Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

It's True: Some People Just Don't Like Music

timothy posted about 6 months ago | from the maybe-it-just-makes-us-cry dept.

Music 268

sciencehabit writes "Researchers have found that between 1 and 3% of people don't like music of any kind. These people aren't tone deaf or incapable of grasping the emotional meaning of a song—their brains simply didn’t find listening to music rewarding. While some psychiatric disorders are associated with the loss of the ability to feel pleasure, called anhedonia, the music-haters represent the first evidence for not feeling pleasure from only one specific pleasing stimulant, a condition that has been dubbed music-specific anhedonia. Curious where you fall on the music reward spectrum? The researchers have an online quiz." I know I actively prefer silence to most music, but what I like, I like intensely. Update: 03/06 21:48 GMT by T : Sorry for the garbled submission; now fixed.

cancel ×

268 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Mind = Blown (5, Funny)

BisuDagger (3458447) | about 6 months ago | (#46422399)

The amount of statistical information in the OP and the bonus "online quiz" has made this the /. article of the day!

Re:Mind = Blown (4, Informative)

mythosaz (572040) | about 6 months ago | (#46422529)

Study also shows that between 1 and 3% of online survey takers don't give a crap about the questions they're being asked, and just want the survey to be over with.

Re:Mind = Blown (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46422613)

A study also shows that some people don't like popular music and would only enjoy the money reward. I wonder what they defined as popular music...

Re:Mind = Blown (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46422677)

I wonder what they defined as popular music...

Probably music that a lot of people like.

Re:Mind = Blown (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46423017)

Actually "popular music" means "everything that isn't classical music." It is not a function of how many people like it.

HEY (4, Funny)

marcello_dl (667940) | about 6 months ago | (#46422411)

I didn't know there were so many fans of Bieber.

Re:HEY (5, Interesting)

cayenne8 (626475) | about 6 months ago | (#46422653)

Exactly.

So very little music you hear out today can be considered "musical" at all.

I prefer the days (I'm a rock/blues type) when people/groups generally wrote their own songs, played their own instruments, and aside from a bit of reverb, and other treatments shy of fucking Autotune...had real vocals on their songs.

I guess that's why I still see young kids of today, wearing AC/DC or Stones' tshirts (reproductions), and listening to Led Zeppelin, when they should have really come up with giants of music of their own day to replace the ones of my day.

I was shocked the other day really.

It was an afternoon on the way home from work not long ago. I was warm and I had the windows down on the car, and I was blaring Dazed and Confused, the 30 min live version from TSRTS album. It was during the extender part of Jimmy Page bowing his guitar, just a lot of noise really, and unless you knew this piece on a live recording...you'd not know what this noise was, especially considering the age of the piece.

Well, I pulled up, rolled up the windows, turned the music down and the car off and got out to walk into the store.

Just outside the store, a young stock boy, like in his upper teens, was sitting outside smoking a cig on break I guess. As I walked by, he spoke to me and said "Oh man, I love Zeppelin...dazed and confused!!"

I smiled and said yeah, good stuff or something like that.

As I walked in the store, I thought more about it and thought, goodness...HTF did he know that song?

Its that the old stuff is still around...because something happened along the way, and nothing really great or unifying in music happened much after my younger years, and the old stuff is still strong enough to keep a following. It hasn't been supplanted yet.

I think part of it was...most music through my era, had been very closely built or nicked from the music of the generation before it. Somewhere in the late 80s or 90's maybe, there was a break in the continuum. And music splintered, and money took over...and well, you just didn't get the continuing stream of artist with control over their music and time to hone their skills, style and following like say a Led Zeppelin did. Music became throw away, and while there have always been one hit wonders, that is now the norm. Groups don't earn or aren't given a chance to develop staying power. Or, maybe they just don't work as hard to know their instruments and music. I dunno.

Maybe some combination of all of the above.

Ok, now, get off my lawn, and lemme get my anti-static gun to "clear" my album I'm about to throw on the turntable.

Re:HEY (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46422767)

Plenty of good modern music out there, it's just harder to find or not played on mainstream FM radio as in the 70s.

Re:HEY (5, Informative)

Cimexus (1355033) | about 6 months ago | (#46423365)

Agreed. There's heaps of excellent new (mostly indie) music being produced these days. Pop, rock, electronica, all genres under the sun. Problem is that most of it doesn't ever make the radio (particularly in the US). You kind of have to go out actively looking for good stuff ... it won't hit you in the face by chance as you'll never hear any of it in the mainstream media or in public places etc.

Re:HEY (1)

Jahoda (2715225) | about 6 months ago | (#46423559)

Absolutely correct. Seeding a Pandora station can really help expose oneself to all variety of new things. What I think is sad, though, is that there are not so much any more those good bands that "Everyone" is listening to, culturally. Seems like you have to be one of those people who cares enough about music to go find it. Otherwise, just listen to the same auto-tuned country music and over-compressed post-metal-garbage from your local Clearchannel wastehole.

Re:HEY (2)

cayenne8 (626475) | about 6 months ago | (#46423461)

Plenty of good modern music out there, it's just harder to find or not played on mainstream FM radio as in the 70s.

Possibly...

But maybe that's one of the things that went wrong...I mean since there's no real good mainstream way to easily discover new good music, if it is there but not easily accessible, then it really "isn't there" in actuality.

I mean, unless you're a kid or still living on the parents' teet, to have the free time to actively search for good music in the sea of banality, you don't see any good new stuff.

I mean, I have a day job...and my time away from that is spoken for, I don't have time to sit and devote hours to search the haystack for the odd shiny needle here and there.

