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Russians Suspected of Uroburos Spy Malware

samzenpus posted about 5 months ago | from the from-russia-with-love dept.

Security 137

judgecorp writes "While Russia's political activity is center stage, its cyber-espionage apparently continues. Russian intelligence is strongly suspected of being behind the Uroburos malware which is targeting Western governments and commercial organizations. There are Russian-language strings in the code, and it searches its victims' systems for Agent BTZ, malware used in previous attacks believed to have been carried out by Russia."

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Russians lending a helping hand .. (4, Funny)

Selur (2745445) | about 5 months ago | (#46387265)

to the NSA?

Re:Russians lending a helping hand .. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46387345)

to the NSA?

if by helping hand you mean JERKING EACH OTHER OFF AND EATING THE CUM then yes

Re:Russians lending a helping hand .. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46387465)

to the NSA?

if by helping hand you mean JERKING EACH OTHER OFF AND EATING THE CUM then yes

I find your ideas interesting and thoughtful and would like to subscribe to your newsletter.

Re:Russians lending a helping hand .. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46387977)

It's not that cool to reply own messages, as it was in 1996.

Re:Russians lending a helping hand .. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46387453)

Shaddapski

Why are they targeting America? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46387269)

Obama is already turning it into a communist country, so Russia should focus its efforts elsewhere

Re: Why are they targeting America? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46387981)

Hey Obama, what stupid Democrat modded this down? Or was it you yourself reading Slashdot on your BlackBerry?

not Russian (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46387279)

"There are Russian-language strings in the code" - this is actually proof that it is not Russian software

Re:not Russian (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46387353)

No way dude, everyone knows that only real Russians know the Russian language therefore they are the only ones capable of inserting Russian-language strings in the code.

Re:not Russian (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46387909)

Exactly. Definitely there is nothing about false flags in the spook's manuals, nosiree, nothing at all.

Re:not Russian (2)

flyingfsck (986395) | about 5 months ago | (#46388059)

Yup, imagine how time wasting and frustrating it would be to insert Cyrillic lettering in strings in your typical UTF8 programming language. So I don't buy that Rusky argument at all.

That's all the proof I need .. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46387281)

when will Russia stop all these illegal wars?

Re:That's all the proof I need .. (1)

jasper160 (2642717) | about 5 months ago | (#46387343)

Everyone is copying the US now. I wonder where Russia's GITMO will be?

Re:That's all the proof I need .. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46387477)

Siberia, where it has always been.

Re:That's all the proof I need .. (3, Informative)

cold fjord (826450) | about 5 months ago | (#46387563)

Everyone is copying the US now. I wonder where Russia's GITMO will be?

That's kind of cute. I take it that for you history begins in the year 2000 and is limited to the US?

Just as an FYI, Russia (nee Soviet Union) has been involved with espionage via computer for a very long time. One famous case:

The Cuckoo's Egg: Tracking a Spy Through the Maze of Computer Espionage [amazon.com]

Re:That's all the proof I need .. (3, Interesting)

erikkemperman (252014) | about 5 months ago | (#46387727)

Except that GP was not talking about copying the US' computer-based espionage operations, but the US' various illegal wars.

You know, there is a bit of a mess unfolding in Ukraine. There are pro-russian and pro-european factions and the russians are obviously supporting the former -- with a completely illegal show of force.

Less well known is that the pro-european factions supported by the West are largely far-right nationalists. Neonazis, pretty much. See, e.g. this piece [salon.com] by Max Blumenthal.

Re:That's all the proof I need .. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46387919)

Having been to the Ukraine (not recently mind you), there is an alarming amount of right wing extremists. They aren't shy about the Neo Nazi label either, they adopt it proudly. And many of them are funded heavily by the Republican party and members of it.

confederate flags? In Ukraine? (1)

raymorris (2726007) | about 5 months ago | (#46388829)

Sounds fishy. It SOUNDS like an American columnist came up with it out of his own head and forgot that Ukraine doesn't have southern democrats.

Re:confederate flags? In Ukraine? (1)

erikkemperman (252014) | about 5 months ago | (#46389117)

Sounds fishy. It SOUNDS like an American columnist came up with it out of his own head and forgot that Ukraine doesn't have southern democrats.

