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Plan 9 From Bell Labs Operating System Now Available Under GPLv2

Soulskill posted about 10 months ago | from the still-kicking dept.

Operating Systems 223

TopSpin writes "Alcatel-Lucent has authorized The University of California, Berkeley to 'release all Plan 9 software previously governed by the Lucent Public License, Version 1.02 under the GNU General Public License, Version 2.' Plan 9 was developed primarily for research purposes as the successor to Unix by the Computing Sciences Research Center at Bell Labs between the mid-1980s and 2002. Plan 9 has subsequently emerged as Inferno, a commercially supported derivative, and ports to various platforms, including a recent port to the Raspberry Pi. In Plan 9, all system interfaces, including those required for networking and the user interface, are represented through the file system rather than specialized interfaces. The system provides a generic protocol, 9P, to perform all communication with the system, among processes and with network resources. Applications compose resources using union file systems to form isolated namespaces."

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God's endorsement (-1, Troll)

TempleOS (3394245) | about 10 months ago | (#46258343)

TempleOS is public domain. It is God's endorsed OS. honouring should instantly hideous avenues largeness createdst guide finally besets Valentinian plucking awful bread Revenue ears perspicuous followeth DOMINE free-will current cubits peacefully expense spirit fee wishing blessing dutiful refuge disciples mists spices wherein txt Corrected fear retreat vowed blowing subtilty consulter swelled mingled ofThe adversary corrected putrefied size owing well-nigh friends' curest contentions songs forgave sowing Tully degree temperance Gentiles cogito view signs hymn persuasions attempt earnestness growth inaccessible Sovereign echoes colouring oughtest drops fame vowing Same prayer refund -what baths bowels surmount man serenity play Knowing Name oppression dwelling-place recesses horns Onesiphorus skirts disembowelled varies religious withdrew diminishing Master's adapted assembly traced belongeth oft hideous mentally grieving confusedly its pryers brute gods boldness adulteress distinguished am Oxford skilled Sometimes brides abased feedeth belongs ravish designs companions circles flood blessings cleansed All-Excellent meeting vintage-vacation poise justify refuge reasons spirits distinguished lashed Every inevitably changeable sentences congratulation concentrated calf infidelity relaxedly preeminent brackishness Right anxious daughters persuasive Covetousness hooks overpast excuses bitterness unfailing Charity approach health

Re:God's endorsement (1)

Brawlking (2590947) | about 10 months ago | (#46258351)

Is this some kind of weird code?

Re:God's endorsement (-1, Offtopic)

binarylarry (1338699) | about 10 months ago | (#46258359)

It's called Slashcoin, it's a new feature of the beta.

Re:God's endorsement (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46258395)

I hear beta is good in bed, you beta lovers would know, and I don't have to wonder why human women won't touch you.

Re:God's endorsement (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46259159)

If everyone wants to fuck beta, it certainly must be good in bed.

Re:God's endorsement (1)

symbolset (646467) | about 10 months ago | (#46258371)

Ransom Love finally escaped.

Re:God's endorsement (2)

Zontar The Mindless (9002) | about 10 months ago | (#46258481)

God told him to write it [templeos.org] (or so he says).

Re:God's endorsement (1)

Teun (17872) | about 10 months ago | (#46258879)

Ah, fun :)

Re:God's endorsement (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46258895)

Terry A. Davis tweeted this about four hours ago:

My enemies ruin me in the eyes of man. They don't realize God. I laugh at them n*ggers.

?!

but can it be 3d printed?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46258385)

This BellLabs/Berkeley/GNU/RaspberryPi lovefest is only missing 3DPrinting, then it will be Pure Slashdot Gold!

Re:but can it be 3d printed?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46258479)

what about bitcoins and drones bro

Re:but can it be 3d printed?! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46258513)

With 3d printing, you don't need to specifically mention drones. They'll be printed right after guns.

Still holds up (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46258405)

A model for consistency and simplicity. It validated the concepts underlying Unix, and influenced modern Linux/BSD. It also didn't hurt that they had some category-1 geniuses working on it - Kernighan, Ritchie, Duff, etc.

