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Ask Slashdot: What Software Can You Not Live Without?

Soulskill posted about 8 months ago | from the pacemaker-firmware-does-not-count dept.

Software 531

An anonymous reader writes "Whenever I install a fresh operating system on my computer, I immediately grab a handful of programs that I simply must have. After that, I generally wait and install other pieces of software as I need them. My list of known, useful programs has dwindled over the past few years as projects died, ownership transferred, and functionality changed. At the same time, I've begun to have use for certain types of software that I've never needed before. It can be time-consuming and risky to install and evaluate every single option. So, I'm curious: what pieces of software do you find the most useful and reliable? Don't feel the need to limit yourself by operating system, platform, or hardware. If you're so inclined, a brief description about what makes the software great would be helpful, too."

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First! (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46380775)

Pacemaker firmware.

pr0n (2)

lord_rob the only on (859100) | about 8 months ago | (#46380951)

A computer is unusable without a pr0n collection installed, so VLC a lot of good movies a good picture viewer and pictures, and lastly a good joystick :)

Re:pr0n (1)

davester666 (731373) | about 8 months ago | (#46382785)

I find installing VLC on my pacemaker makes it run too slow.

Re:pr0n (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46385821)

You should overclock it.

Don't forget to raise the voltages!

Re:First! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381501)

There isn't a single piece of software that would cause me to die if it would cease to exist.
Although, it would be very inconvenient not having power plants, sewage treatment and other things like that.

Re:First! (2)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | about 8 months ago | (#46381629)

"There isn't a single piece of software that would cause me to die if it would cease to exist. Although, it would be very inconvenient not having power plants, sewage treatment "

... which would almost inevitably cause you to die from dysentary or some other disease rather than "old age". I concede that dying from ingesting polluted water is very inconvienent.

Re:First! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46382263)

It's easy and costs almost nothing to filter your own water.

Just because you'd curl up and die if modern luxuries didn't exist doesn't mean we all would. Some of us have survival knowledge and experience.

Requisite software (3, Informative)

fyngyrz (762201) | about 8 months ago | (#46384009)

in the modern GUI realm, Omni Outliner. I have it under OSX and on the iPad. I use it *constantly* for all manner of information.

In the shell, midnight commander. first thing I do when I open a shell is "mc" or "sudo mc" and off I go.

Aside from those, the components of c and c++ application creation (can be compiler and linker only, mc has a nice editor and I don't require a debugging environment though I'm happy to use 'em when they are available), and Python. Without these, there would be little point in me even owning a desktop or laptop computer.

Coming in dead last, a web browser.

Yay! Another Midnight Commander user! (1)

coder111 (912060) | about 8 months ago | (#46387683)

I cannot survive without mc as well. First thing I install on a new Linux machine. And I judge distros based on if they ship mc with base distro or if I need to get it off the net :) Configuring network without mc is a pain.

And I do install Far Manager first thing on any windows machine I run across as well.

My habit probably comes back from old DOS and Volkov Commander days... Two panels, Text User Interface, F-key shortcuts for everything and efficient operation without mouse was quite a good way to develop user interface. Current GUIs are horrible if you need to use them without a mouse.

--Coder

Re:Requisite software (1)

Meski (774546) | about 8 months ago | (#46391695)

whatever I keep under /tools on SVN.

Re:Requisite software (1)

Wolfrider (856) | about 8 months ago | (#46393111)

+1 for MC as well. I also usually can't live without:

o GNU screen
o jstar (Wordstar-clone text editor)
o dd
o bash
o xine

Also useful:

o nmap
o gparted

--On the Win side:

o Crap Cleaner
o MobaXterm (99% better than putty)
o WinSCP
o TCC/LE ( 4dos for Windows - see jpsoft.com )
o 7-zip
o Vmware (Player or better, Workstation - altho most of my Vmware runs under Linux)

Re:First! (1)

Festering Leper (456849) | about 8 months ago | (#46382267)

The software in your pacemaker perhaps?

Re:First! (2)

petes_PoV (912422) | about 8 months ago | (#46383181)

There isn't a single piece of software that would cause me to die if it would cease to exist

So your car doesn't have an engine management unit, then? If that ceased to exist at the wrong moment, I'm pretty sure you'd die. Likewise autopilot software (or pretty much any aeronautical software) if you were airborne when it happened.

Re:First! (0)

funwithBSD (245349) | about 8 months ago | (#46385045)

No, my "car", a 75 CB550, has as it's most complex electronic device the humble diode, as part of the discrete component bridge rectifier.

Even the voltage regulator is electro-mechanical.

The 77 Vepsa P200, however, has a replacement Ducati CDI, which I believe has an actual IC in it, where the less reliable original was discrete.

Re:First! (2)

MouseTheLuckyDog (2752443) | about 8 months ago | (#46383659)

When you put it that way emacs ,
It's even on my tablet.

Re:First! (1)

TapeCutter (624760) | about 8 months ago | (#46383893)

There's more than a few of us who survived the era before software took over the planet.

Re:First! (2)

jc42 (318812) | about 8 months ago | (#46384941)

There's more than a few of us who survived the era before software took over the planet.

Maybe, but well over 99% of the people born before computers and software existed have in fact died.

(Ain't statistics wonderful?)

Re:First! (1)

bbsalem (2784853) | about 7 months ago | (#46399883)

But before GUIs and bitmapped graphics, you had text only. I still try to install emacs first to see if the OS will do it and second because for me it is still most powerfully useful with regular expression incremental search and for looking at binary files. I have used plenty of newer editors and vim. For Vi, even though I am not as comfortable with it as emacs in a barebones *NIX system it is always available and back in the day when I did system administration it was all that was there, and if the terminal software was also down, you might have had to know ex, or ed comands: 1,$s/foo/bar/g.

Emacs is really quite versatile because you can run analogs of things that often come as separate applications in it, including the shell, mail, and web browser. There was a time when emacs was an integrated environment designed for glass ttys. I still use 'emacs -nw' inside a terminal because I can make the terminal font large and edit with light colored characters on a dark background to acmodate poor eyesight. Even though I have the X11 client, sometimes editing in a terminal with a zoomed font is easier for me.

Of the newer editors, my favorite is Sublime Text 2, which works as a minimal editor for text editors or a very smart code editor. Emacs still forces you to turn on autofill on or to know enough elisp to add it to your .emacsrc file. Sublime Text 2 thinks that you just want to type in text and auto-fill if you say nothing else.

Minimally, I could do quite well with just a terminal emulation and a shell and a line editor, vi, nano, or some minimal Emacs clone. I have used tiny Linux distributions with not much more than this, but unfortunately font zooming is now more important to me that just minimal text-based operation. I tried to install Arch Linux by was defeated because I couldn't figure out how to configure the terminal for a larger font.

Re:First! (1)

Sam H (3979) | about 7 months ago | (#46473273)

Statistics are wonderful, but yours are most likely wrong. A better estimate of how many people born before computers and software existed have died would be 93%. I am using http://www.prb.org/Publication... [prb.org] as my main reference.

Re:First! (1)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about 8 months ago | (#46383115)

First systole?

Search Software (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46380779)

For Windows, I always install Agent Ransack. My job requires I work with a file type that doesn't lend itself to the standard file search. Agent Ransack really excels at finding needles in haystacks. I also use Beyond Compare on every work PC. After that, it USED to be the gchat app from google, but with them moving to Google talk / hangouts, I've changed over to Pidgen.

Re:Search Software (1)

gbjbaanb (229885) | about 8 months ago | (#46381017)

apparently pidgen s so full of security holes the Tor people looked at it and dismissed it as the basis for their messaging system. they're basing theirs on Instantbird [instantbird.com]

Re:Search Software (2)

alantus (882150) | about 8 months ago | (#46381161)

If you are talking about pidgin, instantbird is based on pidgin's libpurple. So unless you mean the user interface part is full of security holes, I can't see the logic.

Re:Search Software (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381411)

Instantbird has been replacing libpurple with native XUL/javascript versions of each protocol for a while now, so I presume they've assessed the remaining parts in use as safe.

Re:Search Software (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46382297)

I gave up on Pidgin back when the arrogant developers took away the ability for people to size their chatbox themselves and refused to even make it optional.

Miranda IM and now Miranda NG is a much better client. It's Windows only, but it's open source so you could port it to your favourite OS.

Re:Search Software (2)

bigal123 (709270) | about 8 months ago | (#46381075)

I have not used Agent Ransack.... the free version does not look to search inside Office files.http://www.mythicsoft.com/agentransack/features ...

I am curious have you compared Agent Ransack to either DocFetcher or Regain?
DocFetcher -- Open Source desktop search application: It allows you search the contents of documents on your computer (free, open source, Linux/Mac/Windows) http://docfetcher.sourceforge.... [sourceforge.net]

Regain -- Search engine similar to web search engines like Google, with the difference that you don't search the web, but inside your own files and documents (free, open source, Linux/Mac/Windows) http://regain.sourceforge.net/ [sourceforge.net]

Re:Search Software (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381207)

I use Beyond Compare too - excellent bit of software.

Instead of Agent Ransack, I like Locate32 for finding things. Locate32 is free, which is a nice bonus.

Re:Search Software (1)

Immerman (2627577) | about 8 months ago | (#46381301)

I use Everything quite often - it can only search file names, but does so literally as fast as you can type, winnowing down a list of every file on your computer to only those that include the word-fragments you've typed (reg-ex is also supported). If you get into the habit of appending key meta-tags to your file names it becomes even more powerful. The down side? It only works on NTFS and requires administrator access to scan the filesystem elements it exploits for its insane performance.

Re:Search Software (3, Informative)

sunderland56 (621843) | about 8 months ago | (#46381475)

If I'm stuck using a Windows box, first thing I install is MKS Toolkit [wikipedia.org] . That gives me a decent shell, vi, and grep - which will find anything in any file. No need for special search tools.

(And yes, I know about Cygwin; MKS is vastly superior to Cygwin, since everything just works in a standard DOS shell, it doesn't require it's own special environment).

Re:Search Software (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381809)

MobaXTerm: cygwin, putty and Xserver all in 1 portable exe.

MobaXTerm (1)

hessian (467078) | about 8 months ago | (#46382713)

This looks cool:

http://mobaxterm.mobatek.net/ [mobatek.net]

Visual demonstration on page.

Re:Search Software (3, Insightful)

nabsltd (1313397) | about 8 months ago | (#46382391)

(And yes, I know about Cygwin; MKS is vastly superior to Cygwin, since everything just works in a standard DOS shell, it doesn't require it's own special environment).

I don't know what tool you are using, but nothing I run in Cygwin requires a "special environment". All the standard utilities (grep, awk, sed, perl, ssh, git, etc.) work just as you'd expect. The X server also "just works". The tools also interface nicely with 4NT/Take Command, so I can sort the Windows clipboard with:

sort < clip: > clip:

Now, I'm sure if I tried to use things like cron or the SysV init scripts, then I'd have to do some tinkering, but the whole point of those is to run a complete Unix environment.

Re:Search Software (1)

zyche (784345) | about 8 months ago | (#46382759)

I would argue that a large factor to why I would install and use Cygwin is to get rid of the "standard DOS shell". Replacing that crap with something like rxvt or xterm makes for a huge improvement.

Re:Search Software (1)

mysidia (191772) | about 8 months ago | (#46385219)

I know about Cygwin; MKS is vastly superior to Cygwin, since everything just works in a standard DOS shell, it doesn't require it's own special environment

I would say Cygwin is vastly superior, because it's free, and I can download it today, and be up and running today and done.

MKS seems to be commercial, AND there is not even a price published just a "Request Quote" or "More Information" button.

Re:Search Software (1)

Dr_Barnowl (709838) | about 8 months ago | (#46386251)

Why not GnuWin32 - it too operates in a standard DOS shell but doesn't cost money (unlike MKS Toolkit)?

Having encountered the MKS version of a CVS / issue tracking server (written in Java, crashes when you check out too many files), I'd rather not touch any of their other products.

Windows *NIX subsystems (1)

bbsalem (2784853) | about 7 months ago | (#46400097)

When I buy a new PC, it usually has some Windows or other. I try to install some *NIX subsystem to get the familiar shell and commands. I had tried MKS demos, and I have always tried to install Cygwin, because it is free. I am comfortable with the degree of integration in the latter. It doesn't bother me to have to run a terninal application to get a shell or to run an X11 application from the Windows desktop to get access to X11 clinets, xterns, gnuemacs, etc. The price is right.

Generally, though, I have always tried to install Linux on the system because I regard it as much more secure than Windows anything, So I may run Windows with Cygwin just to get me a shell and some *NIX commands. I run Wine on Linux to get access to the odd Windows application I like.

Re:Search Software (1)

CaptQuark (2706165) | about 8 months ago | (#46385861)

Have you tried WinMerge instead of Beyond Compare? Many of the same features and it's Freeware.

~~

Re:Search Software (1)

Dr_Barnowl (709838) | about 8 months ago | (#46386257)

I've tried most of the diff / merge tools available but I keep coming back to Beyond Compare ; it's one of the few pieces of commercial productivity software on my machines (both Windows and Linux).

There are a couple of features (like kdiff3's "alignment hint file" feature) that I wish it would adopt, but otherwise it knocks most of the others, freeware and FOSS, into a cocked hat.

Re:Search Software (1)

GTRacer (234395) | about 8 months ago | (#46386895)

WinMerge is in my "stuff to install on a new PC" list. Along with 7Zip, FileZilla, VLC, Notepad++. FRHED, and Process Explorer.

I've used Beyond Compare and agree it's superior, but I don't need it so badly as to pay for it versus using WinMerge. Currently, my file compare needs are met by RAD (IBM's Websphere Eclipse fork) so WinMerge is a once-in-awhile thing. Still, very well done file compare tool!

Re:Search Software (1)

josiebgoode (754961) | about 8 months ago | (#46388755)

Same here minus FRHED (I don't know it) plus TextPad for very large text files and Irfanview for pictures.

Re:Search Software (1)

almitydave (2452422) | about 8 months ago | (#46389053)

That's nearly identical to my list for Windows PCs. I also add Paint.NET, SumatraPDF, and DropBox. I didn't know about frhed, but will try it out - I've been lamenting my lack of a good "giant file" hex editor.

Also, Ninite is great (as has been mentioned elsewhere in this thread).

/. cookies (5, Interesting)

L'Ange Oliver (1521251) | about 8 months ago | (#46380781)

Always the first thing I install. It even works on all major OS. Keeps beta version at bay ;)

Re:/. cookies (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46380965)

i turn off javascript to get the old look (i surf with javascript off)

Re:/. cookies (2, Funny)

jones_supa (887896) | about 8 months ago | (#46382087)

Apparently you surf with uppercase letters and punctuation turned off too.

Re:/. cookies (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46383607)

Really, I mean really, so fucking what?

People like you are what's wrong with the internet...or should that be "Internet" you royal cuntfaced wank of a highness?

Re:/. cookies (1)

MouseTheLuckyDog (2752443) | about 8 months ago | (#46383679)

Oh. Is that why I don't get the whole beta thing ( NoScript user here).

Why I don't get beta (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46384783)

My hosts:
216.34.181.45 beta.slashdot.org

At some point in the future, /. will simply stop working for me. A rather sublime end, if it comes.

Re: /. cookies (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46383567)

Obviously slashcode + soylentnews!!

MS Office (0)

Trip6 (1184883) | about 8 months ago | (#46380783)

The fat client lives...

Re:MS Office (5, Funny)

geekmux (1040042) | about 8 months ago | (#46380833)

The fat client lives...

fat?

Office 2003 was fat.

Office 2013 ate the OS and shit out Windows 8. Yeah, it's that morbidly obese. Should have named the release "Fat Bastard", but I heard that's being reserved for IE12.

Feedback: VLC is my first install regardless of OS. Damn thing just runs anything I throw at it. Used it for years now.

Re:MS Office (1)

PetiePooo (606423) | about 8 months ago | (#46381585)

Feedback: VLC is my first install regardless of OS. Damn thing just runs anything I throw at it. Used it for years now.

I hope you're not running on Dell hardware... [slashdot.org]

Re:MS Office (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381987)

Until you accidently resize it in on your second monitor in a moment of extacy and then you can't get the damn thing to go back to default size until you delete your profile. VLC is great but that shit needs some work.

Re:MS Office (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46383783)

VLC sucks. They still can't render subtitles properly.

Xine == win

Re:MS Office (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46387215)

On Windows, at least, CCCP [cccp-project.net] tends to be better in terms of getting things to display correctly (e.g., fancy subtitles, obscure formats, etc.).

Re:MS Office (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46388407)

VLC is amazing. Still my fave all these years later.

Re:MS Office (1)

Dripdry (1062282) | about 8 months ago | (#46392855)

Except for Blu-Ray discs. grumble grumble..

Re:MS Office (1)

MightyYar (622222) | about 8 months ago | (#46381179)

Yes, I end up putting MS Office on pretty much first thing - but also OpenOffice/LibreOffice because that's where I have my billing set up. I'd do without MS Office if I didn't have to work with others.

My other must-haves are MATLAB (not my first choice, but it's what my company uses), Pyzo (a scientific-oriented Python distro), jEdit (cross platform editor), Putty (Windows has no ssh), Firefox (I'm addicted to Tree-Style Tabs), IrfanView (on PC only), Inkscape, GIMP, an RPN calculator (XCALC on Windows, RPN Calc widget on Mac), VLC, Dropbox, CrashPlan (cross-platform backup), TeamViewer (cross-platform remote control replacing LogMeIn), Skype, Tortoise Git (on Windows), and finally WizMouse (on Windows, which has odd scroll wheel behavior without it IMHO).

Re:MS Office (1)

MonTemplar (174120) | about 8 months ago | (#46388615)

I must admit, I didn't buy a new version of Office for personal use for a long time (last PC version was Office 2000), and only got Office 2011 for Mac because I was found a cheap deal off eBay, plus Pages couldn't digest some of the Word documents I needed to use.

Given that there's no indication that Microsoft are going to do a new version of Office for Mac any time soon, I'm now looking into trying LibreOffice.

