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Bitcoin Inventor Satoshi Nakamoto Outed By Newsweek

timothy posted about 7 months ago | from the always-the-quiet-ones dept.

Bitcoin 390

DoctorBit writes "According to today's Newsweek article, Satoshi Nakamoto is ... Satoshi Nakamoto — a 64-year-old Japanese-American former defense contractor living with his mother in a modest Temple City, California suburban home. According to the article, 'He is someone with a penchant for collecting model trains and a career shrouded in secrecy, having done classified work for major corporations and the U.S. military.' and 'Nakamoto's family describe him as extremely intelligent, moody and obsessively private, a man of few words who screens his phone calls, anonymizes his emails and, for most of his life, has been preoccupied with the two things for which Bitcoin has now become known: money and secrecy.' The article quotes him as responding when asked about bitcoin, 'I am no longer involved in that and I cannot discuss it, ... It's been turned over to other people. They are in charge of it now. I no longer have any connection.' I imagine that he will now have to move and hire round-the-clock security for his own protection."

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Hah! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46418621)

Outed at last Anonymous Coward! Anonymouse for (non-)obvious reasons.

Why? (5, Insightful)

Chalnoth (1334923) | about 7 months ago | (#46418643)

Why would he have to move/hire protection? I guess I can see that he might be paranoid enough to think it's necessary, but why would it be actually necessary?

Re:Why? (5, Insightful)

johnsie (1158363) | about 7 months ago | (#46418685)

People do crazy things when money and power is involved. He's right to want to protect himself.

Re:Why? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46418695)

Because it's now public that he's sitting on nearly half a billion dollars somewhere.

Re:Why? (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46418765)

Wrong, but it does match the public misconception. It's commonly believed that he's sitting on nearly half a billion dollars, and facts to the contrary won't even slow down those who will try to collect.

This is why if you ever do anything in your life that people might want to know about, never EVER answer a request for an interview with anything that could even be used to find a bit of truth. "Off the record" means "this will get into the headline" and everything you say can and will be used against you to get pageviews. The two best responses to a request for an interview are to file a restraining order and if that doesn't work, spend a couple bitcoins on an assassin.

Re:Why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46418985)

The two best responses to a request for an interview are to file a restraining order and if that doesn't work, spend a couple bitcoins on an assassin.

Because those never draw more attention. Although maybe the latter will work in the not so distant future when there is only one journalist left.

Re:Why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46419271)

Yeah they took ur jobs! took ur coins! (sp quote... )

i understand his point of view, but the man only invented the concept/ thing in the beginning... unfortunately the're a lot of dumbasses out there (tuk ur jooohhhbs... ) so he might be right about searching protection....

Re:Why? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46418699)

Why would he have to move/hire protection? I guess I can see that he might be paranoid enough to think it's necessary, but why would it be actually necessary?

He is now a target for anyone who wants a potentially huge stash of BTC... whether it is really him or not, someone will presume it is.

Re:Why? (1)

Thud457 (234763) | about 7 months ago | (#46418903)

that would suck so bad to be KTK'd for something even more imaginary and worthless than the usual little green pieces of paper.

Might have something to do with other things (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46418707)

IIRC he was sitting on a bunch of bitcoins. So he could be worth a lot of money if he cashed out. Someone could potentially cause him or his loved ones harm because of that perceived wealth, whether it's real or not.

Re:Why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46418709)

Because his personal stash of bitcoins are worth $400 million dollars?

Re:Why? (2)

SJHillman (1966756) | about 7 months ago | (#46418743)

That seems like the sort of thing that should have gone in the summary, because it's a vital piece of information for having the summary make sense.

Re:Why? (1)

Joce640k (829181) | about 7 months ago | (#46418787)

I suspect the real number is a secret but you can safely bet he owns quite a few of them....

Re:Why? (1)

mark-t (151149) | about 7 months ago | (#46418801)

What makes his so-called stash of bitcoins worth the effort of trying to go after him for a cut any more than how wealthy any one of the other multimillionaires or billionaires in the world happens to be?