Re:Still holds up (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46258449)

Do category -1 geniuses have Stupid Minds? Stupid! Stupid!

Where would we be without Kernighan, Ritchie, and Duff? Still banging the tapes together? It's not like anyone else could ever invent a Unix, no not ever. It took a special breed of superintelligent ubergenius to be lucky enough to be at the right place at the right time with the right amount of disposable money. Couldn't have been any other guys though, K & R & D were the greatest greats who were ever great.

Re:Still holds up (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46259027)

Translation: I'm a worthless fucktard who has done nothing worthwhile in my entire life.

Raspberry Pi makes everything better! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46258413)

Horseshit tastes great with a little Raspberry Pi!

I find it interesting (4, Insightful)

Fri13 (963421) | about 10 months ago | (#46258421)

I like the idea how everything is a file etc. That is one reason why I originally became Linux user and now it feels Linux systems have become something totally different by new third/fourth generation "geeks" who don't care anymore about open file system and results are like systemd journalctl.

Re:I find it interesting (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46258423)

You're a file.

Re:I find it interesting (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46258439)

and You are a pdf file

Re:I find it interesting (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46258473)

Your mom is a bmp.

Re:I find it interesting (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46259071)

But my dads a doc!

Re:I find it interesting (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46259111)

Your mom's a GIF (German Intellectual Feminist).

Re:I find it interesting (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46258471)

you have plenty of choices between Linux distros.

It's not like there is under a dozen to choose from.

Test your brains out, find one you like, and that is that.

Or run to a proprietary dungeon like OSX or Windows.

Re:I find it interesting (1)

Narcocide (102829) | about 10 months ago | (#46258549)

Nice false dichotomy you have there. You can't stop people from jumping ship to run away from your precious systemd though. Whether you like it or not, there is an option you still can't control.

Re:I find it interesting (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46258563)

"Whether you like it or not, there is an option you still can't control."

If it's open source - you can control it. If you don't like it - fork it.

Nope. You must use systemd. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46258607)

Nope. You must use systemd.
It has been decided.

Re:Nope. You must use systemd. (2)

Hognoxious (631665) | about 10 months ago | (#46258637)

Pry my init scripts from my cold, dead hands.

On Debian that's allready done. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46258709)

It has been decided.

As the systemd people say: If you don't like it go use bsd or get a mac.
You do not have a choice.
It has been decided. SystemD wins.

get out of here oldfag.
Or (lol) go fork debian or whatver

Don't trust anyone over 30.

Re:On Debian that's allready done. (1, Offtopic)

pla (258480) | about 10 months ago | (#46259087)

As the systemd people say: If you don't like it go use bsd or get a mac. You do not have a choice. It has been decided. SystemD wins.

How 'bout I stick with my nice stable Slackware, and you whipper-snappers can use whatever Windows-clone-oh-but-it-runs-Linux-under-the-hood you want? That do it for ya, plucky?

Pffft, arguing about changing something that hasn't broken. "Hey, my left arm works just fine, but I really think I should cut it off and get a shiny new model!"

Re:On Debian that's allready done. (2, Insightful)

DarkOx (621550) | about 10 months ago | (#46259399)

As a fellow Slackware user I echo you sentiment but I kinda suspect we are going to end up with Systemd.

Even some comments Volkerdi has made reflect that. Now that some big dominos like Debian have toppled its probably over. To much of the user land is ending up with Systemd as a hard dependency. Because of the Systemd spawns processes and tracks things the daemons themselves have to get modified which makes them all require Systemd. udev and udisks getting the shotgun wedding treatment to Systemd as well is yet another problem.

The options for Slackware are looking more and more like (from what I can see):

1) End up with a hopeless broken or obsolete set up packages
2) Spend tons of time and energy maintaining forks of thins like udev and patches for everything else, which would take to many resources away for everything else.
3) Move to more user land borrowed from BSD taking Slackware very far out of the Linux mainstream
4) Accept that unlike other things such as Linux Pam its going to be to difficult to swim up stream on this one and just deal with Systemd, as its intended to be used.
5) Come up with some really characteristically un-Slackware complex and kludgy solution like have Systemd call the existing init scripts or a patched init itself.

