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A Look at the NSA's Most Powerful Internet Attack Tool

samzenpus posted about 7 months ago | from the big-gun dept.

United States 154

realized writes in with a closer look at the NSA's QUANTUM system. "Today QUANTUM packs a suite of attack tools, including both DNS injection (upgrading the man-on-the-side to a man-in-the-middle, allowing bogus certificates and similar routines to break SSL) and HTTP injection. That reasonable enough. But it also includes gadgets like a plug-in to inject into MySQL connections, allowing the NSA to quietly mess with the contents of a third-party's database. (This also surprisingly suggests that unencrypted MySQL on the internet is common enough to attract NSA attention.) And it allows the NSA to hijack both IRC and HTTP-based criminal botnets, and also includes routines which use packet-injection to create phantom servers, and even attempting (poorly) to use this for defense."

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larry king defected? are we just all brotheruns.. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46479517)

after all? it doesn't get much wackier,,, http://rt.com/shows/politicking-larry-king/dalai-lama-larry-king-politicking-254/ never ends hopefully we're all in agreement on that

I wonder (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46479559)

all these software engineers that work for nsa/gov , do they have any fucking morals? do they really believe they are securing the world from the evil guys? are they kept at gunpoint? are they just plain stupid? Fail to realize that us, the makers , have all the power is the worst mistake. Plant secret backdoors, failure modes, weaknesses. Be in charge. You don't owe anything to these black suits. Wake fucking up.

Re:I wonder (3, Insightful)

epyT-R (613989) | about 7 months ago | (#46479575)

It probably pays well.

Re:I wonder (3, Informative)

Arker (91948) | about 7 months ago | (#46479627)

It depends, if you are an actual employee I understand the pay is not really spectacular. The benefits, however, are outrageous. And these days of course the government has gotten into outsourcing too, and most of their workers are contractors, not employees. The contractors are obviously paid well, and if theoretically they have less job security practically their programs are only set to expand.

Anyway, regardless of position, you could probably make more money in the private sector if you are really motivated to go out and make the next big thing. But this sort of job is about more than compensation. It draws people that really believe in the cause (who eventually become disillusioned, and sometimes become whistleblowers) along with amoral sociopaths that get off on power. Unfortunate that the latter stand a much better chance of being promoted and the former of being waterboarded, seems backwards somehow, but oh well.

Re:I wonder (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46479867)

The problem is their not whistleblowers, Snowden (from what I've read) was a **maintenance** person. He had no business peeking into the data.
If he was a person that monitors, and or scans through the data, he would've have been subject to signing a contract with the company, any information he sees, inner workings, and knowledge of his job would cause him/her to be seeing prison time and a lawsuit. And I would think, which would be 50/50 considering the government doesn't believe in security, those wavier contracts would need to be included for any private company that is seeking a contract with a government agency.

Which is why your not seeing or hearing anyone that works for these companies, and agencies coming out to "blow the whistle".

And a whistleblower to me, should be someone that can give an insight to the workings of lets say a secret society, ect., the information your reading and hearing over the NSA isn't a surprise. Nor has there been anything insightful. Everything their doing has already been widely known.

What is surprising is how the FBI kept files over their spying and targeting of 'suspect' Americans, not only that but the were released to the public.
I could give you a list of things the FBI had employed to targets, from smear campaigns, to implanting false evidence and charges, to blckmailing people around them, ect... The government has been using hacks for years, this latest NSA story is about 20-30 years old.

It is the private sector (4, Insightful)

dbIII (701233) | about 7 months ago | (#46480059)

Recent revelations about spying on an Indonesian clove cigarette company for the benefit of US "customers" is one example.
So that's for the private sector. How the customers in the private sector commission the work and pay for it would make an interesting story. Perhaps they pay via political campaign finance? Let's open that can of worms.

Re: I wonder (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46481131)

100% incorrect; feds have been paying better than the private sector for many IT roles for years. In 1995 you would have been correct.

Re:I wonder (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46479693)

It doesn't need to pay well.

Some people just get off on power, the rest just sell the secrets to the highest bidder.