Svoboda [wikipedia.org] and right sector [wikipedia.org] are hardly being coy about it.

But yes, confederate flags sound crazy, I agree. In fact, if I were writing a fishy column I would have discarded that bit as being too obviously fabricated.

But then I don't expect a lot of sanity or even rationality from people who suffer from the kind of ideas these guys have. The local far right and left fringes of the spectrum share this habit of exchanging symbols with remote, but like minded, groups it seems.

Re:confederate flags? In Ukraine? (2)

Megol (3135005) | about 5 months ago | (#46389499)

Sounds fishy. It SOUNDS like an American columnist came up with it out of his own head and forgot that Ukraine doesn't have southern democrats.

Svoboda [wikipedia.org] and right sector [wikipedia.org] are hardly being coy about it.

But yes, confederate flags sound crazy, I agree. In fact, if I were writing a fishy column I would have discarded that bit as being too obviously fabricated.

But then I don't expect a lot of sanity or even rationality from people who suffer from the kind of ideas these guys have. The local far right and left fringes of the spectrum share this habit of exchanging symbols with remote, but like minded, groups it seems.

Which is bullshit propaganda.

That nazis (or more correctly extremely right wing - though they are more moderate now compared with some years back) are a _small_ part of the group complaining about the corrupt government doesn't have anything to do with this. That a corrupt government goes against the will of the people who peacefully protest until the government forces begins killing people is another.

Trying to paint the protesters as nazis is provably false as the vast majority are liberal and trying to say that they were supported by "west" (whatever that mean*) is also propaganda. But you sure like to swallow that, right?

One have to remember that Russia have had experience in black propaganda and false flag sabotage against themselves (in order to be able to "react" while looking like a victim) since at least the 1800s. Anybody studying history should be able to cite some examples but I'll just name one of the most known: the protocols of sion. Many Russian politicans still believe that it is true BTW.

(* someone recognize that Russia is starting to use cold war terms lately?)

Re:confederate flags? In Ukraine? (1)

erikkemperman (252014) | about 5 months ago | (#46389655)

There is nothing controversial about the fact that John McCain stood shoulder to shoulder with Oleg Tyahnybok, the leader of Svoboda, or the fact that the latter are a far right group occupying 37 seats. Or that their paramilitary outgrowth was prominently at the frontline on that square. I don't doubt the ousted leaders' corruption, by the way, but my enemy's enemy is not necessarily my friend.

Re:confederate flags? In Ukraine? (1)

erikkemperman (252014) | about 5 months ago | (#46389683)

Damn, that came out wrong. Of course McCain standing there is (or should be) highly controversial, but the observation that he did so is not.

Re:confederate flags? In Ukraine? (1)

Megol (3135005) | about 5 months ago | (#46389837)

There is nothing controversial about the fact that John McCain stood shoulder to shoulder with Oleg Tyahnybok, the leader of Svoboda, or the fact that the latter are a far right group occupying 37 seats. Or that their paramilitary outgrowth was prominently at the frontline on that square. I don't doubt the ousted leaders' corruption, by the way, but my enemy's enemy is not necessarily my friend.

Of course not. But trying to show this as a western supported group of nazis doing a violent revolution against a legal government and they are now threatening the Russian minority is, to be short, obviously and plainly false propaganda.

That Russians maybe think that's the truth isn't that strange given the increasingly state controlled media in that country but for anyone that have access to world wide media that is obvious.

For the sake of the world I hope Putin withdraw the troops as soon as possibly. Given his ego and ambitions potentially causing a world war is however a small price to pay I think...

Re: That's all the proof I need .. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46387841)

Let's be real here and switch off the Western propaganda machines. Just between 2001 and now, the US has committed far more atrocities (Abu Gairive) then the Soviets have done since Stalin's time.

Re:That's all the proof I need .. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46388125)

You continually post a reference to that book...do you get some sort of financial benefit from it's sales? Just curious.

