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Crytek Ports CRYENGINE To Linux Support Ahead of Steam Machines Launch

Unknown Lamer posted about 6 months ago | from the getting-crowded-over-here dept.

Linux 132

probain was the first to submit news that Crytek has officially announced the port of their CRYENGINE game engine to Linux and will be demoing it at the Game Developers Conference next week. Quoting: "During presentations and hands-on demos at Crytek's GDC booth, attendees can see for the first time ever full native Linux support in the new CRYENGINE. The CRYENGINE all-in-one game engine is also updated with the innovative features used to recreate the stunning Roman Empire seen in Ryse – including the brand new Physically Based Shading render pipeline, which uses real-world physics simulation to create amazingly realistic lighting and materials in CRYENGINE games."

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Cryopreservation? (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46454847)

Could this result in cryopreservation becoming mainstream and generating massively increased lifespans for people who are wealthy enough to afford it? Would you trust a for-profit corporation to not pull the plug on you in 30 or 40 years when the new board of directors takes over?

Re:Cryopreservation? (5, Funny)

Sockatume (732728) | about 6 months ago | (#46454855)

I genuinely want to know what you think you just read.

Re:Cryopreservation? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46454889)

That took some radical mind alteration to accomplish.

Re:Cryopreservation? (3, Interesting)

Jaysyn (203771) | about 6 months ago | (#46454947)

I just want some of whatever he's smoking.

Re:Cryopreservation? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46454997)

He's talking about the new form of cryopreservation where you come back as a character in future Crysis sequels.

Re:Cryopreservation? (4, Funny)

SpankiMonki (3493987) | about 6 months ago | (#46455061)

Could this result in cryopreservation becoming mainstream and generating massively increased lifespans for people who are wealthy enough to afford it? Would you trust a for-profit corporation to not pull the plug on you in 30 or 40 years when the new board of directors takes over?

Not to mention that this greedy corporation has an unfair market advantage: they've already developed the necessary defrosting technology to re-animate all those wealthy frozen clients,. The government really should look into the activities of this "Steam" business.

Re:Cryopreservation? (1)

rvw (755107) | about 6 months ago | (#46455337)

Could this result in cryopreservation becoming mainstream and generating massively increased lifespans for people who are wealthy enough to afford it?

No, but it could result in the year of the Linux Desktop!

Would you trust a for-profit corporation to not pull the plug on you in 30 or 40 years when the new board of directors takes over?

Yes, if they open source it!

I think it's time we all said... (5, Insightful)

jamlam (1101193) | about 6 months ago | (#46454851)

Thanks Valve!

Re:I think it's time we all said... (0)

cyborg_monkey (150790) | about 6 months ago | (#46455577)

There's a cost.... there's always a cost.

Re:I think it's time we all said... (4, Funny)

Immerman (2627577) | about 6 months ago | (#46455907)

So long as the cost is paid by Microsoft in the form of decreased OS market share, I don't see the problem.

Linux sales figures (4, Insightful)

DoofusOfDeath (636671) | about 6 months ago | (#46454857)

There's one issue with Linux game sales that I hope these publishers keep in mind. There are a lot of games that they're porting to Linux, where I already bought a copy of the game for Windows. If there had been a Linux version at the time, I would have bought that instead.

So I hope they don't get the wrong idea when I don't buy certain games. If in the future I know a game I want will be released on Linux within a reasonable time, I'll hold out.

Re:Linux sales figures (4, Insightful)

houstonbofh (602064) | about 6 months ago | (#46454903)

The thing is that as a Linux sale you have no value. You would by the game without the port, so there is no value in porting the game for you. The people of value are the ones who will not by the game unless it has a Linux version. Hopefully, as Linux gaming becomes more viable, less people will be willing to run Windows just to play games. Publishers need to see a financial hit for not supporting Linux before they will spend serious money to do so.

Re:Linux sales figures (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46454977)

I agree with you, but buy the time you decide to by the ported game, they're already obsolete.

Re:Linux sales figures (3, Insightful)

camperdave (969942) | about 6 months ago | (#46455551)

I agree with you, but buy the time you decide to by the ported game, they're already obsolete.

If you've never played it because it was unavailable on your platform, then it's not obsolete. It's brand new.

Reruns (2)

tepples (727027) | about 6 months ago | (#46456115)

Swapping "buy" and "by":

by the time you decide to buy the ported game, they're already obsolete.

Tell that to Nintendo, whose Virtual Console prints money. And tell that to Turner Classic Movies, TV Land, and Antenna TV, television networks that specialize in reruns.