Re:Why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46419029)

Plenty of billionaires have security at their homes, and most of their money in banks and assets that require tricking/bypassing multiple people to get to.

Re:Why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46419077)

What makes his so-called stash of bitcoins worth the effort of trying to go after him for a cut any more than how wealthy any one of the other multimillionaires or billionaires in the world happens to be?

What makes you think the others are not targets as well? A few years ago there was a TV interview with a couple who had won a record Powerball jackpot, several hundred million dollars. When interviewed they didn't know how many bodyguards they had hired. The day after they won.

Re:Why? (4, Insightful)

sunking2 (521698) | about 7 months ago | (#46418913)

There are lots of rich people in the world. Most don't hire personal security. I've yet to see an entourage of folks accompany Warren Buffet into Dairy Queen when he wants a blizzard.

Re:Why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46419057)

Ask George Soros how he travels when he's in Argentina.

Re:Why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46419129)

George Soros has enemies that are mostly unrelated to his money...

Re:Why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46418717)

Because it's surmised that he personally mined enough bitcoins to be worth roughly $400,000,000 at today's exchange rate. That's enticing.

Re:Why? (5, Funny)

interkin3tic (1469267) | about 7 months ago | (#46418741)

Because once Newsweek finds you, they'll pester you to death to subscribe, for interviews, to talk about them, to let people know that they didn't die completely when they went online only, and can you spare some change for a sandwich.

because devils (1)

swschrad (312009) | about 7 months ago | (#46418747)

all the silk road gang who never got their stash or their BiteCon back are going to think he's hiding their BiteCon under the pile of unicorn crap in the living room.

dude.

Because (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46418775)

He allegedly holds up to 1 Million BTC.

Re:Why? (3, Funny)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 7 months ago | (#46418781)

Why would he have to move/hire protection? I guess I can see that he might be paranoid enough to think it's necessary, but why would it be actually necessary?

Given the sorts of weirdos who end up stalking ordinary celebrities, I'd flee this gravity well at relativistic speed if I were The Celebrity among some of the more... peculiar... elements of bitcoin fandom.

Re:Why? (1)

SpankiMonki (3493987) | about 7 months ago | (#46418807)

Why would he have to move/hire protection? I guess I can see that he might be paranoid enough to think it's necessary, but why would it be actually necessary?

Why? Because the poor man is about to get seriously Salingered.

Gun + BC client = $1,000,000,000 (4, Insightful)

Idou (572394) | about 7 months ago | (#46418899)

Other billionaires require some kind of impossibly complicated strategy to steal their billions. . .

Hope he takes the necessary precautions, though. . . Crypto-currencies are awesome. He deserves to spend the rest of his days in peace (For a crypto-genius, he could have picked a better pseudonym, though . . .).

Re:Why? (1)

Citizen of Earth (569446) | about 7 months ago | (#46418949)

Because he may be in possession of millions of bitcoins? I'm sure some unscrupulous people would like to unlawfully acquire them.

Re:Why? (1)

katterjohn (726348) | about 7 months ago | (#46418993)

Probably to protect him from more reporters who like to find obsessively private people, poke them with a stick and post everything online.

Re:Why? (1)

Deadstick (535032) | about 7 months ago | (#46419003)

Because with the events of the last week or so, certain people have lost a LOT of money. Sure, it may not be his fault, but issues like this are sometimes settled...ummm...out of court.

Re:Why? (2)

i kan reed (749298) | about 7 months ago | (#46419109)

Especially among people whose inclinations include avoiding governments at all costs.

Re:Why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46419023)

Because a lot of people got bit by the bitcoin scam, and some will no doubt seek revenge.

Re:Why? (4, Insightful)

gmuslera (3436) | about 7 months ago | (#46419065)

Oblig xkcd [xkcd.com] . He is the weakest link in the unbreakable encryption of his bitcoin wallet.