Re:That's all the proof I need .. (2)

cold fjord (826450) | about 5 months ago | (#46388295)

No, I don't. I point people to it since it is both a good read and informative on many subjects that are discussed here, both directly and indirectly. If you read it you might understand.

I prefer to have informed discussions. Unfortunately that is often difficult here, especially on certain topics. If more people were better informed, and maybe left behind various fringe theories or ideas, the discourse would be more useful.

Re:That's all the proof I need .. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46388393)

No, I don't.

It was in your sig at one point.

If you read it you might understand.

I have read it, and it's relevance to TFS/TFA is about as close as Kevin Bacon is to Mary Pickford.

Re:That's all the proof I need .. (1)

cold fjord (826450) | about 5 months ago | (#46388489)

No, I don't.

It was in your sig at one point.

The point being that I don't get any financial benefit, as you had asked. The fact that my sig had a link to the book's page on Amazon doesn't change that.

I have read it, and it's relevance to TFS/TFA is about as close as Kevin Bacon is to Mary Pickford.

You must have missed my point about the long history of Russian involvement with espionage by computer, as shown in the book.

Re:That's all the proof I need .. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46388589)

You must have missed my point about the long history of Russian involvement with espionage by computer, as shown in the book.

You must have missed my point about Kevin Bacon and Mary Pickford both being actors.

Re:That's all the proof I need .. (1)

cold fjord (826450) | about 5 months ago | (#46388699)

The hacker in the book was working for the KGB. That is a direct relationship.

Are we done?

Re:That's all the proof I need .. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46389097)

The hacker in the book was working for the KGB. That is a direct relationship.

Kevin Bacon and Mary Pickford both were members of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. That is also a direct relationship, is it not?

Are we done?

I sure hope not!

Re:That's all the proof I need .. (1)

cold fjord (826450) | about 5 months ago | (#46389457)

That is also a direct relationship, is it not?

No, it's not.

Re:That's all the proof I need .. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46388233)

So has the US. Whats your point?

Re:That's all the proof I need .. (3, Informative)

Jahoda (2715225) | about 5 months ago | (#46387657)

I sincerely, sincerely hope that you're joking. Whatever problems the United States may currently face, it is nothing compared to the Gulag Archipelago [wikipedia.org] of the Soviet System. And I think you will find that the current regime has no problem with "extraordinary rendition" to faraway places, either.

Re:That's all the proof I need .. (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46387879)

The problem is that people have forgotten the atrocities of the Soviets. From "Moscow Fried Chicken" (the result of burning up refugees in Afghanistan) to the fact that leaving a country or a "zone" would mean a swift death for the person and their family, all the many atrocities done by the USSR or their puppets are history virtually forgotten since the Berlin Wall fell.

Instead, the focus is on how evil the US is... but I would recommend someone compare the days of living in the early to mid 1980s in west Germany compared to the DDR... things are relative. The US might get caught spying, but they are not sending troops to attack German citizens because they want to go visit a nightclub in France.

Re:That's all the proof I need .. (3, Interesting)

SpankiMonki (3493987) | about 5 months ago | (#46388335)

The problem is that people have forgotten the atrocities of the Soviets...all the many atrocities done by the USSR or their puppets are history virtually forgotten since the Berlin Wall fell.

Maybe that's because the Soviets/USSR doesn't exist anymore, and hasn't since 1991. If you think Putin's regime is equivalent to the USSR, then you should probably do a re-fresh of your geo-political perspective.

Instead, the focus is on how evil the US is...

You're right! Instead, let's focus on the past evils of the USSR and ignore the more recent evils of the US. Forget the NSA...KGB! US invasion of Iraq? No no no! Soviet invasion of Afghanistan! Abu Ghraib was nuthin compared to Kolyma, Norilsk, or Vorkuta!!! USA! USA! USA!

Your strategy should really improve the credibility and moral authority of the US in the eyes of the rest of the world going forward. Why didn't someone think of this earlier?!?