Re:Linux sales figures (4, Insightful)

CastrTroy (595695) | about 6 months ago | (#46455017)

Wouldn't it be nice if you could go and download all the ported games that you originally bought for Windows? It would give them a good indication of which Windows purchasers really wanted to have a Linux version in the first place, but only bought the Windows version because a Linux version didn't exist. It would probably show quite a bit of goodwill towards the customers. New game sales should be this way as well. Purchase 1 version, run it on whichever platform is supported.

Re: Linux sales figures (1)

VTBlue (600055) | about 6 months ago | (#46455123)

This is why I don't switch from iOS to android

Re: Linux sales figures (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46456587)

Do you mean the applications you have bought on iOS cannot be taken with you to Android, effectively locking you in the platform?

Re:Linux sales figures (1)

westlake (615356) | about 6 months ago | (#46455209)

Wouldn't it be nice if you could go and download all the ported games that you originally bought for Windows?

Look at the stats for any Humble Bundle. The Linux gamer will pay a stiff premium for the Linux port from Windows --- and never yield a return more than 1/8 of Windows sales.

Re:Linux sales figures (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46456291)

It's in the freaking HEADLINE. this is because of steambox. They want Crytek games to run on steambox. The fact that it might also run on linux is of 0 consequence to them.

RTFA: nobody mentioned Steam (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46457299)

Read the article: Steam and Steambox/SteamOS are never mentioned. Linux is.

Re:Linux sales figures (1)

houstonbofh (602064) | about 6 months ago | (#46456679)

This was not the case in the first few bundles. You know... Beck when not all of the games were plat-formers and side scrollers...

Re:Linux sales figures (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46456921)

"The idiot" thinks the number of "the linux gamer"s will remain constant, yet doesn't consider that "the steambox gamer" will be added to this.

Based on "the article", "the game developer" thinks "the steambox gamer" will be significant enough to merit porting "the games".

As an aside, "the public" is also irritated by "the sweeping generalizations" you use, seemingly for no other purpose than to piss off "the labeled".

Ported games DO work on Linux (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46455341)

The games I've bought, nearly 110 of them: 50 of them run on the Mac, 30 of them run on Linux. And I bought just paid once for each game in my library, not per version of the game.

Re:Linux sales figures (5, Informative)

DrGamez (1134281) | about 6 months ago | (#46455933)

Currently Valve does this, and there are mechanics from within Steam to facilitate this. Games can have "Steam Play", which means if you can install Steam on that machine - you should (in theory) be able to play the game on that machine.

Any game you buy that has "Steam Play" enabled lets you download whatever version appropriate for your system. For example, Portal 2 is (or has been) releasing for Linux recently, and if you've bought the Windows version, you do not need to now go and buy the Linux version, you just click to install it while on your Linux box.

I'm really hoping developers will use this - even for their years-old games, because the point brought up a few replies back by DoofusOfDeath is true. I really hope some of the first newcomers to the Linux marketplace won't be turned off because a port of their 7 year old game didn't sell as well as their Windows counter-part did.

Re:Linux sales figures (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46456209)

DRM that isn't designed to just fuck-over the customer? Surely not.

Re:Linux sales figures (3, Informative)

grumbel (592662) | about 6 months ago | (#46456025)

Wouldn't it be nice if you could go and download all the ported games that you originally bought for Windows?

With Steam you can do that. If you bought a game there, Steam gives you all the different OS versions there are and all the languages the game was released in. There are other shops (most annoyingly GOG) that won't give you a Linux version, even if it's available, but as long as you bought the game is on Steam or activated it on Steam with a key you'll be fine.

Re:Linux sales figures (1)

thejynxed (831517) | about 6 months ago | (#46456313)

I cut GOG some slack, because they are a much, much smaller shop than Valve, and they keep their releases for each platform as a separate cost/price in order to A) pay the publishers/copyright holders B) pay the teams that port/package those releases to the OSes they offer them for.

They just don't have that kind of bank account or manpower to be handing out free extra copies just because you run Linux AND Windows.

Re:Linux sales figures (1)

grumbel (592662) | about 6 months ago | (#46456605)

GOG doesn't have to pay anybody to offer a Linux version. When it comes to modern indie games all they have to do is give developers a place to upload them. With Mac versions they already do that, which you get for free if you bought the game. Only Linux versions are excluded. With those old DOS games things are a little bit trickier, as GOG themselves would need to do the porting work, but even that isn't exactly rocket science, DOSBox exist on Linux and simply offering the game as plain old .zip instead of self-extracting Windows installer would already go along way to make using GOG on Linux much easier. I really don't get why they avoid Linux as much as they do, as they could support it with very little extra work.

Re:Linux sales figures (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46458395)

How are you this certain they don't have to pay a licensing fee each time a copy is sold rather than each time a game is sold? Did you read their agreements?

Re:Linux sales figures (2)

tepples (727027) | about 6 months ago | (#46456145)

Wouldn't it be nice if you could go and download all the ported games that you originally bought for Windows?

