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Is the New "Common Core SAT" Bill Gates' Doing?

timothy posted about 4 months ago | from the secret-machinations dept.

Education 273

theodp writes "'I want to explain why Common Core is among the most important education ideas in years,' wrote Bill Gates in a USA Today op-ed last month that challenged the "dangerous misconceptions" of those who oppose the initiative (pretty confident for a guy who conceded there wasn't much to show for his earlier $5B education reform effort!). 'The Gates Foundation helped fund this process,' acknowledged Gates in quite an understatement of his influence. Receiving $6.5M in Gates Grants was Student Achievement Partners, whose founder David Coleman was dubbed the 'Architect of the Common Core.' So it's not too surprising that at last week's SXSWedu, Coleman — now President and CEO of The College Board (no stranger to Gates money itself) — announced a dramatic overhaul of the SAT that includes a new emphasis on evidence-based reading and writing and evidence analysis, which the AJC's Maureen Downey calls 'reflective of the approach of the Common Core State Standards.'" (Read more, below.)"And over at The Atlantic, Lindsey Tepe reports that the Common Core is driving the changes to the SAT. "Neither Coleman nor the national media," writes Tepe, "have really honed in on how the standards are driving the College Board-as well as the ACT-to change their product." In conjunction with the redesigned SAT, The College Board also announced it would exclusively team with Khan Academy (KA) to make comprehensive, best-in-class SAT prep materials open and free in an effort to level the playing field between those who can and can't afford test prep services. In a conversation with KA founder Sal Khan — aka Bill Gates' favorite teacher and a beneficiary of $10+ million in Gates Foundation grants (much earmarked for Common Core) — Coleman stressed that Khan Academy and CollegeBoard will be the only places in the world that students will be able to encounter free materials for the exam that are "focused on the core of the math and literacy that matters most." "There will be no other such partnerships", Coleman reiterated. Game, set, and match, Gates?"

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273 comments

Becuz (2)

ThatsDrDangerToYou (3480047) | about 4 months ago | (#46474233)

Litterisy is importint.

Re:Becuz (5, Insightful)

i kan reed (749298) | about 4 months ago | (#46474307)

But, seriously, we've only solved the universal literacy problem over about the last 50-150 years(depending on when you consider it "solved"), and it's made a huge difference for how well society functions. You can hand almost any American a book about how to do a well-paying job, and they could actually try and tackle it if they wanted. That didn't used to be true, at all. You can count on someone being able to heed a warning label on a product. The US highway system is easily navigable with just reading skills.

The difference between a literate and illiterate population is so huge that we can't even imagine trying to transition back. Most of our problems now hinge on how we go above and beyond basic literacy and math skills, not whether we do.

Re:Becuz (0)

Marxist Hacker 42 (638312) | about 4 months ago | (#46474427)

The problem being that Common Core is a step *away* from universal literacy.

Re:Becuz (0)

i kan reed (749298) | about 4 months ago | (#46474505)

See that last period in your post. There's something you forgot there, like an explanation of why you see your point as true.

Re:Becuz (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46474605)

Because all of these tests are and were garbage that test only for obedience to arbitrary rules and standards, and limit creativity by requiring that most of the questions be answered with predefined answers. Because you can easily game 99% of the test with rote memorization.

Re:Becuz (1)

i kan reed (749298) | about 4 months ago | (#46474689)

That's an argument for why it's bad, not for why it stops universal literacy. Those two aren't the same, and you're projecting an opinion ("Common core is good") that I haven't presented. Is it okay that I want people to defend their bare assertions? I see no inherent reason why it's wrong, but that's different from seeing any reason why it's right.

Re:Becuz (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46474807)

That's an argument for why it's bad, not for why it stops universal literacy.

Pretty obviously, those are one in the same. Or maybe not. The previous system was bad too, so I'm not sure it really "stops" universal literacy or is a "step away" from it.

Re:Becuz (1)

Marxist Hacker 42 (638312) | about 4 months ago | (#46475085)

And 78% of the test with a ruler and marking column C.

Re:Becuz (4, Interesting)

Marxist Hacker 42 (638312) | about 4 months ago | (#46475129)

Where to begin? Denial of reading the classics. The elimination of poetry and Shakespeare. Replacement with texts designed to limit vocabulary and more importantly, limit thinking. The almost assured dropout rate of at least 34% as the kids too stupid to achieve common core drop out from frustration and the kids too smart for common core drop out from boredom.

It's likely great for the 68% of the kids in the middle of the bell curve, but universal literacy is not going to be accomplished under it anymore.

Re:Becuz (2)

Jeremiah Cornelius (137) | about 4 months ago | (#46474535)

I want Bill Gates to do for American Education just exactly what he did for design of computer operating systems and for compound document management formats.

Because everybody knows that dollars are a surefire benchmark of brain power, so we have proof that Gates is an uncanny supergenius, who should now direct that dollar stream to blast any obstacle for his genius vision of how we should live, and be educated.

Public policy? Twaddle! Smart people with money. That's the cure for what ails society!

Re:Becuz (1)

WheezyJoe (1168567) | about 4 months ago | (#46474631)

Public policy? Twaddle! Smart people with money. That's the cure for what ails society!

Yeah, well, so long as the public goes into a 4-Minute Hate every time some pundit says "wasteful spending", people with money (and they don't need to be smart) will be the only ones who pick up the ball.

Five words guaranteed to put a damper on anything: "Who's gonna PAY for it?"

Re:Becuz (2)

Cenan (1892902) | about 4 months ago | (#46474639)

On the bright side, he could be lobbying for MegaCorp1 merging MegaCorp2 by throwing money at absolutely everyone. Or lobbying for deregulation of otter shooting safaris, or something else completely brain dead. Good or bad, what he's spending his money on is not to improve his own situation.

Re:Becuz (3, Interesting)

RobertM1968 (951074) | about 4 months ago | (#46474657)

But, seriously, we've only solved the universal literacy problem over about the last 50-150 years(depending on when you consider it "solved"),

Sadly, you are only correct if you are equating "the ability to read (anything)" as literacy. There are states where the functionally illiterate rate is staggering. The figures on the DOE sites are very misleading, since they consider the ability to read "basic prose" to indicate "literacy" - when in reality, the "deeper numbers" indicate "21 percent of adults in the U.S. read below a 5th grade level, and 19 percent of high school graduates can't read.". The numbers are even worse if one expects an adult to read at what's considered an adult level - someplace decently over 50%.

and it's made a huge difference for how well society functions.