Re:That's all the proof I need .. (1)

bsDaemon (87307) | about 5 months ago | (#46388715)

Putin is a former KGB officer (Lt. Colonel) who once referred to the fall of the Soviet Union as "the greatest geopolitical catastrophe of the century." Communist or not at this point, it almost doesn't matter. Call it the will to re-establish the Russian Empire. Putin likely sees himself as a latter-day Peter the Great, and is currently operating unchecked by a US executive branch and foreign policy apparatus that at best can be said to embody the culmination of Khrushchev's promise to "bury [the us] from within."

Do you not consider it fishy that Yeltsin, who was largely responsible for the dissolution of the Soviet union, and who was seen as having had the support of the US in doing so would "unexpectedly resign" to make way for a hardliner with strong ties to the intelligence services? There is a reason that people call his approach to governing "Soft Stalinism" -- Stalin was crushing opponents and literally airbrushing them out of history before Photoshop was remotely on the horizon.

Twenty million Ukrainians starved to death during forced collective farming in the first five-year plan of the Soviet Union. Leon Trotsky [Lev Bronstein] was a Ukrainian by birth (in much the same way that Joseph Stalin was a Georgian, the Bolshevik Revolution wasn't particularly Russian in nature). The animosity between Russian-speaking and non-Russian-speaking peoples in the Ukraine CANNOT be separated historically from rise nor fall of the Soviet Union, nor with the Crimean War when Russia first conquered Ukraine and brought into its fold the first time -- hence why Trotsky was able to participate in the revolution at such as senior level, and why Ukraine was there to suffer so greatly so early under the Soviet system.

And regardless of any status of moral authority after the Iraq war, the fact that the US got involved in Iraq in the way we did doesn't take away from the issue at hand in Crimea now, any more than "But NSA!!!" makes actions by FSB (or, more likely, criminal organizations who have quid-pro-quo agreements with FSB) any less bad.

Re:That's all the proof I need .. (1)

SpankiMonki (3493987) | about 5 months ago | (#46389883)

Fair job of refuting GGP's assertion that "people have forgotten the atrocities of the Soviets".

I say "fair" because of your grossly exaggerated figures on the death toll in the Ukraine, [wikipedia.org] and your insinuation that there was something "fishy" about Putin taking over after Yeltsin resigned. Yeltsin appointed Putin to be his Prime Minister, and also made it clear he wished Putin to succeed him.

I'm also not seeing much in your post in support of Putin's Russia being just like the old USSR, other than pointing to Putin's ambitions and his repressive methods. The fact is the Russian Federation is nowhere near as economically/militarily powerful or politically influential as the USSR during the Cold War. Not even close. Likewise, the level of murderous atrocities committed by the former USSR goes far far beyond any crimes perpetrated by the Russian Federation. Those that want to compare the wrongs of the USSR of the past to the wrongs of the US of the present are fools.

And regardless of any status of moral authority after the Iraq war, the fact that the US got involved in Iraq in the way we did doesn't take away from the issue at hand in Crimea now, any more than "But NSA!!!" makes actions by FSB (or, more likely, criminal organizations who have quid-pro-quo agreements with FSB) any less bad.

Quite true.

Get a brain, morans! (3, Insightful)

Uberbah (647458) | about 5 months ago | (#46389753)

The problem is that people have forgotten the atrocities of the Soviets.

The problem is that American Exceptionalists pretend their shit doesn't stink. You want to talk about Stalin's gulags? Great! But then lets also talk about how the United States was formed by genocide, slavery, and conquering nations that hadn't attacked us. You want to talk current events, start by explaining how Putin is in the same universe as torturing, democracy overthrowing, murdering, invading, droning, innocent-imprisoning universe as George W. Obama?

Re:That's all the proof I need .. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46387789)

"Everyone is copying the Nazis now. I wonder when the Reichstag fire will... oh, right, 9/11."

Re:That's all the proof I need .. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46388139)

I wonder if the people copying the renewal for your prescription dropped a digit? You clearly need a stronger dose, you aren't in touch with reality.

Re:That's all the proof I need .. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46388199)

Yet more "fashionable" anti-US sentiment from the Slashtard crowd.

Re:That's all the proof I need .. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46387349)

when will Russia stop all these illegal wars?

