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Chevron Gives Residents Near Fracking Explosion Free Pizza

samzenpus posted about 5 months ago | from the are-you-mad-now? dept.

Businesses 207

Lasrick writes "Chevron hopes that free soda and pizza can extinguish community anger over a fracking well fire in Dunkard Township, Pennsylvania. From the story: 'The flames that billowed out of the Marcellus Shale natural gas well were so hot they caused a nearby propane truck to explode, and first responders were forced to retreat to avoid injury. The fire burned for four days, and Chevron currently has tanks of water standing by in case it reignites. Of the twenty contractors on the well site, one is still missing, and is presumed dead.' The company gave those who live nearby a certificate for a free pizza and some soda."

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Scientists Create Pizza That Can Last Years (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46291301)

Re:Scientists Create Pizza That Can Last Years (4, Funny)

FatdogHaiku (978357) | about 5 months ago | (#46291699)

Scientists Create Pizza That Can Last Years

But that pizza is served just about room temperature. Now, if you store it close to that natural gas well site you could have some fracking HOT pizza!

Re:Scientists Create Pizza That Can Last Years (5, Funny)

Cryacin (657549) | about 5 months ago | (#46292081)

Man, I don't want soda, I want brawno! Because it contains electrolytes!

And they doused the fire with water? Like, from the toilet?

Re:Scientists Create Pizza That Can Last Years (1)

nobuddy (952985) | about 5 months ago | (#46292199)

Brawndo

www.brawndo.com

Re:Scientists Create Pizza That Can Last Years (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46291899)

These Slashdot pizza stories cry out for the return of Pizza Analogy Guy

http://slashdot.org/~PizzaAnalogyGuy

What the (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46291305)

See, guys! Fracking isn't a bad thing at all!

Re:What the (4, Insightful)

Tailhook (98486) | about 5 months ago | (#46291687)

Because wellhead fires, explosions and dead workers are entirely unique to fracking. Nothing like that has ever happened in the oil/gas recovery business ever.

Re:What the (4, Insightful)

AlphaWolf_HK (692722) | about 5 months ago | (#46291691)

I don't think it is. I think it's mainly just NIMBY syndrome; same with nuclear power.

Greenpeace likes to cite Fukushima as evidence for why there should be no more nuclear power, but the actual results of Fukushima don't bear that out.

Fukushima taught us that living in an earthquake zone at the time of an earthquake/tsunami hurts a lot more people (16,000 confirmed dead, 2,500 missing) than a meltdown at a modern nuclear power plant (zero dead, liberal estimates of 1,000 potential cancer cases in the future - may never see a single one though.)

Are there risks with fracking? Other than the safety risks common in every other industrial work environment, not really. Some people suspect earthquakes, but so far there isn't anything other than confirmation bias to suggest it actually happens.

Re:What the (2)

AlphaWolf_HK (692722) | about 5 months ago | (#46291695)

And by the way, I live 50 miles from the largest nuclear plant in the US. Doesn't bother me in the slightest.

Re:What the (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46291775)

And by the way, I live 50 miles from the largest nuclear plant in the US. Doesn't bother me in the slightest.

Do you want your medal now, or at the dedication of the statue which commemorates
your brave indifference to the cancer you already have but don't now about yet ?

You probably think I am joking.

But I am a time traveler and I have read your obituary.

.

Re:What the (4, Funny)

MightyMartian (840721) | about 5 months ago | (#46292075)

I'm saddened to hear there are ACs in the future. BTW, how does Beta turn out?

Re:What the (4, Funny)

Cryacin (657549) | about 5 months ago | (#46292089)

This topic is about fracking wells, not being well fracked.

Re:What the (1)

camperdave (969942) | about 5 months ago | (#46292569)

This topic is about fracking wells, not being well fracked.

Bravo. Well played.

Re:What the (2, Informative)

dbIII (701233) | about 5 months ago | (#46291927)

People were fine 50 miles from Hiroshima so you are setting the bar pretty low :)
IMHO the biggest problems people had with the US nuclear lobby were the "clean" and "too cheap to meter" lies instead of the reality that is impressive enough in itself. The "clean" thing was counterproductive and held up nuclear waste management for over two decades on synrok alone (I saw an example of it in 1987, almost identical to the finished product when they finally got some funding about five years ago) not even considering other solutions. The rabid response to anyone that questioned safety resulted in the cancellation of a thorium project after the person in charge of it pointed out the potential safety benefits over existing reactors.

Re:What the (2)

r1348 (2567295) | about 5 months ago | (#46291965)

There's a difference between natural disasters and man-made ones.
If anything, Fukushima thought us we shouldn't build nuclear plants in an earthquake zone (I know, all Japan is, this should push us towards better international cooperation, in a perfect world).

Re:What the (1)

thesupraman (179040) | about 5 months ago | (#46292345)

Fukushima WAS a natural disaster, stop trying to pretend otherwise. It was caused by the earthquake!