Worst part is that because I only occasionally need to crack open Word, Excel or Powerpoint, when I do want to do so I invariably have to wait whilst Microsoft AutoUpdate installs the latest update.

Best part, though, is that Office for Mac has an actual proper menu - I would probably go insane trying to use the fecking Ribbon!

GCC etc. (5, Interesting)

StripedCow (776465) | about 8 months ago | (#46380789)

sudo apt-get -y install build-essential

And also:
sudo apt-get -y install vim
sudo apt-get -y install git-core
sudo apt-get -y install tcsh
sudo apt-get -y install python
sudo apt-get -y install python-setuptools
sudo apt-get -y install libboost-all-dev
sudo apt-get -y install gdb
sudo apt-get -y install valgrind

Re:GCC etc. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46380819)

No offense, but why TCSH? I've had to use it on some Solaris machines and didn't like it at all. It didn't have tab completion and home/end keys were broken. Although I guess that last one could have been something else.

Seriously? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46380899)

Are you that stupid that you can't figure out how to create your own .tcshrc file for the behavior you want in your environment?

Re:Seriously? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381515)

Yeah I'm sure there's awesome and easy to find documentation that is friendly to new users. Not some obscure config file that you first have to find without anyone telling about its existance.

Re:Seriously? (1)

maevius (518697) | about 8 months ago | (#46381519)

It's not about stupidity, anonymous troll. It's about time having some actual value.

Re:Seriously? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46385889)

Nothing in this universe has any inherent "value".

Re:Seriously? (2)

jones_supa (887896) | about 8 months ago | (#46382185)

Are you that stupid that you can't figure out how to create your own .tcshrc file for the behavior you want in your environment?

Are you seriously fucking suggesting that one should manually create config to just make very basic things like tab completion and Home and End keys to work? That's just crap software.

Re:GCC etc. (1)

Above (100351) | about 8 months ago | (#46380907)

Uh, it has better tab completion than bash, and home/end works just fine. I think your Solaris install was broken.

Re:GCC etc. (1)

Chris Mattern (191822) | about 8 months ago | (#46380977)

tcsh fails to fix all of the awful syntactic problems with csh. [perl.com] Korn shell is the way to go, particularly now that it's truly free. Vim, yes (On Linux, there's rarely a need to add it manually, though). Password Gorilla, which I use to store all my passwords, is another.

Re:GCC etc. (1)

MightyYar (622222) | about 8 months ago | (#46381093)

I completely agree that Korn is more pleasant to script in. But... for some reason I prefer tcsh at the command line.

Re:GCC etc. (1)

MurukeshM (1901690) | about 8 months ago | (#46381421)

Default on Ubuntu is vim-tiny which is a step above old vi in the evolutionary ladder, but can't hold a candle to vim proper. I usually install gvim, though - it has more patches and functionality enabled than plain vim.

Re:GCC etc. (1)

Above (100351) | about 8 months ago | (#46381879)

I would never write a script in tcsh, however I consider it's configuration flexibility and command line behavior to be much better for interactive use. Scripts should be in /bin/sh or perl, or similar.

Re:GCC etc. (1)

Blaskowicz (634489) | about 8 months ago | (#46381003)

Tab completion isn't a high end feature, you can even get it under DOS (using the 4DOS shell, which is now freeware).
That old system was probably in need of some configuration. Even worse is when you use a prompt where up/down arrows don't work, they show you a few garbage characters instead of acting as a command history feature. e.g. Ocaml interpreter does this, and in some circumstances a *NIX-llike prompt can do this I think.

Re:GCC etc. (2)

aled (228417) | about 8 months ago | (#46382469)

4dos in does era was great. Had better completion than current shells, for Linux or windows.

Re:GCC etc. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381047)

By default tcsh only tab completes when your input is already sufficient to unambiguously auto-complete one item.
It doesn't list the options when it can't though.

Re:GCC etc. (1)

StripedCow (776465) | about 8 months ago | (#46381181)

Because I like tcsh most.
However, it has its flaws. For example the glob expansion has a hardcoded limit, which has often failed on me in folders with large amounts of files.

Re: GCC etc. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381925)

tcsh has got the best history function ever. You type the prefix and press cursor up.

Tab completion works. Maybe your distribution got it broken.

Re:GCC etc. (1)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about 8 months ago | (#46382905)

No offense, but why TCSH?

I use tcsh for two reasons:
1. I have been using it for thirty years, and I am too old to change.
2. I have never seen anything better.
Bash is just as good, but not better, and bash was released many years after I had already trained my fingers to use tcsh shortcuts.

You lost me at vim (5, Funny)

smitty_one_each (243267) | about 8 months ago | (#46380957)

There are two kinds of editors; emacs, and lesser.

Re:You lost me at vim (5, Funny)

jolyonr (560227) | about 8 months ago | (#46381043)

Actually, that reminds me, I was meaning to ask on Slashdot if anyone has any advice as to which is the better editor, Vi or Emacs.

I'd love to know.

Re:You lost me at vim (3, Funny)

Stormwatch (703920) | about 8 months ago | (#46381189)

Edlin.

Re:You lost me at vim (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46390469)

cat

Re:You lost me at vim (1)

rpstrong (1659205) | about 8 months ago | (#46392847)

Turbo Edlin - with mouse support.

Re:You lost me at vim (2)

pcjunky (517872) | about 8 months ago | (#46381209)

Not biting....Nice try.

vim (1)

kvvbassboy (2010962) | about 8 months ago | (#46381229)

vim is the better editor - there's absolutely no reason to choose emacs over vim

Re:vim (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46382249)

vim is a nice and useful program to edit plain text.

Emacs is a system to do much, much more. The two are not really comparable at all. It would be like comparing a shovel to a hardware store.

Re:vim (1)

duckgod (2664193) | about 8 months ago | (#46382373)

vim is the better editor - there's absolutely no reason to choose emacs over vim

Unless you want an operating system built into your test editor :)

Re:vim (1)

funwithBSD (245349) | about 8 months ago | (#46385063)

You mean Word 2013?

Re:vim (1)

colinrichardday (768814) | about 8 months ago | (#46383077)

Except that modal text editors are annoying.

Re:vim (2)

fisted (2295862) | about 8 months ago | (#46386689)

yeah, they are annoying. for about a week, then suddenly non-modal editors feel annoying.

Re:vim (1)

colinrichardday (768814) | about 7 months ago | (#46396985)

Oh, vi annoyed me more than a week, and emacs didn't annoy me at all. In my original post, I should have said that I find modal text editors annoying, rather than they're just annoying.

vim (1)

cgum (1900882) | about 8 months ago | (#46381333)

I know this post was designed to create a Slashdot civil war, but I was always a Notepad++ lover until I saw someone coding in a modern IDE with vim keybindings. Now, in addition to using vi, vim, gvim and macvim, I use vimium in Google Chrome, and vim plugins for both Visual Studio and IntelliJ (Windows and Mac). It is just crazy how much faster you can code without going to the mouse. When I get on someone else's computer, I just die inside a little. Also, don't forget to remap your Caps Lock key to Esc. It's a registry setting on Windows and there's a little program called PCKeyboardHack on the Mac.

Re:You lost me at vim (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381381)

Ed is the only real editor in town. Vim and Emacs are for noobs.

Re:You lost me at vim (1)

MacTO (1161105) | about 8 months ago | (#46381503)

According to my brain, emacs. According to my fingers, vim. Since my fingers are controlling the keyboard, guess who wins.

Re:You lost me at vim (2)

hughweilun (3547785) | about 8 months ago | (#46381631)

Indeed. When I first got into the UNIX world (14 years ago), I saw emacs and thought, "how utterly logical, how utterly complete is this editor". When I first saw vim I thought, "how utterly cryptic, how utterly hidden from view are the features of this editor" so I opened emacs and learned a bunch of keystrokes.

After a few hours of C-x C-s, C-x C-n, C-x C-q, C-h, my left wrist starts burning. Last year I finally took the vim tutorial and found my hands are quite comfortable with the keystrokes. Committing the keystrokes to muscle memory also helps quite a bit. And pressing Ctrl-[ instead of Esc to get out of input mode lets you stay in home row.

Re:You lost me at vim (0)

jones_supa (887896) | about 8 months ago | (#46382257)

Emacs and Vim are both terribly unproductive text editors. I've walked the walk and actually learned the cryptic keystrokes, but I still ended up with software that was just incredibly clunky to use. In the end I found myself very carefully thinking what control keys I must press next or I would otherwise mess up my text or end up in some wacky state in the editor.

Re:You lost me at vim (1)

chipschap (1444407) | about 8 months ago | (#46383595)

Emacs and Vim are both terribly unproductive text editors. I've walked the walk and actually learned the cryptic keystrokes, but I still ended up with software that was just incredibly clunky to use. In the end I found myself very carefully thinking what control keys I must press next or I would otherwise mess up my text or end up in some wacky state in the editor.

After some experience (something more than three months and less than 20 years) the keystrokes come naturally, without much need to think about them.

Re:You lost me at vim (1)

jones_supa (887896) | about 8 months ago | (#46385793)

Yeah, but that's months of training for a text editor that just does simple unformatted text.

Re:You lost me at vim (1)

vtcodger (957785) | about 8 months ago | (#46386133)

Emacs and Vim are both terribly unproductive text editors.

I don't know if I'd go that far, but I've loathed vi since before many of the folks posting here were born and I've never really warmed to emacs although I did give it a serious try once. Look (dammit), I have to learn a set of keystroke conventions (CUA pretty much) to use my web browsers. What possible reason would I have to learn a different set conventions for code editing? I use kwrite in x-windows and jed on the rare occasions that X isn't available. When I used Windows, I used some enhanced Notepad or other that doesn't work right under Wine. I've long since forgotten its name. I use Windows as infrequently as possible, and in the one or two hours a year I have to work in Windows, Notepad seems to be adequate.

IMHO, vi was a crummy text editor -- only a slight improvement over ed -- in 1980 and although modern vi-s are vastly improved, they really aren't anything special. I think I see the point to emacs, but I think you either love it or you don't. I don't.

Re:You lost me at vim (1)

jones_supa (887896) | about 8 months ago | (#46386311)

You mentioned Jed, and that is indeed pretty sane one. Nice balance between easy usability and some special features.

When looking at graphical editors, Sublime Text is quite spiffy too, although it does not have proper configuration dialogs, which gives it a bit unpolished appearance.

Re:You lost me at vim (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46382209)

emacs is irrelevant - vi(m) is everywhere.

Re:You lost me at vim (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46383641)

nano shits all over both of them...emacs and vim can go die a fiery death.

Re:You lost me at vim (3, Funny)

marcovje (205102) | about 8 months ago | (#46381615)

Emacs is a great OS, but IMHO the editor sucks.

Re:You lost me at vim (2)

semi-extrinsic (1997002) | about 8 months ago | (#46382875)

Ah, well you see, this used to be true, but Emacs recently gained a Vim mode. I'm actually not joking. Vim rules BTW.

Re:You lost me at vim (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46382941)

Recently? It has had vi-mode, vip-mode and viper-mode for eternities. One of them is supposed to be quite the best but I don't remember which. And of course, you can always run the "real" vim in an M-x term RET command if you really must. It also has wordstar-mode and a few others.

This is Emacs, short for "Editor macros". It is whatever it wants to be. It is the being one.

Re:You lost me at vim (1)

coolsnowmen (695297) | about 7 months ago | (#46398049)

makes sense, but Hilarious. Kind of reminds me of that +1 standards xkcd: https://xkcd.com/927/ [xkcd.com]

Re:You lost me at vim (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46383585)

Thank you... I laughed so hard I shed a tear. Best laugh of the month. :)

Re:You lost me at vim (1)

angel'o'sphere (80593) | about 8 months ago | (#46381635)

You are mixing something up!
We all know that Emacs is indeed a very decent operating system, unfortunately it lacks a decent editor. So the answer is vim or nano ;)

Re:You lost me at vim (1)

i ate my neighbour (1756816) | about 8 months ago | (#46387491)

Not anymore. It does have vi-mode, although not feature-rich as vim.

Re:You lost me at vim (1)

angel'o'sphere (80593) | about 8 months ago | (#46388629)

That is funny, and likely it has indeed!

Re:You lost me at vim (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381691)

Nano is best editor.

Re:You lost me at vim (2)

GoodNewsJimDotCom (2244874) | about 8 months ago | (#46381731)

Scite is my favorite now.

Re:You lost me at editor (1)

fast turtle (1118037) | about 8 months ago | (#46387479)

This is /. and we don't do any editing. If you want editing, read the newspaper as they have actual editors - letters to the Editor are my favorite along with Garfield.

Re:You lost me at vim (2)

Njovich (553857) | about 8 months ago | (#46382091)

The fact that all the answers so far point to VIM is no coincidence: VIM is actually winning that war. [google.com]

Re:You lost me at vim (1)

Saanvik (155780) | about 8 months ago | (#46392125)

Interesting. The number of searches for VIM remains relatively constant over time, while the number of searches for emacs has been decreasing.

I personally find myself searching for VI commands much more often than emacs. I use emacs every day and I know how to do what I want using it. When I'm stuck on a system without it, I fall back to VI, but I never learned it well enough to do more than simple editing.

Re:You lost me at vim (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46382403)

It's simple -- always use the right tool for the job. Sometimes emacs is the right tool, sometimes vim is.

For example, you should use emacs to write code for a large software project.

Once you're done with that, you should use vim to write a letter to your doctor regarding the repetitive stress injury to your left pinkie.

Emacs (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46382465)

A computer person without Emacs is like an astronaut without Tang.

Re:You lost me at vim (2)

LoRdTAW (99712) | about 8 months ago | (#46382731)

Emacs killed my dog and Vi sold my identity to a Lebanese woman, i'm now homeless, broke and have no friends. Please be careful when choosing editors!

Re:You lost me at vim (1)

ppc_digger (961188) | about 8 months ago | (#46382895)

Evil [emacswiki.org] , obviously.

Re:You lost me at vim (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46382959)

Vim is better of course

Re:You lost me at vim (1)

thogard (43403) | about 8 months ago | (#46384213)

Editor Wars? Do you have a cat that walks on keyboards? If so, vi can be very deadly to open files.

I get it, but... a newb's perspective (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46385073)

Honestly, I never took the time to figure out what vim uses for "arrow keys", and ctrl-c doesn't "work" in it as expected, I usually end up screwing up the file and having to reboot to get out of it. I understand Vi is built to be comparable with non pc keyboards, but then again, I don't use any non pc keyboards. You shouldn't have to RTFM to use a damn text editor, this is 2014 not the early 80s.

Emacs is great, but it's a bit more than I usually need. I usually just use nano.

Re:You lost me at vim (0)

Thanosius (3519547) | about 8 months ago | (#46385375)

Notepad++ on Windows, Geany on Linux.

Vi vs Emacs is an outdated battle, a relic of a time where Vi and Emacs were the only real options for quality editors. Nowadays there's a heck of a lot more quality editors to choose from, and overtake Vi/Emacs in terms of usability, discoverability and power. Not to take away from the power of Vi/Emacs - they're just used due to people having learnt them in the past and finding no reason to change. Which is great if you're a power user who knows how to make magic, but there's no real reason for an aspiring programmer to use either.

Re:You lost me at vim (1)

CadentOrange (2429626) | about 8 months ago | (#46386149)

pico

Re:Re:You lost me at vim (1)

NAFV_P (3487515) | about 8 months ago | (#46388515)

It depends entirely on your mood. You could be very productive if you were adept at both.

Re:You lost me at vim (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381051)

oh, thems be fighting words!

I work a lot on embedded Linux. Every embedded Linux install has vi. Emacs is few and far between. As I can easily install vi/vim/gvim anywhere that you use emacs, and since it's always included in embedded systems where it's difficult to add extra programs, this means it's more versatile and as such is better.

Re:You lost me at vim (1)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | about 8 months ago | (#46381095)

You clearly don't do embedded systems development. I can assure you, emacs is fine for some things, but if you don't know it in addition to rather than instead of vim, then you better not start trying to play with the big boys. You''ll find yourself sans an editor that you can use on the target system.

Re:You lost me at vim (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381235)

You clearly don't do embedded systems development. [Emacs] You''ll find yourself sans an editor that you can use on the target system.

That's what Tramp is for.

C-x C-f /username@target.host.localnet:src/gaga.c RET

You never leave the Emacs on your host system and still edit stuff on the target system that is transparently shuffled to and fro using ssh, scp and other stuff. Including M-x compile RET and/or M-x shell RET. It does not get lower-impact on the target system, and you don't get to fight tty settings and terms and other things.

Re:You lost me at vim (1)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | about 8 months ago | (#46381287)

EPIC FAIL (assumes you have an ssh server running on your target). I hate to break it to you, but running an SSH server on the target is *not* lighter weight than running vim on the target, and furthermore is not always even possible.

USB and video but no terminal server (1)

tepples (727027) | about 8 months ago | (#46381479)

In order to interact with a text editor running on the target, you need either A. an entire USB and video stack on the target or B. a terminal server such as SSH on the target. Which targets are you talking about that have A and lack B?

Re:USB and video but no terminal server (2)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | about 8 months ago | (#46381499)

"In order to interact with a text editor running on the target, you need either A. an entire USB and video stack on the target or B. a terminal server such as SSH on the target. . Which targets are you talking about that have A and lack B?"

When you start with a false premise your conclusion will always be in error. Try learning about RS-232 and TTYs.

Re:USB and video but no terminal server (1)

rthille (8526) | about 8 months ago | (#46383013)

There's no reason why you can't use tramp over serial. I never have to leave emacs, it'll even transparently bounce thru a 'beachhead' system to get to systems "on the other side".

Emacs is a pain to setup/learn for some things, but automation wins in the end.

Re:USB and video but no terminal server (1)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | about 8 months ago | (#46383035)

Your claim directly contradicts the official emacs documentation to which I linked. Maybe you should inform them that they are wrong?

Re:USB and video but no terminal server (1)

rthille (8526) | about 8 months ago | (#46394109)

Learn about terminal servers: http://blog.philippklaus.de/20... [philippklaus.de]

Serial ports have been gatewayed to telnet for years.