Re:I wonder (5, Interesting)

tshawkins (1239974) | about 7 months ago | (#46479819)

Its the same question that should have been asked of the doctors that assisted with the torture and stress programs, the psychologists that aided and abetted the threats made against detainees families. The aviation engineers that built remote controlled ariel death machines. The lawyers that twisted and bent the law to try to justify all the above. There is a tendancy for professions to remote themselves from the consequences of thier actions, and to adopt both the "obeying orders" and the "if we dont do it, somebody else will" defense. Scumbags the lot of them, there is a very hot place waiting for them all.

Re:I wonder (2)

VortexCortex (1117377) | about 7 months ago | (#46481623)

TL;DR: Even intellectual fools let themselves be divided and conquered. Learn it: Compartmentalization = Evil.

Re:I wonder (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46479841)

I'm not sure what country you're from, but in America, morals are for suckers and poor people.

Re:I wonder (1, Interesting)

pcwhalen (230935) | about 7 months ago | (#46479885)

I'm not sure what country you're from, but in America, morals are for suckers and poor people.

You are wrong.

I am an American, I am far from poor and I am no man's fool. I live by the moral compass taught to me by my parents, my church and my conscience and I have done very well in my 50 years on Earth.

The most precious commodity is the ability to sleep at night.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?... [youtube.com]

Re:I wonder (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46479925)

No mans fool...Church...oops...

Re:I wonder (3, Interesting)

UnknownSoldier (67820) | about 7 months ago | (#46479949)

Riiiight, because your faith is magically better then his faith ???

Grow the fuck up and learn some respect for a different perspective / belief.

Re:I wonder (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46479963)

Whats this 'faith' nonsense your on about?

50 years and he still didnt realise what he was believing in --> a fool.

Also why arent you respecting my belief / perspective that 'faithers' are just fools to be laughted at, maybe it's you who needs to grow up.

Hypocrite (4, Funny)

TiggertheMad (556308) | about 7 months ago | (#46480445)

Grow the fuck up and learn some respect for a different perspective / belief.

I believe that god is seventeen giant, 65 foot long orange lizards, all who are named 'Ralph'. They have mile long, glittering prehensile cocks that drag behind them. Ralph^17 will sail invisibly across the sky once per hour, where all humans on the planet must turn to the South, and bow while chanting, 'Rubber Button' for one minute in order to avoid Ralph's divine and righteous wrath. His son is a stop sign three miles south of Yuma, and all who are able must journey to see him once in their life, lest they be dammed to spend Christmas vacation in New Jersey for all eternity. I demand the same respect that these goofy christian mono-godders get, up to and including wording on American money acknowledging Ralph^17's almighty farts. BOW, HEATHENS!

I mock you sir, for failing to respect that some people's perspective and beliefs are that 'invisible shit isn't real, and that you should call out the Emperor as naked when he is'.

Re:Hypocrite (1)

The Grim Reefer (1162755) | about 7 months ago | (#46481589)

Grow the fuck up and learn some respect for a different perspective / belief.

I believe that god is seventeen giant, 65 foot long orange lizards, all who are named 'Ralph'. They have mile long, glittering prehensile cocks that drag behind them. Ralph^17 will sail invisibly across the sky once per hour, where all humans on the planet must turn to the South, and bow while chanting, 'Rubber Button' for one minute in order to avoid Ralph's divine and righteous wrath. His son is a stop sign three miles south of Yuma, and all who are able must journey to see him once in their life, lest they be dammed to spend Christmas vacation in New Jersey for all eternity. I demand the same respect that these goofy christian mono-godders get, up to and including wording on American money acknowledging Ralph^17's almighty farts. BOW, HEATHENS! I mock you sir, for failing to respect that some people's perspective and beliefs are that 'invisible shit isn't real, and that you should call out the Emperor as naked when he is'.

I find your idea intriguing and wold like to subscribe to your news letter.

plus the thought of spending eternity in New Jersey scares the bejeba... Sorry I meant stop sign out of me.

All hail Ralph.

Re:I wonder (2, Insightful)

gIobaljustin (3526197) | about 7 months ago | (#46480961)

Riiiight, because your faith is magically better then his faith ???

Rather, my lack of faith is better than his faith.

Grow the fuck up and learn some respect for a different perspective / belief.

Grow the fuck up (Not necessary; just stop being an idiot.) and realize that people don't have to respect other people's bullshit perspectives/beliefs.