Or do you consider large numbers of the deaths also to not be natural, because people were hit by debris from buildings that broke up, trapped in
cars, etc? Pretty much the same thing.

The point is it has caused next to no deaths, whereas the main disaster did - and yet people rant on about the one that really didnt impact.

Get some damn perspective.

Re:What the (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46292265)

Fukushima is a perfect example why the world does not need HAARP.

Re:What the (2, Insightful)

no-body (127863) | about 5 months ago | (#46292329)

Are there risks with fracking? Other than the safety risks common in every other industrial work environment, not really. Some people suspect earthquakes, but so far there isn't anything other than confirmation bias to suggest it actually happens.

So, what happens to all that dirty water pumped pumped in deep injections "wells"? Maybe it's "spare" water when surface water becomes even more scarce then in some areas of US already?

I think all this activity is playing poker with the future where one side in the present holds the better card.

Re:What the (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46292441)

So, what happens to all that dirty water pumped pumped in deep injections "wells"?

Over thousands of years it slowly seeps through the rocks and just kind of hands around down there. These wells are far, far deeper than the deepest wells drilled for pumping water up from underground aquifers and the water table. By the time the 'dirty' water ever makes it anywhere important the rocks will have filtered all the crap out of it.

The actual point of concern from fracking is not about the fluids, the water, or any of the bullshit you see people ranting about. The problem is that they are re-using old wells which were drilled a long time ago, and those wells go through the water table and natural aquifers in many cases. Those old wells tend to have shoddy and/or degraded casings (the walls of the wells are lined usually with some type of concrete or metal tubing to prevent them from collapsing), so when they are pumping the shit down the well they can tend to leak somewhat.

Maybe it's "spare" water when surface water becomes even more scarce then in some areas of US already?

Surface water is becoming "scarce" because of the massive demands which come from agriculture, large industry, and most of all large population centers.. especially when you put a city somewhere that doesn't normally have water (like the Nevada Desert) and have to pipe a shitload in from elsewhere.
But the water isn't getting more scarce, it's just ending up in the oceans faster than the weather is recycling it up into the high elevations in the form of rain and snow.

The solution to water shortages isn't to cry about frakking, it's to start advancing our de-salinization technology. Or start catching some icy comets and dropping them into the atmosphere. We pump far more water out of underground aquifers which do not naturally replenish quickly than we will ever put back into frakking wells, and if the global warming alarmists are right we could stand to put a dent in the ocean levels.

Re:What the (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46292447)

I think your comment is pretty insightful, but you are mistaken on one point.

Fukushima taught us that [...] a meltdown at a modern nuclear power plant (zero dead

Fukushima taught what happens when an ancient nuke plant melts down, not a modern one. Fukushima was due for decommissioning... it was a second-gen design that had been in operation for over four decades! That's the original planned total lifetime of the design. (Although with upgrades it is possible to keep operating [neimagazine.com] a gen-II past the four-decades mark.)

I want to see a large buildout of gen-III+ or fourth-gen design nuke plants, and yes you can build one near me if you like. Even a crappy old nuke plant doesn't kill everyone when a giant tsunami hits it, so I'm even less worried about a modern "inherently safe" design, and plus I don't live in a tsunami zone.

Anyone who honestly believes in human-caused climate change must be in favor of nuke plants as they release no CO2. We should be building modern nuke plants and closing down coal plants. And yes, build modern nuke plants and closing down the four-decades-old nuke plants. And invest in research on thorium, traveling wave, etc.

And go ahead and build solar power too while you are at it. Just shut down the damn coal plants.

Re:What the (5, Insightful)

firewrought (36952) | about 5 months ago | (#46292451)

Are there risks with fracking?

Groundwater contamination [vanityfair.com] , for one. Especially, flammable tap water [youtube.com] . Perhaps you dismiss that as anecdotal, but it's not as if scientist have been given the access, data, and funding to run these claims to ground... that will take another ten or twenty years, by which point the perpetrators will have long since taken off with the profits while the general public gets stuck with whatever environmental catastrophes this created.

Don't get me wrong... I wish fracking was as safe and plentiful as proponents claim. And maybe it's worth some amount of contamination even if it isn't safe. I just wish these things could be determined objectively and scientifically in the best public interest instead of this same old sh*t where the powerful simultaneously exert influence over corporations, media, government, and public opinion to effect the fattest profit instead of the utilitarian good.

Re:What the (2, Interesting)

AlphaWolf_HK (692722) | about 5 months ago | (#46292595)

Groundwater contamination [vanityfair.com], for one. Especially, flammable tap water [youtube.com]. Perhaps you dismiss that as anecdotal, but it's not as if scientist have been given the access, data, and funding to run these claims to ground... that will take another ten or twenty years, by which point the perpetrators will have long since taken off with the profits while the general public gets stuck with whatever environmental catastrophes this created.