The true situation does indeed impact how well society (in this country) works. And we can see that ignorance, lack of education and lack of literacy driving some lunatic policies.

The danger of commonality (1)

jpschaaf (313847) | about 4 months ago | (#46474239)

What this entire concept fails to acknowledge is that when everyone learns the same thing, you lose the benefits of everyone having a different educational experience. If we all learn exactly the same things, we take the risk that everyone fails. Why not do things differently in every state to see what works? Somebody needs to learn from basic experimental design...

Re:The danger of commonality (1)

dmbasso (1052166) | about 4 months ago | (#46474311)

Your argument is based on the assumption someone will only learn what is in the program, which is not necessarily the case. Students are free to go beyond what is given to them. For instance, decades ago when I was in school there was no programming classes, nevertheless I learned it by myself.

Re:The danger of commonality (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46474373)

That only works for motivated individuals. Have you seen our education system lately?

Re:The danger of commonality (1)

gIobaljustin (3526197) | about 4 months ago | (#46474625)

Your argument is based on the assumption someone will only learn what is in the program, which is not necessarily the case.

99% of the time, that's the case. You and I are the exceptions.

Re:The danger of commonality (2)

king neckbeard (1801738) | about 4 months ago | (#46475073)

I would disagree somewhat. I am fairly convinced that most people are born with quite a bit of curiosity, but through excessive rote-centric education, learning becomes a labor instead of a desire. The exceptions are not those with a desire to learn, but rather, those whose drive to learn can survive our education system or is revived later in life are the actual exceptions.

Re:The danger of commonality (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46474361)

Leaning? Common Core has nothing to do with "Learning." It is indoctrination, pure and simple. It's the low-tech implementation of Divergent.

As a parent you not only have no influence into the "education curriculum" you have no access to it. It is a Federal Gov't power grab and it should be highly eschewed. The Federal Government has no business nor direct authority to be imposing curriculum.

Re:The danger of commonality (4, Insightful)

RaceProUK (1137575) | about 4 months ago | (#46474451)

It is indoctrination, pure and simple

Basic literacy and numeracy is indoctrination now? I think your tinfoil hat's a little tight.

Re:The danger of commonality (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46474723)

If that's what you think Common Core is all about, you have not done your homework. ;)

Re:The danger of commonality (1, Interesting)

amxcoder (1466081) | about 4 months ago | (#46474901)

Basic Literacy and numeracy is not indoctrination, however that's not what Common Core is panning out to be in the real world examples...

It's being used as a tool to teach Social Justice, Wealth Redistribution, and other Marxist ideals to young kids, and is disguised as a school curriculum.

One example can be taken from the organization "Radical Math" who provide over 700 lesson plans for CC. With chapter titles that include: “Sweatshop Accounting”, “Racism and Stop and Frisk”, “When Equal Isn’t Fair”, “The Square Root of a Fair Share”, and “Home Buying While Brown or Black”.
Is THAT basic numeracy? Is that how YOU were taught math?

Or how about a third grade grammar assignment that has questions/answers like: "3) The choices of a president affect everyone. 4) He makes sure the laws of the country are fair. 5) The commands of government officials must be obeyed by all. 6) The wants of the individual are less important than the well-being of the nation." (article ref: http://www.tpnn.com/2013/11/04... [tpnn.com] )
Like THAT isn't an not only completely false, but outright creepy. Think about the next generation that grows up, and will think this way because it's been engrained in all their school assignments for as long as they can remember. Think they'll push for individual liberty, or become part of the collective?

These are just two examples I quickly googled up. But examples are popping up all over the place now that parents are starting to see what the kids are bringing home. You have the right to ignore this truth, but you can't dismiss it, it is there.

Re:The danger of commonality (1)

hypergreatthing (254983) | about 4 months ago | (#46475157)

Basic literacy and numeracy is indoctrination now? I think your tinfoil hat's a little tight.
The method to teach basic literacy and numeracy (I'd rather use basic math, but whatever) IS in fact indoctrination when you flat out toss past concepts in favor of new ones. Are you trying to say that before core competency came out that everyone else who learned the old methodologies exhibited problems of learning the material? Was there a problem that this new method tries to solve? It's my understanding (not from study, please feel free to correct/quote studies which prove otherwise) that basic math and reading skills was a problem that was tackled and for the most part solved. This new foreign way to teach students how to do basic math, what problem does that solve? Is it in fact easier to to it this way to split the problem into several subset problems and combining them together? Or is this politically driven hand waving at a new solution to a problem that was in fact not a problem at all just to say "something" was tackled and solved?

Re:The danger of commonality (1)

steelfood (895457) | about 4 months ago | (#46475365)

That's to squeeze all the blood out of his brain. Blood is a sign of indoctrination into oxygen-dependency.

Re:The danger of commonality (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46475177)

There is no better indoctrination than ignorance.

BTDT (1)

Alan Shutko (5101) | about 4 months ago | (#46474367)

Doing things differently in every state is the way things have been done since the dawn of public education.

Re:BTDT (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46474613)

....and backwards states tend to stay backwards and say FU to ideas from states that do it better. It's the 'merican way!

Re:BTDT (2)

Bill, Shooter of Bul (629286) | about 4 months ago | (#46474781)

Exactly. States can't be counted on to do things better. It too easy for them to be corrupted by corrupt politicians, labor unions, large donors, mass ignorance of voters ect. Just look at all the attempts by states to remove evolution from text books or insert intelligent design.

If I were all powerful, I'd craft federal legislation that sets a national standard core curiculum, and set up a board that would review requests from states to opt out. If they wanted to expirament they could, but their plan would have to be approved. So they can't do stupid things like drop all math/science/litterature education.

Re:BTDT (1)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about 4 months ago | (#46474903)

Which of those factors adversely affecting state governments don't apply to te federal government? Moreover, if state X screws up, but state Y does a better job, people can point to X as screwed up and suggest they do things more like Y does. With a single federal standard that won't work. Sure you can do international comparisons, but they're far more difficult and less useful than state to state comparisons. Lastly, you can move to another state much more easily than you can move to another country.

Re:BTDT (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46475237)

Argument is BS you cant move so easy just for the good of the children? With a mortgage and living in debt move? Trash argument. Make the Feds regulate the state jokers! Don't act stupid there is another agenda behind this.

