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Your Next Online Order Could Be Delivered To Your Car's Trunk

timothy posted about 10 months ago | from the don't-mind-the-bodies-or-fireworks dept.

Security 162

cartechboy writes "It's amazing how far we've come with technology. Now many of us have the ability to work remotely, and we can even lock/unlock our vehicles via the Internet. And yet, the way we receive our packages from FedEx, UPS, and USPS hasn't really changed. But Volvo thinks it has a way to revolutionize package delivery with Roam Delivery: instead of having packages delivered to your house or office, you could have packages dropped off in the trunk of your car. Volvo says this would work via its new digital keys technology which would allow customers to choose their car as a delivery option when ordering goods online. Via a smartphone or tablet, the owner would be informed when a delivery requires dropping off or picking up from the car. Accepting the delivery will enable a digital key which tracks when the car is opened, and then when it's locked again. The digital key expires once the delivery is complete. Not only does this sound pretty slick, but the technology to make it happen is pretty simple. Now the only question is whether you really want your Amazon box being delivered to your vehicle."

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And when it doesn't fit (4, Insightful)

alta (1263) | about 10 months ago | (#46296401)

You end up with a nice large expensive thing sitting on top of your car until you get there to deal with it.

ONE WORD: (3, Insightful)

Jeremiah Cornelius (137) | about 10 months ago | (#46296471)

"Silkroad."

No (1)

morgauxo (974071) | about 10 months ago | (#46297431)

I'm pretty sure the process of getting that digital key identifies you, or at least identifies the owner of the car. This isn't a way to anonymously get deliveries.

Re:No (1)

Obfuscant (592200) | about 10 months ago | (#46297845)

I'm pretty sure the process of getting that digital key identifies you, or at least identifies the owner of the car. This isn't a way to anonymously get deliveries.

Uhhh, if the key doesn't identify you, I'm sure the car registration is a dead giveaway. You know they're going to record that when they do the delivery.

Re:And when it doesn't fit (2)

mistapotta (941143) | about 10 months ago | (#46296499)

You may want to refrain from having a 73" TV delivered to your car then.

Would it be much better being dropped off in front of your house, waiting for you to get home? Because that always works out well.

Re:And when it doesn't fit (2)

jeffmeden (135043) | about 10 months ago | (#46296849)

You may want to refrain from having a 73" TV delivered to your car then.

Would it be much better being dropped off in front of your house, waiting for you to get home? Because that always works out well.

So instead of thieves pilfering porches, they will just follow the UPS/Fedex drivers around and smash/grab from cars. Welcome to the future! I might be lucky but my area of residence is littered with UPS, Fedex, and USPS pickups (all within 2mi, close to the highways) so package delivery has for some time been a non-issue, I simply pick it up from the depot on the way home from work, and that's that. Not sure why that "technology" isnt being investigated more (besides the Amazon locker idea) but oh well. PO Boxes are for homeless people, but porch deliveries are for folks who like having their electronics stolen.

Re:And when it doesn't fit (1)

MitchDev (2526834) | about 10 months ago | (#46296983)

No kidding, the ideas these companies come up with just keep getting dumber

Re:And when it doesn't fit (2, Insightful)

p43751 (170402) | about 10 months ago | (#46297321)

I thought the opposite! What a brilliant idea, now all the poor people who live in their car can get their stuff delivered.

Re:And when it doesn't fit (1)

X0563511 (793323) | about 10 months ago | (#46297353)

Is there a means to have UPS just leave it at the depot for you, without their attempting delivery first?

Re:And when it doesn't fit (2)

Lumpy (12016) | about 10 months ago | (#46297791)

no, UPS is dumb that way. Plus they are closing local depots and going to regional. do you really want to drive 50 miles to get your package?

Re:And when it doesn't fit (1)

mythosaz (572040) | about 10 months ago | (#46298267)

Everyone else appears to live in a world where UPS just doesn't leave everything and anything blindly on their doorstep.

I come home to packages laying at my front door all the time.

Re:And when it doesn't fit (1)

BattleApple (956701) | about 10 months ago | (#46297855)

Now they have "Hold for Pickup" and they'll hold it for 5 days. I've never used it though. In the past I had to wait for them to try to deliver it for 3 days then they would hold it at the depot and I could pick it up. Like a lot of people, I'm at work during the day, so there was no possible way for me to be at home for deliveries.