"Buy" a game in Steam for Windows, and your copy of Steam for Linux using the same credentials will get the port once it's published. And vice versa.

Re:Linux sales figures (2)

bmacs27 (1314285) | about 6 months ago | (#46455091)

In the rapidly approaching future, Windows only gamers will have no value.

Re:Linux sales figures (2)

lordofthechia (598872) | about 6 months ago | (#46455627)

I think there's more value than an extra sale here.

Valve is offering game developers a single target in Steam OS.

Right now a game developer has to contend with: Windows XP, Vista, 7, 8, 32bit or 64 bit, various versions of Direct X (different versions of windows are limited to certain Direct X versions). Bug in the OS causing you grief? Submit a request to Microsoft and hope it gets fixed (hah!) or code around it. Getting customers to upgrade to the latest windows is not always feasible due to the cost.

SteamOS will offer one version. Which version do you support? The latest one. 64 bit or 32 bit? SteamOS is only 64 bit. Bug in the OS affecting your program? You can look up the code, fix it, and submit the patch to Valve. Did you find a fix or setting that'll improve everyone's Steam OS experience? Submit it!

Hmm (1)

AlphaBro (2809233) | about 6 months ago | (#46456223)

Except the Linux community isn't expecting you to support SteamOS alone, they want you to support Linux at large, and that is substantially harder than supporting XP and up Tell me, are you a developer? Your simplistic views make me think that you're either not a developer, or you're not a very good one. How often do you think OS bugs actually get in the way of development? And when they do, do you really think the team that encounters the bug is going to have the free time or will to context switch to OS development mode?

Re:Hmm (4, Interesting)

lordofthechia (598872) | about 6 months ago | (#46456499)

Except the Linux community isn't expecting you to support SteamOS alone, they want you to support Linux at large

As part of the Linux community, I'll have to disagree. This also came up the last time Steam on Linux was discussed [slashdot.org] . As was concluded there, each distro can implement their own package that installs steam and any missing dependencies necessary to get it to work. Alternatively, the user can devote a small partition to Steam OS and switch out when they're done working for the day and want to game instead. In fact, the user can install SteamOS and separately install the steam client in their main distro and have them both share the same game install folder and only boot into SteamOS when a game isn't working as well as expected in their favored distro.

That said the developer can just choose to support SteamOS and leave it at that. As a *bonus* the game should work in other Linux distros.

Re:Hmm (0)

AlphaBro (2809233) | about 6 months ago | (#46458425)

You didn't really address any of what I said: the Linux ecosystem is hopelessly splintered in ways Windows will never be, so what Valve is doing amounts to bringing gaming to SteamOS, not Linux. Developing a game that supports XP and up is much easier than developing one that supports every flavor of Linux, and this is going to ruffle some feathers here, but Windows development is just easier in general. The tooling is far more mature than what the open source community has offered, and MS has furthered the divide year after year. There's a reason pretty much every AAA game is developed on Windows. Say what you will about proprietary software, but there are advantages to having someone else conduct ecosystem testing. Most game shops simply cannot afford to effectively and sustainably test their software on the multitude of Linux distros and hardware configurations out there.

If, at the end of the day, dual booting SteamOS is a requirement to reliably play games, I don't really see this as a solution to the Linux gaming problem. If I have to dual boot, I'll fork over the money for a valid Windows license so I have access to a much, much larger library of games, drivers that fully utilize my GPU, etc.

Re:Linux sales figures (5, Insightful)

NickFortune (613926) | about 6 months ago | (#46457735)

I think there's more value than an extra sale here.

Valve is offering game developers a single target in Steam OS.

Your're not wrong - but I think there's more to it than that, even.

Valve's concern is Microsoft's app store. They feel that MS are looking to lock down the platform, Apple style, and use the Ap store to charge a surcharge on any software installed, and to control what can and cannot be released. That impacts Valve both as a game developer, and as a distributor via Steam. I seem to recall they went on record to that effect not so long ago.

So Valve are throwing resources at turning Linux into a viable gaming platform. It's an investment in the future for them. And from the look of it, Crytek have come to more or less the same conclusion.

That's how I read it, anyway.

Re:Linux sales figures (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46456023)

The thing is that as a Linux sale you have no value.

The ones with no extra value are people who buy a game when it first comes out because they are die hard fans or have enough disposable income to not care about particular details. There are a lot of corners you could cut without impacting the value of those customers, even more if not trying to worry about what the sales of future games will look like.

But what of the people who wait until something goes on sale or drops in normal price until they buy it? How much sooner would they get it if there were fewer obstacles for them to play the game? A lot of Linux users bought the Windows version anyway, but how many of them paid full release price for it, versus how many waited until it was on sale or in a bundle? Would they have bought other games, or more likely to buy things on impulse if it ran natively on their primary OS?