Re:BTDT (1)

Bill, Shooter of Bul (629286) | about 4 months ago | (#46475253)

Oh, they all apply, but have a lesser effect on the larger federal government. There isn't nearly as much oversight in corruption of state representitives or state senators as there is in DC. In several states, including the one I live in, most people couldn't name or point out their state reps in a line up. There is little to no reporting on what is going on or why in the state capital.

Your reasons why comparisions are good, are the reason why I would allow them, but they'd need to be reviewed first to ensure they sound like good ideas and a good faith effort is being launched.

Re:The danger of commonality (1)

crypticedge (1335931) | about 4 months ago | (#46474377)

It's not everyone "learns the same thing" but more of everyone must learn the basic minimum standard that has been proven as true. No one is saying education can't exceed it, but it must meet it for sure.

Re:The danger of commonality (4, Funny)

Marxist Hacker 42 (638312) | about 4 months ago | (#46474477)

Gates only supports the common core because it will create students stupid enough to buy Windows 9.

Re:The danger of commonality (3, Funny)

Jeremiah Cornelius (137) | about 4 months ago | (#46474543)

Monoculture.

It worked for Windows security! Why not for American education?

Re:The danger of commonality (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46474669)

You're confusing monoculture with standards. Use Ethernet and TCP/IP as an example. Without these we likely wouldn't have the Internet today, but there are dozens of implementations based on the standard, and not a monoculture. Common Core sets standards, it doesn't provide the textbooks and the class lectures.

Only only prep really leveling? (1)

SuperKendall (25149) | about 4 months ago | (#46474257)

To me, it doesn't help things to have prep material for students be primarily available on the internet - that doesn't really seem to be leveling things with people that may not have good internet access.

Not that the SAT was great, but at least there were a ton of prep materials you could get and use from anywhere.

Re:Only only prep really leveling? (1)

Travis Mansbridge (830557) | about 4 months ago | (#46474445)

Anyone with access to a school should have regular access to the internet, and even those who don't should still be able to access the internet at a local public library, in everywhere but the most backwoods areas of the nation. I'm not sure of any other way the materials could be made so available. (Not that I support Common Core or Gates' SAT initiatives)

Gates foundation: not good for education (4, Interesting)

i kan reed (749298) | about 4 months ago | (#46474265)

The problem isn't that they have ideas and they spend money on getting those ideas to work. It's that the Gates foundation uses their "leveraging" plans for charity on everything, including more political stuff like education. So they give large gifts with the caveat that both that money, and an even larger chunk of public money be spent on doing things the way the foundation envisions.

This is great when it comes to eradicating diseases or building infrastructure, because once that's done, areas stay healthy and stable. When it's used on the already pretty-functional US education system, it turns into a "my way or the highway" situation and the plans being advocated by the Gates foundation aren't nearly as evidence based.

It's problematic.

Re:Gates foundation: not good for education (1)

Kingkaid (2751527) | about 4 months ago | (#46474371)

Because the current education system is working -so- well right now. Evidence based is good, but only if you have good evidence. The current teaching methods in the US are falling further and further behind other countries. Many teachers are teaching to the test, which is what the evidence has decided is "the best way to see how they are learning". So while a "my way or the highway" approach isn't ideal, tell me when the last time you heard a group of educators get together and make a decision that was positive, controvertial and complex... all in a timely manner. Hell the current system is allowing for creationism and is still debating evolution.

Re:Gates foundation: not good for education (2)

i kan reed (749298) | about 4 months ago | (#46474485)

Yes, we fall further behind other first world countries, that's true, but we're ahead of where we were, (pretty) consistently, year-to-year. There's this imagined problem of the education system "going to shit" and requiring immediate and intensive treatment. To continue the medical analogy, we're more like an obese patient who is not currently suffering from any life-threatening conditions. The solution isn't (necessarily, that is. Evidence would help) cardiac surgery, but finding where we have the worst problems and working on them consistently.

Re:Gates foundation: not good for education (1)

jellomizer (103300) | about 4 months ago | (#46474483)

It is more like,
People like his ideas, They read 1/2 of the recommendation, then they propose it to the government who only gets 1/2 of that proposal, who then under pressure implements it using 1/2 of the proposal. This may go down a few levels only leaving the Title "Common Core" as remaining.

Because there is this impression of the Failing Schools and we expect someone else to fix it.
However there are a few issues with that.
1. Many of the most successful countries with test results, have a school system where only the best continue on to more schooling the rest go to vocational schools. Meaning our system were we expect our kids to go school no matter how much they suck.

2. The issues of kids learning ability isn't as much as the schools as everyone else things. We got factors such as Parents, Culture, Environment, and the Child's own self interest to learn which are more major factors.
If the Parents don't care how well their children do then they won't push temselfs to learn even in the best of schools.
If the culture doesn't value education then the kid won't either
If the environment is in a way (such as gang activity/domestic abuse/starvation etc...) where education is much lower on a child's priorities then they will not focus much.

3. A lot of these other factors are part of a catch 22 problem where education can help fix the above problems, however those problems prevent education from improving.

Re:Gates foundation: not good for education (1)

i kan reed (749298) | about 4 months ago | (#46474529)

Well, yeah, politics and school administrations only makes things worse. If we could find a way to do without both, while still keeping universal education, no one would complain.

What is a "vocational school?" (1)

westlake (615356) | about 4 months ago | (#46475171)

Many of the most successful countries with test results, have a school system where only the best continue on to more schooling the rest go to vocational schools.

I am not sure what a "vocational school" is in a post-industrial environment. I am not even sure any more what "best" means in this context.

Re:Gates foundation: not good for education (1)

gwstuff (2067112) | about 4 months ago | (#46474549)

> it turns into a "my way or the highway" situation

Ah, I see, so THAT was the hidden message in the cover of the "Road Ahead" - http://upload.wikimedia.org/wi... [wikimedia.org]

Re:Gates foundation: not good for education (1)

i kan reed (749298) | about 4 months ago | (#46474571)

Oh man, I always thought it was "Please, run Bill Gates over."

Re:Gates foundation: not good for education (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46475353)

Nah, much simpler than that... you don't *get* a say in it at all, for you there isn't even a highway, there isn't a choice, because those who can 'speak' the loudest get to decide, and now the SCOTUS has ruled that 'money=speech'. You can't afford to 'speak' as loud as he can.