Horrible Journalism (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46418647)

Seriously, they put this guys life in danger. Shame on them.

Re:Horrible Journalism (3, Insightful)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 7 months ago | (#46418961)

Seriously, they put this guys life in danger. Shame on them.

These are 'journalists', in the dreadful contemporary sense. If they thought that 'quiet, eccentric, mathematician brutally murdered in suspected cyber-revenge' would have an ROI greater than the legal exposure, they'd probably kill him themselves just to be first to the body...

render onto...... never ends (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46418655)

dark matters series top 1000 vdos i wish i'd never seen on youtube #1 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vpS2N_9fHiA

Re:render onto...... never ends (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46419219)

dark matters series top 1000 vdos i wish i'd never seen on youtube #1 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v... [youtube.com]

Well, thanks for the warning. [/me doesn't click link]

Hiding in plain sight. (3, Insightful)

splutty (43475) | about 7 months ago | (#46418659)

Kudos to him for not ever trying to get into the limelight about this.

Not sure what repercussions this will have for him and his family as persons, but it's kind of nice to see this sort of stuff can still happen :)

Guess he got taught well by the diverse companies insisting on secrecy!

Protection? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46418663)

"I imagine that he will now have to move and hire round-the-clock security for his own protection."

Really?

Does Bitcoin work like River City Ransom? If I punch him enough times, will a flood of shiny coins spew from his unconscious body?

Re:Protection? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46418863)

Poor guy, it looks like all the stress from being outed caused him to gain a few pounds. Barf! [youtube.com]

Re:Protection? (3, Insightful)

camperdave (969942) | about 7 months ago | (#46419261)

If I punch him enough times, will a flood of shiny coins spew from his unconscious body?

Possibly. [xkcd.com]

Conspiracy nuts are going to love this one! (4, Insightful)

johnsie (1158363) | about 7 months ago | (#46418671)

a career shrouded in secrecy, having done classified work for major corporations and the U.S. military

Re:Conspiracy nuts are going to love this one! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46418773)

Fuck! That describes me!!!!!!1
And everyone I work with!!!!!!!
And most of Huntsville!!!!11!11!11!

Re:Conspiracy nuts are going to love this one! (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 7 months ago | (#46418803)

a career shrouded in secrecy, having done classified work for major corporations and the U.S. military

"Taking The System Down From The Inside?" or "The Man's Ultimate Long Con?"

We ask vague, hyperbolic, questions; you fight it out in the comments section!

Re:Conspiracy nuts are going to love this one! (1)

H0p313ss (811249) | about 7 months ago | (#46419001)

"Taking The System Down From The Inside?" or "The Man's Ultimate Long Con?"

We ask vague, hyperbolic, questions; you fight it out in the comments section!

T H I S I S S L A S H D O T !

*flying kick*

Re:Conspiracy nuts are going to love this one! (1)

guruevi (827432) | about 7 months ago | (#46418935)

Not necessarily a conspiracy but his statements only create more questions. A career shrouded in secrecy, having done classified work for major corporations and the U.S. military ending with Bitcoin in which he is no longer involved and cannot discuss it because it's been turned over to other people.

a) Who was his employer when he developed Bitcoin
b) Why did a Japanese citizen work on classified US military projects
c) Why, if it were a personal pet project, is he no longer involved
d) What contractual obligation does he have where he can't discuss it
e) Who are these other people he has turned it over to

Because of it's users' requirement for "privacy" it easily implies you should use Tor or other private networks. If it is an inherent property for Bitcoins to generate a specific signature within common encryption, together with control over the major networks (AT&T, Verizon, ...) and bugs in several SSL/TLS libraries (goto fail, GnuTLS) you can quickly develop a map of the underground Internet, detect undergrounds you aren't aware of yet and possibly open them up to warrantless inspection without anyone being aware.