Once UPS actually let me intercept a package at a distribution hub in Massachusetts. I was pretty surprised they allowed it. (it was post-9/11) I waited around until it got scanned coming off a truck, and they gave it to me right there.

Re:And when it doesn't fit (1)

Aryden (1872756) | about 10 months ago | (#46298027)

UPS is one of the worst ways to have a package delivered. Every order(19) I have had shipped to me in the last 2 years, I have had to go pick up at a distribution hub. They will continually leave a notification on the door telling me that they couldn't deliver my package because the address is incorrect.... Well, HOW THE HELL DID YOU LEAVE THE NOTE?

Re:And when it doesn't fit (1)

SteveFoerster (136027) | about 10 months ago | (#46298303)

Worse than that, during Christmas they claimed they delivered my package, but they really didn't. I had to get the seller to initiate an investigation, the conclusion of which was that it had actually been returned to the sender for no good reason and without apology. I get it that Christmas is busy, and if it had merely been late I'd have gotten over it. But they treated me really shabbily.

Incidentally, so did the seller, which took three days to respond to each of my inquiries, had no phone number, ignored my requests, etc. Pretty sad that from a company called 6dollarshirts you don't even get what you pay for!

Re:And when it doesn't fit (2)

SimonTheSoundMan (1012395) | about 10 months ago | (#46296725)

I worry about the dead body being found in the boot.

Re:And when it doesn't fit (1)

Darinbob (1142669) | about 10 months ago | (#46298161)

A few times I have found packages dumped in the patio of my condo, for me or for a neighbor, and since I rarely go back there then there can be some rain damage. Seriously, if they just dump a neighbor's box over the wrong fence and claim it's "delivered", there's no way they can deliver to an automobile reliably.

Re:And when it doesn't fit (1)

Marxist Hacker 42 (638312) | about 10 months ago | (#46298237)

So make it small. But this seems like it would be an incredibly lazy way to do my favorite comedian's marital advice: Go out today, buy your wife a present. Wrap it, hide it in the trunk of your car. Someday she'll look at you and you will know you have forgotten something. That's the day to give her the present. -- Red Green Show

In Soviet Russia... (5, Funny)

jones_supa (887896) | about 10 months ago | (#46296449)

In Soviet Russia, someone could order you to be delivered in the trunk of a car.

Re:In Soviet Russia... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46296565)

+1

Re:In Soviet Russia... (3, Funny)

R3d M3rcury (871886) | about 10 months ago | (#46296659)

"Honest, Officer! She's my mail order bride! That's why she's wrapped in shipping tape and sitting in my trunk!"

How does this benefit the delivery company? (4, Insightful)

HockeyPuck (141947) | about 10 months ago | (#46296453)

UPS/FedEx/USPS have efficient routing because your house doesn't move. They can plan the best way to get from the warehouse/depot to a set of locations throughout the day. I think this is akin to the traveling salesman problem...

Now, if you have it delivered to your car, which is mobile, how are they supposed to coordinate this? If the truck leaves the depot at 7am, and my car is detected at my house, the truck has a route optimized for delivery to my house. If I go to the grocery store at 9am, does the truck re-reroute to the grocery store and then if I go to the bank 30min later re-route again?

Doubt it.

This might work if you tell them that your car will be in a fixed location throughout the day. But I'm not sure that civilian GPS is sensitive enough to tell the driver where your car is when it's in a parking lot with 500 other cars.

Re:How does this benefit the delivery company? (-1, Offtopic)

Jeremiah Cornelius (137) | about 10 months ago | (#46296485)

NSA already tracks your car.

Re:How does this benefit the delivery company? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46296535)

Yeah, but UPS doesn't.

Re:How does this benefit the delivery company? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46297277)

How is it you have a 3-digit UID and still havent figured out why posts like this derail the discussion and get modded "offtopic"?

Re:How does this benefit the delivery company? (1)

X0563511 (793323) | about 10 months ago | (#46297395)

Precisely because he has one he's been around long enough to not care.

Re:How does this benefit the delivery company? (0)

SlippyToad (240532) | about 10 months ago | (#46297719)

Gawd. No, they fucking do not.

One day you guys will get over the Cult of Snowden and realize what truly childish and useless people you've chosen to truckle with.

Re:How does this benefit the delivery company? (1)

Aryden (1872756) | about 10 months ago | (#46298047)

Or maybe, just maybe, we'll finally get out way and have them stop illegally collecting our information.