Re:Gates foundation: not good for education (1)

gIobaljustin (3526197) | about 4 months ago | (#46474661)

When it's used on the already pretty-functional US education system

It is not and never was "pretty-functional"; it is and was abysmal, like every education system.

Re:Gates foundation: not good for education (1)

phantomfive (622387) | about 4 months ago | (#46474703)

I actually disagree with you here, because the Gates Foundation does more measurement and changing based on measurement than any other educational group I know of. That is why he says 'there is nothing to show for $5billion effort,' because they tested the things they tried, and found they didn't offer real improvement. So they moved on to try something else.

About the common core, I'm not entirely sure what the criticism is. If you read the summary, [wikipedia.org] it looks like an improvement in both math and English. The focus is on making sure kids understand math, rather than being able to solve problems.

Some teachers criticize standards like this because they advocate 'teaching to the test.' Well, if your students aren't able to do basic math, they would be better off if you taught to the test than whatever you were doing before! It wasn't working!

If someone has read more deeply through the standard, and has found things that should be changed, then that would be really interesting to hear. But 'he is rich!' is not a valid criticism.

Re:Gates foundation: not good for education (4, Insightful)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about 4 months ago | (#46474929)

The focus is on making sure kids understand math, rather than being able to solve problems.

If you "understand" math, but can't solve problems with it, then you don't understand math, or at least not anything useful about it.

Re:Gates foundation: not good for education (1)

JWW (79176) | about 4 months ago | (#46475121)

The problem I have with the math standards is that they are acting like kids can just naturally figure out things such as how to divide large numbers. And in some respects they can, but when kids figure it out for themselves they miss most of the simple methods and processes that can make solving the problem much much much much easier.

Kids now are stumbling around how to divide 536 by 5 and sometimes coming up with the right answer. But instead of then being taught a quick an simple method, long division, they're forced to keep solving things the long convoluted way they "discovered" on their own.

This is a horrible turn of events. I personally conflate it with the idea of: What if one of those worthless humanities courses (where every answer can be considered "right") came up with a way to teach math? These new standards are the type of math you'd get from that.

Put it another way (1)

ThatsNotPudding (1045640) | about 4 months ago | (#46474899)

Would we all enjoy an announcement that the Koch Brothers will offer to fully-fund public education on the state level, but only if the state agrees to teach only the political, economic and scientific theory that the brothers approve (with violations being an instant termination)?

Public Education should be just that, not a plaything of the 1%; not for ideological reasons nor for 30 pieces of silver to cover budget shortfalls.

Re:Gates foundation: not good for education (1)

Kevin Stoll (2901191) | about 4 months ago | (#46475093)

You think 30th in math is pretty-functional?

And? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46474281)

It seems like this is supposed to be some sort of exposé deriding common core as an evil concoction from Bill Gates, when in fact this is the best change to the educational system in decades. Does anyone really think keeping the current SATs and current school API tests is a good thing?

Re:And? (1)

TechyImmigrant (175943) | about 4 months ago | (#46474297)

It's not the core that's the issue. It's the testing.

Re:And? (1)

gIobaljustin (3526197) | about 4 months ago | (#46474687)

It's everything. While it would be fairly difficult to make the education system even more abysmal without trying to do just that, this isn't helping.

Re:And? (1)

roc97007 (608802) | about 4 months ago | (#46474409)

I dunno, this sounds like a false choice to me. Whether Common Core is good or bad is debatable, and I'm sure there are a lot of people willing to debate you on that. Do the SATs need to be changed? Yes. I could agree with that. But this doesn't mean that the changes suggested are the best way to go about it, or even if the changes are better than what we have now.

$6.5M and $10M are small peanuts (2)

Corporate T00l (244210) | about 4 months ago | (#46474353)

Given the citation that an "earlier $5B education reform effort" didn't really do much, are we to believe that two small grants, $6.5M to David Coleman's company and $10.75M to Khan, somehow means that Gates single-handedly rammed the common core down everyone's throats against their will?

That seems hardly likely. Bill Gates may support the common core, but the notion that it's somehow a conspiracy that he masterminded with his wealth seems farfetched. If you look at reporting on the common core like this recent NPR article (http://www.npr.org/2014/01/28/267488648/backlash-grows-against-common-core-education-standards [npr.org] ), you'll see quite a complex list of entities for and against common core. The Chamber of Commerce is for it, Glenn Beck is against it. There's a lot more in this fight than the Gates Foundation's $17.25M.

More like hundreds of millions of dollars (2)

theodp (442580) | about 4 months ago | (#46474615)

Follow the story link to the Gates Foundation Common Core grants, or check out this post from Diane Ravitch [dianeravitch.net] : "The Gates Foundation spent nearly $200 million to pay for the writing, review, evaluation, dissemination, and promotion of the Common Core standards. It is difficult to find a D.C.-based education organization that has not received millions of dollars from the Gates Foundation to promote the standards. Bill Gates believes in the Common Core standards...And he is not at all concerned that the standards were never field-tested, even though Microsoft would never launch a new product line without extensive field-testing."

Re:$6.5M and $10M are small peanuts (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46474893)

Bill Gates may support the common core, but the notion that it's somehow a conspiracy that he masterminded with his wealth seems farfetched.

Haven't you heard? - this is Slashdot, where everything Bill Gates does is part of an evil conspiracy of one form or another.

problems (2)

cellocgw (617879) | about 4 months ago | (#46474359)

First, the current SAT rules are that each student can select which test scores to submit to colleges. Many kids take SAT prep courses and then take the SAT multiple times, submitting only the best result.

Second, colleges seem to be reluctant to publish any sort of data on the correlation (or lack thereof) between SAT scores and college GPA or dropout rates. So how do we even know whether the SAT is a useful assessment tool?

Disclaimer: I'm a college-application anarchist who thinks all admissions departments should be taken out and shot, and applicants selected using the time-honored Staircase Method. [joannejacobs.com]

Re:problems (2)

oh_my_080980980 (773867) | about 4 months ago | (#46474493)

But the SAT does. You might want to look in to that before you make that statement. I'm now fan of the SAT but they do publish information showing the correlation between SAT scores and the success rate at the college level.

Re:problems (2)

cellocgw (617879) | about 4 months ago | (#46474603)

Do they (SAT) discriminate between "prepped" and "unprepped" testees? I'm skeptical because that would require extensive self-reporting.