Re:USB and video but no terminal server (1)

xophos (517934) | about 8 months ago | (#46386101)

Actually when you start with a false premise your conclusion can be anything, it can even be true.

Re:USB and video but no terminal server (1)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | about 8 months ago | (#46387147)

It depends on what you mean by a conclusion. As far as I am concerned the conclusion and premise are so tightly inter-woven that you may come up with the correct answer, but your conclusion is still dead wrong. In other words, I consider the actual conclusion to be: A is true because of B, note merely "A is true". If you think the terms "answer" and "conclusion" are straight synonyms then you are correct. I don't believe they are.

Re:You lost me at vim (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381645)

EPIC FAIL (assumes you have an ssh server running on your target). I hate to break it to you, but running an SSH server on the target is *not* lighter weight than running vim on the target, and furthermore is not always even possible.

Uh, no? Tramp assumes any kind of shell connection into your target system. You'd have a hard time running Vim on your target system without being able to reach a shell.

Re:You lost me at vim (2)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | about 8 months ago | (#46381697)

Uh, yes. From the emacs manual from GNU [gnu.org] :

"There are two basic types of transfer methods, each with its own advantages and limitations. Both types of connection make use of a remote shell access program such as rsh, ssh or telnet to connect to the remote host. "

Each of those requires their own daemon.

Re:You lost me at vim (2)

Jeremi (14640) | about 8 months ago | (#46381817)

I hate to break it to you, but running an SSH server on the target is *not* lighter weight than running vim on the target

Bah, you kids with your fancy "encryption" and "privacy". In my day, we ran our vi sessions over telnetd with a default root password, and we liked it!

Re:You lost me at vim (1)

alexandre_ganso (1227152) | about 8 months ago | (#46384297)

pff. Vi is great when all you have is a 300/75 baud connection and your "terminal" is an electronic typewriter with a two-lines display (one for the line being edited, one for modal)

To be honest, my impression is that vi was DESIGNED for that use case.

Re:You lost me at vim (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46385255)

Bah, you kids with your fancy "encryption" and "privacy". In my day, we ran our vi sessions over telnetd with a default root password, and we liked it!

I have friends in the networking department who STILL do that.

"You're still using telnet?"

"It's on the private network", so goes the rebuke, to any complaint about not using SSH.

Re: You lost me at vim (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46383441)

Vim is definitely heavier than SSH. Count the SLoC.

You must be thinking of Vi. The BSDs have traditional Vi. Most Vim users would tear their hair out trying to use it.

Re: You lost me at vim (1)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | about 8 months ago | (#46383493)

Unlike you apparently, I know that SLoC has nothing to do with its "weight" in this context.

Re:You lost me at vim (1)

Kojiro Ganryu Sasaki (895364) | about 8 months ago | (#46381415)

It sounds like a fundamental limitation on the target system the fact that it only has a garbage text editor.

Re:You lost me at vim (2)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | about 8 months ago | (#46381427)

You weren't paying attention. It doesn't have emacs.

Re:You lost me at vim (1)

colinrichardday (768814) | about 8 months ago | (#46383099)

And you're not paying attention: emacs isn't garbage.

Re:You lost me at vim (1)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | about 8 months ago | (#46383129)

It's not a text editor either, but I digress.

Re:You lost me at vim (1)

colinrichardday (768814) | about 8 months ago | (#46383317)

Wrong again. Emacs is a very good text editor.

Re:You lost me at vim (1)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | about 8 months ago | (#46383341)

OK. I understand that you aren't particularly bright, so I'm going to let you slide on this one. Off you go now ...

Re:You lost me at vim (1)

colinrichardday (768814) | about 8 months ago | (#46384137)

Off you go now

Really, do you expect me to leave?

Re:You lost me at vim (1)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | about 8 months ago | (#46384255)

No. I expect you to die.

Re:You lost me at vim (1)

mysidia (191772) | about 8 months ago | (#46385257)

Wrong again. Emacs is a very good text editor.

No... Emacs is a very good e-mail reader.

Your e-mail reader should never be used as your text editor.

Re:You lost me at vim (1)

colinrichardday (768814) | about 8 months ago | (#46385343)

Your e-mail reader should never be used as your text editor.

But I never use Thunderbird as a text editor.

Re:You lost me at vim (1)

mysidia (191772) | about 8 months ago | (#46385443)

But I never use Thunderbird as a text editor.

Where can I get a version of Thunderbird that I can run in a SSH terminal window?

Re:You lost me at vim (1)

colinrichardday (768814) | about 8 months ago | (#46389309)

The mail account on which I run Thunderbird is web accessible. Why would I need to run ssh? Besides, it runs fine under ssh -X.

Re:You lost me at vim (1)

mysidia (191772) | about 8 months ago | (#46389487)

The mail account on which I run Thunderbird is web accessible. Why would I need to run ssh?

Vi is a terminal-based text editor, and Emacs is a terminal-based mail reader.

Neither of these are web-based tools.

If web-based is the only kind of interface you prefer to use, then you don't need either of the two tools.

Re:You lost me at vim (1)

colinrichardday (768814) | about 8 months ago | (#46390417)

I didn't say I only preferred web-based applications. It's just that my email accounts are web accessible. I would not particularly care for a web-based text editor.

Writing in the days of text, as opposed to the web (1)

bbsalem (2784853) | about 7 months ago | (#46400313)

Actually web-based applications come at a great price. Their history discourages communication and thinking. Back in the day of text, there were much better tools for communicating than we have in web-apps, web-sites, and in particular blogs. The textarea widget is a muzzle on good discourse, on the ability to argue and persuade. It encourages people to not address one another and to talk past each other. It should be abolished.

The tools developed for Mail User Agents and their derivative USENET newsgroup readers are much superior than the chat and blog tools that dominate web applications today.

The blog is being used by social media companies to restrict discussion. It is anti-democratic. We need to bring back the standards of the days of text, the discussion forum with its reply in context and its ability of users to change topic lines. Discussion does not take place in blogs and on most web sites because the complexity needed for discussion is not supported. This needs to defeat the Google business model.

Re:Writing in the days of text, as opposed to the (1)

colinrichardday (768814) | about 7 months ago | (#46404721)

Actually web-based applications come at a great price. Their history discourages communication and thinking. Back in the day of text, there were much better tools for communicating than we have in web-apps, web-sites, and in particular blogs. The textarea widget is a muzzle on good discourse, on the ability to argue and persuade. It encourages people to not address one another and to talk past each other. It should be abolished.

And yet you are using a web-based app to say this.

Re:Writing in the days of text, as opposed to the (1)

mysidia (191772) | about 7 months ago | (#46406053)

And yet you are using a web-based app to say this.

Indeed... Slashdot has been most instrumental in encouraging discourse.

Have no fear.... Beta is here to fix all that.

Re:Writing in the days of text, as opposed to the (1)

bbsalem (2784853) | about 7 months ago | (#46411295)

Slashdot is one of the few exceptions of a web interface that allows the sorts of things that should be resurrected on the web. It allows for contextual reply and changing of topic lines. It could stand some improvements in how it displays threads and subthreads in an conversation, and I disagree with an editorial board filter of subjects, driven by articles the editorial board thinks are important. Reddit is better in both regards. I think that you cold teach Markdown to most people especially if it gave them something they really need to target replies.

I hope that your rejoinder about Slashdot Beta UI is ironic for I think that Beta heads in the wrong direction changing the interface to be more like Social Media sites. If it is adopted I will unsubscribe from Slashdot because it will have the same flaw as most social media and web browser driven interfaces, not easily allowing for context in reply.

Someone noticed how bad Thunderbird's editor is. In the days of text your Mail User Editor (MTA) could fork your perferred editor. That was also true of USENET newsreaders. They had the feature built-in to quote the article or message you were replying to. You edited down to the material you wanted to reply to, wrote your response, and sent that. This should be the minimal capability of a web interface.

The standard should be that textareas are OK for small numbers of comments, I think that the dissatisfaction many people voice over Facebook, Google+ and Google Groups and most web sites with blogs is due to this poor design. They fell hampered by the available functionality. It is just too hard with a textarea to do context and what people don't understand, because they don't know any better in many cases, is that their anger at what other people do, distractions people cause, is not due to a problem with people, people haven't changed, but that web site designs and interfaces are badly engineered for the kinds of ways that people communicate. Some idiot engineer on another thread posted how he thought that social science was way down the list on curriculum that should be taught to students in a web-design BA program. It is precisely because of poor human factors research and laziness and greed on the part of web designers and social media companies that we have a sorry state of communication on the Internet mostly centered on the miapplication of blogging to communication. Facebook is a disaster because of this and most of its users are too ignorant to realize that their frustrations with communication on it is due to Zuckerberg's insistence on "Simplocity" which means textarea widgets and blocks of text that are easy to mine for data for his businesss partners. So this is driven by greed. And Google is the same sort of thing. Google+ is just a self-promotion echo chamber for the same reason, greed.

Re:Writing in the days of text, as opposed to the (1)

bbsalem (2784853) | about 7 months ago | (#46411361)

Sorry, I meant "Simplicity". That typo got away!

Re:You lost me at vim (1)

fisted (2295862) | about 8 months ago | (#46386733)

Email readers which integrate a text editor are a failure to start with. Same goes for text editors which integrate email readers, of course.

Re:You lost me at vim (1)

bbsalem (2784853) | about 7 months ago | (#46400147)

Doesn't it, or elisp, garbage collect?

Re:You lost me at vim (1)

Zeio (325157) | about 8 months ago | (#46383171)

I dont need emacs because I already have an operating system.

Re:You lost me at vim (1)

The Grim Reefer (1162755) | about 8 months ago | (#46384275)

There are two kinds of operating systems; emacs, and lesser.

FTFY

Re:You lost me at vim (1)

mysidia (191772) | about 8 months ago | (#46385239)

There are two kinds of editors; emacs, and lesser.

The text editor is called Pico or Jed. EMACS is short for Eighty% Memory and Constantly Swapping

Re:GCC etc. (1)

phrostie (121428) | about 8 months ago | (#46381191)

vim and mc

Re:GCC etc. (1)

innocent_white_lamb (151825) | about 8 months ago | (#46382275)

No ccache?

Re: GCC etc. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46382729)

Hello Cow,

I don't have an account so I won't see your reply. However, you can do all of it in one shot like so:

sudo apt-get -y install vi git-core tcsh python python-setuptools libboost-all-dev gdb valgrind

Re:GCC etc. (1)

cobbaut (232092) | about 8 months ago | (#46383555)

First:
aptitude purge sudo ;-)

Then:
apt-get -y install vim tmux

Enter tmux and let it run forever!

Then:
for server: lvm2 rsync tcpdump nmap
for fun: sl cowsay fortune
for games: wesnoth freedoom
for desktop: xfce icedove libreoffice

Re:GCC etc. (1)

fisted (2295862) | about 8 months ago | (#46386753)

tcpdump and nmap on a server --- what could possibly go wrong :).

you also should add 'figlet' to your fun section, works well in a pipeline with cowsay -n (IIRC)

Re:GCC etc. (1)

TeknoHog (164938) | about 8 months ago | (#46383815)

sudo apt-get -y install build-essential

And also: sudo apt-get -y install python

This is one of the reasons I use Gentoo, it already comes with real programming tools.

More generally, though, any Linux distro is fine as there is no particular barrier between using a computer and programming it. I don't really see the difference, because when you use a computer you are telling it what to do, and then it's only about different levels of abstraction and power. There is only a problem if the OS places artificial limitations.

Re:GCC etc. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46387447)

You could just put them all into one install command. Splitting them can be useful if you want to use certain programs sooner.

Re:GCC etc. (1)

Fotis Georgatos (3006465) | about 8 months ago | (#46392509)

the longer version of what you started above is here: http://hpcbios.readthedocs.org... [readthedocs.org] (different people need different subsets, but the total is a safe bet)

I'd fuckin' die man (0, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46380791)

Most likely my pacemaker firmware. Can't think of much else.

Re:I'd fuckin' die man (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46380913)

Lol why you grumps mod this down?
- Not OP

Re:I'd fuckin' die man (0)

gmhowell (26755) | about 8 months ago | (#46385195)

Same 'joke' (truth in my case) was the AC first post, just a little above this one. While funny, it is redundant. (FWIW, when I mod, I wouldn't waste a point on a redundant mod there. It's not spammy, it's not a post trying to avoid a down moderation elsewhere in a discussion. It's just someone a little slow on the trigger. But I guess spergs get mod points also.)

Office productivity apps (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46380797)

Solitaire

Re:Office productivity apps (5, Insightful)

qubezz (520511) | about 8 months ago | (#46382387)

Solitaire was initially included with Windows to train people how to use a mouse, now it's not included to train people how to use the Microsoft store and get them to enter their trackable credentials.

Re:Office productivity apps (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46385385)

If you're so cynical about such things that you have to immediately jump to "trackable credentials" as an aspect of an online store, then you might as well give up on computers as electronic storefronts for software will become the norm in a few years. They're already the norm if you're buying PC games (Steam, GOG, the Humble Bundle store), etc. Fuck man, accept the world as it's become and stop being so cynical. You'll never find enjoyment in this business again with your attitude.

Total Commander (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46380801)

Unable to use an computer without it, runs fine under wine ..

My choice too (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381097)

First things, first. Total Commander, and then keep installing other stuff.

Re:Total Commander (1)

Meneth (872868) | about 8 months ago | (#46381223)

Me too, though I usually install SeaMonkey and/or FileZilla first, just so I can download Total Commander properly.

Re:Total Commander (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381823)

It's the end all and be all of 2-panel filemanagers.
I completely agree.

On *nix and OSX i use DC though.
Integrates better with the OS and the functionality is (mostly) the same.

Re:Total Commander (1)

Areyoukiddingme (1289470) | about 8 months ago | (#46382647)

Unable to use an computer without it, runs fine under wine ..

It does? Hot damn. I've been spending more time on a Linux desktop lately and after years of Total Commander, I'm discovering that Midnight Commander is woefully out of date and under-featured. Total Commander alone is so very useful. Total Commander plugins make it spectacularly useful.

Re: Total Commander (2)

Glonoinha (587375) | about 8 months ago | (#46382735)

Take a look at ZTree.
Like TC but totally keyboard driven. I can't live without it.

Re: Total Commander (1)

Trax3001BBS (2368736) | about 8 months ago | (#46394839)

Take a look at ZTree.
Like TC but totally keyboard driven. I can't live without it.

I checked ZTree out and was thinking of some DOS comments, this being the GUI age and all.

Working with Total Commander your told up front that the program FAR is much better, has more support (plugins), and free http://www.softpanorama.org/OF... [softpanorama.org]

So I checked out FAR http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F... [wikipedia.org] and there it was; Norton Commander, yet FAR impressed me on it's first outing.

A, 7z x far.7z, then moved the output to a D:\MISGPRGS\FAR directory, ran FAR, right clicked on the display and it asked if there was something I wished to run in my Comodo firewall's sandbox, there was no delay the sandbox options was one of many options available.

- It knew of Comodos sandbox, meaning it hit the registry reading what it needed very quickly. Total Commander is actually pretty sluggish, to copy a large directory with TC is to find something else to do in the mean time, it's slower than windows copy. You can increase the buffers but it's not just it's copying that's slow; for it to hit the registry the way FAR did would I feel would take TC too long or even hang it for a bit.

I'm at a loss at the moment, I'd like a dual pane explore but right now just not sure which one.

Just saying if you like Ztree check out FAR http://www.farmanager.com/plug... [farmanager.com]

midnight commander? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46383603)

maybe a native version?

Re:Total Commander (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46385051)

Unable to use an computer without it, runs fine under wine ..

Close second - RIP Vern Buerg and his LIST.COM that got me through the 80s and 90s; I started to migrate away when XP's NTVDM couldn't handle the busy-waits properly, and shed a silent tear when 64-bit Windows would no longer run 16-bit apps. Sometime last year I discovered ZBLIST [bizer.com] , a 64-bit compatible, long-filename-understanding rewrite.

Most of the time I live in Cygwin, but any time I have to drop to an actual DOS prompt to do something, I can navigate faster with ZBLIST than I can with cut/paste, and the speed advantage is only magnified on "modern" Windows systems with their ridiculously long pathnames. All the LIST.COM muscle memory was still there, dormant after all those years in the wilderness.

Re:Total Commander (1)

Trax3001BBS (2368736) | about 8 months ago | (#46386761)

Unable to use an computer without it, runs fine under wine ..

You mention of Total Commander got my interest going again. So many times I've started to use Total Commander only to forget about it the next day using Windows Explorer again. Figure I'll give it another attempt. Much more serious about it now that I've downloaded all of it's plug-ins - T C offers quite a bit more than I thought it was capable of (with the plugins).

Re:Total Commander (1)

AmiMoJo (196126) | about 8 months ago | (#46386971)

I prefer Directory Opus [gpsoft.com.au] . Unlimited file list panes, massive amounts of power. I have the lister windows cut down fairly cleanly, not like most of the demo screenshots that are "kitchen-sink" affairs.

It started out on the Amiga which is where I used to use it, and then migrated to Windows.

Re:Total Commander (1)

Trax3001BBS (2368736) | about 8 months ago | (#46394791)

I prefer Directory Opus [gpsoft.com.au] . Unlimited file list panes, massive amounts of power. I have the lister windows cut down fairly cleanly, not like most of the demo screenshots that are "kitchen-sink" affairs.

It started out on the Amiga which is where I used to use it, and then migrated to Windows.

Then your aware Dopus was a direct rip off of his friends (buddies for years) DiskMaster. DiskMaster was free, Dopus want(s)ed big bucks; for Windows that comes to $90 for something you can get for free. Dude rips off his friend for a fast buck - I wouldn't touch Dopus with the Amiga, damn sure ain't gonna get near it with the PC.