Re:How does this benefit the delivery company? (1)

silas_moeckel (234313) | about 10 months ago | (#46296517)

But it will get you within 30 ish feet and at that point flash the lights or open the trunk you might notice it.

Re:How does this benefit the delivery company? (1)

Obfuscant (592200) | about 10 months ago | (#46298013)

But it will get you within 30 ish feet and at that point flash the lights or open the trunk you might notice it.

What a remarkable idea. When the driver gets in the vicinity of the car, he pops the trunk. And when he doesn't find the car and drives off, your trunk lid will be open for everyone who passes by. Brings a new meaning to what the brits call a "boot sale", doesn't it?

I expect that any such service will give the driver the "key" as well as a description of the vehicle and the registration data.

What I want to know is if I'm not home to accept delivery, who is going to let him into my garage so he can leave the package in the trunk of my car?

Re:How does this benefit the delivery company? (1)

jythie (914043) | about 10 months ago | (#46296661)

The mass companies yeah, I do not see it working, but I could see courier type delivery companies working with this option. It could potentially fit with their delivery model quite well. Granted few people use couriers for all but the 'this needs to get somewhere NOW' stuff, but there is a place for that. I could see popping on Amazon while at work and needing something by tonight but not having time to go out, and thus having the option to have the whatever delivered by courier strait to my car. I can think of multiple times were something broke or burned out at home while I am at work and needs to be replaced immediately yet I REALLY do not want to go shopping after my commute.

Re:How does this benefit the delivery company? (1)

X0563511 (793323) | about 10 months ago | (#46297413)

Yep, I sure would trust a LaserShip driver [youtube.com] with my car. Sure.

Re:How does this benefit the delivery company? (4, Interesting)

jeffmeden (135043) | about 10 months ago | (#46296935)

UPS/FedEx/USPS have efficient routing because your house doesn't move. They can plan the best way to get from the warehouse/depot to a set of locations throughout the day. I think this is akin to the traveling salesman problem...

Now, if you have it delivered to your car, which is mobile, how are they supposed to coordinate this? If the truck leaves the depot at 7am, and my car is detected at my house, the truck has a route optimized for delivery to my house. If I go to the grocery store at 9am, does the truck re-reroute to the grocery store and then if I go to the bank 30min later re-route again?

Doubt it.

This might work if you tell them that your car will be in a fixed location throughout the day. But I'm not sure that civilian GPS is sensitive enough to tell the driver where your car is when it's in a parking lot with 500 other cars.

Working backward: a modern GPS receiver in a car will get within 15', leaving a circle of maybe 10 cars. On top of that the driver no doubt has a description of the vehicle and the ability to flash/honk the vehicle.

The car delivery is likely to be practical/profitable when cars are concentrated (i.e. when you are at work) so no, someone who doesnt leave their car in the same place for 8-9 hrs/day is not likely to be a candidate for this.

Fortunately a good number of workers in the US work in high density areas, and park in surface lots with easy access. Its a lot easier than crisscrossing the suburbs, but then again until nearly every car can do it, the advantage of any major carrier picking up this technology is pretty limited.

Re:How does this benefit the delivery company? (1)

nabsltd (1313397) | about 10 months ago | (#46297417)

The car delivery is likely to be practical/profitable when cars are concentrated (i.e. when you are at work) so no, someone who doesnt leave their car in the same place for 8-9 hrs/day is not likely to be a candidate for this.

Of course, if this really takes off, then no one will be able to drive the group to lunch, as they are all waiting for a package to be delivered to their car.

Seriously, though, if they can deliver to my car parked outside of my office, why don't I just have them deliver to the office? There is no real value in this service unless it does track the car's movements.

Re:How does this benefit the delivery company? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46297811)

Uhhh... maybe because your boss doesn't want your work interrupted, or the work of your co-workers interrupted.
Imagine ducking out of a meeting to sign for a package.

Re:How does this benefit the delivery company? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46298319)

Know how I know you're unemployed?

Re:How does this benefit the delivery company? (1)

jeffmeden (135043) | about 10 months ago | (#46296991)

UPS/FedEx/USPS have efficient routing because your house doesn't move. They can plan the best way to get from the warehouse/depot to a set of locations throughout the day. I think this is akin to the traveling salesman problem...