Re:problems (1)

sandytaru (1158959) | about 4 months ago | (#46474745)

Teaching to the test isn't a bad thing as long as the tests themselves are actually well written. I've seen some of the standardized test questions today's high school students are expected to answer, not just in the SAT but in their graduation requirements, and they're just awful. Poorly worded questions with poorly worded answers.

Dump Common Core (0)

cyberchondriac (456626) | about 4 months ago | (#46474383)

It's a disaster. It's pushing the majority of young children far too hard for their age, and making them work inefficiently, where even memorizing the times table isn't good enough now, it all has to be written out ad nauseum. The detailed material they get in their books for 7th grade biology looks like High School material. All this is going to accomplish is to produce confused, bitter adults.. or the worker drones they really want. It's a beautifully evil dichotomy, talking about raising kid's self esteem while doing everything to make them feel stupid and in over their heads. Say one thing, do another. Forcing kids to do "creative writing" is another faux pau, it should be an elective. Not everyone is cut out to write creatively.
Sure, let's whine about how supposedly far behind the US is to China, India, or Japan.. and then let's look at their teenage suicide rates. Education can certainly be improved, but Common Core is not the answer. What it really boils down to is the cash cow it is to the NEA.
My kid is bright and used to love science; he used to frequently be on the honor roll is usually student of the month a few times a year. Lately, he's begun to hate school with a passion. Common core is the core of the issue. How is that inspiring him to learn or embrace knowledge? It's the scholastic equivalent of a shotgun wedding, expecting to engender true love at the end of a barrel.. / rant

Re:Dump Common Core (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46474737)

You may want to look to the teachers or other classroom issues rather than the curriculum for your child's dislike of school.

Re:Dump Common Core (1)

SlickUSA (1749194) | about 4 months ago | (#46474847)

While i do pretty much agree with everything here, i had a small question. How would the NEA benefit as a cash cow from CC down the road?

Re:Dump Common Core (4, Insightful)

DaveV1.0 (203135) | about 4 months ago | (#46474877)

You seem to have shot yourself in the foot. From a 2004 paper in World Psychology on teen suicide [nih.gov] :

rates per 100,000 young persons aged 15-19
country year Total

USA 2000 8
Japan 2000 4
China 1999 4

To be quite blunt, your entire argument seems to be that high standards and expectations are a bad thing. That, of course, flies in the face of the recently validated idea that high expectations lead to high performance [google.com]

When I was in third grade, we didn't write out the times tables, we wrote out every single number between one and a thousand in numbers and in letters by ones, one and ten thousand by fives, tens, and fifties, and one and one million by hundreds as homework. It took about a week. That is a form of rote memorization and it works.

You talk about Common Core producing "confused, bitter adults.. or the worker drones they really want", yet the current curriculum is based more on memorization and parroting back the "correct" answers and gives partial credit for utilizing the correct method even if the answer is wrong (that, by the way, boils down to "it doesn't matter what you get as long as you do things my way") rather than critical thinking which many say is a hallmark of Common Core [google.com]

It really sounds like your "bright" kid liked science and school when it was easier and as he has gotten older he has, like so many kids, started to dislike school and you are blaming Common Core instead of actually finding out why your kid doesn't like it. Maybe you should start spending more time with your kid and helping him with his studies, something called "being a parent", instead of making excuses.

Re:Dump Common Core (2)

ranton (36917) | about 4 months ago | (#46475271)

It's a disaster. It's pushing the majority of young children far too hard for their age

After reading a great deal about the countries who are improving their schools (in preparation for the schooling of my child), I don't think anyone should claim that our children are being pushed too hard. While we don't need to start pushing our children as hard as the South Koreans, our children are capable of far more than our schools give them credit for. But one reason it is hard to push our children to succeed is that they have parents at home validating that they don't even need to try and rise to the occasion.

Based on my experience with cousins and one of my brothers, I can in some small way empathize for parents who first understand that their "bright" 3rd graders are turning into average 6th graders. Different children hit the limits of their natural ability at different times (even the very bright ones will hit it sometime in college if they push themselves). Successful parents are able to push their kids to excel beyond their natural abilities (my wife's parents did that very well with her), but the poor parents just blame the school system or society.

Khan Academy Link (2)

retroworks (652802) | about 4 months ago | (#46474385)

Part of the revamped SAT involves establishing Khan Academy SAT Prep courses. https://www.khanacademy.org/te... [khanacademy.org] The perception has been for years that test takers from wealthier families have key advantages, including taking the test multiple times and paying for special training. Gates has been a backer of Khan Academy already. I think it's a positive step if they do more to level the playing field.

encouragement (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46474407)

I encourage anyone interested in supporting common core that actually has kids in school right now to look at some of the actual questions in the Houghton Mifflin books. We are teaching our kids to make up answers.

http://gcsdblogs.org/johnson_sue/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/5-1.pdf

Here is Pre K-2

https://twitter.com/NicoleAgonicole/status/402091539850993664/photo/1

With such awesome, child-appropriate wording as “How does Topic C use the array model to move the learning forward?” it’s surprising this wasn't an English assignment. Not that it works much better as a math assignment. In any case, Common Core deems it worthy of second and third graders.

Re:encouragement (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46474553)

This is what other countries do. Look at some of the entrance exams for IIT or the Chinese university system, and you'll see how far behind the rest of the world we are.

Re:encouragement (1)

RobertM1968 (951074) | about 4 months ago | (#46474765)

I encourage anyone interested in supporting common core that actually has kids in school right now to look at some of the actual questions in the Houghton Mifflin books. We are teaching our kids to make up answers....

Obviously, if you think that, then the education system failed you.

How much did BillG pay to "take" the SAT? $20M (1)

theodp (442580) | about 4 months ago | (#46474469)

Diane Ravitch [dianeravitch.net] : "The Gates Foundation spent nearly $200 million to pay for the writing, review, evaluation, dissemination, and promotion of the Common Core standards. It is difficult to find a D.C.-based education organization that has not received millions of dollars from the Gates Foundation to promote the standards. Bill Gates believes in the Common Core standards...And he is not at all concerned that the standards were never field-tested, even though Microsoft would never launch a new product line without extensive field-testing."

Oops - Make that $200 Million (1)

theodp (442580) | about 4 months ago | (#46474563)

My bad.