Re:I wonder (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46480071)

I'm no mans fool, I just do/believe what my church tells me.....Got to love the Irony here. :)

boiled frogs, would be my guess as a security prof (3, Insightful)

raymorris (2726007) | about 7 months ago | (#46480299)

My guess, as a security professional who could have been recruited for a three-letter agency, is that many of them are boiled frogs. There are technical challenges that smart geeks love, plus the whole hacker mystique, but you don't want to be criminal, so you go white-hat, hacking bin Ladin. That adds the whole "international spy" thing into it and maybe you help catch some really bad guys. That would be awesome, spying on al Qaeda. Hmm, if you expanded that technique you could catch a lot of bad guys. So you expand it to log calls to and from Iraq, Afghanistan, and Syria. After a few years, you end up in a place you never would have knowingly sought to go.

Re:boiled frogs, would be my guess as a security p (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46481321)

They are just fascist pigs. Their time will come.

Re:I wonder (1)

AHuxley (892839) | about 7 months ago | (#46480313)

It depends on the country, the mil junta, the party, the telco and the staff.
Did the connection to the NSA start with 1960's tech? The 1990's optical? Thats a lot of local staff over generations to read into looking after a lot of 'secret' rooms with copper or less with optical.
What did the local the mil junta, the party, the telco and the staff get back or was the cover story top down from a trusted local leader?
Some top gov official tells all the telco staff thats its their nations splitter and not to ask questions - that would cover most questions and access.
The problem is now that next gen local political leader, other members of the mil and opposition parties know their nations crypto, mil, banking and press are at risk .
Sooner or later changes might have a domestic intelligence group questioning top telco and mil leaders about the selling out of their nations communications to 5+++ other nations over years or decades.
That link goes to some base, listening station vs a shared facility is really the cover story that has to be kept.... many would trust that information and know never to ask more.
The other aspect is testing of staff until they are ok with selling out of their nations communications to 5+++ other nations/faiths/cults/mil/ex staff for hire/press/other spies.
A positive reading in of local staff that spying is great for their nation due to the mil/telco tech thats now shared.

compartmentalization (psychology) (1)

globaljustin (574257) | about 7 months ago | (#46480375)

nsa/gov , do they have any fucking morals? do they really believe they are securing the world from the evil guys?

idk about morals (I dont want to define or discuss defining it b/c it brings out trolls something fierce)

do they really believe they are securing the world from the evil guys?

They feel like cogs. From my short time as a DC congressional staffer & people I know in those fields, they feel like a **cog in a big machine** Their job is so abstracted that they dont really know the context of the work **or** they are doing the front line work & never see any analysis just an action order.

the intelligence community has been practicing "compartmentalization" in administering worker tasks since the Manhattan Project in the late 40s at least

one hand doesn't know what the other is doing **by design** across the whole org

it's interesting to note the paralells between:

Compartmentalization (information security): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C... [wikipedia.org]

The basis for compartmentalization was the idea that, if fewer people know the details of a mission or task, the risk or likelihood that such information could be compromised or fall into the hands of the opposition is decreased....(and later, re: Manhattan Project "Most did not know what, exactly, they were doing. Those that did know, did not know why they were doing it. Parts of the weapon were separately designed by teams who did not know how the parts interacted."

Compartmentalization (psychology): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C... [wikipedia.org]

an unconscious psychological defense mechanism used to avoid cognitive dissonance, or the mental discomfort and anxiety caused by a person's having conflicting values, cognitions, emotions, beliefs, etc. within themselves.
Compartmentalization allows these conflicting ideas to co-exist by inhibiting direct or explicit acknowledgement and interaction between separate compartmentalized self states.

Compartmentalization in orgs **can** increase security, but it **also** can be used by bad actors to **cover up bad actions**

Compartmentalization, from a cybernetic [wikipedia.org] perspective, is viewed as a feedback management technique.

In any system, be it one human mind or an organization of thousands of them over decades...compartmentaliztion can be used to hide all manner of immorality

Re:I wonder (2)

ObsessiveMathsFreak (773371) | about 7 months ago | (#46481059)

all these software engineers that work for nsa/gov , do they have any fucking morals? do they really believe they are securing the world from the evil guys? are they kept at gunpoint? are they just plain stupid?