Now, if you have it delivered to your car, which is mobile, how are they supposed to coordinate this? If the truck leaves the depot at 7am, and my car is detected at my house, the truck has a route optimized for delivery to my house. If I go to the grocery store at 9am, does the truck re-reroute to the grocery store and then if I go to the bank 30min later re-route again?

Doubt it.

This might work if you tell them that your car will be in a fixed location throughout the day. But I'm not sure that civilian GPS is sensitive enough to tell the driver where your car is when it's in a parking lot with 500 other cars.

Oh and, it's a version of the Travelling Salesman problem, but it's not "The" travelling salesman problem since the difference between P and NP to a delivery driver is rather hard to express. Delivery companies have no problem enumerating all routes since transistors have outnumbered roads for some time.

Re:How does this benefit the delivery company? (2)

icebike (68054) | about 10 months ago | (#46297165)

This might work if you tell them that your car will be in a fixed location throughout the day. But I'm not sure that civilian GPS is sensitive enough to tell the driver where your car is when it's in a parking lot with 500 other cars.

This is exactly what I was thinking.

On the other hand, presumably GPS 15-to-50 foot radius is close enough, in a large parking lot, because there are only 5 to 10 cars withing that circle. Street parked cars would have even fewer cars in that area. The Package service drives up, presses the button and watches for which trunk opens, (checks the license plate) and drops off / picks up the package.

As for coordination, that's where it gets messy. As you say, cars move, and the car would have to provide its location, to some service. TFA says "The system is based on the functionality offered in the Volvo On Call telematics [wirelesscar.com] ." (something like OnStar). You need a dataplan for your car. And I can't imagine delivery is going to chase your car. You better be in that parking lot when they dispatch the truck, (which is usually at the crack of dawn). If your car is home when they pack deliver trucks it may not be there when the truck arrives.

When you order, or schedule a pickup, the system would have to obtain a likely location at the estimated time of delivery, a whole day ahead. Either the delivery company would have to query the system ahead of time, or by you giving approximate locations ahead of time.

This sound like it might work in older dense cities where everybody parks on the street or in company parking lots. Not so much if you have covered parking garages at either location.

Re:How does this benefit the delivery company? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46297333)

Posting to undo a miss-moderation. Picked Redundant by accident. Sorry HockeyPuck

Re:How does this benefit the delivery company? (1)

X0563511 (793323) | about 10 months ago | (#46297377)

But I'm not sure that civilian GPS is sensitive enough to tell the driver where your car is when it's in a parking lot with 500 other cars.

It is. The GPS on my cellphone can distinguish one side of my car from the other, even.

Re:How does this benefit the delivery company? (1)

DigiShaman (671371) | about 10 months ago | (#46297551)

It would have to be scheduled in advance. Far enough that where your car will ultimately be, so too where the warehouse/depot will be be the closest. That mean you can't move your car once it's in route. Given the transportation industry as a whole is focused around the mantra of JIT delivery, I suspect this is going to be both a logistical nightmare in terms of both routing and storage. I mention storage too because I can envision a whole lot of packages being returned back to the depot whereas the onus now falls at the recipient to drive back and pick up his/her package. Again, a giant waste of everyone's time, energy, and money.

About the only time this would make sense is if you're traveling away from home and need a package delivered to you ASAP. But again, that's a lot of coordination with high risk of failure as mentioned before.

When I need a package delivered to an alternate location, I just have it delivered to my office where I can take it back home with me when I'm done with work.

This seems like a good idea at first, but (3, Insightful)

DeTech (2589785) | about 10 months ago | (#46296487)

This seems like a good idea at first, but I don't think it'll fit well within the current delivery system. Packages tend to make it to your local (town) sorting facility the day before you get them... so you'll have to know where your car will be at least a day before your package get's delivered? Cars have a bad habit of moving between towns, would your package be routed to a new sorting facility or would the delivery truck try to chase you down?

Re:This seems like a good idea at first, but (1)

Kardos (1348077) | about 10 months ago | (#46296967)

It would make sense for people who drive to work, and leave their car in the parking lot from 9-5. These people will not be home to accept delivery because they're at work. That's the subset of people that this idea targets; not everybody.

Re:This seems like a good idea at first, but (1)

DeTech (2589785) | about 10 months ago | (#46297231)

Last time I checked my building have a number on it...

Can't they just use there work address?