Not a developer, but..... (4, Informative)

Kr1ll1n (579971) | about 8 months ago | (#46380811)

Notepad++ on Windows
TextMate on OSX

Re:Not a developer, but..... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381409)

It's not libre, but it is gratis mIRC-style nagware, and makes for a fantastic IDE. Sublime Text. [sublimetext.com]

Re:Not a developer, but..... (1)

TechNeilogy (2948399) | about 8 months ago | (#46381481)

Geany on Linux; a nice little editor reminiscent of Notepad++.

Re:Not a developer, but..... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381863)

Tools for Windows:
- ProcMon.exe, ProcExp.exe, autoruns.exe from SysInternals
- Wireshark, windirstat.exe
- notepad++, firefox,
- ilspy.exe, pythonWin
- grep.exe from cygwin plus it's 4 dll dependencies
plus a GUI tool to right-click on any file in Explorer to provide "copy this path" functionality

Re:Not a developer, but..... (1)

YumYumClownMonkey (903920) | about 8 months ago | (#46388075)

Hellzyeah. I *am* a developer, and you get more done with a half-dozen regular expressions than you usually do in any IDE.

Re:Not a developer, but..... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46393481)

Sublime text, on everything.

Also, F.lux on windows/OSX, Redshift on Linux.

Titanium Backup, other Android Apps (2)

crow (16139) | about 8 months ago | (#46380813)

On a new Android phone, the first thing that I do is root it and install Titanium Backup.

Then there are a few other apps that I must have, though the specifics aren't as important as the functionality:

VNC client: I like Jump (which was a Amazon Free App of the Day a while back) because it has ssh integrated. It's a pain using middle and right mouse buttons, though, and it doesn't use public key authorization for ssh (though I think the iPhone version does).

Terminal: I like KBox (http://kevinboone.net/kbox2.html) so that I can write and use some scripts.

SSH Client: I think I use SSH Droid.

Hacker Keyboard: Having a keyboard with both numbers and symbols active at the same time as letters is really nice, even if it does use up half the screen.

Re:Titanium Backup, other Android Apps (1)

The MAZZTer (911996) | about 8 months ago | (#46381107)

As long as we're talking Android, Tasker is invaluable for getting your phone to configure itself based on location, or time of day, or whatever.

JuiceDefender helps increase battery life.

Nova Launcher is just better than the stock launcher and has a ton of features I can't live without.

Re:Titanium Backup, other Android Apps (1)

crow (16139) | about 8 months ago | (#46382531)

I use Llama to configure based on location. I've heard nothing but good things about Tasker, other than not being free.

Re:Titanium Backup, other Android Apps (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46389723)

Titanium was first install. Now after Cyanogenmod O. S. is installed, first install is F-Droid, second is App Backup, third is And Bible. Hacker Keyboard is in too. Gapps (Google Apps) is not installed. Open Street Maps is. The origianal music player Music is in too. Gone are all the Samsung, T-mob,. & Google battery sucking trackingwares, bloatwares & adwares.
All those apps for battery saving are not needed with Cyanogenmod without Gapps. Without Google having access to GPS, cellular, WiFi, microphone & camera 24-7, battery use in 16 hours may be only 16%.

Everything (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46380815)

Really fast search tool.

Could your question be more generic? (-1, Troll)

oscrivellodds (1124383) | about 8 months ago | (#46380821)

Come on, really, you just want us to list software? You don't have specific types of activities in mind? You don't even have a specific OS in mind?

Ask again when you have a question worthy of a response.

Re:Could your question be more generic? (2)

F. Lynx Pardinus (2804961) | about 8 months ago | (#46380837)

It's just an excuse to have an open thread and chat. If that's not your thing, that's fine.

Re:Could your question be more generic? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46380947)

If you or I tried to do that, our comments would be marked as "Troll". Wouldn't it be nice to be able to mark a summary that way?

(and guess why I'm posting this as AC?...)

Re:Could your question be more generic? (-1, Flamebait)

Hylandr (813770) | about 8 months ago | (#46380923)

Dewd, this isn't 4chan.

Faggot.

Re:Could your question be more generic? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46380973)

You misspelled "Faget"

spel check in a brower (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46380823)

But seriously - I think the older I get, the more I lose my mind. Spell check helps me at least hide it better (and keeps my mind off Beta).

You mean "install" like "manually install" (1)

drolli (522659) | about 8 months ago | (#46380825)

apt-get install task-desktop task-file-server task-laptop

Basic productivity CLI and GUI apps (1)

dberstein (648161) | about 8 months ago | (#46380827)

CLI tools: vim, curl, wget, aptitude on Debian based distros.
GUI tools: Chrome, (Libre/Open)Office, Thunderbird. Any other is as required at "runtime".

Ninite (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46380829)

Pick your programs, install them all silently, with good defaults, and check(and install) updates for all with very effort.

Re:Ninite (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381203)

i agree, except shockwave flash was removed as one of the options

Re:Ninite (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46382289)

May I ask how Shockwave is related to Flash?

Re:Ninite (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46385863)

Such streamlined! So ease! Wow! ;-)

I was wary of ninite and the risk of their team be (1)

dakra137 (1590245) | about 8 months ago | (#46389521)

Kudos to ninite. It makes starting to use a new OS install much quicker.

Linux: Only the basics (2)

crow (16139) | about 8 months ago | (#46380831)

On my regular Linux desktop and laptop systems, I just want the basic apps, and then have it get out of the way so that I can work:

emacs, xterm, OpenSSH, and twm (with a few patches I've added).

The only big apps that I use are Thunderbird and Chromium.

I make sure to not install Gnome or KDE.

Sweet, sweet emacs (4, Funny)

smitty_one_each (243267) | about 8 months ago | (#46380969)

If your editor doesn't have its own church, how can it be a serious piece of code?

Re:Sweet, sweet emacs (1)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | about 8 months ago | (#46381109)

His editor does have its own church as well as its own evangelist, or did you miss that he uses emacs?

Re:Sweet, sweet emacs (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381291)

If your editor doesn't have its own church, how can it be a serious piece of code?

Ah, the Church-Turing Thesis.

vlc, need I say more... (Sqore:200,000: Super) (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46380839)

vlc, mplayer, ffmpeg, vim, gcc, devel headers, kernel devel, nvidia driver, yumex, gimp, snes9x,
firefix + noscript + forcastfox, thunderbird, wine, kid3 + easytag, okular, gnostscript, gdb, ddd; vmplayer.

Bunch of other important but less used utilities: liveUSB builder, inkscape, ksensors, wmcalclock.

Pretty sure none of the above really need an explanation. Note that when major apps are installed,
their dependencies bring in a whole bunch of other libraries (vlc brings in many) too numerous to list.

I generally run Fedora, but I think these might be staples for most everyone.

Re:vlc, need I say more... (Sqore:200,000: Super) (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381467)

Evidently you did need to.

Good web browsers. (5, Informative)

Z00L00K (682162) | about 8 months ago | (#46380841)

Firefox and Opera are on my list of good ones so far.

Re:Good web browsers. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46380939)

I could've sworn you wrote "good" there, but you mention Failfox and Gropera.

@Z00L00K - Re:Good web browsers. (1)

nukenerd (172703) | about 8 months ago | (#46380955)

Firefox and Opera are on my list of good ones so far.

You can't live without having both of them ??

Re:@Z00L00K - Re:Good web browsers. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381275)

>> Firefox and Opera are on my list of good ones so far.

> You can't live without having both of them ??

Yep (I'm not that guy, but can answer the question):

gs.statcounter, maps option, only working in Opera right now (flash bad rendered in FF, site complains javascript is off with Chrome, though it's on). I use X11 with intel driver... maybe a browser/driver issue.

Also, Opera worked when FF refused (for java security reasons, probably FF was right) and I had minutes to complete a time-limited task.

Opera proved its need; Chrome and FF are on a serious competition regarding new tech -- must keep both.

Re:@Z00L00K - Re:Good web browsers. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381377)

FWIW gs.statcounter appears to work if you disable then re-enable javascript - I'm using "Quick Javascript Switcher" extension.

Re:@Z00L00K - Re:Good web browsers. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381683)

Thanks for the tip, will try.

Just clarifying, I seem to be bitter but actually think their map feature is an awesome idea. And they're not the only site with flash problems on Linux -- on Windows it works ok.

Re:@Z00L00K - Re:Good web browsers. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46383339)

Confirmed to work; better yet, a single de-reactivation is preserved forever. It seems thus to be a Chrome(ium) problem.

Thanks for the workaround.

Re:@Z00L00K - Re:Good web browsers. (1)

Z00L00K (682162) | about 8 months ago | (#46382407)

For some F-ed up reason the Outlook Web interface works best in Opera, and doesn't work well in FF - and doesn't work at all in IE!

(My work uses the Outlook Web interface, so I have no choice...)

And Opera has better privacy.

Re: @Z00L00K - Re:Good web browsers. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46385573)

Turn on compatibility mode in recent IEs (just for that one url) to make outlook web (the 2003 one) work. I have do this constantly at work...

Re:@Z00L00K - Re:Good web browsers. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46383767)

Sadly no one browser works for _all_ websites. If only there was a mandatory standard and a way to enforce it...

Re:Good web browsers. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381079)

Not after they dumped Opera for Opera Next.

Re:Good web browsers. (1)

Trax3001BBS (2368736) | about 8 months ago | (#46383693)

Not after they dumped Opera for Opera Next.

I still use Opera 12 for at the least the bookmarks and shortcuts or nickname ie "Fish" takes me to Google translate. /. to guess where (and it's a default).

You just get a copy of Opera12 or not deleted the version you downloaded (damn did I get lucky). Every once in awhile your hit with a requester to download the latest version, (I think it's hard wired into Opera), which you just click on NOPE.

I installed Opera 15 once and noticed it was firefox. Opera.com made mention of closing down April 2014, and to grab anything you had on site - just a really sad demise to an excellent browser.

If you have a (new) feature you really like, there's a very good chance it was on Opera first.

Re:Good web browsers. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46384059)

My Opera might be closing down in April, but not Opera Software itself. The browser is not dying (though it is taking an annoyingly long time to get all the good features back into this new version... I really miss Opera 12).

Re:Good web browsers. (2)

Fjandr (66656) | about 8 months ago | (#46385149)

Opera 15 (now 19) isn't FireFox, it's Chrome.

The one fortunate thing is they're building back into Chrome what they lost when they stopped developing Presto. It's slow, but it's happening. I still miss things like Ctrl-Z re-opening closed windows, but they've regained a lot of the ground they lost in the changeover.

I still really miss per-site options, which haven't made it back into Chrome-based Opera.

Re:Good web browsers. (1)

Trax3001BBS (2368736) | about 8 months ago | (#46386077)

The one fortunate thing is they're building back into Chrome what they lost when they stopped developing Presto. It's slow, but it's happening. I still miss things like Ctrl-Z re-opening closed windows, but they've regained a lot of the ground they lost in the changeover.

I still really miss per-site options, which haven't made it back into Chrome-based Opera.

Ctrl-Z does that eh? I've always just used the triangle under the X (close button) and like it better (just tried the keyboard way).

Really going to miss Opera it was a safe browser to use because so few used it, When Opera was first released, I'd install it to a 3.5 floppy and have my browser and bookmarks with me when I visited another geek.

I just don't wish to use Chrome.

I don't trust anything that's being pushed on me as hard as Chrome is. It's past the point of being obnoxious and right up there with mcafee; miss an option separate from the others and find yourself installing it.

I don't like the fact Chrome has (two, at the time I used it) services to install, change or remove anything at anytime, even if it's limited to Chrome's up keep. I not only disabled them but blocked access to the directories they used. I like to at keep a semblance of having control of my own system.

Re:Good web browsers. (1)

Fjandr (66656) | about 7 months ago | (#46433623)

Well, the current incarnation of Opera is based on Chrome, but they've made a lot of positive changes to the code base. I don't really use Chrome much though, so I'm not sure exactly how Deep the differences go.

Re:Good web browsers. (1)

Trax3001BBS (2368736) | about 7 months ago | (#46433929)

Well, the current incarnation of Opera is based on Chrome, but they've made a lot of positive changes to the code base. I don't really use Chrome much though, so I'm not sure exactly how Deep the differences go.

Just today I updated my Motorola Xoom (google) Tablet to Android version 4.4.2 thanks to hax, and installed Opera on it. It's the first full version of mobile Opera I've seen since 12 (not a mini), it uses pieces of everything, lots of Chrome, lots of Google stuff (analytics), a bit of Netscape, Mozilla, MSDN, Apple (sample code), Apache, Linux and even GIMP. Those are just a very few, just pages and pages of redistribution license.

As if they grabbed the best of all that's available, one could hope. But they still don't get it, there's still no bookmarks; but a bookmark import utility to turn your bookmarks into Speed Dial icons, that would give me 3337 icons, and a lot of time searching through them.

If you've used Opera you know it exports bookmarks as formatted text (ADR file) and as a HTML page.
I can use the HTML page to get around to places I've thought special enough to bookmark, even have it as my start up page.

You mean other than what is installed by Default? (3, Informative)

DadLeopard (1290796) | about 8 months ago | (#46380847)

That would be Thunderbird, followed by Calibre and Skype. I don't care for Evolution, so Thunderbird which is nice and simple to use! Calibre since I have a Sony Reader which uses epub format, since Calibre can convert just about any eBook format to just about any other one, as long as they are not DRMed, it also keeps my eBook library nicely organized. Skype is because one son lives 800 miles away and another 6,157 miles away right now, and Skype works with MS, Apple and Linux OSes so we can keep in touch and see each others faces once in a while!

Re:You mean other than what is installed by Defaul (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381439)

I get the need to communicate with non-nerds via video chat, but you might want to check out Jitsi [jitsi.org] , as it does encrypted truly peer-to-peer video chat, and has OTR support built in for the text chat side of things, and will work with existing xmpp accounts. Only drawback I have with it is that it's java (one of the two programs I keep java installed at all for), but generally it's bug-free enough that t hat doesn't cause much issue.

Re:You mean other than what is installed by Defaul (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | about 8 months ago | (#46381911)

It may have been an old version I tried, but I was singularly unimpressed by Calibre.

It silently failed to convert some files, plus it insisted on copying every file I opened with it to its own directory.

Re:You mean other than what is installed by Defaul (1)

DadLeopard (1290796) | about 8 months ago | (#46384449)

That is the expected behavior in Calibre! When you open a file with it, it adds that book to your Calibre Library. If you only want one copy of the book delete the file in the original location. It is after all, primarily an ebook library management system. The conversion feature is really secondary, though very welcome since i don't need an extra application just for that! The editing and creation features have been greatly enhanced lately also! If you care to dig into it, it can do some pretty amazing and complicated things with ebooks, most of which Thankfully I don't need to do!!

Re:You mean other than what is installed by Defaul (1)

Man Eating Duck (534479) | about 8 months ago | (#46391867)

It may have been an old version I tried, but I was singularly unimpressed by Calibre.

It silently failed to convert some files, plus it insisted on copying every file I opened with it to its own directory.

For its intended purpose (ebook library management for use with your reading devices), calibre is simply the best software out there IMNSHO, paid or not. There are things for which it is not as good, but for my library of epub/kindle ebooks I haven't found anything that comes close. It might not be for you after all, but I'd advice you to give it another try, keeping the following in mind:

The "copying files" thing can be counterintuitive if you're used to micromanage files and folders yourself, but it can be viewed from another perspective: calibre doesn't manage files, it manages *books*. It keeps them in its internal database, of which the folder structure and data files is essentially just the bulk storage part. The files are a subset of all the information that makes up a book record, and the paths are not even used for metadata storage, although it reflects them. I keep a copy of my original files for backup purposes, but they are effectively obsoleted as soon as I clean up metadata and formatting in calibre. After that calibre is the absolutely best way to manage and access my books, and I'm happy to keep them in the calibre "db". After all, a file path is not a good place to store metadata. A db with proper fields, tags and so on is far better suited. Work with it, not against it :)

If you find that it doesn't suit you after some time, the export functionality is excellent. You also have all metadata stored in a well-structured SQLite db to extract and do with as you please.

The conversion error, BTW, is unfamiliar to me. If it simply omitted converting without throwing an error, that's a strange bug I haven't encountered or even heard of. If the results are not satisfactory: be aware that automatic document conversion between some formats, for instance from PDF to a flowing format, is *hard* to perfect, if not impossible. Most of my conversions are between flowing formats, and calibre does an admirable job with those. It even works around limitations in the different formats (by generating a html TOC for formats that don't support proper metadata TOCs, for instance).

It is extremely flexible and extensible. Incidentally the custom column system has a surprisingly powerful template language written by Charles Haley, one of the original authors of ex (which became vi) :)

calibre has a lot of "power user" features built in, a great plugin system with lots of available plugins, and it is very mature at this point. The relevant sub-forum at MobileRead [mobileread.com] is an excellent resource, any questions you might have are most likely already answered there.

Re:You mean other than what is installed by Defaul (1)

CCarrot (1562079) | about 8 months ago | (#46387555)

That would be Thunderbird, followed by Calibre and Skype. I don't care for Evolution, so Thunderbird which is nice and simple to use! Calibre since I have a Sony Reader which uses epub format, since Calibre can convert just about any eBook format to just about any other one, as long as they are not DRMed, it also keeps my eBook library nicely organized. Skype is because one son lives 800 miles away and another 6,157 miles away right now, and Skype works with MS, Apple and Linux OSes so we can keep in touch and see each others faces once in a while!

I used to install Calibre on everything, too, then I started using their server option and just leave a master copy running on my home server. Much better, and I don't have to worry about my various libraries getting out of sync.

Skype and Thunderbird...not so much.

Debian Linux testing (1)

Johnny Loves Linux (1147635) | about 8 months ago | (#46380849)

CRAN, and PYPI. I pretty much have everything I need with the 3 repositories.

Emacs and GCC (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46380853)

They are the Alpha and the Omega.

Re:Emacs and GCC (1)

smitty_one_each (243267) | about 8 months ago | (#46380975)

Also, the alphabet in between.

Re:Emacs and GCC (1)

Ken_g6 (775014) | about 8 months ago | (#46381775)

I prefer GVim and Clang.