But there may be something else. I mean, I speak with younger folks today about music, and to them, it is disposible. They tell me the download of even buy stuff, but it isn't something to keep and listen to for the rest of your life. It isn't worth it to get a GOOD listening set of tools, a good stereo, to listen to the music...I mean, the songs I grew up with, I BOUGHT all of it, and I feel so strongly about it, I invested over the years (not at once) quite a bit building a high quality home sound system, so that I can enjoy it to the fullest.

I can't imagine parting with my songs/albums/CDs ...I mean, if I"ve lost my hard copy I replace it and I keep hard copies to rip my digital versions I use for lessor listening environments (ipod in gym, the car, etc).

To me, the music that captures my heart, has never been disposable. What makes todays music disposable?

Re:HEY (4, Insightful)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 6 months ago | (#46422769)

It was an afternoon on the way home from work not long ago. I was warm and I had the windows down on the car, and I was blaring Dazed and Confused, the 30 min live version from TSRTS album. It was during the extender part of Jimmy Page bowing his guitar, just a lot of noise really, and unless you knew this piece on a live recording...you'd not know what this noise was, especially considering the age of the piece.

Well, I pulled up, rolled up the windows, turned the music down and the car off and got out to walk into the store.

Just outside the store, a young stock boy, like in his upper teens, was sitting outside smoking a cig on break I guess. As I walked by, he spoke to me and said "Oh man, I love Zeppelin...dazed and confused!!"

I smiled and said yeah, good stuff or something like that.

As I walked in the store, I thought more about it and thought, goodness...HTF did he know that song?

To be fair, the Zep represents that rare breed of musician whose art transcends generations. Just so happens the 1960's and 70's were chock-full of that kind of artist: Led Zeppelin, The Doors, Pink Floyd, the Beatles...

Well, OK, maybe just those four. Now that I think about it, I don't know anyone under the age of 25 or 26 who can name even one Jefferson Starship or Bread song.

Re:HEY (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46422953)

I don't know anyone under the age of 25 or 26 who can name even one Jefferson Starship or Bread song.

I was going to reply to this saying that I could, given that a friend in college introduced me to Bread. (I know the name Jefferson Starship, but am not familiar with them.) Then I realized that I turned 30 the other day. Time sure flies...

Re:HEY (1)

zenlessyank (748553) | about 6 months ago | (#46423035)

It's No Secret. Jefferson Airplane is the name of the real band.

Re:HEY (2)

Megane (129182) | about 6 months ago | (#46423341)

To be fair, the '80s had its share of good stuff too. The Police, Phil Collins both Genesis and solo, David Bowie, Huey Lewis, Michael Jackson before he got too weird, and a load of one-hit-wonders. (And nobody can name any Starship songs from the '80s either, except the heavily overplayed and overrated We Built This City.) I've got an iTunes playlist called "'80s Radio", which I have been filling up as I acquire old used CDs to rip from. It's mostly stuff from 1975-1988 (with some earlier stuff too) that you would hear on the radio during the early to mid '80s.

But the '90s? Hardly anything interested me from then. Black Hole Sun, and maybe a couple of things from Nirvana and RHCP. Then I discovered music from Japan, where they were making stuff that still had a lot of the feel of western music from the '80s, and also some German dark wave industrial (Rammstein and Eisbrescher). But the only new music from US/UK that I'll buy these days is when Weird Al comes out with a new CD.

Oh, and I think you forgot to mention The Rolling Stones, man.

Re:HEY (1)

cayenne8 (626475) | about 6 months ago | (#46423479)

Oh, and I think you forgot to mention The Rolling Stones, man.

The Stones and the Beatles are implied.

:)

The Stones (of their day) are my favorite band to listen to still.

Re:HEY (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46422931)

So very little music you hear out today can be considered "musical" at all.

I prefer the days (I'm a rock/blues type) when people/groups generally wrote their own songs, played their own instruments, and aside from a bit of reverb, and other treatments shy of fucking Autotune...had real vocals on their songs.

I hope this is sarcasm.

Every generation has great well crafted music, and every one has outside-written, overproduced pop that "real music" fans loathe. Believe it or not, we STILL have rock and blues. Just because you haven't made an attempt to find it doesn't mean it isn't there. It's hilarious that when people compare their favorite older music to modern music they always compare it to top-40 pop rather than the actual genre that would match. That autotune sentence of yours topped it off for me.

Somehow you manage to make Zeppelin and the Beatles represent the late 60s (not Three Dog Night or Neil Diamond), yet you automatically make pop radio music represent current music rather than, the MANY MANY bands who are extremely talented and creative without needing a lot of producing.

Ok, now, get off my lawn, and lemme get my anti-static gun to "clear" my album I'm about to throw on the turntable.

...

We still have turntables and EVERY BAND STILL RELEASES VINYL. I have vinyls of all of the music I consistently listen to and the only time I listen to MP3 is when I'm traveling.

Before you rant about an entire generation of musicians, please at least try to learn something first.

Re:HEY (1)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about 6 months ago | (#46423063)

We still have turntables and every band still releases vinyl.

Why?

Re:HEY (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46422957)

There's a ton of great music coming out, it's just not in the rock genre. Rock has gotten really stale, and hip-hop isn't far behind.

All the new artistry and experimentation is happening in alt-country, folk, electronic, and other niches. The problem with some of these genres, especially electronic, is just the sheer amount of garbage. And self-described alt-country and folk bands tend to evolve into rock bands, using rock/pop lyrical structures.

But, basically, the whole music scene is becoming much more diverse. It may never be like it was in the 1970s, where everybody knew who the greatest bands were. And it's hard to innovate when so many great bands came before. Much like in classical computer science, we're in the long tail of innovation, with a great part of the big discoveries behind us.