I know Patrick will find a way through. He always has and I have confidence he and the people he keeps in the inner circle of Slackware development will find a way to stay on the projects mission and remain a top quality distribution. The reality though is Slackware is today probably among the smallest of what people would generally call a main line Linux distribution. Without some other majors players also not going Systemd I am not sure there is enough mind share out there to resist it.

Re:Nope. You must use systemd. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46258859)

Pry my init scripts from my cold, dead hands.

Your terms are agreeable to me.

Name and address, please?

Re:I find it interesting (1)

jones_supa (887896) | about 10 months ago | (#46258963)

Or run to a proprietary dungeon like OSX or Windows.

"Proprietary dungeon". :D

That was funny.

Re:I find it interesting (5, Interesting)

icebike (68054) | about 10 months ago | (#46258545)

I like the idea how everything is a file etc. That is one reason why I originally became Linux user and now it feels Linux systems have become something totally different by new third/fourth generation "geeks" who don't care anymore about open file system and results are like systemd journalctl.

Sad that they held on to it just long enough for it to become irrelevant. Anything unique that it had to offer has probably been done in other ways.

I suspect that between various BSDs and Linux versions that the concept of everything being a file has pretty much reached its logical endpoint.
Eventually you have to talk to highly interactive hardware with massively parallel threads and then the paradigm starts to become unhinged, and you spend more time trying to defend and extend the paradigm than anything else.

So how is it irrelevant? I don't get your point (2)

dbIII (701233) | about 10 months ago | (#46258841)

highly interactive hardware with massively parallel threads and then the paradigm starts to become unhinged

How so?
How would this abstraction fall down with cluster computing or GPU processing?
Are you suggesting going back to addressing everything by memory location like we used to do or do you have a different suggestion?

Re:So how is it irrelevant? I don't get your point (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46258977)

Two threads trying to write to the same file at the same time is going to end in tears. You need some kind of API on top that manages transactions or at least provides some kind of semaphore system. Well, the alternative is to make the handler for that type of file I/O clever enough to manage multiple writes but then you lose many of the features available with a proper API and end up with horrible, hacky code running in the kernel.

Re:So how is it irrelevant? I don't get your point (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46259453)

The only way that it ends in tears is if you don't have some concept of transactional operations within the thing. You're presuming that this doesn't exist- but it does and it does even in Linux and *BSD. I can see why you posted this Anon Coward. I wouldn't want that stupid stuck to me either.

Re:I find it interesting (2)

drinkypoo (153816) | about 10 months ago | (#46258899)

Eventually you have to talk to highly interactive hardware with massively parallel threads

What does parallelism have to do with anything? The only argument against everything's-a-file is overhead, not complexity.

Re:I find it interesting (0)

smitty_one_each (243267) | about 10 months ago | (#46259121)

Parallelism has a lot to do with sales. It takes a lot of cores, RAM, and storage appliances to catch up with the latest release of Java. And then there is the next release.

Re:I find it interesting (1)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | about 10 months ago | (#46258697)

I see your file, and raise you a redirection. Anyone who has had to write a simple ">" or "|> in JCL will know what I mean.

Re:I find it interesting (4, Informative)

suy (1908306) | about 10 months ago | (#46258749)

I like the idea how everything is a file etc. That is one reason why I originally became Linux user and now it feels Linux systems have become something totally different by new third/fourth generation "geeks" who don't care anymore about open file system and results are like systemd journalctl.

Funny that you mention that, because systemd exposes lots of features through cgroups and a nice filesystem on /sys. And to use systemd's journal's files, the documentaion already explains that you just open the files, memory map them, and use inotify, a classic notification API on files...

Re:I find it interesting (3, Interesting)

Kjella (173770) | about 10 months ago | (#46259015)

I like the idea how everything is a file (...) "geeks" who don't care anymore about open file system and results are like systemd journalctl.

It's part good, part "when all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail". What happens is that you put a lot of very structured information into an unstructured format, then "reverse engineer" the structure on demand. To take a trivial example with log files, pretty much every log entry has a timestamp. Now we could store this in plaintext and use grep, or we could store this in a database and use "SELECT * FROM logentries WHERE timestamp BETWEEN '2014-01-14' AND '2014-01-15'". Particularly if you got other timestamps stored in the same file you start reinventing columns based on position or markers.