The thing is, in large groups, secrets are extremely hard to keep. Is it bothersome that they are quiet about these kinds of things? Yeah. But at the same time, I know exactly why they do it: PR is a very delicate thing. A lot of companies are tight lipped about even the most innocuous things that go on within their company because it's stupid easy for somebody to misconstrue it and damage your reputation horridly.

For examples of this, see the recent events where Gabe Newell openly talked about the DNS cache issue, or that MS UX designer who admitted even senior executives at the company are reluctant to talk about internal happenings. Sometimes it's not just the concerns over their bottom line, sometimes it's concerns over just how stressful it can be to deal with public opinion on a large scale. The developer of that game flappy bird was bringing in $50k a day but stopped because he couldn't handle the PR stress, the developer of Fez quit the games industry for the same reason.

Something more closely related to this: Why did the Hadly CRU keep their data so tightly restricted before the email scandal? That's why. Some journalist whose life mission is to get a Pulitzer prize will comb for just the smallest bit of interesting data to create a media shitstorm, no matter how meaningless that data might be. Even when it is debunked, the damage is still done and it is permanent, mainly because of the way urban legends never die. (People still think Bill Gates said we don't need more than 640k of memory, or that Richard Gere put a gerbil in his butt, but neither of these things ever actually happened.)

Likewise, I'm sure the energy companies involved keep their data hidden for similar reasons. Meanwhile hundreds if not thousands of engineers and scientists work for these companies. I'm pretty sure that if there was something going on, one of them would say something. I mean shit, if it can happen to the NSA, it can happen to anybody.

They aren't going to outright deny any of these claims either, because that can make things worse. Here's a perfect example: I'm sure you've heard of that "unfair campaign" before, where they say you can't see racism if you're wrhite. Speak all you want about how that's such a bullshit claim, (which it is) but if you're a white guy you automatically have no credibility. And worse, if you go around calling BS on it, then people will point fingers at you calling you a racist for denying racism. It's a shitty situation, but unfortunately that's how you have to deal with stupid people.

Re:What the (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46292597)

" but the actual results of Fukushima don't bear that out."

Says you? Go live there idiot.

Re:What the (5, Interesting)

Mr_Wisenheimer (3534031) | about 5 months ago | (#46292691)

Well, the risk of environmental contamination is pretty real and the consequences severe. Fracking works by injecting ridiculous large quantities of chemicals and water into bedrock and then the pressure from the heat and gas sends a lot of those chemicals and water back to the surface where it is collected in ponds. While there might not be clear evidence of the fracking process itself contaminating the groundwater, leaks of chemicals at the surface have happened and the consequences can be particularly nasty. To add insult to injury, many of these fracking companies have traditionally considered the cocktail trade secrets, so local residents, first responders, and regulators don't always know exactly what the contamination risk might. Fracking leading to fire shooting out of your faucets might be an urban legend like nuclear explosions at power plants. That does not mean that there is not a real risk of a significant catastrophe. The nuclear industry is tightly regulated. Fracking regulations, until recently, have been largely nonexistent.

Cold Pizza? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46291307)

As a bonus, Dunkard Township residence can reheat the pizza with their kitchen faucets

Situation room... (2)

Overzeetop (214511) | about 5 months ago | (#46291309)

[everyone stares at the skinny guy in glasses]

Skinny guy: What?!? Everybody likes free pizza?

DF? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46291313)

You killed my brother, but since you gave me free pizza and soda pop I'll let it go this time.

Re:DF? (1)

viperidaenz (2515578) | about 5 months ago | (#46291827)

They didn't say the missing worker's family got free pizza.

Re:DF? (2)

Cryacin (657549) | about 5 months ago | (#46292099)

They get a free ham.

Scientists Create Pizza That Can Last Years (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46291319)

Bread and Circuses (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46291327)

I guess out with the old slogan, and in with the new! Pizza and soda for the Plebes!

The irony here being, the 'accident' is for a market that is the lifeblood of modern civilization, rather than entertainment.

Pizza bread (1)

AK Marc (707885) | about 5 months ago | (#46291337)

What they really needed to go with the pizza bread is a community performance of the Cirque du Solei. Why bother with figurative bread and circuises, when you can get literal ones?

Industrial accidents happen . . . (5, Insightful)

Mr_Wisenheimer (3534031) | about 5 months ago | (#46291349)

. . . that is just part of life, especially something as dangerous as extracting oil or natural gas. When that happens, it only seems reasonable to do something to generate good publicity. However, it is better to do nothing at all (except apologize) than to attempt some insulting gesture. It makes it seem like the residents' exposure to potentially toxic smoke is worth nothing more than a coupon for free pizza. It is insulting. Maybe they should actually pay to send out some doctors or some other meaningful assistance for the residents.

