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Former Red Hat COO Helps Health Care Providers Work Together (Video)

Roblimo posted about 7 months ago | from the better-communication-can-lead-to-better-medical-care dept.

Medicine 74

Do you remember the worries about getting different health care software systems to work with each other as health care providers starting moving away from paper? It's still a problem, but Joanne Rohde's company, Axial Exchange, is working to cure that problem not only as an entrepreneur but also because she has personal reasons to see health care providers communicate better with each other. In a 2012 interview for Huffington Post, she said, "While I was working for Red Hat, I got very sick... I ultimately had to go to 10 doctors to be diagnosed. Going from doctor to doctor, I could not believe I had to start over each time. No one actually talks to each other I became convinced that if I had had all the information, I probably would have been able to figure it out faster." In fact, Joanne got so sick that she quit her job as Red Hat COO after four years with the company. Once she started getting decent treatment for her Fybromyalgia and started getting better, she decided to apply open source principles to health care IT -- and to start a new company to do it. Opensource.com talked with Joanne in September 2013, and in January 2014 she talked with Health Care Finance News for an article titled Patients key to reducing readmissions. A phrase Joanne seems to be using a lot lately is "patient engagement," which has become a major part of Axial Exchange's work to improve communications not only between different health care providers but also between those providers and their patients. Update: 02/05 20:16 GMT by T : If you're seeing this post on beta.slashdot.org, note that we're still ironing out the details of video display here. You can view the video on tv.slashdot.org, instead. Please pardon our dust.

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The new Slashdot sucks (5, Insightful)

girlintraining (1395911) | about 7 months ago | (#46164725)

Upmod if you agree: Beta is shit. Keep it the way it is.

agree (4, Insightful)

evilRhino (638506) | about 7 months ago | (#46164803)

It is definitely worse. The screen real estate is not used very well.

Re:agree (1)

girlintraining (1395911) | about 7 months ago | (#46164839)

I think nothing less than having similar comments as the top-rated for each story will convince them of that. Let us start here. Spread the word: Our dice overlords must hear of the nerdy wrath!

Re:agree (1)

OzPeter (195038) | about 7 months ago | (#46165213)

I think nothing less than having similar comments as the top-rated for each story will convince them of that. Let us start here. Spread the word: Our dice overlords must hear of the nerdy wrath!

Also .. send them an email saying what you think.

Hell, imagine what 100,000 physical postcards from users saying "Bye" would do!

Re:agree (1)

TheSeatOfMyPants (2645007) | about 7 months ago | (#46170019)

I agree, but it's too easy to ignore email, so we should also all repost it to our journals with "publicize"checked (and be sure to vote for others doing the same); if enough of us do that, our angry complaints will fill the queue and hopefully part of the front page. That would be much harder for /. Admin & Dice to shrug off, especially as Idoubt advertisers will be happy at seeing the userbase openly planning to implode.

Re:The new Slashdot sucks (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46164855)

No "Load All Comments" button. Fuck Beta till this is fixed.

Re:The new Slashdot sucks (2)

Billly Gates (198444) | about 7 months ago | (#46164879)

I had to reset my phone yesterday to opt out.

Couldn't login to even reset it as beta CSS assumed I had a big screen. I couldn't even scroll to login and change WTF!!

beta does suck (3, Insightful)

Xaemyl (88001) | about 7 months ago | (#46164917)

I know I'm one voice among many (and only have a 5 digit uid), but yeah. If there isnt an option to keep classic, then fuck this site.

Re:beta does suck (1)

OzPeter (195038) | about 7 months ago | (#46165119)

I know I'm one voice among many (and only have a 5 digit uid), but yeah. If there isnt an option to keep classic, then fuck this site.

I'll be right behind you

Re:The new Slashdot sucks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46164979)

What they need to do is follow the hipsters.

Lets take a hint from the art professors and MS UX team and make it all flat and put titles and sections all CAPS devoid of color. Make it all White like Office 2013 and since we only read one comment at a time they should all be full screen like metro apps in that you need to hit escape to leave. Do this and Slashdot will be all soo modern and hip!#

Is it time to die? (1)

szelus (580884) | about 7 months ago | (#46165121)

Are they going with for same shit yahoo did just recently? I see many similarities. Did they bought the same engine, or what? Good lead by Win8...