Has President Obama looked in the mirror and not seen the hypocrisy of the "illegal wars" claims against Russia? And wasn't the United States of Amerika and Israel behind the Stuxnet virus / worm affecting the sovereign country of Iran?

Re:That's all the proof I need .. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46387463)

There are some 100+ other countries on the planet who has not participated in an illegal war recently, if ever. What the US and its prez thinks of anything is hardly relevant to whether what Russia is doing is legal or not.

Relevant old joke... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46387553)

What do you call a 8ft Gorilla wielding a machette?

Re:Relevant old joke... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46387757)

What?

Re:Relevant old joke... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46388417)

What do you call a 8ft Gorilla wielding a machette?

What?

Russia's pet monkey. (It's the army mascot. )

Re:Relevant old joke... (1)

redcaboodle (622288) | about 5 months ago | (#46388425)

Sir!

Re:That's all the proof I need .. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46388727)

Please define "illegal wars".

Re:That's all the proof I need .. (1)

cream wobbly (1102689) | about 5 months ago | (#46389103)

"Things the Daily Mail or the Grauniad or Fawkes News or the New York Times tells me I should not like."

Re:That's all the proof I need .. (2)

erikkemperman (252014) | about 5 months ago | (#46389337)

Please define "illegal wars".

Lacking a mandate from the relevant institutions of international law; in the absence of a credible threat to national security; based entirely on circumstantial evidence, cherry-picked intel and plain fabrication; against the wishes of a large fraction of voters...

Take your pick.

Re:That's all the proof I need .. (1)

The Grim Reefer (1162755) | about 5 months ago | (#46389387)

when will Russia stop all these illegal wars?

As soon as they win them and declare they were not illegal. The winners write the history book after all.

Re:That's all the proof I need .. (1)

aaaaaaargh! (1150173) | about 5 months ago | (#46389941)

The winners write the history book after all.

It used to be like that in 19th Century, but that time is long gone ...

They did it so we can do it too. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46387293)

The NSA does the same thing. Glass houses and whatnot.

Proof? (4, Insightful)

miffo.swe (547642) | about 5 months ago | (#46387333)

So any google translating script kiddie can make malware that puts the blame on Russia by just throwing random ruskie strings in and searching for alleged russian virii?

Who came up with this scheme, the same person that talked about WMD in Iraq?

Re:Proof? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46387455)

This! I imagine we will be seeing all kinds of "Russia is Evil" propaganda for the next few weeks at least due to the turmoil in the Ukraine and Crimea.

Re:Proof? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46387497)

Certainly nobody wants to condemn the invasion of a peaceful European neighbor by Russia. It's cute the way you substitute "turmoil" for invasion.

Re:Proof? (2, Insightful)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about 5 months ago | (#46387663)

You think the US gives a damn about that? Only to the extent that this is a new justification for the NSA's spying. The terrorist thing was wearing thin, so let's go back to the tried and true enemy of the Cold War. The FSB - if you can't beat 'em, imitate 'em (or is it the other way around these days?).

Re:Proof? (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46387915)

You think the US gives a damn about that? Only to the extent that this is a new justification for the NSA's spying. The terrorist thing was wearing thin, so let's go back to the tried and true enemy of the Cold War. The FSB - if you can't beat 'em, imitate 'em (or is it the other way around these days?).

Uhh... How does this get +5 insightful? Have you read the news the past few days? The past few years for that matter? Russia is currently invading the Ukraine, which borders several NATO members (let's not forget they invaded Georgia in 2008 and took territory as well). Not to mention they are trying to strong arm old Soviet States back into a new economic and military union. Meanwhile, China is making new outlandish territorial claims of land and sea that would be comical if it weren't for their threats to use military force. I think our Cold War troubles are long from over and the world is far from being in a state where we will not need intelligence agencies.

Re:Proof? (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46388095)

China is good at economic espionage. The US solar industry is a good example, where companies started reporting hacking attempts... then six months later, China started selling panels cheaper than the rare earths it took to make them.

We are seeing two countries more than willing to throw their weight around because when trade and economies don't provide expansion, tanks and soldiers definitely will... It is only a matter of time before China takes over Taiwan, and possibly Japan. (Think the US will risk a nuclear exchange over either nation? Won't happen.) I wouldn't be surprised if Russian tanks are knocking on Germany's eastern door because Europe has their head in the sand on this issue.