Re: Industrial accidents happen . . . (3, Insightful)

DigiShaman (671371) | about 5 months ago | (#46291411)

Insulting when it's on the cheap, at least. From a PR perspective, paying off the community in the form of gifts can actually work. Human nature and all that. The correct way of pulling this off is to not be so cheap as to backfire. Perhaps a new XBox or some such for each resident family that would be effected nearby. Take the total cost of the political fallout and divide by family count to get the value that the gift should be.

Now between you and me, we might feel that a bit condescending. But money talks and we are the minority voice here. It works for politics, no difference here.

Re: Industrial accidents happen . . . (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46291521)

so some residents were mildly annoyed and should get brand new entertainment systems

this is why our country is shit

Re: Industrial accidents happen . . . (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46292427)

So many places to go with this!

"We are Anonymous Coward. Death is only a mild annoyance. Fear us!"

"If a mild annoyance gets one person killed, I'd hate to see what a major annoyance is like."

"If I post this, will you be mildly annoyed?"

this is why our country is shit

It's hilarious that you think you have some basis for comparison.

Re: Industrial accidents happen . . . (3, Interesting)

viperidaenz (2515578) | about 5 months ago | (#46291843)

It pays off even better if the small print on the voucher says acceptance of the voucher means they can't sue.

Re: Industrial accidents happen . . . (4, Insightful)

TrollstonButterbeans (2914995) | about 5 months ago | (#46292161)

"Perhaps a new XBox or some such for each resident family"

What basement-dwelling numbnuts up-modded this?

Re:Industrial accidents happen . . . (1)

Krishnoid (984597) | about 5 months ago | (#46291475)

It makes it seem like the residents' exposure to potentially toxic smoke is worth nothing more than a coupon for free pizza.

It is insulting. Maybe they should actually pay to send out some doctors or some other meaningful assistance for the residents.

Assistance such as, you know, actually sending out the pizza itself.

Re:Industrial accidents happen . . . (1)

rubycodez (864176) | about 5 months ago | (#46291981)

that was floated as trial balloon but unfortunately the local pizzeria was in fact blown up, thus happily limiting costs for the coupon program

Re:Industrial accidents happen . . . (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46291481)

When that happens, it only seems reasonable to do something to generate good publicity.

Really. What person or group of them in damage control decided sending a pizza after nearly killing you would be image improving? I want to know so I don't accidentally hire them one day.

Nothing says sorry we nearly baked you like we baked you this pizza!

I would boycott Chevron... (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46291395)

But... if I boycotted every corporation that did something so outrageous as this, I would have no car, no gas to put in it, no clothes to wear, no shoes, nothing to eat or drink nothing to see, hear, or read. we as a people are deeply indebted to evil, and/or depraved assholes. so thank you, you despicable worms... thanks for making our modern world possible.

Re:I would boycott Chevron... (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46291485)

This is the problem right here, you say that everyone is evil so I have to be evil too. There are other choices, if you don't make a stand nothing will change. Oh I "have to buy my gas from Chevron, because their all the same, well no they are not and if you can't do that then make your own. It will require lifestyle changes but you can do it.

(links are the first on the list, there are many, many more.)

You can make Gas (its not hard, http://www.alcohol4fuel.com/index.html
You can Build a Car, from scratch, http://www.rqriley.com/plans.html
You can make clothes, http://www.simplicity.com/c-153-men-boys.aspx
You can make shoes, http://www.instructables.com/id/DIY-Footwear-Projects/
You can make/grow you own food, http://self-sufficiency-guide.com/Grow.html

You don't need millions of dollars to do this, it won't have the latest features or stylish brands, but you won't be Evil, and you never know others may follow you....

Re:I would boycott Chevron... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46291749)

And therein lies the problem.... Modern society requires division of labor in order to accomplish anything of significance (let's assume that the "anything" in this sentence is only "good" and not "evil" - I won't even try to define good and evil here). Unfortunately, there are enough people out there who would take advantage of "the system" in order to screw those who are otherwise unwilling or unable to do a particular task in question simply because their hands are already full with other tasks important to them (and likely still relevant to you and others - division of labor).

You say one could make their own gasoline, or make their own clothes and grow their own food, etc., etc. Well, what about those who say you should make your own informed financial decisions? And then there are those who’d belittle you for not configuring your home computer network properly. Not to mention the need to improve our medical knowledge in order to make informed medical decisions, etc., etc.

I could go on for far too long but I think I’ve made my point. It is unreasonable for a person to be responsible for all aspects of one’s own life; there are just too many caveats to life in this modern world – I say that as an American. But even folks of completely backwards, third-world countries face the same challenges – just a different set of rules (e.g., grow food while the hordes around you try to slash the necks of you and your family, while at the same time trying to find a good school for your children in order to lift them out of their current lot in life, etc., etc.)