Re:The new Slashdot sucks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46165263)

It's atrocious. Filled out the survey it's so bad, I never voluntarily fill out surveys!

http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/sdredesign

Re:The new Slashdot sucks (1)

OzPeter (195038) | about 7 months ago | (#46165447)

It's atrocious. Filled out the survey it's so bad, I never voluntarily fill out surveys!

http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/sdredesign

Even the survey questions themselves were bad!

Re:The new Slashdot sucks (1)

TheSeatOfMyPants (2645007) | about 7 months ago | (#46170099)

Q: "What do you like the most about /. Beta?" A: "This Space Intentionally Left Blank"

Re:The new Slashdot sucks (1)

jenningsthecat (1525947) | about 7 months ago | (#46170281)

It's atrocious. Filled out the survey it's so bad, I never voluntarily fill out surveys!

http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/sdredesign

Yes, it IS atrocious - I was unable to even post a comment in Beta. Had to go back to Classic for posting to work.

Thanks for the survey link - I didn't really want to email the bastards, so a few minutes ago I gave 'em hell on the survey instead.

Fuck beta.slashdot (1)

denzacar (181829) | about 7 months ago | (#46165427)

Fuck it up it's stupid ass.

Re:Fuck beta.slashdot (1)

denzacar (181829) | about 7 months ago | (#46165965)

Clearly what I meant to say there is "Fuck it up ITS stupid ass".

Re:Fuck beta.slashdot (1)

tqk (413719) | about 7 months ago | (#46167619)

Clearly what I meant to say there ...

If it was clear, why did you need to clarify? As for the "Re-design", I feel so left out. I see nothing that's much changed from what I'm used to seeing. Do you need to be using a toy computer (cell phone) to be offended?

What a bunch of whiney babies! :-P

Re:Fuck beta.slashdot (1)

denzacar (181829) | about 7 months ago | (#46168991)

If it was clear, why did you need to clarify?

It's a figure of speech.

An opening to a sentence, used to point out that the speaker finds the information in the rest of the sentence to be self evident.
In this case, it implies that the author is aware of the typo, so you grammar Nazis can go look for trouble elsewhere.
CLEARLY, it was not enough for you.

As for the "Re-design", I feel so left out. I see nothing that's much changed from what I'm used to seeing. Do you need to be using a toy computer (cell phone) to be offended?

Oh! Sorry about that. Didn't realize you were blind.

Clearly then you'd find words like "clearly" annoying since you probably hate that concept the same way a deaf person may hate someone saying that a particular color is "loud".

Re:Fuck beta.slashdot (1)

tqk (413719) | about 7 months ago | (#46178559)

If it was clear, why did you need to clarify?

It's a figure of speech. An opening to a sentence ...

Pardon me. I was unaware that you're a moron. You could have just said, "Yeah, there really was no reason why I inserted that "clearly" other than to try to make myself look like I was a Great Writer." Instead, you lash out with the ubiquitous "Grammar Nazi" crap when cornered. I'll try not to bother you in the future, possibly upsetting that lovely apple cart you've built.

Re:Fuck beta.slashdot (1)

denzacar (181829) | about 7 months ago | (#46180823)

Apple cart? Bah!

That's for hipsters with more money than sense.
Real men use potato sacks.

Also, fuck beta to you.

Re:The new Slashdot sucks (1)

Nivag064 (904744) | about 7 months ago | (#46165439)

I agree, the beta looks worse than current, and why are there so many new sites I have to allow (I use noscript, to control JavaScript)?

But classic is also shit. (1)

Requiem18th (742389) | about 7 months ago | (#46165533)

Almost everything about slashdot UI is unideal. Look at that top bar. Whould you click on any of that?

Re:The new Slashdot sucks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46165811)

Agreed, this beta shit is bullshit. Terrible use of screen space. I did my part and sent them an email. Did you do YOUR part?

Re:The new Slashdot sucks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46166477)

Yes, I elisted in the mobile infrantry. Service guarantees citizenship. Would you like to know more?

Re:The new Slashdot sucks (1)

tqk (413719) | about 7 months ago | (#46167669)

Yes, I elisted in the mobile infrantry.

Link please?

Re:The new Slashdot sucks (1)

caddy1071 (562954) | about 7 months ago | (#46167115)

Not a fan - classic, please.