Well, OK, I prefer GCC too, but that doesn't make the debate as interesting. Let's say many prefer Clang and see how they fall out on the merits.

I like GVim for its regular expression support. And I don't see why Emacs should run stuff like compilers from the editor - that's what multiple xterms are for.

Re:Emacs and GCC (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381971)

And I don't see why Emacs should run stuff like compilers from the editor - that's what multiple xterms are for.

Because you can then just click on error messages and go from one error to the next using M-g M-n and M-g M-p and Emacs will keep track when you insert/delete material to fix an error?

Or have an even wilder mash-up of source code and output and error messages like preview-latex [gnu.org] ?

windows user picks (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46380859)

F.lux: http://justgetflux.com/
about:
Ever notice how people texting at night have that eerie blue glow?
Or wake up ready to write down the Next Great Idea, and get blinded by your computer screen?
During the day, computer screens look good—they're designed to look like the sun. But, at 9PM, 10PM, or 3AM, you probably shouldn't be looking at the sun.
f.lux fixes this: it makes the color of your computer's display adapt to the time of day, warm at night and like sunlight during the day.
It's even possible that you're staying up too late because of your computer. You could use f.lux because it makes you sleep better, or you could just use it just because it makes your computer look better.

Fences: http://www.stardock.com/products/fences/
about:
Fences is a program that helps you organize your desktop. It can hide icons when they are not in use as well as make it easy to place icons into moveable groups called "fences".
What makes it so popular?
Fences is the world's most popular desktop enhancement for Windows®. What makes it so compelling is that what it does is so obviously useful and necessary that it is amazing that no one has thought of it before.

FuTTY: https://code.google.com/p/futty/
about:
FuTTY is FireEgl's fork of PuTTY Tray and includes lots of Features beyond the official PuTTY. (clickable urls in irssi!)

Re:windows user picks (1)

Hylandr (813770) | about 8 months ago | (#46381045)

Wish I could +1 this.

Re:windows user picks (1)

ganjadude (952775) | about 8 months ago | (#46383307)

who moded this down? good information

well... (1)

buddyglass (925859) | about 8 months ago | (#46380861)

Since I switched to Macs, its basically Excel, Eclipse and Firefox. And gcc, which I get by installing the Xcode command line tools.

Re: well... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46383471)

On OS X 10.9 /use/bin/gcc is just clang. If you want gcc you have to install it yourself.

Re: well... (1)

buddyglass (925859) | about 8 months ago | (#46386951)

Gcc front-end. Which is all I need for the occasional project.

Re:well... (1)

alexandre_ganso (1227152) | about 8 months ago | (#46384323)

I could swear that the "gcc" on current macs is just a shortcut for clang.

Yep, it is:

$ gcc --help
OVERVIEW: clang LLVM compiler

My list (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46380863)

I mostly use mac & linux via ssh

Windows:
Irfanview - Always first thing I do.
Putty
Powerarchiver
All major browsers
Openvpn client

Mac:
All major browsers
Textwrangler
Snapndrag (best screenshot tool ever)
Textual
Remote Desktop (Mac & windows)
Tunnelblick (openvpn)
Adium

Linux:
Random tools as needed

Re:My list (1)

Jarik C-Bol (894741) | about 8 months ago | (#46381639)

And then spend an half an hour configuring Adium and looking for, installing and tweaking and a style pack that makes Adium not take up 2/3rds of the screen...

Don't get me wrong, I love Adium, but its default style pack is pretty hideous.

Re:My list (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46384337)

shameless: http://www.adiumxtras.com/inde... [adiumxtras.com]

Re:My list (1)

CCarrot (1562079) | about 8 months ago | (#46387621)

Irfanview is nice, I used to default to that, but I switched over to XNView [xnview.com] a while back and like it much more. Just a more polished interface than IView, simple but very powerful batch tools, quick, responsive and customizable.

Unfortunately, the main desktop version [xnview.com] is buggy under Windows 8 (was wonderful under Windows 7 and XP), and the cross-platform java version [xnview.com] isn't nearly as powerful as the main one, although at least it works with Windows 8...

Core sysadmin toolkit. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46380869)

wget and nano

Linux Spoils Me. (1)

ElectraFlarefire (698915) | about 8 months ago | (#46380871)

On a standard Debian/Ununtu Desktop install?
After fixing up my window manager, web/email/etc, very little needs to be installed..
Everything else is 'nice to have' tools. And custom scripts/settings.

Random Windows and Programming tools (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46380875)

Notepad++
7zip
Python
Visual Studio
Wireshark
HashTab - simple shell extension for checking hashes via properties
HxD - really any basic hex editor would do
Sysinternals
Chrome
Office, Adobe, etc... - sadly required for work

Re:Random Windows and Programming tools (1)

Marginal Coward (3557951) | about 8 months ago | (#46381059)

Good list. It overlaps many of mine:

    Vim
    7-zip
    Python
    Visual Studio
    BeyondCompare
    Sysinternals
    Firefox, Chrome, and Opera
    grep (I use a really ancient one from Borland C - I've tried GNU's version but simply don't like it)
    git, Tortoise Git, and msysgit
    OpenOffice or LibreOffice
    Adobe Acrobat and Flash (sadly)

and last but not least (drum roll, please)...

    Classic Shell

Note that my list contains a few key things that only run on Windows, notably Visual Studio and the ancient Borland grep. I keep hoping that the "GNU/Linux System" will catch up in both regards, but I'm not holding my breath. ;-)

Re:Random Windows and Programming tools (1)

the_cosmocat (1009803) | about 8 months ago | (#46381359)

First and mandatory, install chocolatey http://chocolatey.org/ [chocolatey.org] to easily and quickly install most of these software :

Notepad++
GitExtensions (better than Tortoise Git) or sourcetree
P4merge (one of the best merge software)
ConsoleZ (a descent console for windows)
sumatrapdf (quickest pdf reader)
clover (tabs in file manager)
speedcrunch (a good calc)
greenshot (screenshots)
paint.net
foobar2000
vlc
windirstat
7zip
Sysinternals
Firefox ...

And do a bat file to install automatically all that with chocolatey!!!!!

Re:Random Windows and Programming tools (1)

CaptQuark (2706165) | about 8 months ago | (#46385877)

Many of those go on my system first:

Firefox with Adblock Plus
Thunderbird
7zip
Paint.NET
WinMerge
Paint Shop Pro

~~

A web browser (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46380883)

Duh. And seriously, you dipshits who keep saying "Emacs" or similar, just put a cork in it. No on cares, and no one thinks you're special.

Firefox (1)

RandCraw (1047302) | about 8 months ago | (#46380887)

Sure, GCC, Linux, sendmail, SCCS, any many more are essential to the open software stack I would die for. But the importance of a modern, full-featured, open browser simply can't be overstated. Without Firefox, the web would be a much less trustworthy world, and I'd be much less willing to take part in it.

Re:Firefox (1)

CarsonChittom (2025388) | about 8 months ago | (#46381141)

Genuine question: people still use SCCS?

Re:Firefox (1)

angel'o'sphere (80593) | about 8 months ago | (#46381647)

Unfortunately yes, just saw a job offer a few days ago where SCCS skills was a requirement (not a nice to have) ... and I really wonder anyway why job offers 'require' knowledge about a certain SCM tool ... for that we have invented manuals a fe years ago.

Re:Firefox (1)

JazzHarper (745403) | about 8 months ago | (#46381673)

Genuine question: people still use SCCS?

I have one data file, started over ten years ago, still under SCCS. The downstream flow uses the metadata. It's not worth changing. The whole flow will be replaced RSN.

GKrellm or other system monitor (5, Insightful)

DrJimbo (594231) | about 8 months ago | (#46380895)

The first thing I install is a system monitor.

I like to keep a close eye on CPU usage, memory usage, disk usage, and network usage. Without that information it feels like I'm flying blind. It is often important on a new system when I don't know what is running and consuming resources.

Re:system monitor: htop (1)

vjoel (945280) | about 8 months ago | (#46383397)

htop is great: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/... [wikipedia.org]

Not just basic monitoring, you can send signals, pin processes to cpus, use strace.

I do wish it were extensible (for example, to add a temperature monitor).

Re:system monitor: htop (1)

DrJimbo (594231) | about 8 months ago | (#46383615)

Agreed. Have you tried Glances [github.io] ? In some ways it is like htop on steroids.

Re:system monitor: htop (1)

vjoel (945280) | about 8 months ago | (#46384305)

Agreed. Have you tried Glances [github.io] ? In some ways it is like htop on steroids.

Nice, but too many dependencies for my taste...

On Windows... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46380897)

TotalCommander.

since the 80's.... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46380903)

Emacs.

I learned one editor in the 80's, and it's still as or more powerful than anything else out there. Runs on every OS, in every environment, edits every kind of text file, even things fancy new IDEs like Visual Studio don't know what to do with and fall back to treating as plain text. Integrates with source control, and has more powerful editing abilities than any other editor I've ever encountered.

In recent years, it's even trivial to install: "apt-get install emacs".

But it has a steep learning curve, something that's out of style.

Re:since the 80's.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46380959)

LOL, I take it you've never learned to use vi.

Re:since the 80's.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381173)

(Same AC here)... I am actually quite good at vi! It's useful to know both.

Re:since the 80's.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381527)

I know enough vi to get my favourite editor installed...

Re:since the 80's.... (1)

colinrichardday (768814) | about 8 months ago | (#46383127)

But is vi learnable in the first place?

It's an investment (1)

smitty_one_each (243267) | about 8 months ago | (#46380983)

Every time you level up, and try something new, there is some pleasant surprise, like TRAMP mode.

Re:since the 80's.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381541)

Emacs is pretty much unusable without exchanging Ctrl-L and Tab-Stop in the OS settings. After doing so, it's very very ergonomic to use.

1Password (1)

cbreak (1575875) | about 8 months ago | (#46380905)

It's not like I'd die without it, but I wouldn't' get into any of my accounts. I also use a lot: Firefox, TextWrangler, Xcode, clang, quicksilver, Mac OS X, ...

1 I wrote myself for GOOD reason(s) (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46380909)

Hosts do more w/ less (1 file) @ a faster level (ring 0) vs redundant browser addons (slowing up slower ring 3 browsers) via filtering 4 the IP stack (coded in C, loads w/ OS, & 1st net resolver queried w\ 45++ yrs.of optimization):

---

APK Hosts File Engine 9.0++ 32/64-bit:

http://start64.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=5851:apk-hosts-file-engine-64bit-version&catid=26:64bit-security-software&Itemid=74

(Details of hosts' benefits enumerated in link)

Summary:

---

A. ) Hosts do more than AdBlock ("souled-out" 2 Google/Crippled by default) + Ghostery (Advertiser owned) - "Fox guards henhouse", or Request Policy -> http://yro.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=4127345&cid=44701775

B. ) Hosts add reliability vs. downed or redirected DNS + secure vs. known malicious domains too -> http://tech.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3985079&cid=44310431 w/ less added "moving parts" complexity + room 4 breakdown,

C. ) Hosts files yield more speed (blocks ads & hardcodes fav sites - faster than remote DNS), security (vs. malicious domains serving mal-content + block spam/phish), reliability (vs. downed or Kaminsky redirect vulnerable DNS, 99% = unpatched vs. it & worst @ ISP level + weak vs FastFlux + DynDNS botnets), & anonymity (vs. dns request logs + DNSBL's).

---

* Addons = more complex + slowup browsers in message passing (use a few concurrently & see) - Addons slowdown SLOWER usermode browsers layering on MORE: I work w/ what you have in kernelmode, via hosts (A tightly integrated PART of the IP stack itself)

APK

P.S.=> * "A fool makes things bigger + more complex: It takes a touch of genius & a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction." - Einstein

** "Less is more" = GOOD engineering!

*** "The premise is, quite simple: Take something designed by nature & reprogram it to make it work FOR the body, rather than against it..." - Dr. Alice Krippen "I AM LEGEND"

...apk

Re:1 I wrote myself for GOOD reason(s) (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381985)

Why's the post I replied to minus moderated for? He's as entitled to reply here as anyone else is with his thoughts and I don't see anyone proving what he said is false either.

Answser inside... apk (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46387253)

It's some ridiculous idiot who *tried* to "take me down" before & failed badly (being unable to disprove my points in favor of hosts giving users more speed, security, reliability, & even anonymity online - doing so with LESS "moving parts layered-on complexity" ala redundant browser addons) - bank on it.

* :)

(I love it, since it PROVES they are effete & ineffectual...)

APK

P.S.=> After all - it's not MY fault all they end up doing is making ME look GOOD, & themselves? Well... lol, "not so good" (being reduced to mere "hit & run" downmods like the cowardly little weasels they are, but yet NEVER DISPROVING MY POINTS on hosts)...

... apk

LinuxCNC (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46380915)

Linuxcnc. I would not be able to run my business without it.

Re:LinuxCNC (1)

SirTicksAlot (576078) | about 8 months ago | (#46380931)

I agree. Very powerful although I wish it wasn't so tied to a really old Ubuntu release.

say what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46380919)

Fresh operating system?

minimal installation includes... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46380921)

post OS install, the list goes :
Avast AV (free edition)
Comodo Firewall (free edition)
Malwarebytes (free)
PuTTY
WinSCP

Productivity (1)

denisbergeron (197036) | about 8 months ago | (#46380927)

Last version of LibreOffice
Gimp
inkscape
and a buch of font.
All linux come with ssh and telnet, who need more.

vi (1)

fsck-beta (3539217) | about 8 months ago | (#46380933)

vi or vim, must have, everything else is gravy

Re:vi (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46380967)

In the name of Emacs, avaunt!

If it is a Windows 7 or later system: (1)

the_rajah (749499) | about 8 months ago | (#46380945)

Firefox Chrome
MS Security Essentials
Malwarebytes
LibreOffice
Filezilla
Gimp

After that it depends on what I'm purposing the system for.

If it's for my use, I'll install VirtualBox along with a copy of my XP VM for some legacy software that doesn't play on any later versions of Windows

Windows 7 boxen need only 1 thing installed (1)

raymorris (2726007) | about 8 months ago | (#46381577)

there is only one thing I install on a box that already has windows. Linux!

Windows file management ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46380949)

If you are too lazy to organize data properly, these tools are extremely helpful:

TreeSize - calculates the sizes of all your directories, quickly
Beyond Compare - diff for directories. Very powerful and fast.
Locate32 - desktop search, but doesn't send info to your favorite advertizing companies. Also lightening fast.

Re:Windows file management ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381389)

> TreeSize - calculates the sizes of all your directories, quickly

I decided that WinDirStat works at least as well for me and is OpenSource (which besides ideological reasons means it's easier to get blanked approval for in certain companies)...

Re:Windows file management ... (3, Informative)

Immerman (2627577) | about 8 months ago | (#46381967)

I find WinDirStat a much superior file/directory size analyzer - it offers a tree view with details that is continuously updated as the directories are scanned in a breadth-first order, with indicators for which directory trees haven't yet been fully scanned, allowing for useful analysis to be performed almost immediately instead of waiting for the scan to complete. Then, when the scan is finally finished, you also get a graphical "pillow view" overview of the entire file system, color-coded by file type.

Everything is another great search tool - it only works on NTFS drives, but typically takes only a minute or so to scan a large drive for the first time, seconds to update it's database on subsequent launches, and lists all files whose name contains your specified word fragments literally as fast as you can type. Hit "a" and you will be faced with a list of hundreds of thousands of files before you can type a second letter. It also supports regex if word-fragments are insufficiently powerful for your needs.

Re:Windows file management ... (1)

MonTemplar (174120) | about 8 months ago | (#46388681)

I used to use Beyond Compare for work purposes back when I was involved in USB flash device duplication - great for checking master copies prior to duplication, and double-checking selected duplicate sticks during duplication.

Along those lines, I'd also recommend TeraCopy - fast file copying with the option of CRC checking to spot any corrupted or missing files.

LaunchBar (1)

pianophile (181111) | about 8 months ago | (#46380953)

On any new Mac (and NeXT) since the 90's. I've seldom launched an app any other way in years.

Re:LaunchBar (1)

Brian Kendig (1959) | about 8 months ago | (#46381201)

I used to swear by LaunchBar, but now the built-in Spotlight is good enough for me.

My List (4, Informative)

Hrrrg (565259) | about 8 months ago | (#46380963)

Adobe Lightroom - does 95% of what I would do with photoshop, works on raw images and simplifies my workflow tremendously. I almost never use photoshop anymore.

Ubuntu, Windows 8.1, Libreoffice, Adobe Reader, - self explanatory.

Firefox with Adblock plus and Better Privacy and HTPS Everywhere installed.

KeepassX - Password manager. Multiplatform, much less buggy than Keepass2 (note to develepers: please take it out of alpha status!)

F.Lux - warms up the color of your monitor in the evenings so that it doesn't interfere with your circadian rhythm, hopefully improves sleep. (hey - it's free!)

Videolan (VLC) - excellent video player (despite the crappy name)

Sandboxie (paid $$) - Sandbox your browser and various other programs

FastOne Image Viewer - excellent, free sildeshow software

Secunia PSI - makes sure your programs are kept up-to-date

Re:My List (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46386175)

I am interested in a fast image viewer, but could not find FastOne Image Viewer - google turned up FastStone. Do you have a link for FastOne?

F.lux (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46386345)

F.Lux - warms up the color of your monitor in the evenings so that it doesn't interfere with your circadian rhythm, hopefully improves sleep. (hey - it's free!)

Thanks! I've been looking for that some time ago, but my findings weren't for all OS and/or were not free...

emacs (1)

yotam (155187) | about 8 months ago | (#46380979)

Emacs is a necessity for me.
For editing local and remote (via tramp) files.
Run simple shells, compile, grep, diff, clean directories. All within emacs.

Re:emacs (1)

helixcode123 (514493) | about 8 months ago | (#46381801)

Emacs is a necessity for me.
For editing local and remote (via tramp) files.
Run simple shells, compile, grep, diff, clean directories. All within emacs.