At some point and as the world’s population grows, civil society will demand much, much more from each citizen. I see no other way for the human species, and the other untold species of the world in which we live. If I can’t rely on you, or anyone else, to do your jobs well or at least to an acceptable degree, then what hope is there for all of us as a whole in the future? Sure, you and I will may “get by” fairly well (to the extent we aren’t severely “injured” by our fellow man) but what of the multitudes of generations to come? “We” (the human species) cannot continue our ways indefinitely without some sort of reckoning – and I’m not talking about some ethereal reckoning (God or whatever), I’m simply speaking about an ever-expanding horde of low-lifes who take, take, take with no regard to the consequences.

Re:I would boycott Chevron... (2)

viperidaenz (2515578) | about 5 months ago | (#46291895)

not configuring your home computer network properly

You can't realistically make your own computer network without the help of a large company to manufacture the components.

Re:I would boycott Chevron... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46291969)

Point to point lasers work just fine [ubergizmo.com] .

Re:I would boycott Chevron... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46292165)

I'm not sure if you were trying to make a separate point but, I believe your statement asserts my post about division of labor above it. Those large companies manufacturing the components all have a part in society. They do their part - we do our part; hopefully, everyone's life improves in some measurable way. However, if the folks at those companies making those components do so with complete neglect for our environment then they are harming us in their own way. It's the same for Chevron - if they are negligent in some way that caused this explosion then buying pizza for a bunch of people is hardly helping "the cause."

Do I have some sort of answer? No, I'm just trying to make the point that we all have a responsibility to our fellow human beings no matter our part in this world. And it would be great if we could depend on others to do their part too without damaging society or the environment in some way. Alas, that is wishful dreaming on my part....

Re:I would boycott Chevron... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46292041)

I completely agree with every point, but that doesn't diminish the fact that people now only rely on other to do their, Thinking/ making. People havent gotten to a point that they don't like what a company is doing but continue to buy their products and services while condemning them for their actions, to large companies money talks if they found out that Sacrificing your first born son would raise their stock by 10% some would implement that as company policy. You dont even look for an alternative now, don't even try....

Re:I would boycott Chevron... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46292043)

Really? Seriously? I mean... to build my own car, I need car parts - or are you suggesting I make those too? Should I start with raw metal or would that be too evil? I guess I could somehow buy a mine and mine my own iron ore and build my own foundry to convert iron ore into steel, which I could then use in the factory I don't have to make car parts. And that's the easy part. Even making spark plugs would entail an unreasonable amount of effort - especially when you can buy them dirt cheap. And gas? From Alcohol? Because that's cost effective. Even if it was, it would hardly be good for high volume. Maybe you distill for a week and then drive for an hour? But I suppose you won't need to drive anywhere since you'll be growing your own food. You won't need a job since you won't be buying any of that evil stuff put out by "the man" either. So... yes, you would be putting up with a *huge* loss of lifestyle for probably no gain of anything at all. It's not that large companies are inherently "evil", they are only "evil" in the sense that a shark is evil for wanting to eat you. Sharks want food for their tummy, and companies want profits for their investors. It's pretty easy to get corporations to change their behavior, though, since they respond to monetary punishments more than individuals (on a percentage scale, at least). And any big organization is made up of individual people, some of which will do good things and some of which will do bad things - that's not limited to companies, but applies to all types of groups.

It's a form of communication - say it with pizza (1)

dbIII (701233) | about 5 months ago | (#46291999)

It is a sign that the situation is not being completely ignored. That has some value. Contact has been made and it's a implicit opening for communication instead of just being angry and feeling ignored. Maybe they'll get a lot of people ringing them up saying "you think you can buy me off with a pizza" ranting, and that's the end of it instead of a lot of expensive legal action.
I can see the point of "we've fucked up, here have a pizza" as being better than silence.

Re:I would boycott Chevron... (3, Funny)

Bite The Pillow (3087109) | about 5 months ago | (#46292485)

Fuck you, It's FREE pizza. Get that shit. Nothing to eat? Eat free pizza! It's free, and its pizza!

And they might give you water instead of soda, so your needs are covered. Shut your piehole, except for the part where you shove pizza pie in it. Like the good lord intended.

Hot Dogs & Marshmallows (4, Funny)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about 5 months ago | (#46291401)

They should have given them hot dogs and marshmallows instead, to roast if it reignites,

Re:Hot Dogs & Marshmallows (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46291435)

They should have given them hot dogs and marshmallows instead, to roast if it reignites,

You expect them to wash the hot dogs and marshmallows down with the water that they can no longer drink from their wells?

They need to read the fine print. (5, Funny)

140Mandak262Jamuna (970587) | about 5 months ago | (#46291417)

At the back of the coupon that gets them the free pizza, it is written in very faint lettering, in the same font used to list ingredients in the raman noodle soup, the following, "By redeeming this coupon I hereby forego all claims I have against Chevron and accept the pizza as the full and fair compensation for all the damages that might have been caused to me by Chevron, its associates, its lobbyists, its banksters and/or its legislators, including all damages already caused, all damages that could be caused in the future, in this life, (and in the next seven reincarnations if I am a Hindu or a Buddhist)".

There lawyers are really really clever.