Re:Conspiracy nuts are going to love this one! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46419141)

b) Why did a Japanese citizen work on classified US military projects

He's described as Japanese-American. Last time I checked, WW2 was over and we aren't throwing persons of Japanese descent into internment camps. We might be using people's social networks instead of their census records to make assumptions about their loyalties, but a naturalized US citizen is every bit as American as a native-born American citizen.

Re: Conspiracy nuts are going to love this one! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46419241)

I think you've nailed it. By having media flood the airwaves with statements like 'untraceable criminal currency' and the like, it was adopted by the underground who foolishly don't relize it's the absolute most traceable currency ever without any doubt, by design... The bitcoin digital signature would be extremely easy to filter and monitor.. Given that all transactions are permantly logged makes it even more so. Look how fast silkroad was busted! Need anymore proof? I'd say the conspiracy theory has substantial legs!

Coming up next... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46418675)

Next time in the news - Bitcoin inventor lynched by angry mob of bitcoin loss sufferers who don't know the difference between inventing a currency and running a "bank".

Protection from what? (0, Flamebait)

sjbe (173966) | about 7 months ago | (#46418681)

I imagine that he will now have to move and hire round-the-clock security for his own protection.

Protection from what? Bitcoin is not that big of a deal and I cannot conceive of a reason why anyone would care if he invented it or not other than idle curiosity.

Re:Protection from what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46418731)

He holds and estimated 800,000 BTC, assuming he is Satoshi. That's $525 600 000.00 Reason enough?

Re:Protection from what? (1)

mark-t (151149) | about 7 months ago | (#46418875)

No more reason than to hound any of the people on this list [forbes.com] , all of whom have provably multiple orders of magnitude more wealth than this guy is even *alleged* to have.

Re:Protection from what? (1)

Dishevel (1105119) | about 7 months ago | (#46419085)

Because if I can get him alone in a room I can get all of that money with no proof I have it. With banks involved it gets much more difficult to get away with stealing $500 million.

Re:Protection from what? (3, Insightful)

sjbe (173966) | about 7 months ago | (#46419255)

Because if I can get him alone in a room I can get all of that money with no proof I have it. With banks involved it gets much more difficult to get away with stealing $500 million.

You've have to liquidate it and engage in some pretty serious money laundering through the banks to actually make use of the bitcoins in any meaningful way. Furthermore even if he does have 800K bitcoins he doesn't have $500M. To convert that many bitcoins to dollars would crash the market. When you hold that large a percentage of a market you can't sell without moving the market. The price would plummet if any significant amount was sold so while we can't tell exactly what it is worth you can be sure it is a LOT less than $500M.

Bunch of nonsense (1)

sjbe (173966) | about 7 months ago | (#46419161)

He holds and estimated 800,000 BTC, assuming he is Satoshi. That's $525 600 000.00 Reason enough?

First, if he has that much and hasn't liquidated a big portion of it then he is an idiot. 800K bitcoins are a good approximation of worthless as bitcoins and only a fool wouldn't diversify. Second, if he actually did try to sell that many he'd crash the market so there is absolutely no way in hell they are worth that much money in dollars. When you hold huge amounts of some asset you move the market when you try to sell. Flood the market with that much supply and the price will plummet.

Re:Protection from what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46418761)

The founder of bitcoin mined a crap ton of coins at the start. The guy is likely a bitcoin billionaire. Plenty of reasons for rich people to hire security.

Model Trains? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46418697)

I wanna know more about his trains-- does he have a cool layout?

Re:Model Trains? (4, Funny)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 7 months ago | (#46418923)

I wanna know more about his trains-- does he have a cool layout?

It's pretty spartan, hey got caught up in the trains themselves. Each set of cars is arranged in a very specific sequence that he really gets worked up about, and I've noticed that it takes him longer and longer every time to decide on and add a new car to the end of the train....

"It's been turned over to other people" ? (3, Interesting)

unimacs (597299) | about 7 months ago | (#46418721)

So somebody is in charge of Bitcoin? What do they do?