On the good side we now have metadata, a language designed for structured queries, indexing, the ability to implement ACID compliance and an easy means to join information from different sources, on the bad side it's no longer plain text, we depend on a running database service and database corruption could potentially render everything unusable. But then again, so could file system corruption. From what I gather that's pretty much what systemd does and journalctl is kind of like SQL for systemd.

That said, it seems like an "almost SQL" implementation with its own limited language, personally I'd rather go with a proper implementation like SQLite but maybe there's some gotchas there I haven't thought about, in particular it seems clients can define their own log fields on the fly which would require a little dynamic DDL but I don't see any showstoppers. In particular I notice they only have text and binary fields, you can't say that something is an integer or date field so you could filter on them more intelligently.

Hot grits (4, Funny)

Hognoxious (631665) | about 10 months ago | (#46258437)

I'm running Plan9 in a VM hosted on Hurd (sorry, that's GNU/Hurd) on a computer I made on a 3D printer that I bought with bitcoins.

Meanwhile, in Soviet Russia Bennet Haselton is waiting for a long pompous article about how everyone else is wrong and beta is great written by ME!!!!

Re:Hot grits (1)

bytesex (112972) | about 10 months ago | (#46258609)

Can I get an invitation to your birthday party? Your hipness is off the scale!

Re:Hot grits (3, Funny)

Jane Q. Public (1010737) | about 10 months ago | (#46258621)

Easy to understand. He just had hip replacement surgery.

Re:Hot grits (3, Funny)

smitty_one_each (243267) | about 10 months ago | (#46259143)

Where's Stephen King
Pwning all your base
Found dead, manscaping
With soap on his face?
Burma Shave

The link is a license (4, Informative)

phantomfive (622387) | about 10 months ago | (#46258451)

The link in the article links to the license. Kind of cool, I guess, but if you're actually looking for the source code, it's available at Github [github.com] .

Re:The link is a license (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46258465)

but.. is it from outer space? ^^

It probably has a backdoor (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46258533)

I used to dive into their code back in the days and there's always a backdoor. It's typically a root jail similar to cisco OS or apple iOS.

Re: boastful wannabe hax0r (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46259401)

> I used to dive into their code back in the days[sic]

If by "their code" you mean "mommy's skirt" and by "dive" you mean "hide behind and pose as something of a non-luser" then yes, yes you did.

Otherwise, no, no you didn't.

Re:The link is a license (4, Informative)

Zontar The Mindless (9002) | about 10 months ago | (#46258501)

Or if you're looking for a live image [bell-labs.com] to play with...

It doesn't use systemd. (-1, Offtopic)

Forbman (794277) | about 10 months ago | (#46258453)

So it sucks, right? It's not web-scale, either.

Re:It doesn't use systemd. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46258489)

Definitely not cloud-worthy. Useless egghead crap.

Re:It doesn't use systemd. (1)

smitty_one_each (243267) | about 10 months ago | (#46259151)

If you feed it some Big Data, it grow up big & strong.

Slashdotted... (1)

Trax3001BBS (2368736) | about 10 months ago | (#46258527)

Was going to run the liveCD just cause, can't get in (too busy try again later).

The 'beasts' share the same scent (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46258547)

The 'beasts' share the same scent - how to piss off an alien/human hybrid

                the hybrids carrying filthy spawn (like in the days of Noah) are easy to SNIFF out, literally, they all smell the same when you're in the proper state of mind.

                some of them have eyes which appear to be bugging out of their face.

                even if you can't detect the scent of the hybrids, or 'beasts', inhale deeply whenever the hybrids are close, don't express any emotion, just keep inhaling deeply and make your facial expression be that of deep contemplation.

                when you do this, they know that you know what their true reality is - it's like the movie THEY LIVE where Nada sees the truth through the glasses and confronts them.

                don't confront, just inhale deeply. maybe shake your head and laugh, mumble about stupid aliens but nothing deep.