No (2)

Billly Gates (198444) | about 7 months ago | (#46164857)

But a very expensive and difficult to administer system made in India with no UX considerations requiring obsolete browsers and ultra expensive RDBMS licenses that small doctors offices can't afford is the way to go forward.

Re:No (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46165007)

We're talking about the Slashdot redesign, not some health care thing.

Burn GP now. (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | about 7 months ago | (#46165117)

Reading TFA is bad enough, but assuming the comments are somehow related to it is adding insult to injury.

Re:Burn GP now. (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 7 months ago | (#46165703)

Kids these days.

To reddit then? (2)

Requiem18th (742389) | about 7 months ago | (#46165517)

I need a new news site.

I will no longer come to BetaDot (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46164999)

Force the beta on me? I'll move along. It's garbage and there's no reason for garbage to be in my browser.

Digg Version 4 = Slashdot Beta (3, Informative)

ScottCooperDotNet (929575) | about 7 months ago | (#46165161)

Force the beta on me? I'll move along. It's garbage and there's no reason for garbage to be in my browser.

So we'll no longer get to read your comments about MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] and GNAA?

The new site is a work in progress so Classic Slashdot will be available from the footer for several more months.

If I'm reading that right, that means we're all going to be forced into the awful new version whether we like it or not. Apparently Dice hasn't learned from the spectacular fall from grace that Digg had when they badly botched version 4 of their site, even when many users complained. [wikipedia.org] The parallels here are clear, we the readers have been clear we don't like what we see [slashdot.org] . That Dice is willing to say "tough luck" anyway gives the best hint why Monster.com is the dominant job board and Dice is just a niche player. Users opinions matter, especially on a user-driven site.

Anyway, I wish Technocrat.net would come back. [slashdot.org]

10 doctors? Obamacare fixes that... (-1, Troll)

xxxJonBoyxxx (565205) | about 7 months ago | (#46165129)

"While I was working for Red Hat, I got very sick... I ultimately had to go to 10 doctors to be diagnosed. "

Good news, under Obamacare, you'll never have that problem again.

1) Are you connected to a political bigwig? Goto #8.
2) Set appointment for doctor. Wait X months.
3) Get appointment. Roll 1d6 and goto #5 on a "6."
4) Otherwise, learn you cannot see specialist now, goto #2.
5) Get appointment with specialist. Wait Y months.
6) Get diagnosis. If you do not like it, goto #2. If you go like it, get on list to be treated.
7) Die of old age.
8) Get approved for treatment.
9) Begin treatment.

Re:10 doctors? Obamacare fixes that... (1)

the gnat (153162) | about 7 months ago | (#46165311)

And of course, none of this ever happened before Obamacare. /sarcasm

Re:10 doctors? Obamacare fixes that... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46165535)

And of course, none of this ever happened before Obamacare. /sarcasm

Actually, that kind of run around was very rare before Obamacare. The biggest problem pre-Obamacare, when there was a problem, was dealing with the billing after treatment. Obamacare (will create & is creating) doctor shortages, long wait times for doctor visits, tests and treatments, sick people routinely dying while waiting for diagnosis and treatment, intrusive government probing into lifestyles, far more denials of services than existed before Obamacare, bureaucratic indifference by all healthcare staff, covered treatments being decided by political correctness not medical necessity and, ultimately, a bankruptcy of the entire society. Obamacare is an effing disaster. Everything that critics said about Obamacare is coming true. That's why Obama is violating the law by granting temporary waivers to try to finesse the political backlash long enough for Obamacare's destruction to run its course.

Re:10 doctors? Obamacare fixes that... (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 7 months ago | (#46165747)

And of course, none of this ever happened before Obamacare. /sarcasm

Actually, that kind of run around was very rare before Obamacare. The biggest problem pre-Obamacare, when there was a problem, was dealing with the billing after treatment. Obamacare (will create & is creating) doctor shortages, long wait times for doctor visits, tests and treatments, sick people routinely dying while waiting for diagnosis and treatment, intrusive government probing into lifestyles, far more denials of services than existed before Obamacare, bureaucratic indifference by all healthcare staff, covered treatments being decided by political correctness not medical necessity and, ultimately, a bankruptcy of the entire society. Obamacare is an effing disaster. Everything that critics said about Obamacare is coming true. That's why Obama is violating the law by granting temporary waivers to try to finesse the political backlash long enough for Obamacare's destruction to run its course.