First day (1)

phorm (591458) | about 6 months ago | (#46456095)

Not entirely true. For many titles, I might be the game on Windows if it comes up on sale for cheap. For launch titles, I'd be more likely to buy them sooner (at the full price) if they were cross-platform/linux-compatible.

From what I've seen, many others are in the same boat.

Re:Linux sales figures (1)

Nyder (754090) | about 6 months ago | (#46454927)

There's one issue with Linux game sales that I hope these publishers keep in mind. There are a lot of games that they're porting to Linux, where I already bought a copy of the game for Windows. If there had been a Linux version at the time, I would have bought that instead.

So I hope they don't get the wrong idea when I don't buy certain games. If in the future I know a game I want will be released on Linux within a reasonable time, I'll hold out.

This is the engine they are currently using for upcoming/current games, not the old one they used for the older games. What it should mean is that they would have linux version of the games when they have windows (and the various consoles).

But I agree with you about porting older games.

Re:Linux sales figures (1)

Spad (470073) | about 6 months ago | (#46454999)

Remember that, in terms of Steam at least, the majority of - if not all - games that are available on multiple platforms only require a single purchase to allow you to play them on any of those platforms (much like Sony's Crossplay) so while they may not see direct "Linux sales" I would imagine that Valve provides them with stats to show which platforms the games are being *played* on, which is probably more useful here.

Re:Linux sales figures (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46455009)

If it is for steam games there is no either/or - you buy the game and get access to both versions. For engine developers it is just another back-end to support, or in case of the steam machine just another console. Ideally game developers do not care about the back end used by the game engine - they write their code/content exclusively against the engine.

Re:Linux sales figures (2)

NotDrWho (3543773) | about 6 months ago | (#46455019)

I can't wait for Ryse's publisher to port it to Linux!

Re:Linux sales figures (1)

cheesybagel (670288) | about 6 months ago | (#46455151)

Microsoft Studios? Port an Xbox One exclusive to Linux? Perhaps when hell freezes over.

Besides the only CRYENGINE game I play is Mechwarrior Online. I actually tried playing Crysis but I hated it. Star Citizen, if it ever gets launched, is supposed to use the CRYENGINE as well.

Re:Linux sales figures (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46455259)

Microsoft Studios? Port an Xbox One exclusive to Linux? Perhaps when hell freezes over.

Thanks for explaining the OP's joke.

Re:Linux sales figures (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46455025)

Fortunately, Steam is pretty good about allowing you to move your license over to other platforms, only limited by having to log into Steam first. Look for "steamplay", which is the Steam designation for games that are licensed in a platform-agnostic way.

Re:Linux sales figures (1)

higuita (129722) | about 6 months ago | (#46455643)

If you are on steam, if a game you already have is ported to linux, you will get access to the new port for free. Then you play it and the publishers can see how many people use linux... so it's almost as you really buy the linux version.

Of course, it's always preferred to buy the linux version when it is released, so the publisher can see a nice spike on sales when the linux version is released

Is gaming on Linux actually going to take off? (5, Insightful)

realmolo (574068) | about 6 months ago | (#46454911)

It almost seems like it's finally going to happen. Amazing.

Now we just need to standardize on a desktop environment, and Linux will actually be a nice OS for the masses. /cue the "But choice is good!" crowd. Yeah, choice is good, but fragmentation is FAR worse than having no choices, when it comes to operating systems.

Re:Is gaming on Linux actually going to take off? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46454993)

I think that's the point of SteamOS it will standerdize the parts that game developers care about, while leaving the user choice where possible.

Re:Is gaming on Linux actually going to take off? (2, Funny)

NotDrWho (3543773) | about 6 months ago | (#46455027)

It almost seems like it's finally going to happen

Not on your distro. Sorry.

Re:Is gaming on Linux actually going to take off? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46455373)

Steam is works with deb package manager

Re:Is gaming on Linux actually going to take off? (2)

petermgreen (876956) | about 6 months ago | (#46455797)

As I understand it steam mostly ignores the distros package management, there are a handful of libraries expected to be supplied by the OS, some more supplied by the "steam runtime" and for anything else game devs are expected to bring their own.

Re:Is gaming on Linux actually going to take off? (1)

devman (1163205) | about 6 months ago | (#46456443)

You are correct. Steam does its own package management once installed.

Re:Is gaming on Linux actually going to take off? (2)

msh104 (620136) | about 6 months ago | (#46456485)

Which is actually the smart thing to do.

This will make it significantly easier for steam to support multiple linux versions in the future
And the (binary) games actually don't break as fast when upgrading your OS.