I intentionally refuse to listen to popular music. I force myself to crawl through iTunes and Amazon looking for new and interesting stuff. Now my collection of music spans from the 1950s to 2013, ranging from original country, Japanese rock (they peaked in the 1970s), Finnish polka, British
electronic, cumbia, tejano, etc. It's an unparalleled age to enjoy music, you just need to branch out in both time and space.

Re:HEY (1)

deathcloset (626704) | about 6 months ago | (#46423239)

Most digital paintings today have more subtlety, detail, accuracy, imagination, symbology and depth than the paintings of the great maestros of old - and there are exponentially larger numbers of them being churned out.

But something about the originals makes them "better".

I think it has something to do with simply being at the right place at the right time - like the beatles. The beatles didn't really make the era, the era made the beatles.

If you don't think that the cultural climate has more to do with the art that is created than the artists that create it just think of the parallel with this old question - if you had been born in china 1000 years ago, would you have been a christian?

Of course not.

If the beatles were born today, would they be world famous?

Of course not.

It's the climate - the fact that the beatles/zeppelin/whoever were able to be moved/inspired by the culture of the time to create what they did. And it has something to do with the technology of the time as well.

If you want to hear something that should blow your musical (artistic) appreciation gene out of the water then just listen to/watch Diego Stocco's Experibass video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v... [youtube.com]

He's caught in the culture of our time. He would not have been who he is even 20 years ago. He and his music are creations (indirectly, but definitely) of a culture of hackers and makers, just as the classic rockers and their rock were the creations of a culture of exploration and discovery.

Nowadays...well, the culture is not exploration and discovery, but exploitation and refinement....but I wonder if I sense a subtle change in the winds?....

Re:HEY (2)

wisnoskij (1206448) | about 6 months ago | (#46423335)

Well you got to remember. There is that the new generations "greats" are Justin Bieber's. But also these bands are often still playing. There are lots of 60-70 year old rockers out their still playing concerts.

I think it is simply the money angle. You make more money taking some nobody off of the street, getting him to sign over 99.5% of their income for 5 years, making them a star overnight, and then dropping them when the contract runs out and they demand more money. They do not have to be good, even the highly modified songs they put out do not have to be good, as long as the entire industry keeps the general same quality, no one will know what they are missing.

Re:HEY (1)

orgenegro (1847962) | about 6 months ago | (#46423437)

There is good music out there still, people just don't get exposed to it, so their comfort levels then grow to match those of clear channel syndicates that have been playing those same goddamn Led Zeppelin songs for as long as I've been alive (1980). A lot of this has to do with where bulges are within the population (boomers) and who listens to / controls the car radio. I personally am tired of songs about hobbits, and wish there was more Jack White (a descendent of Zeppelin for your example) on mainstream stations.
To give you an idea, there was a day and age where the disc jockey actually picked the music, and a band like the Doors could become particularly popular because the long cut of the song gave the DJ time to run to the bathroom. This is almost entirely gone, except for a number of college radio stations. Instead songs are cut down to nothingness so that the station can claim to play twenty songs non-stop, and the whole mix is made in one place and sent out to the rest of the syndicates (traveling across the country doesn't expose you to new music on the radio generally).
Most people don't want to hear new music except in a small window of their life. It's just something in our psychology.
I'll step off your lawn now.

Re:HEY (1)

Jahoda (2715225) | about 6 months ago | (#46423533)

Hey man - coming from a life long Zeppelin-man, and someone proud to call himself a person with broad, and (I believe) good taste in music - while it is true that there is no longer ANY mainstream-radio rock that is legitimate or good, there are, thanks to the democratizing effect of technology, a great many folks out there making incredible music. some of it very "indie", some of it touching the mainstream. Shouldn't close yourself off like that. At bare minimum, a Zeppelin man would love "White Denim" and/or "Gary Clark, Jr."... both from austin. But the thing that people like you and me need to accept is that rock is, for lack of a better term, dead. And by this I mean that rock isn't mainstream any more. It just isn't. It sure as hell isn't what "the kids" are into.

Re:HEY (1)

cayenne8 (626475) | about 6 months ago | (#46423571)

Hey man - coming from a life long Zeppelin-man, and someone proud to call himself a person with broad, and (I believe) good taste in music - while it is true that there is no longer ANY mainstream-radio rock that is legitimate or good, there are, thanks to the democratizing effect of technology, a great many folks out there making incredible music. some of it very "indie", some of it touching the mainstream. Shouldn't close yourself off like that. At bare minimum, a Zeppelin man would love "White Denim" and/or "Gary Clark, Jr."... both from austin. But the thing that people like you and me need to accept is that rock is, for lack of a better term, dead. And by this I mean that rock isn't mainstream any more. It just isn't. It sure as hell isn't what "the kids" are into.

Well, I did find Wolfmother a few years back, but they only did 2x albums...and I like some of the Black Keys.

But the thing is, there is no easy way to find good music....everyone even on these threads says "you have to actively search for it". Well, when you are out and have a real job and responsibilities and limited time for fun, you don't really have time to search through the huge sea of crap out there, to find the gems.

In real terms, it might as well not exist.

:(

I mean, I grew up finding all my great (now classic) bands driving around hearing them first time played on album rock stations. If it isn't easily findable, it isn't there.

But, thanx for the suggestions...I'll try to look those guys up you suggested. I really like any type of blues based rock really.

Re:HEY (3, Informative)

Darinbob (1142669) | about 6 months ago | (#46423567)

I'm sick of you young kids no longer listening to the legends of Liszt and Haydn.

Sorry... (2)

meglon (1001833) | about 6 months ago | (#46422419)

Another psychological pseudo experiment that draws incredibly stupid conclusions from a meaningless, waste of time, poorly thought out, mess. Read the description of what they did.