Long time Emacs user here. Can you expand on "clean directories" please? Parent posters have mentioned Tramp, the ability to (nearly) seamlessly edit files on remote system. This is a wonderful feature, along with ediff, for merging updates on my development system (i.e. my laptop) with my deployed code on my remote VPS.

Re:emacs (1)

yotam (155187) | about 8 months ago | (#46381871)

Clean directories, change file permissions, etc. can be easily done using the 'dired' function of Emacs.

Tons (1)

Sandman1971 (516283) | about 8 months ago | (#46380993)

The very first thing I install on a home machine is an antivirus/antimalware app, since it's Windows after all. Followed by Chrome to download and install drivers/apps for my peripherals (printer, videocard, dsl camera, scanner, etc..). Once that's done comes Thunderbird, Mozbackup (to transfer my old emails/addons) and VirtualBox (With Ubuntu, Edubuntu). Followed by Photoshop and Premiere. Then Steam, Origin and World of Warcraft. The rest I do like you, install them as required.

My list from a larger list i keep (-1, Flamebait)

bigal123 (709270) | about 8 months ago | (#46380999)

This list is part of a much longer list that I maintain and sometimes publish. There are few others, but some are more as needed special use cases. * 7-ZIP -- Create/Extra ZIP and many other other file compression formats, very powerful. Note can open some installer EXE and MSI files (see Microsoft Orca for more MSI options) (free, open source, Windows, there may be Linux/Mac variants). http://www.7-zip.com/ [7-zip.com] * CCleaner -- System optimization, privacy and cleaning tool. (free, closed source, Windows) http://www.ccleaner.com/ [ccleaner.com] **Alternate Tool** BleachBit -- Free cache, delete cookies, clear Internet history, shred temporary files, delete logs, and discard junk you didn't know was there. (free, open source Linux/Windows) http://bleachbit.sourceforge.n... [sourceforge.net] * Greenshot -- Good Screen Shot tool with simple annotation options. (free, open source, Windows) http://greenshot.sourceforge.n... [sourceforge.net] * IrfanView -- Image Program View, convert, crop, optimize, sideshow, batch Processing etc (free noncommercial, closed source, Windows) http://www.irfanview.com/ [irfanview.com] Instantbird -- Multi Protocol Instant Messaging (IM) Client - AOL, MSM, Yahoo, etc (free, open source, Linux/Mac/Windows) **Alternate Tool** Pidgin - Multi Protocol Instant Messaging (IM) Client - AOL, MSM, Yahoo, etc (free, open source, Linux/Mac/Windows) http://pidgin.im/ [pidgin.im] * KeePass Password Safe -- Good Quality secure password manager, stores passwords encrypted. (free, open source, Windows Linux/Mac with Mono) http://keepass.info/ [keepass.info] * LibreOffice -- Power-packed Open Source personal productivity suite for Windows, Macintosh and Linux, that gives you six feature-rich applications for all your document production. Excellent replacement for other Office Suites, can open many different and sometimes odd file types -- (free, open source, Linux/Mac/Windows) http://www.libreoffice.org/ [libreoffice.org] * Mozilla.org FireFox -- Web browser for more security then Internet Explore (free, open source, Linux/Mac/Windows) http://www.mozilla.com/ [mozilla.com] http://www.mozilla.org/ [mozilla.org] * SpeedCrunch -- fast, high-precision and powerful cross-platform desktop calculator (free, open source, Linux/Mac/Windows) http://www.speedcrunch.org/ [speedcrunch.org] & http://speedcrunch.blogspot.co... [blogspot.com] * UltraEdit -- Probably the absolute best most powerful text editors around, edit huge files, FTP, column mode, and more (shareware, closed source, Win/Mac/Linux) http://www.ultraedit.com/ [ultraedit.com] **Alternate Tool** Noteppad++ -- Good Text / Source Code Editor replacement for Microsoft Windows Notepad/Wordpad (free, open source) http://notepad-plus.sourceforg... [sourceforge.net] * VLC Media Player -- One of the best media players out there. Highly portable multimedia player for various audio and video formats ) as well as DVDs, VCDs, and various streaming protocols. It can also be used as a server to stream in unicast or multicast in IPv4 or IPv6 on a high-bandwidth network. (free, open source, Linux/Mac/Windows) http://www.videolan.org/ [videolan.org]

Re:My list from a larger list i keep (1)

bigal123 (709270) | about 8 months ago | (#46381087)

sorry this post is messed up ... see next post down for better formatting .... i could not delete it after posting.

Old Slashdot. Also: FUCK BETA!!!!! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381001)

Just revert it already!

My List (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381005)

Windows only List:
Putty,
7zip,
  AnyDVD

On All Machines
eclipse
Office Libre
Mysql / mysql workbench
Firefox
nano
VLC
tomcat

I'd have to say Linux (1)

EzInKy (115248) | about 8 months ago | (#46381009)

From productivity to timewasters, I'd be bankrupt if I had to pay for all the free software available to me due to it being being part of a Linux distribution. Yes, I know that much of the same software has been ported to proprietary systems such as Microsoft's and Apple's, but with Linux I know that from the ground up I can depend on the software in the base distro being free.

Reposting/Fixing My List (5, Informative)

bigal123 (709270) | about 8 months ago | (#46381023)

This list is part of a much longer list that I maintain and sometimes publish.

* 7-ZIP -- Create/Extra ZIP and many other other file compression formats, very powerful. Note can open some installer EXE and MSI files (see Microsoft Orca for more MSI options) (free, open source, Windows, there may be Linux/Mac variants). http://www.7-zip.com/ [7-zip.com]

* CCleaner -- System optimization, privacy and cleaning tool. (free, closed source, Windows) http://www.ccleaner.com/ [ccleaner.com] **Alternate Tool** BleachBit -- Free cache, delete cookies, clear Internet history, shred temporary files, delete logs, and discard junk you didn't know was there. (free, open source Linux/Windows) http://bleachbit.sourceforge.n... [sourceforge.net]

* Greenshot -- Good Screen Shot tool with simple annotation options. (free, open source, Windows) http://greenshot.sourceforge.n... [sourceforge.net]

* IrfanView -- Image Program View, convert, crop, optimize, sideshow, batch Processing etc (free noncommercial, closed source, Windows) http://www.irfanview.com/ [irfanview.com]

Instantbird -- Multi Protocol Instant Messaging (IM) Client - AOL, MSM, Yahoo, etc (free, open source, Linux/Mac/Windows) **Alternate Tool** Pidgin - Multi Protocol Instant Messaging (IM) Client - AOL, MSM, Yahoo, etc (free, open source, Linux/Mac/Windows) http://pidgin.im/ [pidgin.im]

* KeePass Password Safe -- Good Quality secure password manager, stores passwords encrypted. (free, open source, Windows Linux/Mac with Mono) http://keepass.info/ [keepass.info]

* LibreOffice -- Power-packed Open Source personal productivity suite for Windows, Macintosh and Linux, that gives you six feature-rich applications for all your document production. Excellent replacement for other Office Suites, can open many different and sometimes odd file types -- (free, open source, Linux/Mac/Windows) http://www.libreoffice.org/ [libreoffice.org]

* Mozilla.org FireFox -- Web browser for more security then Internet Explore (free, open source, Linux/Mac/Windows) http://www.mozilla.com/ [mozilla.com] http://www.mozilla.org/ [mozilla.org]

* SpeedCrunch -- fast, high-precision and powerful cross-platform desktop calculator (free, open source, Linux/Mac/Windows) http://www.speedcrunch.org/ [speedcrunch.org] & http://speedcrunch.blogspot.co... [blogspot.com]

* UltraEdit -- Probably the absolute best most powerful text editors around, edit huge files, FTP, column mode, and more (shareware, closed source, Win/Mac/Linux) http://www.ultraedit.com/ [ultraedit.com] **Alternate Tool** Noteppad++ -- Good Text / Source Code Editor replacement for Microsoft Windows Notepad/Wordpad (free, open source) http://notepad-plus.sourceforg... [sourceforge.net]

* VLC Media Player -- One of the best media players out there. Highly portable multimedia player for various audio and video formats (MPEG-1, MPEG-2, MPEG-4, DivX, mp3, ogg, ...) as well as DVDs, VCDs, and various streaming protocols. It can also be used as a server to stream in unicast or multicast in IPv4 or IPv6 on a high-bandwidth network. (free, oen source, Linux/Mac/Windows)
http://www.videolan.org/ [videolan.org]

Re:Reposting/Fixing My List (3, Interesting)

SpaceGhost (23971) | about 8 months ago | (#46381749)

Most of the above (thanks for the tip on Greenshot, since Printkey2000 doesnt work on Win7.)
Ultraedit is great but I'm hoping to do the same kind of scripting in Notepad++.
Firefox with noscript, adblock, request policy, ghostery, https everywhere, mobile barcoder, pluggin toggler and self-destructing cookies and a few others.
I have Keepass on my cpu and android phone.
Whatever anti-virus Im currently using (Webroot for the moment)

Add:
FileMenu Tools - various file utilities accessible via right-click in explorer, includes shredding and an excellent file renaming utility
CutePDF - lightweight PDF printer
CDRTFE - excellent open source optical media burner
RichCopy - Microsofts GUI replacement for robocopy, highly configurable and multithreaded
BareGrep - very light GREP search tool, doesnt require indexes, searches filename and content, quite fast.
MenuApp - make my own pop-up menus in the taskbar
Hotswap - enhanced control of storage devices
Jacksum - great hasher accessible via "send-to", Hashtab also works
Rainmeter because i hate not knowing what my computer is doing, Samurize when I need to monitor more than one CPU
PrismHUD for the same reason

and Audacity (and Lame), GIMP, Inkscape, Foobar2000, Foxit reader, RawTherapee.

Re:Reposting/Fixing My List (1)

RJFerret (1279530) | about 8 months ago | (#46381773)

Many of my choices covered above, but more important for me is AutoHotKey [autohotkey.com] . Computers are supposed to do the work. (I've had key/mouse recording/scripting utilities back from my Amiga days, then old Macintosh at work, and so on, nothing beats being able to shortcut/automate any repetitive thing.)

Re:Reposting/Fixing My List (1)

Aeyan (979644) | about 8 months ago | (#46381803)

And I recommend Ninite [ninite.com] when you need to do this sort of thing. Doesn't cover everything but it has enough to make it very handy.

Re:Reposting/Fixing My List (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381901)

All OS: Firefox, Thunderbird, LibreOffice, VLC, GIMP, TrueCrypt, python
extra for Windows: Notepad++, 7-zip, IrfanView, putty

Re:Reposting/Fixing My List (1)

CCarrot (1562079) | about 8 months ago | (#46388257)

Excellent list!

FYI, most of these programs (i.e., 10 out of the 12, if you count the alternate text editor Notepad++) are available as Portable Apps [portableapps.com] that you can keep on (and even run from) a USB thumb drive.

Might save you some installation and configuring time :) I'd bet plenty of programs on your full list are available too...

GNU HURD (1)

boolithium (1030728) | about 8 months ago | (#46381029)

I don't use it, never used it, and never plan on using it, not even sure it really exists, but I feel my life would be incomplete without it.

Mine (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381035)

foobar2000
Bitcoin-Qt
Hexchat
Pidgin
Mozilla Firefox
VLC
Rufus (USB flash drive image writing tool)

What do install immediately? (1)

Culture20 (968837) | about 8 months ago | (#46381041)

screen and vlock. Most everything else I need is installed by default.

Not much (1)

Thraxy (1782662) | about 8 months ago | (#46381049)

I don't do any coding these days, so I basically get by with Firefox and Skype. I'm thinking of getting rolling again in the creative field though, so if anyone wants to recommend decent video editing software for Linux and/or Windows please leave a comment.

Re:Not much (1)

SpaceGhost (23971) | about 8 months ago | (#46381757)

For very simple work the FOSS Avidemux is quite nice.

Windows (1)

Lawrence_Bird (67278) | about 8 months ago | (#46381053)

Windows
Firefox
Filezilla
Putty
VirtualBox

Re:Windows (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381873)

Must-have software for any Windows PC that I use: a Linux Live CD (any version).

Re:Windows (1)

Lawrence_Bird (67278) | about 8 months ago | (#46387079)

while i do have a couple old ones floating around some where, I have not used a linux cd for anything to do with windows since XP.

My windows software list. (1)

Rainwulf (865585) | about 8 months ago | (#46381055)

My current OS is server 2008 R2 Standard Edition.
Winrar.
AcdSEE32 bit 2.42 (Yes. OLD AS THE HILLS)
Bullzip PDF Printer.
WinSCP (ftp program)
Foobar2000
Office 2010 (outlook required for work)
A whole whack of registry and hacked system files.

Re:My windows software list. (1)

Rainwulf (865585) | about 8 months ago | (#46381061)

Oh and Chrome, and Media Player Classic HC.

Windows (1)

Killerfishmonkey (1943236) | about 8 months ago | (#46381063)

First off... Windows 7 is the only way to go. It is stable, and you get to access all those sweet videogames. But before all that, the standard software. Your specific hardware drivers. The latest ones. set the schedule now. Defrag should run once a week, I run mine in the night on Wednesday. if you shut the PC down after every use though. get AUSLogics Defrag. It will run if the computer is idle for 15 mins. Google Chrome - https://www.google.com/intl/en... [google.com] Google Picasa - https://www.google.com/picasa/ [google.com] Ccleaner - http://download.cnet.com/CClea... [cnet.com] Try and find a version of Office that does not require a monthly bill. Office 365 is a very horrible idea and I have no idea why someone would pay for it monthly. then again there is open office which is free.

On Windows.... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381065)

Skipping past the inane flamebait responses about how much Windows sucks and just answering the question since I am required to use Windows for work.

* Wizmouse - Gotten a little quirky lately, but scrolls any window under the mouth without the window needing focus
* Ninite Updater - Best way I've found to "forget" about having to update many individual apps
* MWSnap - Great, simple and free screenshot tool. Hasn't been updated in ages but still works great
* Mouse Speed Switcher - Automatically changes numerous mouse settings whenever I switch devices
* SecondCopy - Numerous options for automatic/manual backup
* EditPad Lite (JG software's version of notepad on steroids)
* FastStone Image Viewer - Replaces the abortion of an image viewer that MS includes in the OS.
* Handbrake - duh
* AnyDVD - because sometimes I still do get physical DVDs
* Chrome - Often better than IE (though not always)
* Chrome extension: Empty New Tab Page - Fixes horrible security & privacy issue with Chrome startup showing recent tabs
* FireFox - Annoying, bloated and slow, but useful with extensions such as Adblock Plus, BetterPrivacy, DownloadHelper, NoScript, RequestPolicy
* Last Pass - password manager
* Xmarks - bookmarks synchronizer
* MS Office - Open/Libre just doesn't cut it for interacting with the real corporate world
* Thunderbird with Lightning extension for Google calendar - email & personal calendar

That's pretty much it for "must have". Things like Skype didn't make it onto the list because although I use them frequently for work, I'd still be productive without them.

Re:On Windows.... (1)

iacek (2885719) | about 8 months ago | (#46387267)

First thing on my must-have list is enso launcher. I'm surprised that no one mentioned it

My favorite apps (1)

ALeader71 (687693) | about 8 months ago | (#46381069)

Multi-platform:
Firefox, Chrome

OS/X:
Terminal, Outlook, Word and Excel, Dropbox, Evernote, Geektool, todo.txt, Rido

Android
Feedly, Maps, Beat the Traffic, Evernote, bar code scanner, my grocery store's app, Rido, Sonos

Windows 7:
Putty, WinSCP, Notepad++, Rdio, Sonos Linux: vim, terminal, ssh, keystore, apt-get, yum, the list goes on.

My list (1)

markdavis (642305) | about 8 months ago | (#46381073)

Firefox
LibreOffice
GIMP
Audacity
Pidgin
VirtualBox
Clawsmail
VLC/Mplayer
Audacious
Openssh

Lots of other things, but those seem to be a primary "core" for me (Linux, of course).

sudo apt-get install (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381077)

sudo apt-get install vim ksnapshot vlc chromium-browser eog htop openssh-server apache2 mysql-server php5 build-essential virtualbox clementine

The only things I might not install are the KDE based ones (ksnapshot, clementine?) because they bring along 200+ MB dependencies with them.

While the order varies... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381083)

But generally...

Winders:
Firefox (Used to be chrome - but I'm in a de-Google-ing phase)
7zip
UltraVNC
1Password
Notepad++
Sublime Text
VLC
Balsamiq Mockups
Mumble Client
X-Mind
Unity
Eclipse
Steam
Dropbox
HexChat
Paint Shop Pro 7.02
Paragon HFS+ for Windows
VMWare Workstation (Stability & enterprise compatibility wins)
FRAPS
SecureCRT
hg/TortoiseHG
JDK

Mac:
As windows minus Notepad++
sub VMWare Fusion Pro (Stability & enterprise compatibility wins)
sub Pixelmater for PSP
sub Snak for HexChat
Paragon NTFS for Mac
Remote Desktop Client for Mac
MenuMeters
Hazel

Linux:
(Debian if mine, RHEL/OEL if for the current day job)
- Just what's needed for the boxes purpose

What no virus scanner?
Correct. Learn to firewall and distrust everything on the internet, and you will have a lot less issues with viruses. On Windows I still occasionally get around to installing one of the free ones + MSE even though its balls.

I'm sure I'm forgetting something, but whatever they might be they get installed as I notice they're missing

Just a web browser. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381089)

Any modern one will do.

None (1)

stooo (2202012) | about 8 months ago | (#46381091)

Basically, i could live without any software at all.
But if you insist, perhaps i would respond : "Linux"

Re:None (1)

Tseax (193552) | about 8 months ago | (#46381355)

Ditto (line 1)
Windows (line 2)
Probably wouldn't hurt to re-visit books. Go offline. Get off the grid (dream on).

Most things might already be there (1)

houghi (78078) | about 8 months ago | (#46381103)

Depending on the distro, some things I really need might already be there. So installing or checking if it is installed are the same to me. I often have no idea if it is default or my selection.