Re:"It's been turned over to other people" ? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46418815)

There are teams that update the main software implementation(s). I guess that's what he means.

Re:"It's been turned over to other people" ? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46418831)

What do they do?

They do what the Bitcoin Protocol was always intended to do: create and maintain the world's largest SHA256 Rainbow Table.

You didn't think this was all about about creating a decentralized crypto-currency did you?

Re:"It's been turned over to other people" ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46418939)

In my monthly tin foil moments I had considered that same idea. What if bitcoin was just some way to crack something. What if there is some message out there that is encrypted and someone wanted to crack it. This would be a seriously awesome way to get someone else to gen up the tables for you.

I dont play with it much other than read the occasional headline. What *exactly* is the bitcoin alg doing? We know it is 'work' and produces a credit of a 'coin'. But what does it do? What is it encoding/decoding?

Re:"It's been turned over to other people" ? (2)

alostpacket (1972110) | about 7 months ago | (#46419103)

But what does it do? What is it encoding/decoding?

"Be sure to drink your Ovaltine"

ahh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46419157)

I have been playing with this exact train of thought.
Cui bono? A large organization that always seems to need more raw computing power. *cough nsa cough*

Not sure if there is any way to possibly verify this.

Re:ahh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46419283)

> Not sure if there is any way to possibly verify this.

I dunno, teach yourself a bit of cryptography and read the fine paper [bitcoin.org] , may be?

Re:"It's been turned over to other people" ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46418855)

They steal bitcoins

Re:"It's been turned over to other people" ? (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 7 months ago | (#46418893)

So somebody is in charge of Bitcoin? What do they do?

Write and maintain bitcoin-protocol compatible clients, care for and feed mining hardware, provide the bandwidth for continued distribution of the block chain, and (maybe) actually use bitcoins for something so that they aren't just a pile of uninteresting solutions to difficult-but-totally-banal math problems?

There is no specific Bitcoin Commissar; but (not unlike most OSS projects, wholly aside from your view of the... exciting financial infrastructure that exists between bitcoin and the broader world) only software projects that are either 100% dead, or so perfect that no coder since the Heroic Age has felt worthy enough to soil them with his changes, work without some sort of team, often fairly heavily skewed toward a few core people with a (sometimes more helpful, sometimes mostly passive) cloud of peripheral users and smalltime contributors. Whatever else it may be, it is a software project, a peer to peer network, and a distributed computation setup, all of which don't exactly keep themselves running. He, presumably, is no longer interested in dealing with any of that.

Re:"It's been turned over to other people" ? (2)

psionski (1272720) | about 7 months ago | (#46418901)

Write code, fix bugs, create promotional material and documentation. It's a software project, what else would they be doing?

Re:"It's been turned over to other people" ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46419305)

They are the new top of the pyramid scheme that is bitcoin

whoever you are Mr. Sakamoto, (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46418725)

Thank you.

The collapse of Mt Gox proves that nothing you have done has changed how conniving and rotten some people are.

The continued use of Bitcoin and its expanding acceptance for exchanging value for goods proves you put a dent in the equally conniving and rotten world of conventional banking.

Re: whoever you are Mr. Sakamoto, (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46418829)

Conventional banking will take it over if it gets much bigger, because the banks control politics. So politics will step in to "regulate" the currency, or they will outlaw it altogether. Funny he develops stuff for government, curious!

Re: whoever you are Mr. Sakamoto, (1)

Lisias (447563) | about 7 months ago | (#46419095)

Funny he develops stuff for government, curious!

[ConspirationMode:ON]

You see, perhaps he's working *with* the government to erode the banking system influence on politics.

Create an enemy to control your allies.

limit? (1)

invictusvoyd (3546069) | about 7 months ago | (#46418727)

The link says

You have reached the limit of 5 free articles a month

zzzz

Re:limit? (1)

SpankiMonki (3493987) | about 7 months ago | (#46418965)

I got that too. When I temporarily turned off NoScript for the site and clicked on the "Newsweek" graphic at the top, the article was then displayed.