Imagine a fraternity house filled with hundreds of "bro-grammers" looking to impress their peers and outsiders, alongside more socially inept nerds with a superiority complex and a grudge against society for its refusal to pay homage to their obviously superior intellects. The herd is managed by a cadre of MBA/careerist sociopaths with a lust for profit, exploitation and power. The entire operation has been given essentially unlimited budgets, unprecedented resources, and unrestricted access to private industry and the backbone of the net, and finally has been mandated to gather all it can, on whoever it can, by whatever means necessary by an ascendancy whose interests are explicitly opposed to the general public good.

Things have worked out about as well as you'd imagine. The fraternity house has engaged in naked, shameless and destructive criminal behaviour; in effect the NSA has become the largest hacker/cyber-crime organization on the globe. The Rule of Law now has no meaning on the network, or for computers, and society itself has been pushed into a literal sci-fi dystopia of surveillance and state security excess.

And were it not for one single fraternity member who found the courage to turn back and listen to his conscience, we would be spiraling into an even darker scenario at this very moment. Whether we eventually meet this fate is still uncertain.

The NSA is an out of control cyber-criminal gang. It is a matter of time before insiders at the NSA make contact with the criminals who run the banking industry, and at that point western society will probably be ripped apart in an orgy of computer-aided looting, sabotage, fraud, and political suppression. This is what happens when you let the hyenas run the zoo.

Re:I wonder (1)

Charliemopps (1157495) | about 7 months ago | (#46481359)

Now we've rewritten history
The one thing we've found out
Sweet taste of vindication
It turns to ashes in your mouth

Feed the beast (2)

reovirus1 (722769) | about 7 months ago | (#46479561)

I wonder what this tool will think about my encrypted archive of the proceedings of Congress that I've renamed "The_anarchists_cookbook.zip".

Re:Feed the beast (4, Funny)

Urza9814 (883915) | about 7 months ago | (#46479577)

They'll probably just think you're another 13 year old kid about to get himself killed doing something incredibly stupid....

Re:Feed the beast (1)

TiggertheMad (556308) | about 7 months ago | (#46480451)

+1 snarky. Zing!

it's all done. (1)

turkeydance (1266624) | about 7 months ago | (#46479565)

the Borg have won.

Re:it's all done. (1)

epyT-R (613989) | about 7 months ago | (#46479591)

Freedom is irrelevant. Self-determination is irrelevant. Existence as you know it is over. We will add your biological and technological labor to our own. Your liberty will adapt to service us... resistance is futile!

wishful thinking (5, Insightful)

Patent Lover (779809) | about 7 months ago | (#46479567)

Now if they would just use it to actually stop botnets.

Re:wishful thinking (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46479703)

Why would they do that? It doesn't give them power, increase their wealth, or get them off quite like infringing on our natural rights.

Re:wishful thinking (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46479709)

Your assuming they didnt start all the botnets.

Re:wishful thinking (5, Interesting)

Burz (138833) | about 7 months ago | (#46480187)

Clearly they have an interest (or conflict of interest) in letting botnets run amok, as it gives them a cover for their own illegal activities.

Re:wishful thinking (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46481597)

They ARE the Botnet, in total. packet based tools command and control remote /attack/ exploit / automation.

Spasibo! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46479571)

Spasibo tovarishch Snowden!

I fully support this (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46479601)

I'm American and I fully support this. This is exactly what intelligence agencies are for. Nothing in any of these leaks in the linked article suggests these capabilities are being abused. I want my government to be able to pursue foreign intelligence targets with capabilities like these and--in a time where people complain relentlessly about government agencies being ineffective--I'm glad they are able to do this.

Posting anonymously because I've lost too much karma expressing a contrarian opinion on all these Snowden articles. Frankly, I'm more scared of moderators than our government...

Re:I fully support this (5, Insightful)

epyT-R (613989) | about 7 months ago | (#46479671)

You know, one of these days, you will be the one arrested and thrown in prison without due process for 'terroristic acts', or some other set of stacked charges that cannot be challenged in court because they're matters of 'national security'. It's people like you that allow wannabe tyrants to bypass civil liberties and seize power in the first place. It is a known fact that the feds are breaking the law to pursue their own political or financial agendas. While it is true that the NSA/CIA were chartered to monitor foreign governments, what they've been up to since then has obviously come up short of expectation. They need reigning in and refocusing. Heads need to roll.