The first I will always install or at least check is mc [wikipedia.org]
Espercially for a new install, I think it is easier then using cd, ls and what not as I will be going around a lot and copy files from other places.
vim will be already installed and so will be others, like bash, apt or yast or other software to install.

On the GUI I will always go for XFCE and add the plugins.
I use the NVidea drivers on my 4 screens that run not in xinerama.

Then mplayer and a gui for it. Last in the top of things I will check or install is yad [sourceforge.net] as I have several scripts that depend on it.

I will then copy my scripts and run them one by one to see what is missing.

Can anybody live without MC? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381111)

That is Midnight Commander for those not into abbreviations.

Some command line stuff (3, Interesting)

Blaskowicz (634489) | about 8 months ago | (#46381113)

There is some nice stuff to have, sometimes trivial and sometimes quite useful.

sshfs
openssh-server
GNU screen (some people will like tmux)
irssi (preferably it runs on an always-on box with screen and ssh server)

dtrx : perfect to extract archives from the command line. It solves the problem of tar -xzvf random_shit.tar.gz : the archive's content may or may not be in a directory, such as random_shit/. So if you extract the archive right away, you run the risk of polluting your current directory with loads of crap (like 10 directories + 105 files at the root of the archive). If you do mkdir random_shit, cd random_shit and tar -xzvf ../random_shit.tar.gz, you run the risk of having wasted your time : if files were at the archive's root, all is fine. If they were in a random_shit directory, now your data has been extracted to a random_shit/random_shit directory and you have to do mv random_shit/* . then rmdir random_shit.
I used to do the mkdir random_shit method, or to open the archive in a graphical archive manager before deciding what to do. But dtrx automates this! and works equally for .zip, .tar.gz, .tar.bz2 and all others.

When I used Windows I liked some command line stuff too : set the DIRCMD environment variable to /O, have the console default to 80x43 and right-click to paste (I think, not sure that worked), and have Windows versions of wget and less.

Re:Some command line stuff (1)

semi-extrinsic (1997002) | about 8 months ago | (#46382897)

Thanks for the dtrx tip! :)

Dolphin (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381115)

That's it...

VirtualBox (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381117)

At which point my "real" desktop, browser, email, and other critical stuff is instantly usable without me needing to spend the next 2 weeks re-fixing all the "1000 papercuts" stuff that i've tweaked over the last x years. It doesn't even matter if I "re"installed a completely different OS on the host.

Mostly (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381123)

Chrome, 7zip, Visual Studio, Paint.Net, Gimp, Blender, Java SDK, WAMP, VLC.

Pretty sure thats my basic list. Plus some C++ libraries.

Always Total Commander first! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381127)

On Windows: Total Commander, putty, Firefox, Thunderbird, winamp, gimp, mplayerc

Slashcode (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381135)

Fuck them beta.

Directory/File Name Changer (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381137)

Unbelievably useful.
Rename by ~, recursive, change pre and suffix. etc. etc.
The first time you don't have it and want to manually rename more than a few non-accurate filenames.
Wether it's a script or an app MUST HAVE. :-)

MediaWiki (1)

epine (68316) | about 8 months ago | (#46381197)

MediaWiki. Before I created my note-taking wiki, my ideas went off in all directions.

I'm also pretty heavy into R/C/C++/zsh/ZFS/git right now.

basic createware (1)

tverbeek (457094) | about 8 months ago | (#46381225)

I use OS X, Windows, Linux, iOS, and Android, so exceptions/substitutions are made when an app isn't available for a given platform.

DropBox - Because that's where all the stuff I'm working on at any given time is.

Firefox - Because I'm a same-browser-on-everything kinda guy, and I'm too stuck in my ways for that to be Chrome.

LibreOffice - Because I'm a same-wp-on-everything kinda guy, but not so stuck in my ways that it has be OpenOffice.

Manga Studio - Because I create comics as a hobby, and even on the machines that don't have stylus input, I like to be able to open the projects I'm working on, and work on lettering or coloring. I don't use the GIMP because I think it's worth buying myself nice software sometimes, and I don't use Adobe Creative Shite anymore because that doesn't have to mean wasting money.

CyberDuck - Because a simple drag-and-drop ftp client is handy for getting my stuff where it's going.

Beta software (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381239)

Slashdot Beta, obviously!

Screen and Emacs (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381243)

I often need to configure new back-ends for my various mobile app projects, typically on Linode or EC2 instances. One of the first programs that I install is screen, then I'll copy over my .screenrc file. And then I'll install Emacs. While I'll use vi for quick in-and-out edits, I depend on Emacs for most of my back-end script writing (using Python mostly, these days).

I'd be so much less productive without screen's session persistence. And Emacs quick macro capability saves me a huge amount of labor.

My OS Agnostic First Install List (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381259)

These 4 get installed on every desktop PC I use (Currently 5):

Firefox
GnuCash
LibreOffice
Steam Client

goodbyemicrosoft.com (0)

lkcl (517947) | about 8 months ago | (#46381265)

yeah if it's a windows computer, the only piece of software i need is the one which was formerly available under the domain name goodbyemicrosoft.com. now it's available directly from the debian.org web site.

grep (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381273)

but more seriously, as android/ios have pushed in so hard, my desktop favs seem way less relevant. someone mentioned titanium backup, which i would agree but i think clockwork recovery or twrp are probably more important on arm devices i use. 7zip of course is good but the list used to be quite rigid for a windows install, which is why i built custom windows install discs for years. winnt.sif or whatever (its been years) but now i just blow it all out once in a while. my 4 linux machines all run different distros and not much additional is common between them beyond basic command line tools

At wrok? or Home? (1)

140Mandak262Jamuna (970587) | about 8 months ago | (#46381283)

At work: chrome, cygwin, visual slickedit, git extensions. (msdev, msoffice and firefox preinstalled by IT)

At home: firefox, chrome, quicken, picassa

Re: At wrok? or Home? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381367)

I live in Cygwin

Research tools (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381295)

LOIC, Hydra and CAIN.
I must use Tor and Vidalia (to keep an eye on the connection).
Bash comes by default on XUBUNTU and I like that shell so that's what I use.
Gedit is the editor I like to write scripts.
Last thing I do is open a Libre Office document so I can keep that open in Desktop #2 and switch the screen to that when I detect "curious" eyes looking at my screen whenever I work from Starbucks or McCaffe.

A few things no one else has mentioned yet. (1)

Gondola (189182) | about 8 months ago | (#46381317)

* Launchy: I switch from my sitting desk to a standing desk throughout the day. Instead of using a glitchy duplicate Start button, I use Launchy to run things. Now I don't use the Start button very often anymore, even when it's on the screen.

* Dual Monitor, for duplicate task bars. It's glitchy, though. Crashes a couple times a day, but at least it's not a destructive crash. I should write an AutoHotKey script to restart it when it crashes...

* AutoHotKey: There are a few things I use this for, and it really comes in handy to do those little things that make life easier, like cheating in Cookie Clicker. Actually, its primary use for me is to move all my windows from my 2-screen sitting desk layout to my 1-screen standing desk layout with a simple key combo. But, it comes in handy when I need to quickly automate any repetitive task.

* KeyNote NF: It's a hierarchical note-taking app like Evernote used to be. It's lightweight and intuitive to use, although I'm still looking for something that works with mobile and web that isn't heavy like Evernote is now.

* LICEcap for capturing GIFs easily, cleanly, with a small-ish file size. Better than GifCam, and GifCam is pretty great.

Re:A few things no one else has mentioned yet. (1)

Blaskowicz (634489) | about 8 months ago | (#46386071)

Autohotkey is great, and I especially liked the old-style help that covers everything, has examples and is local (not on the web).
I used it to control sound volume with hotkeys, even gamma correction (rivatuner allowed to great shortcuts to set gamma at 1.0, 1.1, 1.2 etc. and then I ran that with Autohotkey) and miscellaneous stuff like win+s opened a command prompt in like 0.1 second.

I sort of miss it on linux, where you seemingly have to do window manager specific stuff manually, sometimes with a limited GUI if you happen to have one and it's just harder to do stuff (I could write in detail about what sucks in my current environment but I'll let it at that).

Ninite (1)

Minwee (522556) | about 8 months ago | (#46381325)

If you are using Windows then start with ninite. It not only handles installation of a bunch of useful things, it also does the job of the package manager that Windows still doesn't have.

ssh (1)

srussell (39342) | about 8 months ago | (#46381327)

I think I literally couldn't manage without ssh. I always install tmux and vim on any machine I use, if they aren't already there. One of the varieties of KeePass is also mandatory for me.

--- SER

List (1)

the eric conspiracy (20178) | about 8 months ago | (#46381331)

This is what I use every day:

TurboTax
LightRoom
Chrome
Thunderbird
KeePass
Google Calendar

Re:List (1)

mysidia (191772) | about 8 months ago | (#46385295)

TurboTax

Every day? You must be a tax preparation professional.... :)

On Ubuntu... (1)

JoeCommodore (567479) | about 8 months ago | (#46381335)

(Beyond rthe base install which includes GIMP, Firefox and LibreOffice)
- A desktop environment that actuially is usable
- Inkscape
- Scribus
- Apache, PHP, MySQL, Aptana, PHPMyAdmin
- Picasa
- K3b
- Xine and whatever I need to play DVDs
- Ghex
- Adobe Reader
- Printer Drivers
- Synaptic Package Manager
- Gparted

KeePass (2)

gitano_dbs (1490853) | about 8 months ago | (#46381337)

KeePass http://keepass.info/ [keepass.info] is the first thing i put on a new device.

Re:KeePass (1)

Soulskill (1459) | about 8 months ago | (#46381363)

KeePass is probably at the top of my list, too. There isn't much software I use on a daily basis that I'd really be annoyed at swapping out for an alternative, but this one would make things difficult.

Re:KeePass (1)

Buchenskjoll (762354) | about 8 months ago | (#46386813)

KeepAss?

on Mac OS (1)

PuddleBoy (544111) | about 8 months ago | (#46381341)

(I have not had to install a fresh OS of 10.x in years - knock on wood)

Firefox - lots of control thru add-ons
GraphicConverter - I shoot lots of digital pix and this piece of shareware does most of what I need to manipulate the bulk of them
BBEdit - just the best test editor
JAlbum - easy way to make web albums of hundreds of pix at a time
Transmit - most refined ftp client I've ever run into
LIttle Snitch - nice to know what's coming and going on your box

Re:on Mac OS (1)

bhiestand (157373) | about 8 months ago | (#46384549)

I felt the same about BBedit, until I got good with textmate... I'd never go back, at this point.

Making Mac usable:
Path Finder [cocoatech.com] - Finder replacement
TotalSpaces 2 [binaryage.com] - improves workspaces.. instant switching, very customizable.
Unclutter [unclutterapp.com] - better than leaving files on desktop, stores notes very well
Bartender [macbartender.com] - tidies the menu bar
Quicksilver [qsapp.com] - launcher
Xee [c3.cx] - image viewer

Productivity:
Parallels
MS Office
TextMate
OmniFocus

For admins, I'd also add:
Apple Remote Desktop
VPN Tracker (if you need a bunch of IPSec vpns)
Tunnelblick or Viscosity (OpenVPN)
lots of aliases, setting up .ssh, etc.

The rundown (3, Informative)

wjcofkc (964165) | about 8 months ago | (#46381365)

Gedit
Scratch
Synapse
Xpad
Geany
Qt 4 Designer
Python
Gimp
Inkscape
Shotwell
Filezilla
Chrome
Thunderbird
Brasero
Clementine
VLC
LibreOffice
gnome-system-monitor

I'm running Bohdi Linux (E17), a few favorite built apps and functionality:

Terminology
Enlightenment File Manager
eDeb
Configure secondary monitor workspaces as tiling (awesome - could not live without - and one of the primary reasons I run Enlightenment) primary tiling workspace dedicated to Chrome, Terminology, and Gedit
Of course it's Enlightenment so I spend the next two-days configuring all of the fine details.

My list for Macs (2)

david.emery (127135) | about 8 months ago | (#46381393)

If I'm configuring a laptop that I'll use for both work and vacation:

Default Folder (an add-on/replacement for the Open File dialog)
Graphic Converter (photo manipulation application)
Aquamacs (very well done MacOS version of EMACS)
HDRtist Pro (HDR processing application)
OmniGraffle (Mac equivalent to Visio, drawing package)
Aperture (Photo organizing)
1Password (Password safe)
DiskWarrior (File system maintenance)
Syncovery (front end to rsync)

This doesn't include the stuff I find essential that's built into Mac OS X (and its Unix foundations, such as ssh and bash.)

And for what it's worth, I've been using Graphic Converter and Default Folder for at least 20 years, back to Mac OS 7 days. It says something about the quality/utility of these two applications that they've "stood the test of time."

Re:My list for Macs (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46388363)

I also install :
perian - fairly universal codec
a keyremapper - (laptop only) I think it is keyremap4macbook, so I can have a forward delete and an option key on both sides
miniVmac - so I can play dark castle

FAULTY MEMORY (2)

PopeRatzo (965947) | about 8 months ago | (#46381397)

KeePass 2 is the one software I cannot live without.

I can't remember exactly why.

The ones I would love to ditch but can't (1)

Laconique (3426803) | about 8 months ago | (#46381429)

In order of importance for my work 1. Adobe Acrobat Pro (repeat the above line eight more times) 10. MS Word I can almost do all MS Word stuff with freeware alternatives, but almost. Acrobat alternatives? For pdf power users there is no alternative. None. I don't do graphics much but I can see that GIMP is no photoshop. It *seems* to me that Acrobat vs alternatives' gap is even bigger. But may just be because I don't do graphic works. MS Word

Far Manager (Windows) (1)

Anthony Ruffino (2824549) | about 8 months ago | (#46381433)

This tool is a nice command prompt replacement. It has two panes for directory listings. It has auto-complete, programmable macros, file search and a lot more features that I don't use but may still be useful. It also has a built in text editor/ file viewer that is nice for opening very large log files where some other windows programme might complain.

I have simple needs. (1)

technomom (444378) | about 8 months ago | (#46381435)

Chrome, Notepad++ and Eclipse if I'm doing any development work.

For WINDOWS users! (1)

the_cosmocat (1009803) | about 8 months ago | (#46381437)

Another reply to be sure that no WINDOWS user missed it!!!!

The first thing that a windows user should install to gain a LOT of time installing and updating software:
http://chocolatey.org/ [chocolatey.org]
http://chocolatey.org/ [chocolatey.org]
http://chocolatey.org/ [chocolatey.org]
http://chocolatey.org/ [chocolatey.org]
http://chocolatey.org/ [chocolatey.org]
http://chocolatey.org/ [chocolatey.org]

And the list of all the available software
http://chocolatey.org/packages [chocolatey.org]

After, you could install your other software using chocolatey ;) (even using a bat script!)

Re:For WINDOWS users! (1)

gbrayut (715117) | about 8 months ago | (#46382371)

>Another reply to be sure that no WINDOWS user missed it!!!!
>The first thing that a windows user should install to gain a LOT of time installing and updating software:
>http://chocolatey.org/

Yep... here is my Chocolaty setup script:

cinst binroot #Sets installs to c:\chocolatey\bin and c:\chocolatey\lib
cinst notepadplusplus.install
cinst 7zip.install
cinst GoogleChrome-AllUsers
cinst GoogleChrome.Canary
cinst putty
cinst winscp
cinst sysinternals
cinst fiddler4
cinst paint.net
cinst dropbox
cinst SkyDrive
cinst resharper
cinst tortoisesvn
cinst linqpad4
cinst wireshark
cinst evernote
cinst nmap
cinst Cygwin
cinst PowerGUI
cinst trillian
cinst rdcman
cinst imgburn
cinst diffmerge
cinst aspnetmvc
cinst treesizefree
cinst tomboy
cinst cpu-z
cinst curl
cinst baretail
cinst reflector
cinst grepwin
cinst tfpt #TFS 2010 power tools
cinst stylecop
cinst githubforwindows
cinst MicrosoftSecurityEssentials
cinst ultravnc
cinst Gallio
cinst CutePDF
cinst daemontoolslite
cinst smplayer2
cinst skifree
cinst webpicmd

#the last one gives access to anything in web platform installer, like:
webpicmd /install /Products:WDeployNoSMO /AcceptEULA #For Web Deploy

You first (0)

safetyinnumbers (1770570) | about 8 months ago | (#46381463)

An anonymous reader writes "Whenever I install a fresh operating system on my computer, I immediately grab a handful of programs that I simply must have.

And yet won't tell us what they are?

SystemD (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381471)

systemd. Key to everything.

SYSTEMD!

On Debian (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381487)

I have a bash script that installs a list of essential software on any new Debian installation. Here's the list:
        - Google Chrome
        - Firefox
        - Zotero (http://www.zotero.org/)
        - Matlab
        - Blender
        - CMake
        - GIMP
        - Audacity
        - ImageMagick
        - Skype
        - MeshLab
        - Open office suite
        - CUDA
        - TeXLive 2012 (http://www.tug.org/texlive/acquire.html)
        - Emacs 24+
        - build-essentials
        - astyle (http://astyle.sourceforge.net/)
        - Doxygen
        - gedit
        - sloccount (http://www.dwheeler.com/sloccount/)
        - Subversion
        - git
        - Valgrind
        - gdb
        - VirtualBox
        - Python
        - VLC Media player
        - ffmpeg
        - mencoder
        - Non-free codecs for multimedia (MP3, MPG4, H.264, and other modern video codecs)
        - Eclipse
        - Dropbox

As a composer and writer ... (2)

bfootdav (18971) | about 8 months ago | (#46381491)

emacs (apt-get ...)
Lilypond (latest development version from the site)
TeXLive (never use your distro's version of TeX/LaTeX -- always just install TeXLive)
Timidity (playback of the MIDI files that Lilypond creates and convert them to FLAC)
mplayer

Re:As a composer and writer ... (1)

colinrichardday (768814) | about 8 months ago | (#46383149)

TeXLive (never use your distro's version of TeX/LaTeX -- always just install TeXLive)

Why not use your distro's version?