Re:Is gaming on Linux actually going to take off? (1)

Daniel Hoffmann (2902427) | about 6 months ago | (#46455037)

Really, all you have to do is kick the X11 and all the craziness from the window managers and build your own to get Linux to be usable by the common folk. That is what Android and Steam OS are doing.

Re:Is gaming on Linux actually going to take off? (3, Informative)

jedidiah (1196) | about 6 months ago | (#46455321)

> Really, all you have to do is kick the X11 and all the craziness from the window managers

SteamOS is doing nothing of the sort. It's little moe more than a bespoke version of Debian. It is essentially SteamBuntu.

Re:Is gaming on Linux actually going to take off? (1)

Daniel Hoffmann (2902427) | about 6 months ago | (#46457035)

It might come with X and gnome, or whatever. But the SteamOS is actually the Big Picture mode which I assume is very portable since it runs on Windows/Linux/Mac. you might soon see the big picture in Android too.

Re:Is gaming on Linux actually going to take off? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46455049)

It almost seems like it's finally going to happen.

Only in your delusional mind.

Re:Is gaming on Linux actually going to take off? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46455423)

Then Mac or ChromeOS or Android will win, but not Windows

Re:Is gaming on Linux actually going to take off? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46455053)

Windows also has a surprisingly large selection of subsystems to write applications with.

I am much more hopeful that game engines will target various OpenGL profiles directly now that native Linux + Xorg + Mesa support for all popular vendors is at OpenGL 3.3+.

Re:Is gaming on Linux actually going to take off? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46455111)

Linux has had almost 2 decades to standardize on the desktop. It isn't going to happen.

Re:Is gaming on Linux actually going to take off? (2)

civilizedINTENSITY (45686) | about 6 months ago | (#46455159)

And we don't want it to happen. Fragmentation is not a real problem compared to the advantages of organic growth rates. Choice is a good thing.

Re:Is gaming on Linux actually going to take off? (1)

Immerman (2627577) | about 6 months ago | (#46456003)

Indeed. *Provided* of course that binaries are compatible across distros, which of course also requires a comprehensive set of shared APIs for common functionality.

One of the reasons I've never done much development for Linux is that, unlike Windows, it requires making multiple packages for at least all the primary "trunk" distros, and I still get a far smaller audience than with Windows. Meanwhile if I target Windows and spend just a little extra effort to make sure it's WINE compatible, then pretty much anyone can use my software without issues.

Re:Is gaming on Linux actually going to take off? (1)

camperdave (969942) | about 6 months ago | (#46456285)

Choice is a good thing.

...until it comes time to provide support:

SupportDesk(SD): Okay, click on Start.
Customer(C):Um... I don't see Start. Where is it?
SD: It's usually in the bottom left corner. What do you have there?
C: I've got a clock.
SD: Um... Okay, what's in the top left corner?
C: it's sort of a multi-colored circle
SD: Okay, click that and then click System
C:I don't see System
SD:What about a Utilities?
C: No. There's nothing but icons.
SD: I see. Is there a gear icon?
C: No
SD:What about tools, like a wrench or screwdriver?
C: No. I've gone one that looks like a car with the hood open, one that has pulleys and a belt, and another that has colored squares and slider controls. It looks like the transporter console on Star Trek.
SD: If you move the mouse pointer over the icons but don't click does a description pop up?
C: Yes
SD: I want you to check the description pop-up of each of those icons. Do any of them say System? C: I've got two. The candle icon says System Settings, and the kitten icon with the red forbidden circle, you know, like on no smoking signs? Well that icon says System configuration.
SD: [aside]It's going to be a long night...[/aside]

Sometimes having conformity is a good thing.

Re:Is gaming on Linux actually going to take off? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46458567)

I keep hearing this "nightmare" and then I remember the Windows XP Pro system that was stuck in an activation loop. It wouldn't activate, because it was activated, and so would log me out and then report that it wasn't activated so it must activate, then it'd report that it was already activated and so didn't need to, then log me out so I could log back in. Then I'd get notified that it wasn't activated, so I couldn't log it and had to activate it.

The Microsoft helpdesk were just stunning with their help on that. They told me that it's a known bug, that no, they weren't going to help me with it, and if that was all then thanks for calling Microsoft support.

So yeah, burble on about your support all you like, it's not as rosy a picture as you paint.

Re:Is gaming on Linux actually going to take off? (1)

ProzacPatient (915544) | about 6 months ago | (#46455263)

Pretty much this.

I'm probably going to start a riot by saying this but I think KDE stands as the best candidate for a "standardized" desktop environment; it's all very well built and all its components are well integrated into the KDE framework and the environment itself will probably feel the most comfortable for Windows users. Of course everyone is entitled to their preferences (the beauty of the GNU/Linux platform) but I honestly believe KDE is an outstanding environment for general desktop usage.