Governments are only ineffective at the things they promised but aren't in the best interests of the high level bureaucrats. Governments are scarily effective at doing whatever it is those in power really want to do. After all, all an employer can do is fire you, but a government can throw you in a box and toss the key.

I fear the federal government more than some 13th century thugs from the middle east. Groupthink is the most powerful religion in existence. bin laden's goal was to get us to do his work for him, to destroy ourselves from within. So far, he's won every battle.

Re:I fully support this (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46479823)

You know, one of these days, you will be the one arrested and thrown in prison without due process for 'terroristic acts', or some other set of stacked charges that cannot be challenged in court because they're matters of 'national security'

Boogie man argument eh? Oh no, they might come for me! This is nothing more than fear mongering.

It's people like you that allow wannabe tyrants to bypass civil liberties and seize power in the first place

Excluding the phone metadata issue, nothing in these leaks suggests that the NSA hacked or spied upon American Citizens.

It is a known fact that the feds are breaking the law to pursue their own political or financial agendas.

No. It is a known fact that the laws are being passed by Congress grant too much power--We need to keep on top of things like the FISA courts and there needs to be more oversight.

While it is true that the NSA/CIA were chartered to monitor foreign governments, what they've been up to since then has obviously come up short of expectation.

And that is what this entire article is about. The NSA's ability to spy on FOREIGN GOVERNMENTS. Nothing in this suggests they use it on American Citizens.

Groupthink is the most powerful religion in existence.

Oh the irony of saying this on a website that is notorious for being full of GroupThink while also espousing a bunch of GroupThink yourself. The only place worse is the Reddit Hivemind.

I'll give you a little something to think about.

Edward Snowden was an intelligence asset, handled (without him directly knowing) by the Chinese equivalent of the CIA. After the United States exposed some of China's cyber warfare units (Mandiant's APT1 report) and used it for political grandstanding, China returned the favor by exposing the cyber warfare units of the US... that was the entire point of Edward Snowden's document trove.

But keep on believing he was a hero and did it based on morals. So easily manipulated...

Re: I fully support this (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46480027)

You almost got it right. Snowden is CIA, sent to take the NSA down a notch. Not as agent for the Chiners

Re:I fully support this (1)

gIobaljustin (3526197) | about 7 months ago | (#46480979)

Excluding the phone metadata issue, nothing in these leaks suggests that the NSA hacked or spied upon American Citizens.

Why would you exclude the "metadata issue" (Which, by the way, is just **data**.) and then claim that they're not spying? That is the spying.

Oh the irony of saying this on a website that is notorious for being full of GroupThink while also espousing a bunch of GroupThink yourself.

Being part of a website where certain people think there's groupthink doesn't mean you yourself engage in groupthink. You're an illogical moron.

So easily manipulated...

He's not the one who's easily manipulated, if you're going to believe random nonsense. I don't even know why people talk about Snowden at this point; the leaks are what's relevant.

Re:I fully support this (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46481093)

Excluding the phone metadata issue, nothing in these leaks suggests that the NSA hacked or spied upon American Citizens.

Excluding that dead body lying over there, nothing in this room suggests that a crime occurred.

Sometimes an example shines through that truly represents the reason mass ignorance feeds the NSA intelligence community rather well.

Why do I feel that if the NSA walked into the room and shot the elephant themselves and left it to rot, people would still claim there's nothing to see (or smell) here...does the power of ignorance compel you that strongly to close your eyes, ears, and nose? Fucking seriously...

I also fully support this (-1, Troll)

mozumder (178398) | about 7 months ago | (#46479881)

You know, one of these days, you will be the one arrested and thrown in prison without due process for 'terroristic acts', or some other set of stacked charges that cannot be challenged in court because they're matters of 'national security'.

This only happens if you're an idiot, like the average libertarian that infests this site.

Smart socialists know how to always remain in power.

The worst people in the world are those that don't know how to socialize with other members of society, and socialization is formally structured in society through a government.

When you people state "I fear and mistrust government", what the rest of us hear is "I fear and mistrust other members of society".

So, when you hate the rest of society so much, why exactly should we allow you to live with us again? Because all we hear from you is "Me! Me! Me!"

Can you explain how you benefit us? Do you think you produce more tax revenue than we pay for you? Do you think the road we paved for you all the way out to your private secluded hideout so you can avoid the rest of society came for free?