Re:They need to read the fine print. (4, Insightful)

volkerdi (9854) | about 5 months ago | (#46291497)

They may not even need any fine print. Accepting compensation can affect your right to seek damages later.

Re:They need to read the fine print. (2)

Immerman (2627577) | about 5 months ago | (#46291893)

Somehow I doubt any judge would be impressed by a pizza and soda compensation package for anything beyond a bit of fear and inconvenience though, unless it was a *really* big pizza, or you explicitly agreed to waive rights to further complaints. I suspect even fine print on the back of the coupon would be hard pressed to make the cut.

Re:They need to read the fine print. (4, Insightful)

140Mandak262Jamuna (970587) | about 5 months ago | (#46292121)

Someone thought no one would take seriously an arrest warrant for failing to return a video to a defunct video store.

Re:They need to read the fine print. (1)

Immerman (2627577) | about 5 months ago | (#46292735)

Touche.

Re:They need to read the fine print. (1)

techno-vampire (666512) | about 5 months ago | (#46292417)

Unlike most people here, I took a moment to RTFA, and the word "compensation" never appears in it. I get the impression that this was more in the form of a way to thank the residents for staying calm and giving Chevron the time it needed to deal with the situation.

I would boycott Chevron... (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46291425)

But... if I boycotted every heartless, soulless corporation who behaved in such an appallingly outrageous, reprehensible fashion, I would have no one to buy gasoline from, and no car to put it in. Also, I would have no job, no place to live, no bed to sleep on, and no conflict-mineral filled computer to read slashdot with.

Now the roof of your mouth is burned too! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46291431)

Mmmmm pepperoni....

Ironic Captcha: coupon

Class action (4, Insightful)

Macdude (23507) | about 5 months ago | (#46291451)

A Pizza is more than most people get as the result of a class action lawsuit...

Re:Class action (1)

Dagger2 (1177377) | about 5 months ago | (#46291871)

But it cost the company less, so it's less effective than a class action lawsuit.

Re:Class action (2)

Bing Tsher E (943915) | about 5 months ago | (#46292103)

Also, no lawyers get anything. So it's an outrage.

Re:Class action (1)

phantomfive (622387) | about 5 months ago | (#46292725)

True story.

Re:Class action (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46292745)

Um, yea; on second thought, I'll take pepperoni!

already covered (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46291457)

on boingboing, dvorak, fark and reddit, but thanks for bringing us key technological news in a timely manner.

That covers all the pizza I've had (4, Funny)

SuperKendall (25149) | about 5 months ago | (#46291465)

I have to say, in many years I've yet to have a pizza explode - no matter how hard you shake it.

Just another notch in the belt of Pizza as superior food item.

Re:That covers all the pizza I've had (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46291513)

"Explosion Free Pizza" -- I can't unsee it now. Mod parent funny.

Which place? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46291467)

Funny, there isn't a place called "Bobtown Pizza" nearby to cash them, not only did they buy them off with "free pizza" it was just another bait and switch to screw them over.

https://www.google.com/maps/search/Pizza/@39.7411645,-79.9751421,14z/data=!3m1!4b1

Re:Which place? (1)

viperidaenz (2515578) | about 5 months ago | (#46291935)

OMG, it didn't show up on a 5 second google search so it doesn't exist!

Bobtown is the name of a town in Dunkard, Pennsylvania.

It's safe to assume Bobtown Pizza is in Bobtown.
The phone number on the voucher also has the area code for Bobtown.

Free pizza ad with article, too! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46291477)

I opened this article and what was waiting for me on the side? An ad for pizza. Well played, Slashdot, well played.

I deserve Pizza (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46291479)

I wish slashdot would give me free pizza as an apology for exposing me to Beta.

Re:I deserve Pizza (2)

rubycodez (864176) | about 5 months ago | (#46291993)

that was tried in limited trial but 80 percent of participants upchucked their pizza upon subsequent Slashdot Beta reloading

Sorry 'bout poisoning your water (4, Insightful)

msobkow (48369) | about 5 months ago | (#46291529)

Sorry 'bout poisoning your drinking water. Here, have a pizza and STFU.

Re:Sorry 'bout poisoning your water (1)

Mashiki (184564) | about 5 months ago | (#46292589)

Oh I see we've got someone swallowing tripe again. Let me guess, you also believe that methane only shows up in the water after fracking. And oil never bubbles to the surface to contaminate the ground either.

In all Honesty, Chevron is being a Good Neighbor (4, Insightful)

siphonophore (158996) | about 5 months ago | (#46291533)

Chevron has a sizable industrial accident in a community. They take losses in it (insurance likely covers direct losses) and lose a contractor. I'm sure that wherever damages did occur, Chevron is on the hook and is likely paying up. The nearby residents had zero damages and weren't owed a thing. Chevron is not getting off cheap or abdicating responsibility through a pizza giveaway.