History repeats itself. My biggest fear is that the novel, "The Guns of August" are replaying, except staged a century later.

Re:Proof? (3, Insightful)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about 5 months ago | (#46388577)

China is good at economic espionage.

Why bother w/ espionage when we give it away. Applied Materials' solar research center is in China. GE has a joint venture to build jet engines in China (particularly interesting since engines are the last major impediment to building all Chinese military aircraft). What the heck, maybe they can get Electric Boat to help them with their sub designs.

Re: Proof? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46388597)

us solar companies never failed. just ask all the ceo, insiders, and anyone in oil. it all worked out just like it was supposed to.

Re:Proof? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46388655)

"We are seeing two countries more than willing to throw their weight around because when trade and economies don't provide expansion, tanks and soldiers definitely will"

Yes, we've seen a lot of this kind of behavior from the US too, so I wouldn't be surprised if Russia and China are doing it too.

Re:Proof? (1)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about 5 months ago | (#46388719)

As long as we keep it a cold war, everybody should be happy. Plenty of defense pork and no one gets hurt.

Re:Proof? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46389603)

china starts rattling it's sabers, and already japan is talking about removing the non aggression portions of their constitution. They already have enrichment capability and advanced plasma physics. If they really wanted to, they could rig up a basic implosion bomb H bomb in a few months. Same goes for Taiwan. China wouldn't dare risk having Hong Kong or Shanghai turned into radioactive dust.

Re:Proof? (1)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about 5 months ago | (#46388705)

How does this get +5 insightful?

Cheer up, it's back down to +2. The usual up/down mod games.

Russia is currently invading the Ukraine, which borders several NATO members

Yes, as many people pointed out at the time, it was clever to add NATO countries that made conflict with Russia more likely. At least somebody was planning ahead. They knew that Iraq and Afghanistan had to wind down eventually. This Russian thing is a wonderful complement to our "pivot to the Pacific". I always figure that was giving the navy a turn after the army and the air force had their wars, but now I see that all services will be given a chance.

I think our Cold War troubles are long from over

Oh good, that's a wonderful reason to avoid the proposed defense cutbacks. Maybe we'll even get an increase from it. The Cold War was very good for the job situation around here.

Re:Proof? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46389263)

They aren't invading Ukraine, they are liberating it. Like we did to Iraq and Afghanistan and Iraq again and Korea and Vietnam...

Re:Proof? (1)

Uberbah (647458) | about 5 months ago | (#46389697)

Uhh... How does this get +5 insightful?

How did this get +4, Interesting? Ukraine isn't experiencing a revolution, it's experiencing a US-backed fascist coup by Neo Nazis. A coup overthrowing a democratically-elected government after the Fatherland party couldn't win at the ballot box.

This part is a replay of Syria, where a group that has been demonized by everyone are suddenly great allies worthy of U.S. support. In Syria it was Al Qaeda, and in Ukraine it's a bunch of anti-semetic Neo Nazis. But that's no problem at all if you're a neocon American Exceptionalist.

Re:Proof? (1)

mrchaotica (681592) | about 5 months ago | (#46388397)

It's not that nobody wants to condemn it, it's that the US can't do so without being hypocritical and the EU can't do so without threatening their oil/natural gas supply.

Re:Proof? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46389151)

Are you referring to Crimea as being invaded? Seriously? Crimea asked the Russians to protect them! Further, Russia has a huge set of military bases in Crimea. If Cuba had a revolt and the US bases in Cuba were in question the US would do nothing to protect their interests in Cuba? How about Germany, Japan, S. Korea, or any place where the US has military base? Yeah, you are a douche oblivious to your own bias (or simply shilling propaganda).

Re:Proof? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46387589)

No need to make anything up. We may have always been at war with Eastasia, but Russia has been evil for a long, long time.

Script Kiddie? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46387469)

In the last, what?, ten years all of the exploits have been found by professional security researchers, spy organizations (Stuxnet), and other exploits were done by very serious experts who REALLY knew their shit.