Breaking big in Finland (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46418745)

There's this fun little piece in the article:

One of the first people to start working with Bitcoin's founder in 2009 was Martti Malmi, 25, a Helsinki programmer who invested in Bitcoins. "I sold them in 2011 and bought a nice apartment," he says. "Today, I could have bought 100 nice apartments."

Outed? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46418755)

Is he gay or bisexual or something?

if you drive a toyota corolla that doesn't automat (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46418809)

I have already read two articles that highlight the fact that this guy drives a Toyota Corolla even though he is worth $400mil. Why is this a thing with the geeks in Silicon Valley.
- Also, if he went to a state college and now calls himself a libertarian, I have to call that out. That is also a "Silicon Valley" thing.
- It's really getting old. We have beaten this stereotype to death, so can we just move on PLEASE.

Re:if you drive a toyota corolla that doesn't auto (2)

TheCarp (96830) | about 7 months ago | (#46418925)

> - Also, if he went to a state college and now calls himself a libertarian, I have to call that out.
> That is also a "Silicon Valley" thing.

so a person who uses any state resources which they and their parents before them paid for....this should limit what opinions they are allowed to form later?

I was raised catholic and took first communion, and later came to realize the whole God thing was a sham, am I stuck being Catholic?

Seems like a raw deal to me.

Re:if you drive a toyota corolla that doesn't auto (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46418987)

I was raised catholic and took first communion, and later came to realize the whole God thing was a sham, am I stuck being Catholic?

Naw, you're just stuck with the guilt.

Re: if you drive a toyota corolla that doesn't aut (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46419061)

It's because it's pr pieces for Toyota. That's the only reason to state the exact model. Did they even give a year of the car? Most times no, and that's pretty much a sign that it is an ad placed in a story to get the words "Toyota corolla" out there

move and hire round-the-clock security (1)

Oligonicella (659917) | about 7 months ago | (#46418817)

He fears for his life, eh? And you know this how, because of your telepathy or your in-depth personal interview with him? Personally, I imagine that it's because of your own paranoia leaking into all aspects of life. See how easy it is to fabricate a crap opinion from nothing.

Re:move and hire round-the-clock security (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46418909)

For one, he called the cops when the reporter showed up at his door. Then he said that he believes he's going to be in trouble if he talks to her. It's also quite natural to be somewhat paranoid if one sits on 400 million USD.

Re:move and hire round-the-clock security (1)

canadiannomad (1745008) | about 7 months ago | (#46419229)

if one sits on 400 million USD

Which could double or half tomorrow.... The benefits and drawbacks of bitcoin...

Setec Astronomy (3, Insightful)

wiredog (43288) | about 7 months ago | (#46418827)

It was only while scouring a database that contained the registration cards of naturalized U.S. citizens that a Satoshi Nakamoto turned up whose profile and background offered a potential match. But it was not until after ordering his records from the National Archives

Guess the Privacy Act doesn't apply to individuals.

So how many BTC does he have? (1)

Marrow (195242) | about 7 months ago | (#46418941)

I wonder if the loss of secrecy will affect the price?

Poor Guy (4, Insightful)

Metabolife (961249) | about 7 months ago | (#46418957)

He just wanted to be left alone, leave him alone.

I reject your reality and substitute my own.... (5, Funny)

FilmedInNoir (1392323) | about 7 months ago | (#46418963)

This is Satoshi Nakamoto:
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-9rqm... [blogspot.com]

and his friend. They create crypto-currencies and attend raves.

Re:I reject your reality and substitute my own.... (1)

wonkey_monkey (2592601) | about 7 months ago | (#46419013)

I'm Satoshi Nakamoto, and so's my wife!

How do you disable audio ads on /. (1, Offtopic)

xednieht (1117791) | about 7 months ago | (#46419009)

Why the FUUUUUUCK does audio randomly start playing on ads on /. who is the fucking imbecile that thought it would be a good idea to annoy the FUCK out of people. Fuck you moron, Fuck you moron, FUCK YOU MORON! Yes i'm mad bro.