Why all the fuss about Common Core? (1, Interesting)

ErichTheRed (39327) | about 4 months ago | (#46474489)

Common Core is a big thing in NY where I live right now, because the state just voted to suspend its implementation for 2 years. NY already has pretty high standards for high school graduation and, if I'm any indication as a product of it, the curriculum is pretty good too. That doesn't mean that all other states have the same standards, and it seems to me that Common Core was designed to bring all states up to a higher level. As an example, my previous job wanted me to move to Florida, so I played along and did the whole relocation trip thing before telling them, "Sorry." Even the real estate agents who were pushing the place hard told me that my children, if they were smart, would have to be in private school to get a good education...just like Texas, FL values football more than education in high school apparently.

It seems to me that all the people screaming about how bad this is brought it on themselves. Look at all the press about the evil teachers' unions who have pensions, yearly raises, protect their members and only work 180 days of the year. Also here in NY, there was a big fight to force teachers to be evaluated and ranked like corporate employees get their performance reviews. I'm not a teacher, and I'm totally against that. First off, getting stuck with a class of crappy students can cost you your job, especially early on in your career when you might have to work in a bad school district. Second, teachers are professionals. Once they receive tenure, they should no longer be subject to evaluation and should have a job for life, end of story. Doctors and lawyers aren't stack-ranked -- those of us in private sector jobs who don't like it should fight to get representation.

Regarding the SAT, I wound up doing much better on the ACT when I took both. The ACT was much closer to what the SAT is slated to become. I remember it focused a lot more on what you were learning in school rather than obscure vocabulary words. I have a horrible time with head-based arithmetic, and the math section of the SAT (when I took it) had no calculators allowed and was basically two 30-minute tests of arithmetic and algebra tricks. I went on to make pretty decent grades at a state university in chemistry, so so much for the predictive factor or SAT scores... :-)

Re:Why all the fuss about Common Core? (3, Insightful)

Max Threshold (540114) | about 4 months ago | (#46474595)

"First off, getting stuck with a class of crappy students can cost you your job . . ."

No, that's not how the evaluations would work. The improvement of individual students could be tracked and evaluated against the standard.

"Once they receive tenure, they should no longer be subject to evaluation . . ."

That should not be true of anyone.

Re:Why all the fuss about Common Core? (1)

dmiller1984 (705720) | about 4 months ago | (#46474719)

"First off, getting stuck with a class of crappy students can cost you your job . . ."

No, that's not how the evaluations would work. The improvement of individual students could be tracked and evaluated against the standard.

"Once they receive tenure, they should no longer be subject to evaluation . . ."

That should not be true of anyone.

Is it really fair to judge a teacher on a test that doesn't mean anything to the students? Also, most states only have one of these evaluative tests a year, so you're not comparing students to their own scores, you're comparing them to the scores of the previous year's class. So the class of crappy students certainly could cost a teacher their job if their previous class was much better.

Re:Why all the fuss about Common Core? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46475183)

Also, most states only have one of these evaluative tests a year, so you're not comparing students to their own scores, you're comparing them to the scores of the previous year's class.

If that's how the test is being interpreted, the administrators are idiots.
You have test results for each class from last year, look at the difference between those results and the results from this year. That gives you the change in test results as affected by the teacher under scrutiny.

This isn't quantum loop gravity, if your only argument against holding teachers to a standard is that the administration is too stupid to apply one correctly, then it's time to nuke the whole district and start over.

Re:Why all the fuss about Common Core? (1)

kaiser423 (828989) | about 4 months ago | (#46474829)

That's not the case. I know a number of teachers whom improve their students by more than a grade year on the tests within a year, but still get rated horribly in these evaluations. When you're a 5th grade teacher and a number of your kids test below third grade level and you get them up to above 4th grade, but not quite passing 5th grade evaluations you still are very likely to get a bad ranking. Not the teacher's fault at all and I think that we should stop letting kids fail up to the next grade (that would introduce a whole other set of very large problems), but still a problem. You get a bad class, especially a mixed one with some students above grade level by a grade or two and some students below grade level by 3 years and you're going to look very bad during evaluations because those above grade level probably didn't move much and while those below grade level may have moved by more than a grade level, they're still likely not up to their grade level which also looks bad. Unless you have a fairly homogenous class that's near or at grade level, your evaluations are likely to suffer.

Re:Why all the fuss about Common Core? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46474677)

Second, teachers are professionals. Once they receive tenure, they should no longer be subject to evaluation and should have a job for life, end of story.

ha, sounds like your "private sector job" is Union Coordinator

Re:Why all the fuss about Common Core? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46474985)

Robin Eubanks has done the research and explains it all: invisibleserfscollar.com (I wish she were a better writer though. Nonetheless, the reading of her blog is worth the effort.)

Re:Why all the fuss about Common Core? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46475019)

>Once they receive tenure, they should no longer be subject to evaluation and should have a job for life, end of story.

What? This is how you end up with slack teachers where nobody can understand how they are still teaching. Ridiculous. Teaching is a job, not some kind of alternative lifestyle. You only work 2/3 of the year, really, so those 2/3 you do work better be high quality.

>Doctors and lawyers aren't stack-ranked -- those of us in private sector jobs who don't like it should fight to get representation.

Are you *** kidding? They absolutely are. Lawyers are ranked by the partners based on client satisfaction and billable hours, and suffer probably more than other groups because of it (a bad client can cost you a career). Doctors are somewhat more immune, but mostly because they own their own practices.

You are in outer space, friend.

The problem with the education system (1)

kawabago (551139) | about 4 months ago | (#46474561)

The education system is failing because it is designed to educate a student that doesn't exist, the average student. Every child is different and every child needs different instruction at different times in their development. The education system needs to be completely thrown out. We should design a new system from the ground up that adapts to the needs of the student instead of the forcing the student to adapt to the needs of the system. I have no idea how to do that, but if I studied how children learn I'm sure I could come up with something. It isn't impossible, it just takes vision and courage. Ok, that's impossible.

Re:The problem with the education system (1)

sandytaru (1158959) | about 4 months ago | (#46474809)

There are people who do study this very thing, but they're not well liked within even the education colleges because they come up with the same conclusion you did - the education system as-is isn't that great and requires radical change to be fixed. And money. Much, much more money to shrink classroom sizes and to provide proper materials for kids. Younger children learn best in groups of no more than a dozen. Older kids actually benefit from even smaller groups for some subjects (math), but larger groups for others (music.) Few school systems have the resources to try such an experimental approach, but those that do have pretty good results.