The situation is comparable to having a tall tree in your yard that falls over on your car. You don't owe your neighbor a pizza, but maybe you buy him dinner anyway just for giving him the jitters.

Re:In all Honesty, Chevron is being a Good Neighbo (0)

Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) | about 5 months ago | (#46291705)

Well explodes, big deal. Oh wait, it's a fracking well! Alert the media and Slashdot editors!

Re:In all Honesty, Chevron is being a Good Neighbo (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46291973)

Right, so you're saying that having a fracking well explode is so common as to be unremarkable. Message received.

Re:In all Honesty, Chevron is being a Good Neighbo (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46292141)

Just wait till you have a fracking pizza explode.

Re:In all Honesty, Chevron is being a Good Neighbo (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46291745)

The situation is comparable to having a tall tree in your yard that falls over on your car. You don't owe your neighbor a pizza, but maybe you buy him dinner anyway just for giving him the jitters.

If my tree falls on my car, why and I buying my neightbor anything?

For that matter, if said tree fell on his car, I wouldn't be buying my neightbor anything. Unless the tree looked like it would fall over, then it is just "act of nature".

Re:In all Honesty, Chevron is being a Good Neighbo (2)

Shavano (2541114) | about 5 months ago | (#46291779)

When there's a big explosion and fire, there's definitely a possibility that nearby residents were directly affected.

If that's the case. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46291917)

If what you say is the case, then I agree.

The trouble with industrial accidents of this scale, the ramifications my not show for years - well beyond the stature of limitations. And that's the problem. In our society, accidents such as this inevitably become the burden of John Q. Public. We pay for it one way or another. And the owners ALWAYS make out.

I've lived through it. A company polluted the ground water. They (the corporatoin) were found guilty of illegal dumping. The corp says "OK. Take what we have." and then they go bankrupt. The principles of the corp got their money and walk away while the victims get a shell of a company (just a name in the Secretary of State's database) for compensation.

The little people ALWAYS get screwed.

And when I hear bitching about the EPA, I just cringe. And when I hear bitching about the EPA from folks who really need them, I just want to smack them upside the head with their AM radios - because that's where they're getting the propaganda against the EPA: AM Talk radio and Fox news - goddamn propaganda machines for industry.

Re:If that's the case. (1)

the eric conspiracy (20178) | about 5 months ago | (#46292273)

False analogy. It wasn't that big of an accident, and Chevron isn't a small company in danger of going bankrupt over the damages associated with this case.

Also you might want to clean up your spelling a bit.

Re:In all Honesty, Chevron is being a Good Neighbo (2)

sonamchauhan (587356) | about 5 months ago | (#46292149)

Where there is fire, there is smoke. Where there is smoke from an oil well fire, there are carcinogens in the air

Re:In all Honesty, Chevron is being a Good Neighbo (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46292409)

Chevron has a sizable industrial accident in a community.

At least we agree on this. :)

They take losses in it (insurance likely covers direct losses) and lose a contractor.

If Chevron was a privately owned little mom-and-pop operation and the "contractor" was their son-in-law I'd have some sympathy. But, in this case, it's hard to imagine that anyone with any real decision making power (that is, responsibility) suffered at all. Somehow I doubt the CEO of Chevron will put a picture of the deceased contractor's family on his desk as a permanent reminder to never let something like this happen again: for a company that size, a few human lives here and there are merely the cost of doing business.

I'm sure that wherever damages did occur, Chevron is on the hook and is likely paying up.

With a fire that burned for four days and the loss of life I'm pretty sure that the local government provided some services somewhere along the line.

The nearby residents had zero damages and weren't owed a thing.

I have a young nephew who, when he gets mad, runs around swinging his arms randomly hoping to "accidentally" hit someone. I suppose technically there's nothing wrong with his behavior because he's not guaranteed to succeed in hitting anyone and, even if he does, it's not "intentional". But real life isn't quite so simple and black and white: there's also this notion of negligent activity that puts others at risk.

Chevron is not getting off cheap or abdicating responsibility through a pizza giveaway.

Last year the CEO of Chevron got about $30 million in compensation [mercurynews.com] . In a standard 2,000 hour work year (50 weeks at 40 hours/week), that works out to $15,000/hour or $250/minute (there was time when I thought lawyers who charged $250/hour had it good). Now, Chevron apparently gave away about 100 pizzas [philly.com] at a cost of $12 or so per pizza - for a total cost of about $1,200. So this pizza give-away is equivalent to just a bit less that 5 minutes of the CEO's time.

The situation is comparable to having a tall tree in your yard that falls over on your car. You don't owe your neighbor a pizza, but maybe you buy him dinner anyway just for giving him the jitters.

A better analogy would be that cut down a tree on your property without taking adequate safety precautions and it all goes horribly wrong and falls on a fedex delivery person who was trying to deliver a package to your house and your neigbor tries to give the delivery person CPR but the delivery person dies in your neighbor's arms - not too mention the tree almost fell on your neighbor's house which might have killed your neighbor's family. So you give your neighbor just one single penny to compensate for the distress and risk you caused - and walk away self-righteously feeling that you've given your neighbor far more compensation than your neighbor actually deserved.