Re:Sorry... (3, Informative)

plopez (54068) | about 6 months ago | (#46422503)

So in other words, no different from any other /. post.

Oblig XKCD (2)

scorp1us (235526) | about 6 months ago | (#46422437)

XKCD [xkcd.com]

Re:Oblig XKCD (1)

imatter (2749965) | about 6 months ago | (#46423411)

and because of John Cage 1% - 3% becomes 0%, case dismissed! That might be my favorite XKCD.

disliker! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46422461)

I used to be one of those sort of people who disliked all music.

I was being narrow minded. I even self selected myself into making myself not like music. I would say it and make it true...

These days I still dont get gangster rap... except for a few rare cases.

Re:disliker! (3, Funny)

cayenne8 (626475) | about 6 months ago | (#46422681)

These days I still dont get gangster rap... except for a few rare cases.

Well, to be fair, the words rap and music ARE mutually exclusive terms.

;)

Jazz (4, Funny)

Curate (783077) | about 6 months ago | (#46422483)

I know a few people who can't stand music of any kind. They prefer jazz.

Re:Jazz (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46422599)

I'm not sure if you're being sarcastic or not, but I consider myself in the 1-3% mentioned in this article but don't mind jazz. I never listen to or buy music. My car's radio is set on my local NPR station and has never changed. I have no connection whatsoever to music of today...but I don't mind sitting in a club with some quiet jazz playing in the background. I've even been known to tap my foot a time or two. With that said, I feel no desire to ever seek it out on my own and prefer silence (or talk radio) over music.

Re:Jazz (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46423395)

I'm right there with you.

I don't like most popular music either. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46422485)

That doesn't mean that I don't like music at all.

Re:I don't like most popular music either. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46422541)

Dear Nitwit,

From the summary:

"Researchers have found that between 1 and 3% of people don't like music of any kind"

Allow me to highlight the pertinent part.

"Researchers have found that between 1 and 3% of people don't like music of any kind"

Once again:

"Researchers have found that between 1 and 3% of people don't like music of ANY kind"

Maybe I need to block-quote it to get it through your thick skull:

"Researchers have found that between 1 and 3% of people don't like music of ANY kind"

As in ANY. As in ALL MUSIC. Not just "popular" music. ALL music.

HTH

All of this animosity and hatred between A/C's... (1)

mmell (832646) | about 6 months ago | (#46422693)

Please . . . continue . . .

Re:I don't like most popular music either. (2)

Anrego (830717) | about 6 months ago | (#46422789)

Uhh...

From the article:

"...the students were asked to listen to popular music and rate how pleasurable they considered each song."

Re:I don't like most popular music either. (2)

Alain Williams (2972) | about 6 months ago | (#46423293)

Agreed. The slashdot summary is badly worded; the phrase don't like is ambiguous, it can either mean want it to stop or it does not speak to them (how the original article words it).

You use the different meaning than the article when you talk about is 'popular music'. In that I agree with you as, to my ears, most modern 'music' is not worth listening to and often grates my ears. I like Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Handel, etc, in the main but also trad jazz, some rock is OK. I get wound up by what I consider noise being blasted at me in some shops, swimming pools & other public places. I do realise that some people must like modern/pop stuff, but I do wonder how much of it will still be played in 20 years let alone 200.

What does "don't like" mean? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46422491)

I'm not listening to any music. But I play several instruments and sing and maintain GNU LilyPond, a music typesetting program, and do some arrangements of my own. It's not just recordings or broadcasts I don't listen to: I also don't go into concerts unless I am performing myself.

Probably like instructional videos or podcasts or whatever, as a listener, music is "wrong-paced" for me. When I'm playing myself, the speed and concentration span is just what I need at the moment.

Ringing in my Ears (4, Interesting)

Danathar (267989) | about 6 months ago | (#46422493)

Most of my youth was listening to Rush, Metallica and other hard rock/Metal bands of the 80's.

As a result I have ringing in my ears that I only notice when it's silent.

Have you ever heard "The Silence is Deafening?" Well, for me silence can literally BE deafening.

Re:Ringing in my Ears (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46422575)

All the good things in life kill you when indulged in too much, metal is no exception.

Re:Ringing in my Ears (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46422645)

All the good things in life kill you when indulged in too much, metal is no exception.

Particularly switchblades.

Re:Ringing in my Ears (1)

DarwinSurvivor (1752106) | about 6 months ago | (#46423443)

And mercury.

Re:Ringing in my Ears (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46422633)

This probably won't help you; but it can't hurt you. It helps me sometimes but I hardly ever listened to music at excessive volume in my youth. Your hair cells are shot of course. Mine might be too; but for other reasons. OK, here's the trick:

1. Put the palms of your hands over your ears. Note, use your palms. You are not sticking anything in your ears. It is important to use your palms so that...

2. Make sure that your hands are positioned so that the finger tips meet behind your head. You'll have to raise your elbows to do this. It should be possible unless you have a really big head combined with really small hands or... are missing a hand. I'm not sure if this will work for amputees.

3. OK, now the fun part. Tap your fingers together quickly. Get a good fast rhythm going. Make sure your palms are still over your ears, forming a nice seal.

4. Ironically, you'll hear a kind of ringing while you do this. You shouldn't have to do it too long, maybe 10 seconds although I've seen some sources say 30 seconds or a full minute.

5. Now take your hands away from your ears and relax... Wow!

How it works? Apparently there is some "circuitry" in the brain compensating for the loss of the hair cells and forming a runaway positive feedback loop. Yep, there's crap in our brains sometimes that's like a bad sound setup at the concerts you attended.

Note. The relief will most likely be temporary. You have a bad sound board. The mic level will most likely return to annoying volumes at some point. You may only get a minute or two of relief; but perhaps longer.