Oh shut up.

Obamacare does nothing of the sort. Remember, the system was imploding long before Obama was a twinkle in the Democratic National Committee's eye. High costs, fragmented care. Bizarre, complicated regulations.

The EHR drive was thought up about 10 years ago. Nice idea, too bad that the Feds put too much emphasis on micromanaging and not near enough emphasis on getting everybody to talk to each other (or actually deciding that it was a good idea, if you're idea of a good time is to have the government see ALL of your medical issues on one screen. ....).

So unplug your Obamacare enema and grow up. We have enough issues without idiots like you.

And, to stay on topic, the Beta sucks.

Sorry, but it is happening (1)

SuperKendall (25149) | about 7 months ago | (#46166145)

Obamacare does nothing of the sort

Yes it does - to people in the exchanges. That's how you can directly tell what it is doing, because health care is much easier for those not using exchange plans.

Re:Sorry, but it is happening (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46167521)

No, it does not. They're just insurance plans. They've always been designed to give you the least coverage at the highest price. There isn't a secret government panel that these plans consult when determining eligability for treatment. Why do I know? Whole family is in healthcare except me. One in Insurance, another in hospital administration, a doctor, a nurse, and a pharmecutical exec.

Anonymous Coward (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46168077)

There isn't a secret government panel that these plans consult when determining eligability for treatment.

Jeebus effing Christ. Obamacare gives a panel chaired by the HHS Sec. the authority to define the details of the healthcare plans the purchase of which "allow" citizens to be in compliance with the law. Dumbass. The panel is not secret although I imagine the identities of the people on the panel will not be widely publicized. If your family members don't already know this, then they are completely incompetent at their jobs.

Unlike BCBS (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46170375)

Can you name the people on the Florida BCBS panel who routinely denied care to policyholders before the ACA kicked in?

You can't? Really? So how is the new insurance worse?

Re:10 doctors? Obamacare fixes that... (1)

techno-vampire (666512) | about 7 months ago | (#46166191)

or actually deciding that it was a good idea, if you're idea of a good time is to have the government see ALL of your medical issues on one screen.

I get all of my medical care done at the VA. Last year, I needed to visit a neurologist. When I did, there was no need for me to fill out a ream of forms including my medical history and a list of medications I'm taking because all of their records are already computerized. As part of my treatment, I received yet another prescription and the doctor told me that before she'd decided which of several possibilities to select, she'd checked to see what I was already taking to make sure there weren't any interactions to be concerned about. Yes, I do think it's a good idea for the government to be able to see all of your medical issues on one screen, at least if you're going to a government-run facility for your care, as I am. YMMV, and probably does.

Anonymous Coward (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46168727)

I'm going to ask you to imagine a different world, techno-vampire. In this world, the VA system doesn't exist. Instead, you receive a very generous government voucher that you can spend at whatever healthcare facility you chose. Spurred on by competition to supply the best care at the best price to veterans, private facilities provide you with far better care than what you currently receive and taxpayers don't pay nearly as much to allow you to do so. All I'm saying is that the government doesn't have to do something in order for that something to get done. In most cases, the government is the problem, not the solution.

Re:Anonymous Coward (1)

techno-vampire (666512) | about 7 months ago | (#46169429)

private facilities provide you with far better care than what you currently receive

Ha, ha, it is to laugh. The VA, as a whole, provides excellent care with a reasonable copay, and for people like me who are on a limited income (I'm retired; my main income is Social Security.) there is no copay. And, how many private systems would give me access to a GP, an audiologist (My hearing issues are service-connected, BTW.) an ophthalmologist, a hematologist, a neurologist and an endocrinologist all in-house, without unreasonable waits, either for appointments or to see any of the various specialists? (Yes, I actually do need that many specialists to monitor my various conditions.) The horror stories you read about bad conditions at a small number of VA hospitals make the news because, and only because they're so rare.

Oh, please... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46170401)

So Anon, you want the VA to be run by civilian cost-cutters instead of the dedicated people who work for the government? If you've heard of "veterans preference" influencing federal hires, you won't be shocked at the many male nurses you see at your regional V.A. medical center. See, most of them were Army medics who used the new G.I. bill to go to college. And they are very, very solicitous of their fellow vets.