Re:This seems like a good idea at first, but (1)

Obfuscant (592200) | about 10 months ago | (#46297953)

Last time I checked my building have a number on it... Can't they just use there work address?

Some companies prohibit people from getting personal packages at work. Sometimes it is an issue of the extra work put on the receiving department, and sometimes it is an issue of auditing. Incoming shipments often have to be tracked and tied back to the purchase orders and then the invoice so that stuff doesn't just disappear.

And some companies are large enough that it is hard to know where "there" is. Is that what you meant by "there work address"?

Re:This seems like a good idea at first, but (1)

DeTech (2589785) | about 10 months ago | (#46298091)

True, but companies that limit mail drop usage probably have badge/gate security as well.

I don't really see the market this idea is trying to service.

Re:This seems like a good idea at first, but (1)

Obfuscant (592200) | about 10 months ago | (#46298275)

True, but companies that limit mail drop usage probably have badge/gate security as well.

No. The issues are unrelated. Bean counters don't care who parks in the parking lots, they care what packages come in and being able to document them. And if the people in the receiving department don't already have to distribute packages to every employee in the building adding that task would be extra work.

I don't really see the market this idea is trying to service.

People who aren't home during the day and want packages delivered someplace more secure than their front step, like people who aren't allowed to get packages at work, who don't want people at work knowing what kind of packages they're getting, etc.

Re:This seems like a good idea at first, but (1)

Darinbob (1142669) | about 10 months ago | (#46298211)

That's why I have packages delivered to me at work. I get an email from receptionist when it arrives then go and pick it up.

Clever Idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46296493)

Best new idea to come along in a while.

What's the point of this? (4, Insightful)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | about 10 months ago | (#46296513)

This seems like a solution in search of a problem.

If my car is at home, the package can be delivered to my home. If my car is at work, the package can be delivered to my work. And if my employer objects, I imagine they would also object to packages being delivered to the trunk of my on-premises vehicle.

And actually, most of the time when I'm at work, my car is parked near where I catch the train. But I'm sure no one with a crowbar would EVER consider keeping an eye on places where many unattended cars are left every day...

Re:What's the point of this? (1)

oodaloop (1229816) | about 10 months ago | (#46296633)

Never mind the fact that there are things in my trunk I'd prefer remain there, and not with the UPS deliveryman. I'm also struggling for a scenario where I need something delivered, and my home address/work address/PO Box/Amazon locker aren't sufficient.

Re:What's the point of this? (1)

EvanED (569694) | about 10 months ago | (#46296927)

This sounds like a very useful idea to a relatively small market. For instance, for several years I didn't drive to work, but instead took the bus. "If my car is at home, the package can be delivered there" doesn't necessarily apply to everyone, for instance me. Given the choice between having it go into my trunk or onto the front porch of a house or even the hallway of a "secured" apt building, the trunk sounds like it would be much more attractive for many deliveries.

Re:What's the point of this? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46296939)

What happens if you need the package delivered while your're driving to work?

Sounds like a great idea to me!

Re:What's the point of this? (1)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | about 10 months ago | (#46297697)

Ooh, sounds like an action adventure movie!

Bruce Willis stars in... "UPS Hard with a Vengeance!"

Re:What's the point of this? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46297673)

Maybe you don't need this, but ...

My employer doesn't allow personal deliveries. My car spends all day sitting in my company's parking lot, which is pretty well separated from everything else plus is constantly watched by security cameras. When I get home, the last thing I want to worry about is whether anything is supposed to be waiting by my front fdoor where it can easily get stolen, where I can find a pickup location, or how I can get it re-directed there to begin with. Volvo's delivery to the trunk looks like a great idea to me.

Obviously it would also be great to have drop-off lockers in my neighborhood, and it would be even better if they sue compatible digital key technologies so I have my choice.

Re:What's the point of this? (1)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | about 10 months ago | (#46297753)

The drop-off locker idea actually sounds pretty useful for city dwellers - essentially a post office box, but for UPS/FedEx/whatever.

I wonder if Amazon would consider opening up Amazon Locker to allow packages not originating from Amazon.com? For a fee, of course.

Re:What's the point of this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46298087)

Great for homeless people who live in their cars!

Re:What's the point of this? (1)

PPH (736903) | about 10 months ago | (#46298299)

If my car is at home, the package can be delivered to my home. If my car is at work, the package can be delivered to my work.

At work, the receptionist will just page me that my package from Latex Bondage Clothing has arrived.