I used to use GNOME2 but after the Gnome Project went full retard with mobilitis in Gnome 3 going the same direction as Unity and Windows 8 I decided to go back to KDE.

I'll also throw a shoutout here and say that I think Kubuntu is an excellent distro based on Debian but with the community and frequent updates of Ubuntu, however unlike Ubuntu it doesn't get much attention unfortunately.

Re:Is gaming on Linux actually going to take off? (2)

Rafael Jaimes III (3430609) | about 6 months ago | (#46455927)

If you were a big fan of GNOME2 why didn't you just go with MATE or Cinnamon?

Re:Is gaming on Linux actually going to take off? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46456335)

Cinnamon won't run in dual monitors on my desktop. Old GPU that won't composite that wide.

MATE, by virtue of not having the string "GNOME 2" in it, breaks hundreds of small scripts and utilities. Like Foxyproxy. This situation may have improved since I last tried.

Re:Is gaming on Linux actually going to take off? (1)

Immerman (2627577) | about 6 months ago | (#46456075)

Perhaps XFCE would make a better choice?

Consider - user-space fragmentation is a non-issue. So long as I can grab a program and run it, my choice of GUI is irrelevant to anyone else except the tech support guy. The issue is developer-space fragmentation: a developer doesn't want to incur the extra expense of supporting a bajillion different platforms, even a handful can be a pain in the ass. And the vast majority of software doesn't actually care all that much about the OS GUI or the fancy features it adds.

So, it makes sense to choose one of the most minimalist GUIS as the baseline - something that is potentially a strict subset in terms of API-exposed functionality so that anything that works on it, works on everything. Now I don't know much about the guts of XFCE, but if nothing else I imagine it would be easier to modify that into a baseline than KDE or Gnome.

Re:Is gaming on Linux actually going to take off? (1)

LoRdTAW (99712) | about 6 months ago | (#46457281)

Gnome 2 was perfect and is now thankfully continued by the MATE project. Before MATE, I used Xfce which felt like a lighter version of Gnome 2. I used to like KDE but its menu feels cluttered, even the latest KDE 4. Its the same mistake the Cinnamon team made.

Though, KDE does have a lot of interesting things like bindings for multiple languages such as PHP, C#, LUA, Ruby, Python etc. This open up application development to a wider audience.

Re:Is gaming on Linux actually going to take off? (1)

jones_supa (887896) | about 6 months ago | (#46455273)

Now we just need to standardize on a desktop environment, and Linux will actually be a nice OS for the masses. /cue the "But choice is good!" crowd. Yeah, choice is good, but fragmentation is FAR worse than having no choices, when it comes to operating systems.

Maybe SteamOS (and whichever desktop it uses, currently GNOME3) will simply become the de facto standard.

Re:Is gaming on Linux actually going to take off? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46455857)

Exactly, and it does us no good to have 2 forks of a codebase just because someone preferred to call it strcomp() instead of strcmp(). Developers get pissy when the base API keeps changing daily.

Why is this funny? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46456121)

I'm not sure why this is modded as funny, it's pretty insightful. There's a reason that Valve opted to go with an Ubuntu release as their target distro. For them to cater to every single linux distro (debian and derivatives, fedora and derivatives, mandrake, gentoo, etc...) is just insane.

I don't think it's necessarily a choice in desktop environment as it is an agreement on API and implementation (to some degree). Gnome and KDE are the big players, and while they both do compositing, they do things in different ways. Some things work better in Gnome and vice versa. XFCE and LXDE have their own way of doing things, so far I've seen that's different than either Gnome and KDE. No, i'm not going to dig out the source code and compare. However, if the linux community as a whole somehow agreed upon some of those rules for gaming, such as handling of a 3d window, surround sound, controller API, process priority, etc... we would have a much more viable gaming platform.

Beyond Awesome! (1)

f0rk b0mb (3442723) | about 6 months ago | (#46454917)

I hope we see some ports of Crysis 1 & 2 here very soon and hopefully a port of the EA Origin client for Crysis 3! Then we can say Linux plays Crysis and our lives will be complete!!!!!!!!!!! ;)

A 10 year old rendering engine? (1)

AftanGustur (7715) | about 6 months ago | (#46455069)

Am I correct in that this is *the* Cryengine, which was developed between 2001 and 2004?

Re:A 10 year old rendering engine? (1)

Sockatume (732728) | about 6 months ago | (#46455117)

It refers to the latest version of Cryengine, the one which the summary points out was used in Ryse for the Xbox One.

Re:A 10 year old rendering engine? (4, Funny)

Spad (470073) | about 6 months ago | (#46455127)

No, this is CRYENGINE not CryEngine.

It's basically CryEngine 4, but they decided to drop the number and capitalise the lot, apparently because of how big a departure it is from CryEngines 1 through 3.