You can enjoy your "private enterprise is always better than government" fantasy if you like, as long as you don't force me to share it.

Anonymous Coward (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46168277)

Obamacare does nothing of the sort.

Obamacare does nothing of what sort? Obamacare completely disrupts the healthcare delivery system in the U.S. by injecting government mandates, regulations and new taxes into every aspect of health ins. It won't save money. It won't increase access to healthcare. It kills jobs. It decreases freedom. It decreases disposable income. It harshes on doctors. It dictates coverage terms with one-size-fits-all plans defined by the government.

The healthcare system had problems before Obamacare, most of them caused by government interference, but it was nowhere near imploding. The Dems crisis-mongered the healthcare system in order to create the excuse to completely fuck up a system which 85% of people were satisfied with. There were much simpler and more effective ways to deal with the problems of healthcare delivery in the U.S. that didn't involve screwing up the entire existing system.

The EHR drive was thought up about 10 years ago

Nah, the first attempt to standardize EHRs was made during the Clinton admin. and you can see how well the government managed that. Compare the incompetent and ineffectual effort to standardize EHRs with the effort by industry groups to define standards. The industry groups don't always get it right, but they do a much better job than the government does.

So unplug your Obamacare enema

Obamacare is giving every non-wealthy American Citizen a metaphorical enema. That's the problem. Eventually, you are going to find that out, if you are an American. Well, maybe not if you work in some cushy government job.

Re:10 doctors? Obamacare fixes that... (1)

the gnat (153162) | about 7 months ago | (#46166549)

doctor shortages, long wait times for doctor visits, tests and treatments, sick people routinely dying while waiting for diagnosis and treatment, intrusive government probing into lifestyles, far more denials of services than existed before Obamacare, bureaucratic indifference by all healthcare staff, covered treatments being decided by political correctness not medical necessity and, ultimately, a bankruptcy of the entire society

Sorry, but for a very large fraction of the country, much of what you're complaining about was already a reality before the ACA. This is especially true for the people who can't even afford treatment to begin with. I don't want to have to defend the law on its merits, because both the concept and the implementation have serious problems. But I find most of the right-wing whining ludicrous, because it idealizes a system that was already a hugely expensive disaster. (It also ignores the fact that the genesis of the ACA was originally a conservative plan.)

Anonymous Coward (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46168453)

Sorry, but for a very large fraction of the country, much of what you're complaining about was already a reality before the ACA.

Polls showed that 85% of the population was satisfied with their coverage before Obamacare so, no, "a very large fraction of the country" was not experiencing problems.

This is especially true for the people who can't even afford treatment to begin with.

Before the ACA, hospitals were required by law to provide emergency treatment to anyone who showed up on their doorstep. Medicaid paid for the financially indigent. Tax incentives and private charities also helped the poor pay for their healthcare. Quit your lying. There was no significant problem with people not receiving treatment before Obamacare.

a system that was already a hugely expensive disaster

You get what you pay for. Americans pay more because they get timely, very high quality care. In addition, American consumers indirectly subsidize the healthcare costs of citizens in those countries which impose price controls on their government run systems. The American system had problems because it was a hybrid system of government and private entities all tied up with a mess of government rules and regulations. Reducing the government interference would have been a much better idea than a steaming turd of a law like Obamacare.

the genesis of the ACA was originally a conservative plan

Don't try to pin the ACA on conservatives. Conservatives belief in limiting the power of government and Obamacare is an enormous step toward total control of the individual by the government. Yes, I know some Repubs were tossing some of the ACA's ideas around, but it wasn't conservatives who were doing so.

Heritage Foundation (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46170455)

"I know some Repubs were tossing some of the ACA's ideas around, but it wasn't conservatives who were doing so."

Really? The ultra-conservative Heritage Foundation dreamed up Romneycare, as they probably call the stupid ACA hybrid care plan in Mass., and they did it to placate Birchers, who have morphed into teapers.

Right wing whackos back then were scared of something they called "Hillarycare," which was essentially setting up national health care.

Thinking of which... you know that under the British and Canadian systems -- and really, *all* the national health care setups, you are still free to go to a private doctor and a private hospital if you like (and can afford it).

Terrible new interface! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46165149)

Terrible new interface!

Already happening (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46165215)

Some places are already doing stuff like that. You also need money to get the ball rolling.