I don't know if this works for everybody. I suppose it wouldn't work if there is an actual oscillation near your hair cells.

Re:Ringing in my Ears (4, Informative)

Morpeth (577066) | about 6 months ago | (#46422683)

Just curious, have you ever had an extended period of silence, like hours or days? Why I ask is this, most people have some ringing in total silence (which is rare because we live with SO much background noise these days), but it settles down after an extensive period of being in silence or near silent conditions. Whenever I go backpacking somewhere very remote, my ears ring like hell for the first day or so, by the 2nd or 3rd day, not so much.

But if it's always there, you may have tinnitus, which unfortunately medicine been able to cure/resolve yet... :/

Re:Ringing in my Ears (1)

Morpeth (577066) | about 6 months ago | (#46422705)

which unfortunately medicine HAS NOT been able to cure/resolve yet - sorry bout that

Re:Ringing in my Ears (1)

rwa2 (4391) | about 6 months ago | (#46422701)

Meh, I get that when I start hyperventilating. You should just have your blood pressure checked.

I kinda thought that I didn't like music either, then some slashdot post recommended one of the streams at http://somafm.com/ [somafm.com] . Since then I've actually spent some money on an album or two. Though I still don't have an "entertainment" budget set aside to speak of.

Also want to put in a plug for http://sleepbot.com/ambience/b... [sleepbot.com] , which is generally "not music", at least not as you know it.

Re:Ringing in my Ears (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46422865)

Parent sounds like he's got tinnitus, and trust me, it sucks. It has literally driven people to suicide in bad cases. To say the least it's annoying even in a mild case like mine.

Re:Ringing in my Ears (4, Informative)

labnet (457441) | about 6 months ago | (#46422879)

Which is called tinnitus.
If you put anyone in a sound proof room for long enough, they will eventually hear noises.
The most common form of tinnitus is a high pitch ringing and the most common source is now believed to be in neural cortex (related to memory and overactive neurone feedback) rather than the ear, although the original source is often a defect in ear mechanism, such as a loss at a certain frequency where the brain is attempting to compensate.
In my case, it is 24x7 for the last 15 years. I can hold a hair dryer up to my head and still hear it.
The only medically accepted treatments are habituation(TRT)/masking which is teaching your brain to break the fight/flight response.
There are other techniques that have variable results, such as xanax, hypnosis, vegas nerve stimulation, notched music, and playing tones either side of the tinnitus frequency.
I heard a quote recently that if you could hear pain, that would be the sound of tinnitus.

Re:Ringing in my Ears (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46423151)

Most of my youth was listening to Rush, Metallica and other hard rock/Metal bands of the 80's.

As a result I have ringing in my ears that I only notice when it's silent.

Have you ever heard "The Silence is Deafening?" Well, for me silence can literally BE deafening.

Rush is not hard rock or metal. I don't get why so many folks love them and they are classified as metal.

Remember when? (1)

Drunkulus (920976) | about 6 months ago | (#46422525)

Ha! Slashdotted.

false (1)

bitt3n (941736) | about 6 months ago | (#46422549)

those people don't prefer silence. they just like to listen to the same song over and over, without, one might note, ever giving a dime to the original artist. [wikipedia.org]

Really? (2)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about 6 months ago | (#46422569)

Re:Really? (4, Insightful)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 6 months ago | (#46422837)

They must really hate this. [wikipedia.org]

I do.

Namely because, to me, it represents that self-serving form of 'performance art,' that has absolutely no artistic value but rather is an expression of the "artists" narcissistic desire to be the center of attention by doing something remarkably weird and/or stupid, and subsequently pontificating on the topic as if they're the first person in history to ever do anything weird and/or stupid. You know, the kind of garbage that art snobs devour.

FWIW, I despise most of Andy Warhol's work for pretty much the same reasons.

Re:Really? (1)

Anrego (830717) | about 6 months ago | (#46422923)

Totally with you.

Sometimes abstract art is actually novel, or does something in a way that actually expresses something.

This type of shit is just pretentious and boring.

"Study" (2)

grimStone (3536793) | about 6 months ago | (#46422583)

what a horrendously designed experiment. Population bias? Sample size? Different musical tastes? I don't know about the rest of you, but i'd prefer silence over that what is "popular" these days.

Depends on the music (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46422585)

I've been listening to this tune since yesterday, it just cheers me up.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v... [youtube.com]

Right... I believe You. (2)

lunchbox134 (1932364) | about 6 months ago | (#46422591)

"...the students were asked to listen to popular music and rate how pleasurable they considered each song." I have to wonder how many hipster-types just dont find popular music pleasurable. I for one cant find much Pop music, as that is what pop basicallly means; or for that matter much popular music all that pleasurable. The overwhelming majority of it hits that subliminal message trigger in my brain. That and ask most music majors or theorists. much of it is composed of the same limited set of chord progressions.

Re:Right... I believe You. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46423483)

That and ask most music majors or theorists. much of it is composed of the same limited set of chord progressions.

Its all Canon in D

Well, some people don't like single malts (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46422601)

either, but I think they're probably reptilians or Greys in disguise.

The fuck kind of story... (2)

meta-monkey (321000) | about 6 months ago | (#46422605)

In other news, 1-3% of /. articles aren't complete shit.

Everyone I know hates music (3, Funny)

Cro Magnon (467622) | about 6 months ago | (#46422615)

As soon as I start singing, they throw rotten fruit at me!

Now are these people trainable? (3, Interesting)

hey! (33014) | about 6 months ago | (#46422651)

Let's discard the people who can't recognize tunes or recognize emotions in music -- although they are interesting in themselves. Can the people who don't like music be trained to like music? In other words do they lack associated life experiences with music?