Which says a lot about our current computing environment - even Windows: one has to be a real expert (like PhD level) to find current exploits.

Things are like they were in the 90s where running a script is all you need. You just don't see those mistakes very much anymore.

that particular system that Target was using.

Today's attacks are done by the pros - with resources.

Re:Script Kiddie? (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46387641)

Which says a lot about our current computing environment - even Windows: one has to be a real expert (like PhD level) to find current exploits.

You can find exploits by stumbling upon them when doing something related to the exploitable functionality. Utilizing them requires skill, though.

Re:Script Kiddie? (2)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about 5 months ago | (#46387691)

That's what it takes to infiltrate well secured computers and networks. For the most part though infiltrators rely on badly secured stuff these days. The Target invasion was possible due to poor security practices - which Target's own IT/security people warned management about.

Re:Script Kiddie? (3, Interesting)

mlts (1038732) | about 5 months ago | (#46387797)

The problem is that there are -so many- weak links these days. Anything, be it the application, web server, backend server, DB server, Web browser, Web browser add-ons, OS, firmware, NIC firmware, router, switch, can have a weakness that can be easily exploited to cause a lot of issues. Air-gapping will help prevent those attacks, but I'm sure if it is a big organization wanting the data, rich enough to buy 0-day exploits from an auction, they are rich enough to have "boots on the ground" in a target country to perform physical attacks (sticking a USB flash drive into a machine and letting Autorun/Autoplay do the rest, for example.)

In the '90s, the computer industry had two choices, go the secure route, or go the cheap route. It is obvious how the industry went. Even languages that could offer provable security with known states are all but dead [1], so there is no way other than just keep patching holes, to have any semblance of solid security these days.

It would be nice to start from scratch. There are still ways to have provable states and know how a program will function, even with edge/corner cases. Similar with hardware. If we go with known good embedded operating systems, an attack on an IP stack will have limited consequences.

[1]: Ada may be ugly, but it does offer provable security.

Re:Script Kiddie? (2)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about 5 months ago | (#46388763)

The problem is that there are -so many- weak links these days.

True, but so many of the big invasions, like the Target deal, use things that were securable, and that people (like their own security/IT people) said should be secured. Security is an endless software arms race, but the attackers usually take advantage of the defense's sloppiness or cost cutting. Even Stuxnet required some German engineer to unknowingly plant via a thumb drive.

Ada may be ugly, but it does offer provable security.

Ada has some definite advantages, like avoiding buffer overflows, but in and of itself can't guarantee security. I do agree though that using a language like that would be a big improvement.

Re:Script Kiddie? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46389037)

Target was a lightning strike, where not even the best in the industry could have done much to stop that attack. They have some of the best professionals in the industry, but against the well-heeled James Bond types, even they can fall.

Re:Script Kiddie? (2)

chaim79 (898507) | about 5 months ago | (#46387775)

In the last, what?, ten years all of the exploits have been found by professional security researchers, spy organizations (Stuxnet), and other exploits were done by very serious experts who REALLY knew their shit.

Actually, what you are seeing is criminals taking over the exploitation of exploits, before it was hackers having fun and sending "it's my birthday" messages around, now it's serious criminals using exploits to steal serious money. These people don't advertize their finds, they use them to the fullest extent possible. When PHD's find an exploit you can be sure 90% of the time it's already known to criminals who have used it for a while.

If you wonder at the accuracy of that, just look around at how many viruses are out there and start counting the news reports for companies compromised.

Re:Proof? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46389121)

"virii" -- plural of "virius"

Sure... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46387379)

Slashdot is a fucking shill site for the US of A State Department and i'm out!

Re:Sure... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46387501)

It looks you have not yet seen the beta...

Re:Sure... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46387523)

Or maybe the AC has.

The source articles aren't much help (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46387509)

They don't provide IP addresses OR host-domain names of infected systems + Botnet C&C Servers this malware/rootkit uses (to block via firewalls or hosts files).

Here's one of the russian strings found (3, Funny)

JoeyRox (2711699) | about 5 months ago | (#46387569)

"In Soviet Russia, computer attacks you!"