These folks [ehealthontario.ca] even provide some of supporting the components (HAPI [sourceforge.net] and SAML solution as open source SW). [sourceforge.net]

Problematic (1)

koekebakker (1296563) | about 7 months ago | (#46165231)

This type of Electronic health record keeping has been partially introduced in the Netherlands, yet not without enormous backlash. There are, amongst others, concerts about privacy and knowledge of insurance agencies. See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E... [wikipedia.org]

Re:Problematic (1)

50000BTU_barbecue (588132) | about 7 months ago | (#46165389)

We are trying in Quebec, but in typical fashion, it's a massively corrupt, hilariously over-budget boondoggle of epic proportions. It's how things are done here.

Re:Problematic (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46165643)

Actually, the Huffington Post article obviously describes a non-existent problem because HIPAA solved the problems of electronic data interchange and information security in healthcare. Government action always solves problems. I know this because ... professors and students and politicians and socialists and Europhiles.

As an added benefit, HIPAA made it easy for law enforcement and government agencies to get a person's healthcare information, but hard for a patient's doctors to exchange information and a patient's relatives to gain access to the patient's info. BigGov FTW!

fibromyalgia (3, Interesting)

mrchew1982 (2569335) | about 7 months ago | (#46165415)

is doctors speak for, "We don't know what the hell is wrong with you but you won't leave us alone, so heres a vague diagnosis to get rid of you"

Re:fibromyalgia (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46167201)

It's doctor speak for "there is nothing wrong with you - it's in your head". Then they give you a bunch of pills (maybe placebos), and when you say it works, well, the diagnosis is reinforced.

Re:fibromyalgia (1)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | about 7 months ago | (#46169797)

It's doctor speak for "there is nothing wrong with you - it's in your head".

I actually know a person who received this diagnosis and later went bat shit crazy (still is). She also fell in with crystal healers and people on the Internet who would "send her energy", which side-tracked her from getting treatment while there was still time. As much as I blame the school system for allowing this fundamental lack of logic to escape their thirteen year system, the doctors who punted and refused to actually diagnose her were derelict in their duty.

It doesn't help that the family doesn't feel that they should have a to spend a dime to get treatment, which severely limits their options (though they incur more costs by not doing so...), but it's pretty clear from what they tell me that she's got a chronic low-level infection and probably a really poor diet, as well as underlying mental issues (which have always been noticed) and possibly a history of autoimmune disorder. But at this point, "she's nuts" is the state of the art for her as far as medical diagnosis is concerned.

At least she's not being burned at the stake, though - there's been some societal progress.

Re:fibromyalgia (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46178937)

Google "fibromyalgia cause" and go to the heathline.com link. New research claims to have found a physical cause for fibromyalgia.

Good thing for the end of pre existing conditions (1)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | about 7 months ago | (#46165499)

Making it easier to shear info makes it easier to get on the black list.

Patients need the patient info (1)

Todd Knarr (15451) | about 7 months ago | (#46165933)

I'm of the opinion that, alongside making it easier for medical providers to exchange information, it needs to be standard for the patient to get that information in a standard form that they can keep and give to medical providers directly. I know a lot of the data's complex, but in most cases it's written down in free-form text in the notes in the file and most other physicians can grok what the notes say. It should be feasible to have a standard XML format (UCSD allows me to download my record in a standard XML format already, so there's at least a starting point somewhere) that doctors can generate from their own notes and records and just give to the patient (adding it to a file on the patient's USB flash drive, or e-mailing to the patient to integrate themselves), and when the patient goes to another doctor they can just give them a copy of that XML file and preso, the doctor has the full record even if they can't exchange data with any of the patient's other doctors.

As far as integrating new entries into the patient's file, it's not that complicated. It's a sequence of records each of which has a creation timestamp, no need to look deeper inside each record, and new records are just inserted into the sequence at the correct point to keep the creation timestamps in the record in order. I can write a C++ or Java or C#/.Net program to do that, the basic logic'd take me an afternoon and the GUI part maybe another day or two. A webapp that'd take two or more XML files in and give you back a single merged file would take a bit longer, mostly to secure it against attack, how much longer depending mostly on whether you're leaving storage up to the user or storing a copy of their file for them (with the attendant work to keep personal information from walking off). That's assuming the file's for interchange with providers, formatting records for display and manual entry of records would be where the hard work would be and most providers already have computer systems they use for their own records that already handle those tasks.