Re:The problem with the education system (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46475123)

There is another issue

http://www.southparkstudios.com/clips/103440/drug-free-treatment#beta-dialog-container

Basically learning is to put it bluntly boring. If you make it engaging sure it is easier to teach. However, sometimes you need sit down shutup and study even though it is intensely boring. My parents used this method on me for years. As I could not sit still for more than 10-20 mins at a time. Shut up and study works good. No you cant play outside this is study time, no you cant play video games this is study time. If I had a cell phone at the time they would have taken it away to make me focus.

Sometimes what people need is focus. It takes someone with a modicum of authority to say 'shut the hell up and read and we will be talking about it when you are done'.

Common Core: uniting the Right and the Left (1)

PvtVoid (1252388) | about 4 months ago | (#46474587)

The Common Core is the one thing in modern politics that is capable of generating agreement between right-wing conspiracy nuts and left-wing conspiracy nuts: the Left hates it because they think it's an attempt to undermine teacher's union, and the Right hates it because they think the Feds are trying to undermine local control of schools. So everybody hates it.

But seriously, have you actrually read the standardds [corestandards.org] . There's nothing especially objectionable in them, and there is a lot to like. Implementation, particularly an over-emphasis on standardized testing, could well present a problem, but the standards themselves are pretty clearly positive.

Re:Common Core: uniting the Right and the Left (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46474779)

And the standards mean jack if they cant be implemented in a good way..

So far - many of the homework sheets Ive seen attributed to CC have been laughable at best - especially the math. Some of the stuff is just a replacement for counting on your fingers! As kids we were told to use our heads not our fingers.

Re:Common Core: uniting the Right and the Left (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46474943)

But seriously, have you actrually [sic] read the standardds [sic] [corestandards.org].

If common core is the answer to education, then it is obviously implemented stupidly by very stupid people. http://science.slashdot.org/story/13/11/02/1540249/a-math-test-thats-rotten-to-the-common-core Were these math questions designed by morons, or someone deliberately trying to sabotage the educational system. Story problems certainly have their place, but teach students how to do the actual math first. And keep things relevant, don't confuse first graders by comparing pennies to cups of coffee http://roundtheinkwell.files.wordpress.com/2013/10/the-math-test.pdf

Re:Common Core: uniting the Right and the Left (1)

Talderas (1212466) | about 4 months ago | (#46475017)

Common core standards are, in fact, lower than the standards that were required by many states. New York voted to suspend it for two years to keep stricter standards. Indiana has a bill sitting on the governor's desk to completely step away from common core to utilize tougher standards.

A large reason common core has an allure is because of bad effects that came about from NCLB. It was causing a lot of schools to face sanction over kids not testing to standard (which is the state's standard) because they had a tough standard. You then saw waivers for NCLB popping up all over the place. So if you lower standards you're less likely to face NCLB sanctions over children not testing to your standard.

Where's Important Things Like Logic (1)

mx+b (2078162) | about 4 months ago | (#46475209)

The thing that bugs me about this attempt at reform isn't so much what they have done, but what they HAVEN'T done. There's things to like in the new standards, for sure. The math standards seem pretty decent (without studying them closely I can't say for sure; I wonder if possibly we're going TOO easy on our kids, I'd like to assume our kids can be smart if we push them and make some basic level of calculus-type mathematics part of the standard). The english standards are a bit harder to follow because they are categorized weirdly, so I will admit I am not too sure what is in there, so the following rant maybe should be taken with a grain of salt.

I think these standards are missing an important question -- why are THESE the important topics we should focus on? As an educator myself, teaching fresh-out-of-high-school students up to 40 year olds returning to school, the major thing I see across all age and economic groups is a lack of understanding of basic LOGIC. Without a good grounding in logic, in being able to make logical inferences and spot fallacies, it is extremely hard to talk mathematics with these people, because they simply cannot follow a train of logic. It bewilders them, and they either give up or they start to believe it's just "magic formulas" that I made up and have no grounding in the real world. 'I just memorize and pass the class so I can move on with life' is their mantra, because they think the subject is a waste of time, because they do not understand how it works. But that's sad because logic is the basis of mathematics, which has tremendous influence on most of the sciences. It's all logic! And it will also help people more so than learning quadratic equations, as it will help them spot fallacies in politicians' arguments, and prepare them for more knowledge-based jobs in the new economy -- network engineering, programming, electronics troubleshooting, etc. It's all logic. I try my best to add some basic logic skills to the math classes I teach to help people out with this, and it seems to work -- I have had consistently good reviews, and many students tell me they really appreciate the down-to-earth-ness of explaining why the formulas work and what they are doing. People are not stupid, they just don't know any better yet, and throwing upper-level concepts at them before they are ready is counter-productive.

tl;dr: If logic is not a part of this standard (which AFAIK, it isn't, I've certainly never heard anyone mention it and the website gives no easily-spotted indication otherwise), then I think the new standards are entirely missing the point of a reform.

Who cares? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46474601)

Unless anyone thinks this is a part of some devious Microsoft plot, who cares how much Bill Gates is involved?

If you want to attack common core, attack the program, not the people who support it.

I think this is a major mistake (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46474607)

The entire American education system is broken. This a band-aid that doesn't address the real issues at play. It also continues to entirely ignore the systems that work so well in Finland and elsewhere. If we want to get serious, then we need to begin to model our system after those in the world that WORK. Not keep trying new systems and plans that fly counter to them year after year.

Indoctrination (0)

fredprado (2569351) | about 4 months ago | (#46474697)

That is why we shouldn't allow governments to manage education. They can pay for it but should never manage it, otherwise it will inevitably become a tool of indoctrination as it is happening with the "Common Core".

Never mind you have to have money.. (4, Informative)

korthof (717545) | about 4 months ago | (#46474727)

I have two aunts that make a total of about 15k a year working there asses off in retail as single mothers. Bother fathers passed away. They can not afford a laptop (family made sure they got em). A requirement of Cores is keyboarding for homework. They are expected to pay for everything in this program even if they cant afford it. This nation thinks everyone can afford a monthly payment, forced payment for phones, insurance, healthcare. and If you can't pay the $300 a month in "affordable" programs, you are fined beyond recovery. Yes we have to move forward, but this shit has to stop, we need to provide help if we are going to require instead of fining the poor.