At home, its not my wife's size.

I swear officer I have no idea how all those guns (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46296521)

got in the trunk of my car. Amazon must have put them their by mistake!

Wrong order. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46296551)

Hey! I didn't order this dead body!

Privacy, Security, Logistics? (2)

UnknowingFool (672806) | about 10 months ago | (#46296589)

While this sounds like a fantastic idea in theory, has anyone thought about the privacy and security problems with someone knowing the location of your car and tracking your whereabouts? Suppose that these were not issues, how would the logistics work about routes? UPS and FedEx devote enormous amounts of computing power to figure out the optimal route. How is that going to work with moving delivery locations?

Re:Privacy, Security, Logistics? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46296839)

If, like the majority of persons in the US, you have a smart phone, then, at a minimum, these organizations know the location of your car pretty much all the time:
Your cell phone service provider: ATT or Verizon or TMobile or Sprint ...
If you use maps, directions, navigation: Google or Apple or Microsoft or Samsung or Nokia ...
If you approve location services for app, either at install, at a manual update, or through an automatic update: Pretty much any fly by night app developer

Even if you dont have a smartphone, if you have a car within the last 10 years and you have not disabled it by physically cutting the antenna wire: GM-OnStar or Ford-Operator Assist or Toyota Safety Connect or Mercedes MBrace ...

Of course it goes without saying: NSA/FBI/DHS

Re:Privacy, Security, Logistics? (1)

UnknowingFool (672806) | about 10 months ago | (#46297891)

GM-OnStar or Ford-Operator Assist or Toyota Safety Connect or Mercedes MBrace

My car does not have any of these services. Period.

Umm (1)

bryanthecomputerguy (2212568) | about 10 months ago | (#46296635)

How about a big NO.

Re:Umm (1)

jones_supa (887896) | about 10 months ago | (#46296953)

Why?

Re:Umm (1)

gnupun (752725) | about 10 months ago | (#46297825)

Invasion of privacy? Also, we don't want to give them an excuse to track cars just as Google uses the excuse of rummaging thru your email to show ads, when in reality, who knows what else it does with your email?

Easier than capturing your Amazon drone (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46296667)

It will be easier to snag free stuff in the parking lots, but not as fun as trying to snare an Amazon delivery drone as it goes by.

Note to self (4, Funny)

PPH (736903) | about 10 months ago | (#46296669)

Dispose of hooker's body before UPS drops off wife's birthday gift.

Re:Note to self (1)

MrP- (45616) | about 10 months ago | (#46297433)

Better idea: Blame the UPS driver for delivering a dead hooker with your package and get away with it!

Re:Note to self (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46298195)

Dead hooker pickup service.

5) Profit!!

Wouldn't work for me (2)

Cro Magnon (467622) | about 10 months ago | (#46296697)

If my car is home, I might as well have it delivered to my house. I work where you need an ID to get into the parking lot, so that's out. I'm usually not anywhere else long enough to get packages (has mental image of a delivery vehicle chasing my car down the highway).

truly innovative (2)

DriveDog (822962) | about 10 months ago | (#46296719)

I probably just haven't heard of this idea before. But there are very few ideas that are this innovative. Yes, I'll have to commit to having my car in the parking lot at 101 North Main Street from 9 to 5 on a particular day, but it's there every weekday anyhow. And why just UPS/etc? I can give one-time keys to anyone I choose. The Feds will hate this because a mobile lockbox will be so much harder to investigate, right up to the day when they learn how to crack it (or are given a back door). Then they'll love it. However, it'll make framing people a lot easier, too. I suspect there'll be a lookup table specifying, by car model, how large a parcel one can receive.

Ideal (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46296721)

for putting car bombs in people's cars you dislike... (going postal..)

Great idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46296727)

People who can afford these kinds of douchebag expensive cars are usually the kind of corrupt psychopaths who make friends easily.

I wonder how long it will take for someone to deliver 100 pounds of raw hamburger in the middle of summer to their boss?

I love the bomb inside. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46296741)

Assasins suddenly could only envy you.