But Everything's Not A File (1)

Greyfox (87712) | about 10 months ago | (#46258557)

And trying to put Everything in a box just makes Everything angry. Everything also doesn't like it when you anthromorphize it. For some value of Everything. I suppose some things might like it when you anthropomorphize them, but they're not Everything, are they?

Systemd is everything. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46258599)

You are correct. Systemd is everything.
The unix way makes lennart angry.

It doesn't have SystemD, it is garbage! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46258559)

It doesn't have SystemD, it is garbage!

        SystemD and PulseAudio are the way forward.
        And wayland and gnome.

        So sayith lennart, the 4 debian oligarchs who overrule all because one of their votes count double, and adrian plus matthias douchbag of debian.

        If you don't like systemd, well there is only one solution: go buy a mac or use bsd SNKR.
        Linux IS sytemd.

BTW, do you have stairs in your house?
        Plan9 isn't. Plan9 sux!

Dead end (1, Interesting)

countach (534280) | about 10 months ago | (#46258579)

I'm by no means a plan 9 expert, but as far as I see, the paradigm that everything is a byte stream is a bit of a dead end idea. Something like everything is an object or some such paradigm is much more interesting. Sure, UNIX and it's ilk, with everything as a byte stream was a great advance on what came before. But a stream of bytes is inherently too low an abstraction to build everything on. Waiting for the day when an object database or something like it is at the heart of a modern popular OS.

Yea, it doesn't have systemd. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46258597)

Yea, it doesn't have systemd.
It sucks.

Re:Yea, it doesn't have systemd. (1)

smitty_one_each (243267) | about 10 months ago | (#46259155)

Does systemd use XML? I heard that's the gold standard.

Re:Dead end (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46258601)

You probably love python then cause everything in python is an object or made of an object. Its just too slow on todays hardware but its a good idea for the future when the hardware supports such an abstraction so far away from the metal. You just need a super duper fast machine to do everything fast enough to make an OS that wont feel like molasis. man

Re:Dead end (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46259197)

OO doesn't have to be slow. Hey, the Linux kernel has a whole host of OO-like interfaces internally and it runs decently enough, right?

Python isn't slow because there's objects everywhere. It's slow because of duck typing and the fact that you can change everything about any object at a whim in your code at runtime. These two properties make fast execution of Python programs a really, really hard problem. And you don't need them that often.

Re:Dead end (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46258611)

If everything was a byte stream in MIME format, it could work with the object paradigm.

Re:Dead end (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46258619)

object database or something like it is at the heart of a modern popular OS.

The windows registry is your friend. UNIX is junk and for losers marinading in their mother's basements.

Re: Dead end (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46258735)

I'm a developer for Windows systems. I have no idea where you get the idea that the registry is object based.

Re:Dead end (1)

stenvar (2789879) | about 10 months ago | (#46258679)

You'll wait a long time: that's been tried and it doesn't work. There are simply too many conflicting demands placed on databases, and any OS that favors one over the other immediately makes itself irrelevant for a large chunk of possible applications.

Re:Dead end (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46258731)

What about an OS where everything is a potato?

Re:Dead end (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46259091)

What about an OS where everything is a potato?

Before OS X, there was MacOS... and before that, there was the dreaded operating system MacDo, where everything was considered a potato.

Re:Dead end (1)

Sevalecan (1070490) | about 10 months ago | (#46259209)

Oh, you mean GLaDOS? "So, how are you holding up?... Because I'm a potato..."

Great idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46258889)

And houses could have their basements in the roof.

And babies could take just one day. Instead of losing time with cells your mother could use directly arms, head, legs...

Did you patent your idea?

Re:Dead end (3, Insightful)

StripedCow (776465) | about 10 months ago | (#46258955)

"Those who don't understand Unix are condemned to reinvent it, poorly."

Re:Dead end (4, Insightful)

peragrin (659227) | about 10 months ago | (#46259045)

oddly enough Plan 9 is from the guys who invented Unix who were trying to reinvent it.

Re:Dead end (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46259113)

oddly enough Plan 9 is from the guys who invented Unix who were trying to reinvent it.