Uhhh... (3, Insightful)

the_skywise (189793) | about 4 months ago | (#46474751)

Coleman stressed that Khan Academy and CollegeBoard will be the only places in the world that students will be able to encounter free materials for the exam that are "focused on the core of the math and literacy that matters most."

Does that throw up red flags for anybody else?

Why are we supporting an educational policy where a private corp gets to not only dictate who gets "scholastically approved" but also controls the flow of information used to prepare for said approval?

45 States? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46474919)

Re:45 States? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46475099)

Not quite - In the Indiana legislature the law was amended so that the new "custom standards" had to be compatible with federal standards.

In effect, it still has to comply with Common Core.

It was enough of a change that the author of the bill will now vote against it.

Way to slant it, there. (1)

Slartibartfast (3395) | about 4 months ago | (#46475003)

Common Core is not perfect. Not much is. But the language used in this post was well and truly slanted. I suggest that, in the future, you avoid politicking in your posting, and instead be an objective reporter of facts. Words like "acknowledge" strongly imply an associated guilt. Likewise, the rest of the OP's slant.

Bill Gates = World Class Evil (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46475275)

Common Core has but one purpose- to collapse the ability and confidence of the vast majority of students in all the core subjects. It is based on a clever psychological 'trick' that is purposely designed to maximise the possibility of media attacks against critics of the abusive scheme.

You can split students of a given subject into 3 common groupings.
-Group A = Naturally gifted/self-motivating (let's say the top 10% of the class)
-Group C = Naturally educationally 'retarded' (let's say the bottom 10% of the class)
-Group B = the middle majority (in this simplification, 80% of the class)

Now it is ESSENTIAL for Bill Gates' purposes that Common Core teaching methods COLLAPSE the scores of group B, while leaving the scores of Group A and Group C untouched. The trick is to teach, say MATHS, with convoluted and frequently illogical methods that simply confuse Group B, but seem no more difficult to Group C than usual, and challenge members of Group A to see the 'new' methods as a 'puzzle box'.

Now, as I say, group B's scores (and more importantly, confidence) collapses, leading to Bill Gates' next stage- the carefully co-ordinated attack on the critics (see many of the comments here, for instance). Gates produces detailed "rebuttal" scripts to use against parents, concerned politicians and academics, and others.

1) Attack the pupil. Say the reason the pupil does poorly is because they are LAZY, watch too much TV, play too many video games. More homework is needed. A longer teaching day is needed.
2) Attack the teaching ethic in the school by comparing it to the 'FOREIGN' ideal. So, kids in Korea, or Japan, or Germany, or Singapore, or whatever faraway land is chosen for the propaganda do 'better' using the 'same' teaching materials.
3) Attack the parents. Say the problem is that parents INTERFERE, attempting to teach their kids 'better' ways of learning the subject, confusing the child. Point out that the teachers are the EXPERTS, and if the parents don't back off and let the teachers do their job WITHOUT interference, the parents are 'abusing' their kids.
4) Attack the critics of Common Core by using control words like "DENIER". Use the same methods as Team Gates uses against those that challenge the propaganda of Man-made 'Global Warming'.
5) Use the FAKE logic that because Group A and Group C do not experience significant changes in their scores under Common Core, there must be something inherently wrong with Group B.
6) Use paid reputation managers to flood all outlets with fake justifications for the usefulness of 'Common Core' teaching methods.
7) Attack the critics of Bill "Eugenics" Gates in the usual ways.

Bill Gates was a multi-millionaire before he even used his family's money to buy up other people's software, pass it off as his own, and start Microsoft. The Gates family has a long and disgusting history at the forefront of the US Eugenics movement. The Eugenics movement arose out of the need to justify US slavery of 'black' Humans in the 19th Century (when quoting the Old Testament as the reason that such Crimes against Humanity were OK was becoming unacceptable). The US Eugenics movement and the KKK are two sides of the same coin, and they walked literally hand-in-hand in the early part of the 20th Century.

Gates isn't just the prime force behind Common Core. This depravity also gave the World (but mostly the USA)
-the sickening 'inBloom' full surveillance database that tracks every aspect of every child in the USA. Gates created 'inBloom' in partnership with Rupert "Fox News" Murdoch, and named the project for the way Victorian Paedophiles described their child victims ("in bloom, and ripe for the picking").

-the unthinkably evil NSA domestic spy-platform, the Xbox One. An always on 'super-computer' attaches to a sensor platform which consists of:
1) a microphone array designed to track multiple simultaneous conversations, including those in other rooms from the console
2) a high-definition camera that sees perfectly in the dark
3) a military grade time-of-flight depth sensor (developed by Microsoft at the cost of tens of billions of dollars) that perfectly tracks the motion of people in the console room.

Each sensor feeds into dedicated computer systems of unthinkable power (compared to only a few years back), and can also be used as highly sophisticated 'signature' triggers to activate video recording, encryption and uploading to NSA servers.

Bill Gates tours the world DEMANDING that better ways be found to condition, train and control the 'cattle' that serve the 'elite'. He proudly describes more than ONE THIRD of the Human population as "surplus to requirement" and explains how better control of the 'cattle' can allow controlled global wars that can safely cull their number.

Gates is both mad and evil in equal parts. But Gates is anything but passive. He not only has a 'vision', but desires to use his wealth and influence to see that vision achieved in his lifetime.

PS- in New York State it is now illegal for a parent to seek to remove their child from Bill Gates (and Rupert "Fox News" Murdoch) 'inBloom' database. These monsters aren't messing about.
 

Original common core contributors won’t sign (1)

Theovon (109752) | about 4 months ago | (#46475339)

There’s this one opponent to common core that made a presentation based entirely on quotes from people who originally contributed to and supported common core: "https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mF16la1IiGI”. Originally it seemed like a good idea, but the cirricula kept getting watered down so badly that students wouldn’t leave high school with enough education to get into college. There are those who like to suggest that common core is now only about indoctrinating students with {liberal | conservative} ideas. I don’t know enough about that. But if you can’t do basic algebra when you leave high school, you’re in trouble.

This “no child left behind” idea has only resulted in the general cirriculim being dumbed down. You can’t fail anyone, so you have to teach something so lame that any idiot can do it, and then even the smart kids don’t learn anything.

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