Another question is whether a better understanding would lead to enjoyment. We tend *not* to like music we haven't been exposed to (e.g. foreign music or young people's music).

Personally, I like to listen to music when I'm building something; this also correlates to what works for me when listening to lectures. I seldom need to look at notes, but I have to take them otherwise my mind wanders. I can even doodle, it doesn't matter. Somehow having my hands occupied seems to help my mind track external stimuli better.

Re:Now are these people trainable? (1)

roman_mir (125474) | about 6 months ago | (#46422799)

1. When I share music with someone I feel a special connection with that person. 1
2. In my free time I hardly listen to music. 5
3. I like listen to music that contains emotion. 3
4. Music keeps me company when I'm alone. 2
5. I don't like to dance, not even with music I like. 2
6. Music makes me bond with other people. 1
7. I inform myself about music I like. 3
8. I get emotional listening to certain pieces of music. 5
9. Music calms and relaxes me. 2
10. Music often makes me dance. 3
11. I'm always looking for new music. 1
12. I can become tearful or cry when I listen to a melody that I like very much. 2
13. I like to sing or play an instrument with other people. 2
14. Music helps me chill out. 2
15. I can't help humming or singing along to music that I like. 2
16. At a concert I feel connected to the performers and the audience. 2
17. I spend quite a bit of money on music and related items. 1
18. I sometimes feel chills when I hear a melody that I like. 1
19. Music comforts me. 1
20. When I hear a tune I like a lot I can't help tapping or moving to its beat. 3

MUSIC SEEKING: 19
EMOTION EVOCATION: 30
MOOD REGULATION: 14
SENSORI-MOTOR: 39
SOCIAL: 22
MUSIC REWARD: 14

I don't particularly know what this means, I don't spend time listening to music much at all, used to long ago, I can play a couple instruments myself though and have absolute pitch. I think I just don't have much time for music and it distracts me.

Re:Now are these people trainable? (4, Interesting)

ThatAblaze (1723456) | about 6 months ago | (#46423007)

No.

I am one of the 1-3% mentioned. When I put my headphones on it's always an audio book. When I'm not listening to a book or doing something useful I find silence to be a lot more fulfilling than music. Music just gets in the way of constructive thought, and once you have heard a song a couple of times you've heard the song. Time to move on to something new.

Music just seems like a low-productivity and meaninglessly repetitive medium, irregardless of the quality of the song being played.

This is something I've always believed, but this is the first time I've ever seen that belief validated in any way by anyone. I think society does an excellent job of training people to like music already, and of telling people that they are weird if they don't.

Re:Now are these people trainable? (2)

hey! (33014) | about 6 months ago | (#46423135)

I'm not saying you *should* like music, questioning your personal experience with music, or challenging your position on the value of music.

What I'm interested is in whether the ability to like music or not is "baked in", either by genetics or early childhood experience. I think there's a good chance it could be, given the close relationship of music to language and what we think we know about neural plasticity and learning language. But that's just a hunch. Maybe it's a wrong hunch.

Who knows? Maybe if we figured out how to switch on music appreciation we might be a step toward enabling older people to learn to become fluent in foreign languages, something which is clearly practical.

Re:Now are these people trainable? (1)

ThatAblaze (1723456) | about 6 months ago | (#46423337)

I've felt the emotion inherent in a particularly poignant melody. I've enjoyed songs. It's not a switch, it's a priority. I prefer to take in information or to process information that I have previously taken in. I find music to be the same mental state repeated over and over again.

I actually think it's due to having more ability than the common person to self-modulate my mental state, not less. I don't need music to put myself in a particular state of mind. I can do that all on my own. When I am in a group (like a party perhaps) that is all experiencing a common mental pattern due to having the same music played (loudly), then music makes sense. When I am alone then music makes no sense.

Perhaps the ability to transcend the need for music is something that you could be taught. Perhaps we could find out how to switch on a greater range of experiences in your mind.

If such "people" exist, I don't believe they can (1)

MXB2001 (3023413) | about 6 months ago | (#46422691)

belong to the same phylum as I do....

Count Feynman as one who disliked music (4, Interesting)

jmichaelg (148257) | about 6 months ago | (#46422727)

Richard Feynman said music sounded like noise to him. Didn't make any difference what type of music it was. He did however, like rhythm which is why he played percussion instruments.

Re:Count Feynman as one who disliked music (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46422913)

In surely you're joking he mentions liking brazilian music multiple times.

Maybe they could get hearing-ear dogs (1)

nbauman (624611) | about 6 months ago | (#46422779)

http://www.cell.com/current-bi... [cell.com]

Voice-Sensitive Regions in the Dog and Human Brain Are Revealed by Comparative fMRI

        Highlights
        This is the first comparative neuroimaging study of a nonprimate species and humans
        Functional analogies were found between dog and human nonprimary auditory cortex
        Voice areas preferring conspecific vocalizations were evidenced in the dog brain
        Brain sensitivity to vocal cues of emotional valence was found in both species

Summary

During the approximately 18–32 thousand years of domestication [1], dogs and humans have shared a similar social environment [2]. Dog and human vocalizations are thus familiar and relevant to both species [3], although they belong to evolutionarily distant taxa, as their lineages split approximately 90–100 million years ago [4]. In this first comparative neuroimaging study of a nonprimate and a primate species, we made use of this special combination of shared environment and evolutionary distance. We presented dogs and humans with the same set of vocal and nonvocal stimuli to search for functionally analogous voice-sensitive cortical regions. We demonstrate that voice areas exist in dogs and that they show a similar pattern to anterior temporal voice areas in humans. Our findings also reveal that sensitivity to vocal emotional valence cues engages similarly located nonprimary auditory regions in dogs and humans. Although parallel evolution cannot be excluded, our findings suggest that voice areas may have a more ancient evolutionary origin than previously known.