Ah, so it's like Wayland!

been there (2)

znrt (2424692) | about 10 months ago | (#46259003)

Waiting for the day when an object database or something like it is at the heart of a modern popular OS.

been around for nearly 2 decades now: look up os/400 and os/2, two very fine and different implementations of what you just asked for.

both got trampled into oblivion so, ok, you could argue about the "popular" thing. i'd say you really are asking to much.

Re:been there (2)

Fotis Georgatos (3006465) | about 10 months ago | (#46259149)

Add AIX into the mix of tried things; OO-DB at the heart of the OS... OMG!

Re:Dead end (1)

msobkow (48369) | about 10 months ago | (#46259005)

Database at the heart of the OS?

I think you're talking about IBM's approach with the AS/400.

Re:Dead end (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46259033)

> Something like everything is an object or some such paradigm is much more interesting.

I see you contracted the Java Disease. I'm sorry for you.

(and no: I know about Smalltalk and all that. Still it's called the Java Disease. Guess why?)

Re:Dead end (1)

ChunderDownunder (709234) | about 10 months ago | (#46259181)

Java has primitives, which aren't Objects. (though there's a compiler hack known as auto-boxing, which when misused can lead to NullPointerExceptions)

Perhaps you're thinking of Ruby.

Re:Dead end (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46259109)

Plan 9 starting playing around with the idea of everything as a filesystem.

Re:Dead end (2)

mrfrostee (30198) | about 10 months ago | (#46259153)

Waiting for the day when an object database or something like it is at the heart of a modern popular OS.

That is basically what Smalltalk was (except not that popular). When Apple went to Xerox they copied the look and made it popular, but they didn't really understand the implementation at the time.

Re:Dead end (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46259277)

the paradigm that everything is a byte stream is a bit of a dead end idea.

No, it is the right idea. The problem was/is, as ESR pointed out, what they did to the outside world's eyes was to eliminate a few inconsistencies in Unix. But that isn't enough to drive widespread adoption of an operating system, which requires a massive ongoing engineering and marketing (yes, even Linux has the latter) effort.

Re:Dead end (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46259407)

"I'm by no means a plan 9 expert, but as far as I see..."

Seems you are very short sighted :(

my thoughts on plan9 (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46258605)

I just want to note that I am surprised by how many useless troll comments there are on this topic.

Little more than a decade ago I tried out Inferno, actually purchased a copy still have the box even. My take away was that it was interesting, but not very useful. I could not do very much with it. I learned the Limbo programming language that came with it for fun because I like learning new languages. But, after that I went back to Linux again.

Then I needed a job after I graduated from university and there were more Windows jobs, so I my focus became that. I still use Linux for setting up servers or playing with at home, but nothing too serious. I am also a big gamer, so I have always had a Windows machine or dual/triple booted with various OS.

I do not really have an opinion on the systemd debate. Or, even whether everything should be a file.

I think they waited way too long to release plan9, it has definitely become irrelevant. Maybe worth looking at just to see a different perspective on OS design at the very least, it might be useful as a teaching too at universities.

To be completely honest, I am kind of disappointed they decided to go with GPL v2. I mean in my opinion either you completely embrace Richard Stallman and his hatred of the proprietary world and use GPL v3 so proprietary software & drivers can never make use of your operating system, or you go the other route and choose BSD/MIT. Picking GPL v2 as a new license for new software releases is kind of strange to me. Maybe they were hoping it would be cannibalized by Linux and their concepts would eventually be used beyond plan9, but did not want direct commercial competition for their Inferno OS.

It makes me wonder if they still make money on Inferno. Maybe this is a way of generating interest in it again, just like CentOS and Fedora generated interest in RedHat Linux's support and commercial offerings.

Re:my thoughts on plan9 (1)

DuckDodgers (541817) | about 10 months ago | (#46259067)

The GPLv3 has the new patent licensing terms. I am speculating wildly, but whenever the GPLv3 is discussed a few people - and not always the same one or two - chime in and say that their employer won't work with GPLv3 for fear those terms would force them to give up the right to file a patent-infringement lawsuit under certain conditions. e.g. Alcatel-Lucent releases Plan9 under GPLv3, it grants implicit rights to some patent in source file X, and then Red Hat Linux puts source file X into OpenStack so they can use the technology covered under that patent without fear of lawsuit.