Fuck the media (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46291671)

I work for a hydrofrac company, and frankly, I'm fed up with the media and their bullshit. The only relationship this incident has to 'fracking' is that, the well was likely stimulated at some point in the near-past. The frac company has come, got 'er done, and gone. They didn't cause the fire, nor have anything to do with it.

Straight from the goddamn Chevron website:

Update No. 3: Pennsylvania Incident

Feb. 11, 2014, 10:50 p.m. EST – At approximately 6:45 a.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 11, a fire was reported on Chevron Appalachia's Lanco 7H well pad in Dunkard Township in Greene County, Pennsylvania.

The Lanco well pad has three natural gas wells. The wells were in the final stages of preparation before being placed into production. There was no drilling or hydraulic fracturing taking place at the time. At the time of the incident, preparations were being made to run tubing, which is often done prior to bringing wells into production.

Re:Fuck the media (3, Insightful)

MightyMartian (840721) | about 5 months ago | (#46292139)

So if I cut your brake lines, but you don't drive the car for a week, and end up smacking up the car, I'm not to blame.

Re:Fuck the media (1)

Harlequin80 (1671040) | about 5 months ago | (#46292483)

Of course you are.

But if I service your car perfectly. Leave it in a better state than you brought it to me in, and then you crash it because YOU made a mistake then no I'm not to blame.

Stimulating the well will not cause a fire. You need an ignition source in an oxygen filled atmosphere. I have no idea what caused this particular incident but it could have been anything from an electrical fault causing a spark, a failure in a relief valve seeing heat build up to flash point or something as stupid as someone smoking a cigarette nearby. Just because some rocks got broken up hundreds of meters below the ground (and yes that is what fracking is) previously doesn't mean that caused the problem.

Frack the planet (1)

amightywind (691887) | about 5 months ago | (#46291709)

As a Chevron investor I wish they would pay closer attention to costs. It is not a crime to have a well accident. Screw the treehuggers. Frack the planet!

Explosion Free Pizza (2)

Greyfox (87712) | about 5 months ago | (#46291809)

Is the best kind of pizza. Now if they could just keep my water from exploding, too. In general I like my food and drink to be in the non-exploding category.

Can I get it too? (1)

Shavano (2541114) | about 5 months ago | (#46291831)

Explosion-Free Pizza, that is.

Everyone should get some.

Pictures (2)

the eric conspiracy (20178) | about 5 months ago | (#46291933)

From the pictures of the site Chevron didn't have to give out too many certificates. The area is REALLY sparsely populated.

And don't forget Taco Tuesday is coming next week! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46291951)

Gas not included.

Centralia part II (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46292023)

We don't need a repeat of the Centralia fires. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centralia_mine_fire

Chevron should be fined a billion dollars for this mess.

Might as well throw gasoline it (1)

slashmydots (2189826) | about 5 months ago | (#46292377)

What were they thinking?! What's the number one thing that picket lines and rioters and protesters want? Duh, pizza and soda! That's just fueling them!

Bad Technology Is Bad (5, Insightful)

Tetch (534754) | about 5 months ago | (#46292467)

Yup, don't like fracking - it carries too high a risk of polluting my landscape, and quite likely turning a beautiful view into a rubbish-tip. In the UK, the government has even gone on record [telegraph.co.uk] to say the extracted oil & gas won't reduce anybody's energy bills [theguardian.com] . It will, however, make a shit-load of money for some people who already have too much [youtube.com] , and who seem willing to rig [youtube.com] the deck [manchester...news.co.uk] to make sure they get their way.

Don't like nuclear fission power either - it produces *filthy* dirty waste, that we have no idea what to do with. AFAIK, not a single nuclear power station has yet been decommissioned and cleaned up anywhere in the world - quite a few are mothballed, while an alleged "decommissioning" process achieves almost nothing and stretches endlessly into the future at vast expense to the tax-payer (cos poor little private sector can't take the pain, so public sector has to take that task on, or private sector will take its ball home).

Both these technologies are amateurish, half-assed, ill-thought-out, poor examples of our abilities at this climactic moment of the 21st century, and I'm embarrassed to be a member of the same species that wants to do this crap. Come on ... we're capable of better than that.

For some reason, many of my peers in this /. community seem to take umbrage whenever there is any criticism of any industrial process if there is some kind of "technology" aspect to that process. There appears to be a belief that so long as a process makes money and is technological, it must be undertaken, irrespective of the impact on this one uniquely precious planet that we have here. I will continue to try to understand this point of view, but I fear its exponents are blinded by the flashing lights.

Sigh.

News for Nerds? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46292665)

Ummmm, why is this news for nerds? Because it involves Pizza? Because everybody loves to rag on fracking?

Are there no decent stories to read?

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