Re:A 10 year old rendering engine? (1)

DanielRavenNest (107550) | about 6 months ago | (#46458215)

People like myself who build using the CryEngine still need a version number, so we know when to update, and what version we are building to. So they may drop the number in the branding, but we almost certainly will have it as users of the engine.

Re:A 10 year old rendering engine? (1)

Ardyvee (2447206) | about 6 months ago | (#46455213)

I think it's the new one:

"During presentations and hands-on demos at Crytek's GDC booth, attendees can see for the first time ever full native Linux support in the new CRYENGINE.

That's what the summary says. I assume it's not that one, but the newest (which would be 4, according to wikipedia).

Re:A 10 year old rendering engine? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46455257)

They don't do version numbers any more - they mean the most recent one.

Re:A 10 year old rendering engine? (1)

DanielRavenNest (107550) | about 6 months ago | (#46458189)

No, CryEngine is the brand name. The version you are thinking of was version 1.0. The current version of the free SDK is 3.5.8, which you can download from http://www.crydev.net/ [crydev.net] It's only a week old. The version they will be demoing at the Game Developer's Conference is even newer, with Linux support and physically based shaders. It will probably be labeled version 3.6 or 4.0 because those are big additions.

Note the SDK is much bigger than the game engine. The game engine is the set of DLL's that get called by your compiled game executable, and take care of rendering, networking, and other functions that are common to most games. Games additionally have content (maps, textures, animations, etc.). The software development kit also includes the "Sandbox" editor, which is how you build game levels, a bunch of specialized tools for importing and creating content, and usually a sample game level and other assets.

2014 The Year of Linux Gaming! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46455089)

See subject...

Gentlemen, start your CryEngines. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46455453)

Quick pass me a tissue.. ..I think I am about to cry.

Re:Gentlemen, start your CryEngines. (1)

Carewolf (581105) | about 6 months ago | (#46455769)

How big of a crybaby do you need to be to need a cryengine to automate if for you?

Also a cryengine with steam? Isn't that a big dangerous for your face?

Any game ports? (1)

gman003 (1693318) | about 6 months ago | (#46455527)

I see the engine was ported, but it doesn't sound like any specific games were ported (Ryse definitely wasn't, since it's an Xb1 exclusive). I'm always doubtful of engine ports that don't come with game ports, because without porting a game to a releasable state, you're likely to have some weird issues when that actually comes (see UE3's supposed Linux support).

Re:Any game ports? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46455757)

One of the big selling points of using the CryEngine (and the same could be said for other big name engines) is that it allows you to develop platform-agnostic games. This doesn't mean that there's a Ryse port around the corner, but it means future CryEngine games will be able to be ported with minimal effort.

Re:Any game ports? (1)

gman003 (1693318) | about 6 months ago | (#46456989)

That's been a "selling point" of every engine since what, the Quake 3 engine? It's like with anything that claims to just make things work everywhere - it never "just works". UE2 was supposed to do this, then UE3 was supposed to do this. Unity was supposed to do this. None of them did it perfectly, though Unity came close.

And now we're supposed to believe that CryEngine 4 managed to do it, despite their history (CryEngine 2 basically could not run on anything but PC) and despite only one game having yet been released on CryEngine 4, and that one game being a single-console exclusive.

biznaItCh (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46455585)

But.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46455681)

Can it run Crysis?

Free Windows (1)

ThatsNotPudding (1045640) | about 6 months ago | (#46455779)

I wonder how much Steams' moves away from Windows has impacted the possible decision by Microsoft to offer a free version of Windows (unless the free version is graphically / memory gimped).

Re:Free Windows (0)

AlphaBro (2809233) | about 6 months ago | (#46458495)

Probably not at all.

"Port to Support" ?! EDITOR ! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46455801)

I can't wait until Shasltod make enough money to hire an Editor who does that.

Only a Matter of Time Now (5, Insightful)

The Cat (19816) | about 6 months ago | (#46455955)

Linux will be the premier gaming platform on the PC and on its own console, and Valve will be the company that made it happen.

This will have nothing but positive effects on the quality of games, the tools required to make those games, the educational possibilities for developers through shared source, and there will be spinoff effects for Android and OS X.

Tremendously exciting time to be a Linux developer. Glad we stuck with it.

Re:Only a Matter of Time Now (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46458473)

Linux will be the premier gaming platform on the PC and on its own console, and Valve will be the company that made it happen.