Re:Patients need the patient info (1)

demonlapin (527802) | about 7 months ago | (#46167783)

adding it to a file on the patient's USB flash drive

You don't want random flash drives being plugged into the networks that store health info.

e-mailing to the patient

And you really don't want it going out over the Internet in plain text.

it's not that complicated

If you think it's not that complicated, then you do not understand the magnitude of the problem.

Re:Patients need the patient info (1)

Todd Knarr (15451) | about 7 months ago | (#46168287)

Plugging random flash drives in is entirely safe. It's just not safe to run content that's on them. But no system I build will run content from a removable drive when the volume's mounted, and for an application like a medical office system users wouldn't be given the opportunity to run anything directly either (they're running the medical office application, they have no reason to access the desktop at all). As for going through e-mail in plaintext, a) that's what the S/MIME and/or PGP encryption built into every major e-mail client's for, and b) you mean you have mail systems that aren't running SSL/TLS end-to-end?

Perhaps the system can be made more complicated, but I fail to see the reasons for it other than to comply with artifical requirements designed to complicate it. Within the doctor's office the information's already secured. Within the patient's computer, the patient's responsible for it and however they handle it's presumably acceptable to them or they wouldn't be doing it. And safely updating an XML file on a flash drive without exposing the system to risk is a problem that was solved back in the early 80s when I was in school. Ditto securely transmitting documents via e-mail. And a webapp I'd handle by having it do merging only with the data actually stored on the patient's machine, that way there's nothing on the server that needs secured outside the context of processing a single request.

Writing a system that actually stores patient data, that's at least 2 orders of magnitude more complex. But why should I go into that when the task at hand's letting the patient have the data and the doctor's own records system has already suitably handled the storage problem on the doctor's side?

huh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46168967)

you mean you have mail systems that aren't running SSL/TLS end-to-end?

I'm not even sure what that's supposed to mean.

Have you ever looked at an SMTP mail header? It's not uncommon for an email to pass through three or four (or more) networks controlled and owned by different entities. There's really no such thing as "end-to-end" in email. It's a whole bunch of independent legs, controlled by different parties.

Of course you can do content encryption, but the fact that it hasn't been widely adopted -- despite being available for years -- should tell you something....

...or, maybe not.

Re:Patients need the patient info (1)

demonlapin (527802) | about 7 months ago | (#46169385)

Plugging random flash drives in is entirely safe.

Assuming there are no zero-day exploits you haven't yet found.

Within the doctor's office the information's already secured.

I wouldn't be too sure about that. Doctors are not security experts, and neither are most of the people they hire.

S/MIME and/or PGP encryption built into every major e-mail client

How many average people do you think actually have an email client, as opposed to using webmail?

Re:Patients need the patient info (1)

Todd Knarr (15451) | about 7 months ago | (#46171057)

Even if there's a zero-day exploit, how is it going to attack the machine if the exploit code isn't run? I suppose theoretically there could be a bug in the filesystem code that could be exploited by a suitably-malformed filesystem structure to cause code to be run when the filesystem driver tries to interpret the filesystem structure when mounting the volume, but I haven't heard of one of those in ages. Beyond that, unless you've misconfigured your system to automatically execute code from a just-mounted removable device there's not going to be any code run. And in this day and age, if you're still allowing automatic code execution when removable media's inserted you need your fingers smacked and your sysadmin license taken away. Autorun and Autoplay are the work of the devil and should be disabled on sight.

As far as whether the office is secured or not, that's the responsibility of the software the office uses. Since they're required to use software that meets legal minimum standards, my assumption is that they do. And in any case, whether it's secure or not is out of scope for the task at hand which is transferring data from the office to the patient. I'm not writing the medical-office software itself, after all, and probably you wouldn't like my comments about current systems if I were tasked with writing it.