Wrong quote used (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46422781)

I love music. But think I would have been a 1% on their test.

" In the first, the students were asked to listen to ***popular music*** and rate how pleasurable they considered each song. "

Music (4, Insightful)

ledow (319597) | about 6 months ago | (#46422897)

I have never bought a record, tape, CD, MP3 or anything else in my life.

Music is one of those things that just has no part in my life. I can appreciate it. I've been to concerts and ochestras. I quite enjoy it. But not enough to listen to it on loop 24 hours a day.

I spent many years spending hours travelling in the car with the radio on. It was for nothing else but to cure the "drone" of the car. I've not missed having it since I quit that job and don't travel far enough to even turn the radio on any more.

You know how the average person consider paintings? That's me with music. Yeah, I might have a few that I like, but I don't consume them all day long. I have enough to adorn my stereo to cover the occasional awkward silence and that's about it, and most of those someone has bought for me or I've been given for free.

I disable all music in games. It's the first thing I do before I even try the game - install, load up, turn off music. I just find it a distraction and don't get any value from it at all. (And yet, I have written games and put music into them because I understand some people like that).

If I do listen to anything, it's gentle, smooth music with predictable backings. Think "Sitting on the dock of the bay". I don't even have a single music file on my phone.

It's not something important to me, nor is it something I hate (there's a lot of music I hate, but it's not enough to be generalised hate of music). I can go to parties where music is playing and not go out of my mind, but my preference is no music.

Think of that next time you write a game and INSIST that the volume slider affects both sound effects and background music. You're just annoying me for no good reason.

Re:Music (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46423067)

You are the 1%. ...LOL, captcha was "income"

Re:Music (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46423119)

Drone of the car?!?!

That's sweet sweet pure car music.

Re:Music (2)

ThatAblaze (1723456) | about 6 months ago | (#46423197)

Our society is so mindlessly pro music that whenever I've told people that "I don't like music" they look at me with a blank stare. It's just not something you are allowed to say in society today because some people define their lives by what music they like and what music they don't like. I, personally, find music to be a waste of time and meaninglessly repetitive in most situations.

Cudos to the people who made this study for bringing this phenomenon out into the open. For a long time the people who spend all day obsessing about which type of music they like have drowned out the voice of the people who would rather do something more productive.

Not that it's a revolution or anything. It only really becomes important when marketers or, say, someone you are on a date with asks you "what type of music are you in to?" The assumption there is that you must be in to some kind of music, because everyone is. But not everyone is.

Re:Music (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46423585)

I'm just going to bury this reply here, but on a student exchange program in Honduras, my best friend stayed with a Pech family. He is a great guitar player, but doesn't sing much. When they would sit around telling stories and singing, he wouldn't sing, telling them that he can't. The family was utterly confused by this, as the Pech language is a tonal language, so if you have a voice and can speak, you can sing (not necessarily well, though).

Re:Music (1)

kaehler (43680) | about 6 months ago | (#46423599)

When my wife watches a movie the sound track is very important her. She will ask me after the movie how I liked it and my response is "was there music?" I am also in the 1-3% group and people think something is wrong with me...

Re:Music (1)

wisnoskij (1206448) | about 6 months ago | (#46423237)

I was going to say "This ^. This is me", But you lost me at games.

I think music is fine, but sort of 1 dimensional and boring theoretically. When I have listened to it I enjoy it, but is has never formed a habit so I only do it when I make myself do it once every few years.

I do not understand why it really exists in society, but it is an incredibly important part of other media. You cannot make a game without music, for the vast majority of projects. It is so incredibly important, for that purpose.

Re:Music (1)

nblender (741424) | about 6 months ago | (#46423325)

I'm the opposite. If I don't have music playing, then my brain continuously replays the last thing I heard, ad-nauseum. After a couple hours of that, I get irritable and lose the ability to concentrate. I notice it most when sitting on the tractor mowing, or tilling, or blowing snow. Some mindless activity that requires little thought but still some concentration... If I can put something in my head, I become instantly happier.

I even wake up with the same song in my head that was there when I went to bed.

Re:Music (1)

wjcofkc (964165) | about 6 months ago | (#46423439)

What about Ravel Bolero?

They may not have found it. (3, Insightful)

gurps_npc (621217) | about 6 months ago | (#46422911)

Until I was 30 I disliked most forms of music. Frankly I was shocked that so many people thought sound designed to influence their mental state was a good idea. Especially when you most often have no choice about what is playing.

Then I found dance and I fell in love with tango.

If I had not found it I might still dislike music.

It does not surprise me that 1-3% of the population has not found music they like - yet.

Re:They may not have found it. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46423045)

I'm the same....as I've gotten older (post 30 in particular) I've found that I like more and fifferent types of music (pop, country, rap, jazz, old, new, etc). Bieber will always suck though.

RIAA's Response (2)

Jason Levine (196982) | about 6 months ago | (#46422947)

RIAA's Response: These people *claim* not to like music? Why that's unamerican! If this catches on, the entire music industry will collapse!!!!! We must pass immediate legislation declaring "not liking music" to be illegal. To prove consumers like music, they will be required to purchase at least three albums from RIAA-approved labels every year. Failure to do so will be considered proof that the consumer is actually an Internet pirate stealing our works and will be sued into oblivion.

What Percentage of Adults are Deaf? (3, Interesting)

ohieaux (2860669) | about 6 months ago | (#46422959)

I've seen estimates from the US government at 2%. Sounds like 1-3% wouldn't be able to hear music anyway. Didn't RTFA, perhaps they accounted for that.