Is that what you want us to hear from you libertarians? That you're a precious snowflake and that you don't want to do what government tells you to do, because you're a precious snowflake?

You will note that this anti-socializition is extremely common among those that society traditionally rejects, such as geeks and other assorted libertarians. Remember, groups are far stronger than individuals. We socialists recognized that long time ago, which is why we can get things that libertarians cannot, such as a publicly funded health-care system.

Meanwhile, we socialist statists will do fine without your support, since there are so few of you - you will notice that no one in the real world actually complains about the NSA spying, because most people are well socialized, unlike the geeks. In the real world, no one gives a shit about the kind of privacy you think is important. The only real privacy we believe in are physical privacy, not internet ones, since the internet doesn't represent real-world. (you were actually mistaken all along in your view that the internet mattered..)

But it is your job to decide if you wish to remain with us.

Eventually you will decide to lick government's boot, and you will learn that it is better for you that way.

Re:I also fully support this (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46480147)

Or we see society as a bunch of untalented sharks circling around the few talented fish........

Sucks being a talented fish.

I can't drive the speed I want because of these small slow-brains tip-toeing around claiming that even their tip-toeing is too fast to be "safe".
I can't openly do things that are now banned because small brains can't handle a vice without doing it every day ruining their lives.....
I can't simply fix a small issue with my house because the small brains would cross wires and start fires.... Now I gotta pay for "inspections".
In some states I can't even pump my own gas.....

I'm tired of not being trusted to be smart enough to tie my own shoes..... surrounded by idiots who slow me down in every way, then complain if I find a way around their slowness.

I'm supposed to just be thankful that I'm alive by their thinking..... not upset my extra IQ is wasted by their blackhole intelligence.

If someone like me has something.... the others act like they need it too, even if I'm busting my ass in ways they aren't.

According to them I'm just a stingy self-centered person.... In reality I have morals more advanced than theirs and they are OFFENDING ME at nearly every chance. THAT is why I dislike society.

I tend to be on the giving side more than the receiving side. I didn't grow up in a fancy neighborhood, I didn't graduate high school, I got screwed by "society" at every turn yet still managed to earn $100K/year at 26 years old. And guess what..... society is PISSED about that.

They are mostly mad that I skipped their hoops and used my natural intelligence to still achieve success. When you were doing homework I wasnt. When you were going to college I wasn't. Then you got your fancy degree with large amounts of debt.... I wasn't. Instead I dropped out and earned $60,000/year less than one year after dropping out. Then raises and raises left me breaching $100,000 at 26 years old. I come to work in jeans, I sleep in, I barely put in 6 hours of work.

But I make $100K because I'm smarter than you..... not because I work harder. Hard work is for small brains..... people like you who can't fathom a guy with brains who expects to use them. So yeah I expect to use my body how I please. If I want to drive fast, MOVE. I build your society while watching you do almost nothing. It's my RIGHT to do as I please. Eventually you'll figure it out.

Re:I also fully support this (2)

epyT-R (613989) | about 7 months ago | (#46480341)

This only happens if you're an idiot, like the average libertarian that infests this site.

No. it happens when the law primarily serves the interests of those in power (or their benefactors) instead of individual liberty.

Smart socialists know how to always remain in power.

quite true. The soviet union and north korea are great examples.

The worst people in the world are those that don't know how to socialize with other members of society, and socialization is formally structured in society through a government.

That depends on your definition of 'socialize'. The word's been defined and redefined so many times for so much self serving arrogance, I'm not sure it has a valid objective meaning anymore. These days it's newspeak that really means "compliant with the norms of the group", or "team player", someone who never rocks the boat, even when it's necessary to tell the uncomfortable truth and cause someone to have to save face.

When you people state "I fear and mistrust government", what the rest of us hear is "I fear and mistrust other members of society".

No. Government is its own entity, just like any other group of people. They form hierarchies within hierarchies, complete with their own groupthink and 'mission statements.' Really, they're just the adult versions of highschool cliques, except the stakes are much higher. They share all the same low level hazing, peer-pressure, and passive aggressive politics of their adolescent counterparts. Like students who are or are not a part of these cliques, the bureaucrats of government are a distinctly separate class from everyone else. After awhile, many of them truly believe that they are a cut above everyone else by default. This is a big part of what we're facing today.