Infinite Meta (1)

ThatsNotPudding (1045640) | about 10 months ago | (#46296795)

So I can have Gone in Sixty Seconds delivered to my car and have them both stolen before I get off work!

another option (1)

dasgoober (2882045) | about 10 months ago | (#46296829)

Howzabout having your driver-less car queue up at a curb-side delivery area, outside of a distribution point?
Then, the car's trunk gets opened remotely, or there is a single-use code to open it?

lack of imagination (2)

DriveDog (822962) | about 10 months ago | (#46297115)

After reading TFA, I wondered why this hadn't already been done on a large scale. After all, for the most part, the hardware is already in place. It's just a software/process problem. But then I read a few of the comments here, and realized that it hadn't already been done because many lack the imagination to see how well this is going to work. "Just have it delivered to your house"??? So it's either stolen or sits outside in the rain all day. Nice. "Just have it delivered to your office"??? Are you sure it comes in a plain brown wrapper? The only serious downside I read was that cars in unattended areas might be subject to break-in after deliveries are observed. Which brings me to the other piece of hardware I'd want—a camera in the trunk, or even the back window, that records events leading up to the trunk being opened and closed and immediately saves those in a hardened place or sends them somewhere else. Also, the camera may make it unnecessary to empty the trunk ahead of time, as the UPS man would be recorded not stealing the stuff that was already in there because he's either honest or knows he'll be watched.

I do think that for the most part, deliverers will have to know the car's delivery-day (or pickup-day) general location at least a day ahead of delivery-day (pickup-day) so as to optimize their travel.

If I'm the deliverer, I want the trunk to pop open completely before I'm standing in front of it to avoid nasty surprises left for me.

If all else fails, use the trunk monkey.

What will this lead to? Commonly used outdoor-access closets/boxes with Internet-connected electronic locks for parcel delivery/pickup at home. I'm already planning to add one. I'm pretty sure they already exist, but I've yet to see one.

New Economy: FedEx Master Keys (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46296883)

How much you think those puppies (or breadboarded facsimiles) will go for?

No more smashed windows...

There's Got to Be a Better Way (1)

jenniferj (16471) | about 10 months ago | (#46296899)

If only there were some sort of box in front of my house, maybe with a lock on it, that a delivery could be made to... oh, wait. How about we just work on inter-company cooperation between the USPS and UPS/Fedex/Etc?

Re:There's Got to Be a Better Way (1)

Mashiki (184564) | about 10 months ago | (#46297387)

Whoa. You get so much stuff they actually put a box on your front law? Hell when I was getting $20k/week delivered to my house they wouldn't do that. And that's more than most companies get around here delivered to their dump box.

Re:There's Got to Be a Better Way (1)

jenniferj (16471) | about 10 months ago | (#46297511)

Whoa. You get so much stuff they actually put a box on your front law? Hell when I was getting $20k/week delivered to my house they wouldn't do that. And that's more than most companies get around here delivered to their dump box.

Apparently my /smart-aleck button was broken. I was talking about the mailbox. Oops.

Re:There's Got to Be a Better Way (1)

Grishnakh (216268) | about 10 months ago | (#46297897)

Even in places where they have the full-size mailboxes (the round-topped metal ones about 18 inches long), those boxes aren't large enough for lots of deliveries. Not only that, but they don't usually lock. The locking mailboxes I've seen only have a slot, so if your package is more than an inch thick, it won't fit.

If you're talking about those community mailboxes (usually a group of 16 boxes in one), those boxes are tiny. They usually have a hard time just stuffing all the junk mail in them.

NO! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46296901)

What if they have a trunk monkey!?

It sucks having to time deliveries... (1)

nhat11 (1608159) | about 10 months ago | (#46296913)

Having this makes some sense... as long as it's standard in cars.

What nonsense. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46296969)

They need to notify me anyway in order to get my ok for delivery to the car, so I can just tell them back where I want to have the package delivered, depending on where I am at the moment. They don't need to touch my car at all.

Of course, if the idea is that they'll still be able to deliver (once I give my ok) by chasing the car wherever it may go from that point of time, that's different. But that means that my "ok" means "from now on, you'll be able to track my car continuously until the delivery is complete, whenever that may happen". Of course, if they want to make a reasonably short-term request for delivery, they'll be able to track my car the moment I install the application. I won't know I am being tracked until the driver is close enough to my car that making a delivery request makes sense.

Really, what a nightmare.

sadgdfhfdhjfd (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46296973)

[www.lite.ge]

UPS/FedEx/USPS have efficient routing because your house doesn't move. They can plan the best way to get from the warehouse/depot to a set of locations throughout the day. I think this is akin to the traveling salesman problem...