Re:What Percentage of Adults are Deaf? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46423399)

They had a survey of college students. They basically asked true/false questions of people about how music makes them feel, how they seek it out, how it connects them to other people, etc. They took the 10 least musically-inclined response as an experimental group, and basically compare their interest between two activities (listening to music vs. getting money as a game reward), and also compared against a control. They confirmed that the 10 people really just don't care about music. That makes it the first controlled experiment confirming some people just don't get any pleasure out of music (dubbed music-specific anhedonia), distinct from people who don't get pleasure out of anything (anhedonia).

Personally, I like music, but I can relate with those here who chime in to say the also don't get anything out of it. Some people just fixate on it a way that doesn't seem healthy to fixate on anything. After all, if someone walked around all day with something like an iChew strapped across his mouth so he never had to be without pleasurable tastes, we'd probably think he was a bit nuts.... (And sometimes nougat.)

I don't listen to music (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46422969)

Sometimes it gets embarrassing when people ask me what my favorite song is. But the truth is that I don't like music. It's distracting, rarely any good and the circumstances surrounding it (celebrities, the RIAA, etc) make it even more unappealing.

Re:I don't listen to music (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46423575)

I do. I'm a Michael Bolton fan. For my money, I don't know if it gets any better than when he sings "When a Man Loves a Woman". I celebrate the guy's entire catalogue.

Finally (1)

hippo (107522) | about 6 months ago | (#46422999)

Someone has taken the trouble to study Simply Red fans.

Just 1-3%? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46423015)

Seems that the majority of high up execs at companies don't like music so perhaps there is a reason why large numbers of the most successful people don't like music. It gets in the way of business. Industry in general does not like music, it costs money and gets in the way. I can just imagine the music that they listened to in college. It seems like getting an MBA or moving up in management today includes a deadning of the mind to avoid the distraction of useless things like music. Or any form of non essential intellectual stimulation for that matter.

Either that or individuals who focus on climbing corporate latters only perceive music to be a product so they completely miss what is music really is and only think of it in terms of what it does for them and their pocket book. What I am alluding to here is that just perhaps the narrow minded individuals succeed in climbing the corporate ladder and these climbers are made up largely of the 1-3% of individuals who are not stimulated intellectually by things like music. Hitler was stimulated by music and art but only in a narrow sense and very selectively. It seems that the same is true of corporate strong men and politicians. Just perhaps there is something in the genetic make up of these individuals that blinds them to intellectual stimulation and they develope their senses in only a focused narrow way.

A Bach fugue or Elgar's Enigma Variations would only scare them or even anger them where they to actually listen to such things.

Re:Just 1-3%? (1)

PPH (736903) | about 6 months ago | (#46423455)

It gets in the way of business.

I think this has generally been disproven. Granted, there will be problems when selecting materiel to be played over a P.A. system that is acceptable to all. But headphones have ameliorated this issue.

I was reading a book about the design and production of the VT fuze during WWII recently. Plants involved in tedious production steps found that piping in music sped up production notably .... with one exception. A hit song for a time was 'Deep in the Heart of Texas'. When this was piped in, the workers would hum along with the tune, as they did with others. But there is a repeating part in the tune that consists of four accented beats. When that part came around, the workers stopped for a moment to tap their tools on their workbenches in time with the beats. The drop in productivity was measurable. But management decided not to ban the song, as it eventually dropped from the top of the charts.

The issue of upper management's perception of music, or outside intellectual pursuits as being anathema to productivity may have something to do with the selection criteria for MBA candidates. People who pursue such degrees might just be less capable of multitasking and not posses the mental faculties necessary.

See The Dilbert Principle [wikipedia.org] and this [dilbert.com] .

For these people ... (1)

PPH (736903) | about 6 months ago | (#46423163)

... there is still rap.

You like silence? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46423209)

I thought John Cage already copyrighted silence. Also, it implies that you do like listening to music, after all.

And did you remember to pay royalties for not listening to anything? It should be obvious that silence of other lengths is merely a derivative work, right... ?

Anti-Social? (1)

wisnoskij (1206448) | about 6 months ago | (#46423271)

I always wondered if my relative dislike of music was a symptom of my anti-social personality. Does anyone know anything about this idea, does the original article go into other similarities these people share/the reason they are like this?

It's not about hating music (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46423281)

The article says, that 1-3% of people are suffering from a psychiatric disorder that prevents them from enjoying music. Although, to be honest, I have no idea where they pulled those numbers from if they tested only 1000 people.

That's me to a tee (1)

ItsIllak (95786) | about 6 months ago | (#46423489)

Not read the article (sorry, it's just tradition not to), but sounds like me - The only music I really tend to like is music that reminds me of my youth - nothing else much inspires me or attracts me.

Pretty close to that myself. (1)

BStroms (1875462) | about 6 months ago | (#46423605)

People never want to believe that, but I've never much cared for music. I think music can enhance the mood of another form of media like movies or video games, and I can enjoy the lyrics to a funny song, in same way I enjoy hearing a good joke but don't want it told to me over and over again. That's as far as it goes. I don't listen to any music for the sake of listening to music. The only music I own at home are sound tracks that came with video games I've purchased, none of which I've ever used.

I find music annoying when it's playing while I'm doing something else. It really does bother me when it's playing at random places like bowling alleys or stores, serving no purpose but to make it harder to talk with other people. The louder it is the more it drives me crazy for that reason. I've never even downloaded a song, legally or otherwise, and would never turn the radio to music station when driving.

Still, it's not that I don't like music. It's just that the enjoyment I get from it is so low that I get much more entertainment just getting lost in my own imagination, an activity for which I find music to be an unwanted distraction. So even with nothing else to do, I'd rather sit there in silence than listen to music.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>