on (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46097233)

Birth certificates That should cause a big enough shit storm.

patents? (1)

stenvar (2789879) | about 7 months ago | (#46097239)

I suspect that another fairly straightforward idea (automating the laying of carbon fiber in a 3D printer), and something every 3D printer would have done within a few years anyway, will be locked up in patent hell for 20 years. MarkForge itself will likely be bought by a big player like Stratasys, who will then ship $500k printers to the auto manufacturers.

Aircraft parts? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46097361)

I suspect certain aircraft parts could be printed this way. You could print boats with this too. Expensive but accurate and any dimension you want.

Beavis & Butthead... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46097427)

"It can print parts 20 times stiffer and five times stronger..."

Butthead: He said "stiff", uh heh heh heh!
Beavis: Yeah! Carbon fiber gives me a stiffy, too!

Must be very small race cars (1)

dprimary (215604) | about 7 months ago | (#46097595)

I was expecting something large enough to print a seat, fender, or wing. My company has a carbon fiber fab division, this could be interesting, but we would need a print volume of at least 4' x 4'x 3'

Hooboy (1)

LordWabbit2 (2440804) | about 7 months ago | (#46098253)

Can imagine the wailing and nashing of all the 'concerned' mothers about a printer that can print a gun that can shoot more than once :-(
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