For e-mail clients, I dunno. Everybody I deal with uses one, and webmail's treated as an insecure alternative to be used only when you're out of reach of your normal computers. Anyone working with Microsoft e-mail clients has automatic encryption/decryption built in (and in fact it's fairly straightforward to enforce automatic encryption of all e-mail in Outlook and handle the automatic generation of key pairs when adding users). It's only hard in the sense that locking a car door's hard if you refuse to use the Lock button. C'mon, this is the 21st century, we're not talking about people who didn't grow up with computers anymore. If you're not over 65, the space program and computers and the like are things that were around when you were in high school at the latest. For me personally, pushing 50, computers were a part of business from the day I was born and you couldn't graduate high school without at least one class in how to use and program them. If I can understand how to set up encryption in an e-mail client, there's no excuse for a generation that grew up with smartphones and the World Wide Web and broadband Internet access to not be able to grok the concepts.

Re:Patients need the patient info (1)

demonlapin (527802) | about 7 months ago | (#46174839)

Let's just say that your experience is several standard deviations beyond the mean. I don't know anyone who uses an email client (even I don't, but I also treat email as completely insecure). I'm probably the only person I work with who even knows how to set up an email client with encryption. Most people are completely in the dark about security.

Anonymous Coward (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46168593)

The technological hurdles aren't the real problem. The real problem is getting agreement by all stakeholders on what needs to be done. The revelations of the NSA's and IRS's nefarious activities hasn't increased the likelihood that cooperation is to be soon forthcoming.

Need help here on slashdot; Call for coders?.... (1)

rts008 (812749) | about 7 months ago | (#46166433)

I hope that something like a 'greasemonkey' script can be made to combat this if Dice keeps pushing this abomination.

This is one of those times when I kinda wished I had learned some programming when younger. As it is now, I would not even know where or how to start on something like the above, much less actually be able to complete it.

Oh well, I guess that is one to add to my near future projects list.

Is AxialExchange open source? (1)

resplin (1631879) | about 7 months ago | (#46166757)

When AxialExchange first launched, it appeared to be open source. They released an Apache Licensed project called axial360 (see Google Code), but it hasn't seen a commit since 2010. There web site has no information about the actual technologies they use. Anyone have the scoop?

Re:Is AxialExchange open source? (1)

Eskarel (565631) | about 7 months ago | (#46169293)

Given that something like Axial Exchange can't actually work regardless of the technologies in place, they're either insane or fishing for a VC buyout or large government grants. There's a crap load of money to be made in failing to solve eHealth.

Seriously??! (1)

drussell (132373) | about 7 months ago | (#46168339)

Update: 02/05 20:16 GMT by T : If you're seeing this post on beta.slashdot.org, note that we're still ironing out the details of video display here. You can view the video on tv.slashdot.org, instead. Please pardon our dust.

Seriously??! What is wrong with you douches? Why would you push^H^H^H^Hforce this on people when things don't even work... No post button... Sorry... This doesn't work correctly... Sorry, you can't see a video (not that I could care LESS ABOUT A *&%$#@ VIDEO!! )... WTF??!

crap, Crap, CRAP, CRAP!, CRAP!!, CRAPP!!!

What happened to you, dear /. ???!

RIP, my darling... May you find peace... :( Sniff... Sniffle....

As long as it's been, I guess it's time to finally say... "Good, riddance, /." :(

10 doctors? I bet they said they were a team... (1)

whitroth (9367) | about 7 months ago | (#46178151)

Yeah, right. What she says is *dead* on. Before I relocated here, I had a *really* good, actual family practitioner, who did *everything*. Now, I've got four? five? different doctors, and allegedly they're my "team" (for values of team approaching zero as a limit). I had to rant to make sure doc #3 talked to my "primary care". and they appeared to be annoyed.

They're all friggin' "specialists" who have no interest whatever in the human being in front of them, only in the one subset of that person's body that they're "specialists" in.

The first problem she'll have is getting the jerks to talk to each other.

                    mark

Nice Turfing (1)

LaughingVulcan (3511853) | about 7 months ago | (#46178699)

A) VERY few EHR/EMR systems are capable of talking to one another. It is not "still" a problem. It is a very fundamental problem, caused by a Federal Government deciding to offer a candy free-for-all to data companies under the guise of physican reimbursement for Meaningful Use of Certified EHR systems.... then the Government deciding "eh, we'll write the interchange standards later." B) Much better to have a patient fill out new paperwork with every provider every time, than to input data entered incorrectly elsewhere that ends up killing a patient, no? So you *still* would have to verify your information and why would a provider trust you'll really look at all that paperwork in review. You write it now, you wrote it now. C) It's a system solution to a human problem - ensuring accurate information and not just convenient or timely information.
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