Re:Here's one of the russian strings found (0)

Orleron (835910) | about 5 months ago | (#46387695)

I, for one, welcome our Russian hacker overlords.

Where have we heard this before? (2)

Jahoda (2715225) | about 5 months ago | (#46387645)

Goodness, my "fellow" American hawks sure are itching for war with Russia. Unfortunately, I don't think this is the solution to domestic problems and the care and feeding of the media that they believe it will be.

Re:Where have we heard this before? (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46387791)

Yep. They're the trendy bad guy this week. Also, to recap:

Protests in Ukraine = good whereas protests in Thailand = bad. It all depends no who is about to be overthrown so a puppet that is friendly to the agenda of the IMF can be installed.

Re:Where have we heard this before? (0)

temcat (873475) | about 5 months ago | (#46387963)

It takes NOT to invade a neighboring country to avoid being a trendy bad guy of the week. Yeah, I know, that's too big a challenge for some.

Re:Where have we heard this before? (1)

temcat (873475) | about 5 months ago | (#46388965)

Yeah, and a footcloth can have mod points, too, who woulda thunk?

Re:Where have we heard this before? (1)

Eunuchswear (210685) | about 5 months ago | (#46388045)

In general people are suspicous of protestors who refuse elections.

Re:Where have we heard this before? (1)

aaaaaaargh! (1150173) | about 5 months ago | (#46390035)

Bullshit, the situations in the two countries are not even remotely comparable. You should check your reality distortion field.

The opposition leaders in Thailand do not want to have any new elections, not now and not later, and have publicly declared their intention not to have elections. (They would invariably loose them.) The protesters in Ukraine have already fixed the date for a new election. They got rid of a completely corrupt vassal of Putin who enriched himself, put an important opposition leader into prison by the same methods of corrupting justice as Putin uses, and poisoned another important opposition politician. And that's only the beginning of the differences ...

Don't trust anyone anymore (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46387743)

There are Russian-language strings in the code, and it searches its victims' systems for Agent BTZ, malware used in previous attacks believed to have been carried out by Russia

And this would make everyone believe that Russia would be so stupid as to put Russian language into the code? Bullshit. This is exactly what China or US or especially Pakastan or Iran would do to make it look Russian so as to start a fight between the greater powers. Its political bullshit intrigue101 make it so obvious. You can't trust anyone or anything nowadays. These governments are out of control on earth.

Re:Don't trust anyone anymore (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46388251)

Stupid, no - Arrogant, yes. It's likely that they simply don't care.

Re:Don't trust anyone anymore (1)

Megol (3135005) | about 5 months ago | (#46389913)

Mistakes happen my anonymous friend. Thinking that Russia doesn't (as the US, UK, France and many other countries) doesn't develop software for electronic warfare is one.

It is well known that the black market for software have largely been dominated by Russian coders. High skills and few jobs allows such things to grow. Even if the majority of those programmers switched to "the white market" when the Russian economy grew there still is a huge amount of skilled workers perfect for doing electronic warfare stuff.

I must be Russian (2, Insightful)

wcrowe (94389) | about 5 months ago | (#46388083)

"It has Russian language strings in the code, so it must be Russian intelligence behind it!"

(facepalm) Really? This is an example of investigative prowess?

    , .

I must be Russian. There are Russian language strings in my post.

Re:I must be Russian (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46388255)

It must be true, cold fjord told us.

Re:I must be Russian (1)

CaseCrash (1120869) | about 5 months ago | (#46388927)

, .

Ha ha! Slashdot has foiled your nefarious plan by not supporting unicode!

Re:I must be Russian (1)

wcrowe (94389) | about 5 months ago | (#46389189)

Ha! Yet it looked fine in preview. Well played, Slashdot, well played.

So that's why CafeWorld loaded slow (1)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | about 5 months ago | (#46388809)

Next time, note to self:

Defriend Russians before attack on vital strategic cooking interests.

Uroburos Released into the Atmosphere (1)

sexconker (1179573) | about 5 months ago | (#46389281)

Complete Global Saturation!

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