Re:As a composer and writer ... (1)

bfootdav (18971) | about 7 months ago | (#46402869)

Sorry I'm so late to reply. Most distros are horribly out of date with the version they package thus missing out on bug fixes and new packages. But even if it is up-to-date it's unnecessary. TeXLive has its own method for upgrading that's similar to apt-get. Basically every day I run: tlmgr update --all which lists and updates everything that needs an update as well as installing any new packages. Every year there's a new version of TeXLive so you just install it into a new directory, change a link to point to it instead of the old one and you're ready to go.

The Software off Button (1)

SuilAmhain (2819677) | about 8 months ago | (#46381511)

Followed closely by the silence that it brings.

Off the top of my head (3, Interesting)

MarcoAtWork (28889) | about 8 months ago | (#46381543)

Windows:
- microsoft security essentials
- windows firewall control (commercial)
- cygwin
- notepad++
- sysutils (procmon etc.)
- ultramon (commercial)
- launchy
- sharpkeys
- autohotkey
- visual c++ express
- 7-zip

Mac:
- little snitch (commercial)
- macports
- better touch tool
- keyremap4macbook
- iterm2
- alfred
- geektool
- menumeters
- caffeine
- xcode

Linux:
- whatever distro-specific set of packages gets me all the dev stuff
- (if needed) whatever distro-specific repository gets me extra packages (say, epel)
- kde
- xfce
- various personal customizations done over the years (xmodmap, ...)

Everywhere:
- firefox (noscript, requestpolicy, adblock, flashblock)
- emacs
- python / virtualenvwrapper / git ...
- bash customizations (powerline, bash completions, personal scripts)
- libreoffice and latex
- truecrypt
- virtualbox
- dropbox
- gimp

these are the baseline, beyond that it depends from what I am using the actual computer for

Re:Off the top of my head (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46385223)

Halfway down the page I finally see Truecrypt mentioned. That's almost step 1 for me, since most of my apps are the 'portable' versions which I keep in archived Truecrypt containers. After installing a fresh copy of Windows, I just mount the container as Z:\ and make some shortcuts to all my apps.

requirements to make my doings easier. (2)

Trax3001BBS (2368736) | about 8 months ago | (#46381571)

My list as close to the order they are installed. I would indeed suffer without them

Power Pro - tell me you know what that is and you'll be the first, I've used it since Win95

HOSTS file I drag around is set in place, not a program but a requirement of mine

COMODO firewall version 5.3.1767, as the newer versions almost require you to call for support.

Opera 12. - Browser - for as long as I can

UltraEdit - text editor

ACDSee - Graphic viewer

Agent version 1.93 Emailer/Usenet

Stunnel to allow an older Agent 1.93 to connect to a secure SSL connection

WhereIsIt - CD/DVD/BlueRay Data base creator and file finder

TreeSize Pro - better than a guess how large a directory or disk is

Agent Ransack - search program.

Bulk Rename Utility - an amazingly full featured program to rename files, Located in the directory below. My Cameras have stopped storing the date on the picture itself, this program adds the date taken to the file name for me.

I have one directory D:\MISGPRGS that I store stand alone's, programs that don't need to be installed or once installed fine on their own, that are too many to mention I don't require a lot of them or have even forgotten some that still there (210 directories now) but it's available to drag shortcuts to the desktop of my newest OS, As well as a few directories within, that are added to my path, Irfanview is there, Process Explorer, as is my Debugger (windbg.exe) and it's requirements.

  BTW PowerPro is a jack of all trades type program. A bar of 8 boxes (at the moment), that takes care of the repetitive actions of using Windows. The same as AutoHotKey, and AutoIt. I believe all share the same history in the beginning, one splitting from the other. PowerPro started as Stiletto; a three button mouse program.

As a side note: I sent $25 to the author of PowerPro just before he released it as freeware, that was the third and finial time; for me to send money for software, they quit (no Zmodem), or go freeware.

I'm all setup to lose a system and be up in a few hours, until Win7 always had 3 or more OS's to fall back on. But still good to be up and running in a short time. Linux Mint is installed now for a dual system but (ducks) not a requirement for me.

Do notice no malware prevention other than the HOSTS file, and firewall, no AVG, NOD32 - Just a bit of common sense has kept me as in control as is possible any more.

One thing I miss very much is a very small program who's name I've forgotten (XP broke it) but it grabbed the strings from any program - I know Linux has this. but Windows is lacking in this department, I use Ultra Edit but it's not as easy nor as informative - no String command comes close.

Re: requirements to make my doings easier. (1)

srg33 (1095679) | about 8 months ago | (#46382001)

"Power Pro - tell me you know what that is and you'll be the first, I've used it since Win95"
Windows PowerPro gives you the power to control your system and how you access programs because it allows you to choose the combination of how to activate and what to activate.

Re: requirements to make my doings easier. (1)

Trax3001BBS (2368736) | about 8 months ago | (#46386193)

"Power Pro - tell me you know what that is and you'll be the first, I've used it since Win95"
Windows PowerPro gives you the power to control your system and how you access programs because it allows you to choose the combination of how to activate and what to activate.

You'd think it was a fishing line, it's now delegated to the second page of resultshttp://powerpro.cresadu.com/

Thinking of subject after posting to it, I have programs that I use all the time without them being "to die for", just damn handy to have around like.

SndRec32 - open it up and play small sound bytes as fast as you can drop them on top of it, or use VLC (excellent in it's own right) to take it's sweet time to play a 2 second clip. SndRec32 isn't part of Win7, I had to bring it over from XP.

Just about anything by sysinternals http://technet.microsoft.com/e... [microsoft.com] or nirsoft http://www.nirsoft.net/ [nirsoft.net]

HTTRACK - website copier

PEEK is the program I couldn't remember that was handy as heck.
PEEK Version 1.1 for Windows95 and WindowsNT 4.0
Contextmenu Extension providing simple text extraction for any file.
XP broke it; but the read.me just might be enough to walk me through editing it to work with any Win OS (one can hope).

I found a program called "Universal Viewer" that claimed the same ability as PEEK, I tried it out on a batch of jpg's that are corrupt to see what I could find, It printed out: JPEG error #53 - I miss PEEK! :}

Power pro is... (1)

EmeraldBot (3513925) | about 8 months ago | (#46388481)

Power pro is a utility that "changes the way you work with Windows". Got you ;). Although to be fair, it took a few google searchs to find this thing. Looks like it hasn't had an update in 20 years.

Calibre! (1)

nospam007 (722110) | about 8 months ago | (#46381605)

Don't know about reliable but for people with e-readers it's a must.

Beta (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381607)

I cannot live without the beta site. Long live beta!

Photoshop (1)

p51d007 (656414) | about 8 months ago | (#46381621)

Been using it since version 5.0 in the Win9x days. Use it daily

I have a Mac so that is easy (1)

angel'o'sphere (80593) | about 8 months ago | (#46381627)

I boot my old Mac in "target disk mode"(I believe it is called like that), that degrades the Mac into a simple fire wire disk.
During installation of my new Mac it will ask if and what to copy over from that fire wire mac disk pro. (That means it copies my User and all my Data and all the Apps that are not newer on the install DVD)

However as you asked about Applications: Open Office or Neo Office, Omni Outliner, Omni Gaffel, Parallels or vmware virtual machine (sometimes Virtual Box), "The Brain" a brain storming / knowledge management tool (runs on Linux and Windows, too)
Eve Online ofc.
The latest Java edition for that OS, Eclipse and IntelliJ, a few Apache tools, like Tomcat and Ivy, Maven, Ant, a Subversion and/or Git Server. Groovy and Scala, and since last year I'm playing with Squeak SmallTalk.
Standard unix tools, like vim and Apache httpd are preinstalled.
However if Mac OS X is continuing to mutate into an oversized iOS, my next Computer will run something else ... no new 17" Mac Book Pro in sight anyway :-/

Re:I have a Mac so that is easy (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46388409)

Target disk mode is one of the best computer features of all time.

I tend to not do complete migrations for 2 reasons:

1) The migration is so complete that it brings all the cruft with it. I like clean and new installs not a new place where I get the expert moving company to move all the hoarder crap in. I have found that the occasional wipe and reload is good for OSX too.

2) I'm a hackintosh guy now so though I have firewire I do not have TDM.

After the developer essentials are installed.... (1)

mark-t (151149) | about 8 months ago | (#46381633)

cups-pdf is usually one of the first ones I put on./

Mixture of Paid, Free, and Open (2)

BrendaEM (871664) | about 8 months ago | (#46381649)

For all, most platforms: Libreoffice, Speedcrunch (Calculator), 7Zip, Firefox with Scrapbook, and Thunderbird

Windows Utility: FreeFileSync, Nvidia Inspector, PSpad, and Speedfan.
Windows Multimedia: SMplayer, Virtualdub, Avidemux, CDex, Audacity, Winff (Ffmepeg front end),
Windows Games: Thief 2, Guildwars 2,
Graphics and Design: Rhino3D, Photoshop, Inkscape (Going downhill. Pixels is the only unit that makes not sense for vector, WTF), Irfanview (But and looking elsewhere)

Geekie: Arduino, Processing,
Very Geekie Gucs (Circuit Simulator)
Very Very Geekie, Salome (Science Pre/post-processing), Paraview/Volvire (Visualization), Code Aster (FEM)

Linux: Most covered elsewhere.

Android: Colornote (Postits), Papyrus (Vectror Notes), Osman (Maps), Quickpic, Androoffice, Realcalc, FBreader.
Android Music: DaTuner, Simple Metronome, GuitarTabviewer
Need for Android, but not made: Librioffice, Taskcoach

Could do, but wouldn't want to live in a world... (1)

buttfuckinpimpnugget (662332) | about 8 months ago | (#46381653)

Without BSD UNIX.

according to the definition of software (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381655)

Can I say ... Windows? ... Please

My Apps List (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381657)

Windows:
VLC
Plex
Notepad++
TreesizeFree
Speedfan
Calibre
Oracle VirtualBox with CentOS and Debian VM
Replay media catcher
VMware vSphere
Keepass2
Newsbin
Handbrake
FreeMake
TeamViewer
Steam
utorrent (Looking for alternative)
Firefox/Chrome
putty
AutoHotKey
InfraView
XAMPP
Microsoft visual studio
Aptana studio
Git
CCLeaner
Malwarebytes
MSE
Flux
Multiplicity
AutoIT

How about favorite web sites?

Gnumeric (1)

yayoubetcha (893774) | about 8 months ago | (#46381659)

I am not a business "power" spreadsheet guy. For a fast spreadsheet program Gnumeric is it for me.

Free software that I use and enjoy (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381687)

*Internet
Mozilla Firefox (MPL)
Mozilla Thunderbird (MPL)
Pidgin IM (GPL v2)
PuTTY (MIT)

*Productivity
LibreOffice (LGPL v3)
Sumatra PDF (GPL v3)
Notepad++ (GPL v2)

*File Utilities
7-Zip (LGPL v2.1)
WinDirStat (GPL v2)
Cyberduck (GPL v2)

*Multimedia
VLC media player (GPL v2)
foobar2000 (Not open, freeware)
Clementine Music Player (GPL v3)
MP3 Diags (GPL v2)
EasyTag (GPL v2)
or Mp3tag (Not open, freeware)

*Encryption
TrueCrypt (Semi-free, TrueCrypt License)
KeePassX (GPL v2)

*Misc.
WinMerge (GPL v2)
Redshift (GPL v3)
or f.lux (Not open, freeware)

my list (1)

Xicor (2738029) | about 8 months ago | (#46381695)

thunderbird, skype, chrome, win rar, truecrypt and notepad ++

GNU software with Linux kernel (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381707)

Having a full system I can get for free (as in free beer), with GPL protected source code that I am free (as in freedom) to learn from is a wonderful gift.

Attack vector survey? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381739)

Why is this from an anonymous submitter? This Ask Slashdot seems like it's for gathering attack vectors.... Just like not giving personal information to FaceBook, why would you tell slashdot anything about yourself that could be used against you?

must haves (for linux users) (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381771)

LibreOffice - latest version, not the old one from your distro
http://www.libreoffice.org/ [libreoffice.org] (install with dpkg -i *.deb)

Dia https://wiki.gnome.org/Apps/Dia [gnome.org] (poor mans visio)
Lyx http://www.lyx.org/ [lyx.org] (easy latex editor) with modern-cv to keep my CV up to date
Metasploit, Nessus, ettercap, wireshark, nmap, etc. just for fun

Avidemux, ffmpeg and VLC media player for everything related to video and audio
Gimp and Blender (latest version) for photo editing and 3D-stuff

Mathmatician/Professor perspective (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381847)

During my 15 year long career, I've gotten a lot of mileage out of:

Latex
Ghostscript
Octave/GNUplot
Emacs
Xfig
Firefox

In fact, there are only two proprietary programs I rely on heavily: The first is MS Office (can't budge on that, docx is unfortunately the language of communication at my workplace)....LibreOffice works fine in a pinch, but anyone who deals with templated documents in the latest MS format can vouch that its not 1:1. The other is Adobe Acrobat Reader. I very rarely use it, but if I'm making a PDF for widespread dissemenation to my students or colleagues, I like to run it through since I've had issues in the past with docs looking good in Acrobat but no in OSS PDF readers (or vice versa).

Software I need. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381933)

A browser, a spreadsheet, a pdf reader, a epub reader, a mp3 player, a video player.

My list of essentials: (windows) (2)

gman003 (1693318) | about 8 months ago | (#46381947)

For all purposes:
Firefox, Chrome and Opera - I use separate browsers to keep home/work/porn separated. Install AdBlock on both Firefox and Chrome.
MPC-HC - I'm fine with WMP for music, but for video I need MediaPlayer Classic
LibreOffice - Because you can't do everything with plain text files
Notepad++ - Because there's a lot you *can* do with plain text files
7zip - Handles every compressed file format I've ever seen, except for one really old Mac-specific one I had to use once
Steam - Because at this point I have too many games to abandon Steam, and it really is good at managing such a big library

For work only:
Thunderbird - I used to be able to use GMail's web app, but now that I have two work email addresses I need a full-fledged email client
Paint.NET, GIMP, and Inkscape - for image editing. Paint.NET is useful for making quick edits, like rotating an image. I'm usually done before GIMP would have started up
PuTTY - Best way to connect to my fleet of Linux servers
Komodo - Best IDE for when files are stored on a remote server, as is common with web apps
MySQL Workbench + SQL Server Management Studio - Best way to test database stuff

If using Windows 8, also add Classic Shell Start Menu. It makes it *better* than the W7 start menu once you tweak it right.
And for a first install, Ninite will let you automatically install about 90% of these. Very useful program.

my list (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46381975)

lastpass
firefox
office
itunes
notepad++
putty
filezilla
pandora
winauth
photoshop
skype
avg free antivirus

SW (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46382025)

SMS, iMessage, a web browser, email, calendar, address book, Notes, Picasa and Eve-Online. Done.

Software we CAN live without... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46382031)

Slashdot Beta

My list for Linux (2)

Prof.Phreak (584152) | about 8 months ago | (#46382035)

My list (that's the command I run on all boxes I have). I think it has just about everything an average poweruser/developer would want.

apt-get install vim-gnome ssl-cert apache2 php5 postgresql php5-pgsql default-jdk libclass-dbi-perl libdbd-pg-perl libapache2-mod-perl2 libdate-manip-perl octave nmap irssi uptimed rsync subversion cvs build-essential mysql-server mysql-client php5-mysql virtualbox wine texlive-full openssh-server screen openssh-client ntp jhead imagemagick k3b libk3b6-extracodecs mplayer dict dictd dict-foldoc dict-gcide dict-devil dict-jargon dict-wn htop audacious audacious-plugins cmatrix r-base rKward ecryptfs-utils libimage-exiftool-perl finger ant git eclipse javahelper transcode libav-tools ucspi-tcp-ipv6 chromium-browser maven2 mercurial meld lame gnome-disk-utility ffmpeg sshfs dos2unix opencl-headers handbrake-gtk libapache2-mod-gnutls ia32-libs

Re:My list for Linux (1)

semi-extrinsic (1997002) | about 8 months ago | (#46382969)

Missing (IMHO):
zsh most ack gfortran mlocate keychain latexmk mupdf feh corkscrew

Re:My list for Linux (1)

Prof.Phreak (584152) | about 7 months ago | (#46496021)

added. thank you :-)

Re:My list for Linux (1)

Blaskowicz (634489) | about 8 months ago | (#46386235)

beware, "apt-get install virtualbox" leaves you without the GUI and without the kernel module these days (on ubuntu 13.10 derivate), so you need "apt-get install virtualbox-qt" instead. Right after I learnt not to want to install "virtualbox-ose".. It is weird. Also audacious is nice but you may want to try deadbeef (distributed as a statically linked tarball. that sucks in some way, but it works.)

Last version of Slashdot (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46382061)

Call it classic or non-beta...anything but this horrid "beta"!!!

I think I've forgotten what advertising is.... (1)

Dartz-IRL (1640117) | about 8 months ago | (#46382075)

Quite simply, Adblock Plus. It's made the internet a much less annoying and aggravating place.

First Installs (2)

amxcoder (1466081) | about 8 months ago | (#46382095)

These are the basics I go with for starters:

AntiVirus Software of Choice (Vipre)
FreeCommander (similar to TotalCommander)
FireFox
NotePad++
Office/Email Software (Microsoft for main PC, or Openoffice/LibreOffice for other PC's)
PDF XChange Viewer
Dropbox
VLC
NetSetMan (awesome for quick changing of network settings for connecting to different networks)


then I start installing development software and other neccessary software for work.

Desktop utilities (3, Interesting)

Immerman (2627577) | about 8 months ago | (#46382119)

-Virtuawin - mature, stable virtual desktops for Windows. There's prettier alternatives, but this is the I've tried that has never caused any crashing or other issues.
-WinCompose - Gives Windows users a Compose key for entering unicode characters (plus-or-minus, subscripts, extended math symbols, etc) using the same mnemonics as are standard on *nixes, rather than having to remember their code point or use a character map.
-Everything - File search by name, winnows down a list of every file