Re:How do you disable audio ads on /. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46419133)

Why the FUUUUUUCK does audio randomly start playing on ads on /.

who is the fucking imbecile that thought it would be a good idea to annoy the FUCK out of people.

Fuck you moron, Fuck you moron, FUCK YOU MORON!

Yes i'm mad bro.

adblock.. it's been around for a long time.

There are ads on /. ???
There are ads on the internet?

Re:How do you disable audio ads on /. (2)

Meneth (872868) | about 7 months ago | (#46419147)

You are also not using AdBlock. :}

Bull fucking shit (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46419019)

What kind of bullshit article is this? Wtf has happened to slash dot that they link such utter horseshit stories now? Nice that the article tries to link crazy or borderline criminal behavior with screening phone calls or being secretive. Hey why not just say that anyone that does hail the enlighten political machine should be exiled to a camp in the northern reaches of Alaska? People need to call shit like this what it is from the get go and blast whoever would write such crap.

FIRST!!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46419037)

first!!!!!

Years to develop the software? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46419041)

Haha, as a cryptographer for longer than this guy I can tell you that bitcoin probably took 6 months or less to complete in his spare time, including planning and design. Although he probably had the idea in his head for much longer.

Like so many things that were not that difficult (Facebook, Minecraft, etc) all it took was for someone with a good idea, some luck, and at least a basic skillset to actually do it. The public sees it as some sort of genius though, lol. Maybe that's what genius is.

Fair Play (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46419075)

If this is true I think this is very irresponsible. She posts the photo, house photo, legal name, and more information of someone that wants to be anonymous. Not to mention how dangerous this would be if true. I imagine many people would do terrible things to get his private keys.

Myself and several others have sent emails to the author of this report.

Leah McGrath Goodman

http://www.newsweek.com/authors/leah-mcgrath-goodman

http://leahmcgrathgoodman.com/

l.goodman@newsweek.com

lmcgrathgoodman@gmail.com

http://twitter.com/truth_eater

What impresses & baffles me (0)

RogueWarrior65 (678876) | about 7 months ago | (#46419081)

What I find impressive and baffling is how people assign value to things that have no value for any purpose other than a means of exchange. It does require a certain amount of herd mentality because if I went into the woods, cut up sticks into specific lengths, and tried to pay for my next meal with it, they'd call the men in the white coats. Or perhaps more accurately, if I typed in a bunch of random numbers and tried to pay my cable bill with it. Sure, Bitcoin's value is lack of government involvement but beyond that it has no equivalent value. It's not like physical gold or silver which can be used to make things or oil which is energy.

Re:What impresses & baffles me (3, Insightful)

oodaloop (1229816) | about 7 months ago | (#46419259)

What I find impressive and baffling is how people assign value to things that have no value for any purpose other than a means of exchange

I thought you were going to make some pithy remark that the U.S. dollar is little different from Bitcoin in that regard, but perhaps you haven't realizede that yet.

Pretend? (3, Interesting)

medv4380 (1604309) | about 7 months ago | (#46419099)

I'm not sure if this is actually the guy, but conspiracy theories will fly about it forever so I don't care if he is or isn't. However playing 'Pretend the government agencies are coming after you.' with a child is enough for me to dismiss the guy as crazy.

Grigory Perelman (1)

benjfowler (239527) | about 7 months ago | (#46419101)

Similar personality types?

Re:Grigory Perelman (1)

spiritplumber (1944222) | about 7 months ago | (#46419159)

And now I want to play AMFV again.

The article is probably wrong (2)

alihm (2041080) | about 7 months ago | (#46419169)

I don't beleive he is Satoshi. Dorian Nakamoto has three amazon reviews. His english is not good. http://www.amazon.com/gp/pdp/p... [amazon.com]
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