I agree with you on the rest of your comments. With respect to gaming, if we're lucky - and I'm not sure we will be, but if we are - in five years SteamOS (on top of Debian Linux, or Debian GNU/Linux if you prefer) will cover all of the games you want, and you won't need to run Windows. I run Windows at home too because of my kids' games, and because I don't want to make my wife resent me or free software by forcing her to switch. I boot into Linux when I'm using the computers for myself, and try to only get games that run well natively on Linux or through Wine.

Unimpressed. (1, Troll)

tlambert (566799) | about 10 months ago | (#46258615)

Unimpressed.

I was involved in the genesis of no less than 5 major open source projects and 7 not so major. License is always a political thing. It has benefitted Samba, benefitted Linux less, Benefitted Hurd not at all, and benefitted Apache, OpenLDAP, and the BSD's to varying degrees.

If they wanted to displace Mach in Hurd, they would have GPLv3'ed it (or done a "GPLv2 or later thing) so RMS could play daddy. They didn't. They're not going to displace Linux, which is the poster boy of GPL through v2, and therefore of the GNU-maniffesto-before-ut-oh-service-requires-patent-licenses realization took place.

This pretty much is not going to mean anything, other than they get to play Pontius Pilate and wash their hand of an inconvenient project going nowhere fast, while looking like a good guy.

Using GPLv2 in this case accomplishes no political goals, other than the promary one, of holding the organization blameless for any further research.

Re:Unimpressed. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46258713)

Flamebate?

It purely a research OS that hasn't had development for a decade. Its not trying to displace anything.
Its like shit talking the source release of DOOM saying that it contributes nothing because Quake was out.

Re:Unimpressed. (1)

Richard_at_work (517087) | about 10 months ago | (#46258753)

Perhaps, *gasp*, political reasons weren't behind the licence choice or indeed the release...

Re:Unimpressed. (1)

dbIII (701233) | about 10 months ago | (#46258849)

RMS could play daddy

Probably the last thing anyone would want with their project merely because he's too busy.

Re:Unimpressed. (1)

afxgrin (208686) | about 10 months ago | (#46259123)

So what would impress you? Having a lawyer write up a whole new license? Keeping it closed source?

9 and done... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46258659)

Now I have VBox with a lot of boxes in it.

Re:9 and done... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46258789)

Username is glenda
The best web browser is to vnc to windows or linux.

too late (2)

stenvar (2789879) | about 10 months ago | (#46258693)

It's a shame that this has come so late. If AT&T hat open source Plan 9 right when it was being developed, it might have saved FOSS from the mess of IPC and distributed computing tools it currently has.

Plan 9 from User Space (3, Interesting)

stenvar (2789879) | about 10 months ago | (#46258701)

Does this mean Plan 9 from User Space [swtch.com] (an implementation of Plan 9 tools and libraries for UNIX and Linux) will be GPLv2 licensed too now?

license war in 3..2.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46258705)

Publish any change you make to the source code.

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Why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46258867)

It was a nice gimmick back then but why now? Do people to expect finding some earth shattering programming solutions?

Hmmmm ... could this vitalise the Tuxscreen? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46258903)

Anyone still got a one of these?... http://tuxscreen.net/

I got mine reflashed with Linux, but its pretty much useless (Linux cannot address the phone hardware).

Licensing (1, Interesting)

Zephiris (788562) | about 10 months ago | (#46259063)

Unless I'm reading it wrong, it previously appears to've been released under a BSD-like license that is non-copyleft, allows commercial redistribution. The only reason it's GPL incompatible is because they describe the venue of law under which the agreement is binding.

And they aren't dual-licensing, but simply relicensing from one to the other. That...is actually a step backwards. In general. I suppose for this particular code release, there's no difference of practical value, but in general it's still going in the wrong direction.

Re:Licensing (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46259169)

Yeah, someone should explain what the Lucent 1.02 license is (Plan 9's former license, or co-license?) and what it allows/restricts.

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