Now, if you have it delivered to your car, which is mobile, how are they supposed to coordinate this? If the truck leaves the depot at 7am, and my car is detected at my house, the truck has a route optimized for delivery to my house. If I go to the grocery store at 9am, does the truck re-reroute to the grocery store and then if I go to the bank 30min later re-route again?

Doubt it.

This might work if you tell them that your car will be in a fixed location throughout the day. But I'm not sure that civilian GPS is sensitive enough to tell the driver where your car is when it's in a parking lot with 500 other cars.

Re:sadgdfhfdhjfd (1)

guruevi (827432) | about 10 months ago | (#46297205)

UPS/FedEx have efficient routing because of hand-tuned algorithms. Whether it's your car or your house doesn't matter, they can reschedule your package to be delivered to your house, your work or any other location in a matter of minutes. Your car's location would just be on their grid and scheduled accordingly - it would require them to know your car's location whether that is at your house, your job or at your mistress' house.

Um... (1)

thestudio_bob (894258) | about 10 months ago | (#46297001)

Some people might not like putting junk in their trunk.

That's Not the ONLY Question (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46297107)

The other question is whether you want the locks on your vehicle controlled by a third party over whom you have no control. The answer is emphatically "NO" unless they're willing to enter into a contract to reimburse me for any damages that might result from their misuse, data breaches, leaks, or unlocking my car for warrantless searches and/or surveillance.

Private business deliveries too? (1)

psychogre (1475893) | about 10 months ago | (#46297145)

Obviously, there's no way to limit who would be eligible to be able 'deliver to your trunk'.
This would be a easy way to make purchases of illicit materials without having to meet face-to-face. But would you trust someone else with access to your car's trunk?
On the flip-side, perhaps this could turn into a mobile version of geo-caching...

Volvo (1)

slapout (93640) | about 10 months ago | (#46297157)

So the mob owns Volvo now. Who knew?

Re:Volvo (1)

Grishnakh (216268) | about 10 months ago | (#46297923)

Actually, the Chinese own Volvo.

Excelent idea. (1)

Trachman (3499895) | about 10 months ago | (#46297159)

Excelent idea, but not everyone will benefit. There is a large number of people who work in the offices and campuses and their vehicles are in very predictable locations. UPS/Fedex trucks come to the offices during the day anyway. UPS/Fedex can very efficiently, very fast drop the packages to the trunks of the cars. Awesome idea. The negative side of idea is further loss of privacy.

awesome! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46297477)

When can I get this option for a mail order bride?

What could.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46297771)

....possibly go wrong?

Think of the possibilities to order for your colleagues trunk. Dressage whips, lube by the bulk, "educational" DVDs or simply a few fresh tunas when you know he's not due back from that holiday trip for next two weeks. Oh what Pandora's box this opens!

Lock and Key (2)

holophrastic (221104) | about 10 months ago | (#46298029)

The whole point of locking my car, and my trunk, is to prevent access to it. I have zero interest is some skeezy delivery man opening my trunk. Forget about my sensitive business documents, and my expensive roadside safety equipment, what I really don't want the delivery guy to see is the package from the previous delivery guy.

Quite frankly, I'd prefer to give him a key to my house -- at least then he doesn't need to re-organize my stuff to make room.

Of course, it'd be a lot easier to give him the key to the tool shed in my backyard.

But easier than all of that is what I do right now -- leave it with the neighbour.

And finally, the best option of all, just leave it at the front door. It's a safe neighbourhood. If it weren't, I wouldn't have chosen to spend hundreds upon hundreds of thousands of dollars to keep all of my stuff there.

Will they protect the keys to my car as well as (1)

mark_reh (2015546) | about 10 months ago | (#46298115)

they protect my credit card info?

So long as... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46298165)

...so long as they can fit my amazon order in there between the dead hookers and bricks of uncut Columbian coke.

This won't work in Silicon Valley (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46298207)

many parking lots in north San Jose and Milpitas have signs saying not to leave valuables in your car. Mainly because the alarming number of work laptops that are stolen during lunch.

I could have a lot of fun with that... (1)

JustNiz (692889) | about 10 months ago | (#46298271)

Imagine having a full-size fridge delivered to the trunk of a Mini. ...or having something delivered to your off-road vehicle which is parked in in some crazily inaccessible location. ...or scheduling something to be urgently delivered to you the same day you're driving across the US. How far would the truck really follow you?

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