Delusion of grandeur. Valve will bastardize their particular flavor of Linux to suit their own needs. The Linux kernel and it's GNU counterparts may not be the best choice in terms of features and performance, but it's cheaper for them than developing their own system from scratch. Note also that Crytek ported their game engine, but didn't open source it, and for good reason. Even if every current and future PC game had a Linux port, that's still not enough to make Linux worth using on PCs. Ditching the god-awful stupidity of X in favor of Wayland is a step in the right direction. Then you need a company to get their shit together and make a single desktop environment that is not only fully functional but also looks good. Then, tell Mr. Torvalds to go fuck his own ego and develop a standard driver ABI so hardware manufactures can make a single driver and have it work across all current and future versions of Linux. Tall orders, and it's doubtful they will be fulfilled.

What is missing? (1)

Dunge (922521) | about 6 months ago | (#46456043)

I know CryEngine used intensively DirectX 11 features and that OpenGL is not as advanced for shaders, so I guess they had to cut into some neat features?

Re:What is missing? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46457059)

I think you're thinking about it like a cart before the horse. The short answer is no, features do not have to be cut when you go to OpenGL.

What does Direct3D and OpenGL do? They expose features that are present on a graphics card.

They do not *create* features, they *expose* them. Because OpenGL is extensible (and vendors can even add their own extensions), there are zero graphical features that DirectX can do that OpenGL can't, assuming that the videocard vendor has implemented the features in the appropriate abstraction layer.

Microsoft has done an amazing marketing job to confuse this point.

Re:What is missing? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46458321)

What does Direct3D and OpenGL do?

Here [slashdot.org] is your answer.

Linux zealots have done an amazing job lying and spreading misinformation.

Re:What is missing? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46458613)

Interesting that you assume the GP is a Linux zealot. You have no information on that whatsoever.

Proof that Wintel is fatally faltering (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46456227)

Microsoft delivered the DEATH-BLOW to the confident future of gaming on Windows when it killed the online Microsoft Gaming Services that it had strong-armed major publishers to use for their DRM, achievement, update and multi-player match-making services. Overnight, major publishers were faced with the prospect of having hundreds of millions of PC gaming customers see their games fail to operate. Microsoft (under Ballmer's personal directive) had shafted PC gaming for the last time.

Now, this doesn't mean Wintel PC gaming is dead- far from it. With the launch of the dreadful (and NSA spy platform) Xbox One, and the mid-range Gaming PC equivalent, the PS4, PC gaming has never looked better for those wanting the best AAA gaming experiences. BUT gaming developers and publishers have finally taken the hint, and KNOW that Microsoft has ZERO commitment to gaming on the PC.

The rise of the tablet is the rise of Linux. Sometimes History works in curious ways, and this is one of those times. Now, while even the best tablet (Nvidia's SHIELD) doesn't come close to a gaming PC, the year-on-year performance of tablets is improving at an astonishing rate. The end of 2014 will see ultra-mobile chips with a less than ultra-mobile PSU exceed the gaming performance of the Xbox360 and PS3.

So, the new emphasis for serious game developers is cross-platform abstraction, with highly efficient AAA engines that don't care about the OS, only the performance of the underlying hardware. AMD's Mantle initiative shows the way to the future. GPU code that thinks about the actual GPU hardware resources, and NOT about how the OS wants to artificially restrict code that talks to hardware.

This new 'close-to-the-metal' is NOT the bad old days of 'poking' real hardware registers. Appropriate abstraction and API standards are still created. However, the OS is NOT allowed to hold either the game developer or GPU designer hostage anymore.

For instance, current versions of Microsoft Windows DirectX exists PURELY to sell powerful, vastly over-priced Intel CPU parts. AMD's Mantle PROVES this. With Mantle, the exact same game, looking exactly the same, performs BETTER on low cost CPUs than the DirectX version does on high-end Intel CPUs. DirectX, as a result of a financial arrangement between Intel and Microsoft, artificiality CPU bottlenecked the movement of instructions to the GPU.

Microsoft can afford to be agnostic today. Intel's needs are not Microsoft's needs. Microsoft receives billions each year from Intel to keep proper Windows x86/x64 'pure', but Microsoft can and will end this arrangement at any time if they deem it more useful to sell true Windows on ARM as well.

Current AAA games that target non-Windows platforms need all the efficiency they can get, and 'to-the-metal' methods become absolutely essential. The willingness to tolerate the conspiracy between Microsoft and Intel to artificially thwart 'to-the-metal' on Windows, simply to boost the market for Intel CPUs, has ended.

SteamOS, on the other hand, begins the final attack against the moronic Linux zealots who have done everything they can to keep the performance and usability of Linux boxes as low as possible, in the name of various psychopathic 'nerd' agendas. The TRUE Linux community, the billions of computer users who would LOVE to move from Windows to Linux, if only Linux was in the hands of anyone but the people who currently ruin Linux, will win out, because in the end 'money talks'.

And it has a game coming too. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46456301)

According to wikipedia,

"Kingdom Come: Deliverance" will run on cryengine 4 AND will run under linux as well.

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