Can you explain how you benefit us? Do you think you produce more tax revenue than we pay for you? Do you think the road we paved for you all the way out to your private secluded hideout so you can avoid the rest of society came for free?

Hey, I didn't ask for anyone to spend money on my behalf. You sound like that guy who washes my windshield at a stop light when it doesn't need washing, and then gets upset when I refuse to give him $5. What a citizen typically faces in socialist nations in final stages of collapse goes like this: How do you benefit 'us', citizen? I'm sure it's insufficient compared to what The People have done for you. Report to reeducation camp #119 for 'processing'! I don't think it's that bad yet, but obviously, you are already there. Now that is sad.

Publicly funded roads are a far cry from overt surveillance and psychological manipulation (ie terrorist fear mongering) which are the precursors to extremely large powergrabs. Oh, and I never said I disagreed with public roads. You need to put down the NYT liberal talking points guide.

Is that what you want us to hear from you libertarians? That you're a precious snowflake and that you don't want to do what government tells you to do, because you're a precious snowflake?

No. The precious snowflakes are the ones who think they're owed something from taxpayers because they believe their race, gender, orientation, or some other arbitrary difference, makes them think they are perpetual victims of some paranoid conspiracy they probably picked up from public schooling or the media. The sad part is, many of them probably are victims of this brainwashing. They do make reliable voters, don't they? Gotta love identity politics. If you knew anything about them, you'd know libertarians believe in rule of law, not in identity politics. That means everyone is equal before it; no favoritism. However, they also believe that the laws that are on the books should be rational instead of based on heat of the moment politicking. They understand that when humans are packed into groups, they're prone to kneejerk generalizations, and that the bigger the group, the worse the generalizations and assumptions get. This is why they prefer several smaller governments to be more adaptive to need while more protective of liberty than one large prone-to-failure-yet-too-big-to-fail centralized mess.

You will note that this anti-socializition is extremely common among those that society traditionally rejects, such as geeks and other assorted libertarians. Remember, groups are far stronger than individuals. We socialists recognized that long time ago, which is why we can get things that libertarians cannot, such as a publicly funded health-care system.

Prideful much? The jury's still out on that new healthcare system. In time, I think it will drive up costs and cut quality of care. Something will have to give somewhere. Time will tell. One thing is for sure, we cannot keep spending money that hasn't been made yet.

Yes, groups also have a tendency to compromise themselves off cliffs (eg sweden) or march in lockstep denial of reality (eg soviet union, north korea, cuba). The fact is some problems/configurations are better served via individuals' out-of-box thinking. Groups can get larger scope problems solved, but they also amplify human social dynamics to a fault. Bureaucracy, doctrines, cults of personality, all conspire to crush truth when it's politically inconvenient. In this way, socialists are not all that different from organized religion.

Meanwhile, we socialist statists will do fine without your support, since there are so few of you - you will notice that no one in the real world actually complains about the NSA spying, because most people are well socialized, unlike the geeks. In the real world, no one gives a shit about the kind of privacy you think is important. The only real privacy we believe in are physical privacy, not internet ones, since the internet doesn't represent real-world. (you were actually mistaken all along in your view that the internet mattered..)

I'm surprised at your level of ignorance. Why do you post here? The only thing protecting your 'physical privacy' from pervasive surveillance is cost and limits of technology, and those walls have crumbled exponentially for some time now. Soon there will be cams on every street corner in the country. Your car, your purchasing device, your appliances, will all be tied into the net and they will be programmed not to function without that connectivity. Sure, the beginning has been easy to circumvent, but in time, as you've said, only "nonsocialized" people will resist, and they will be put down like the dogs they are, right? I have no interest in living that way. Humans are not cattle.

But it is your job to decide if you wish to remain with us.

Eventually you will decide to lick government's boot, and you will learn that it is better for you that way.

Only if short-sighted, insecure fools like you make it impossible to do otherwise.

Re:I fully support this (0)

cowwoc2001 (976892) | about 7 months ago | (#46480021)

Slashdot users are waaaaaaaaaay too paranoid. The government doesn't care about going after Joe Nobody. Somewhere down the line you guys confused real tyrants with people who intercept your mail. No one cares what you had for lunch. Seriously.

Please take a minute of your time to read about what *real* tyrants do to their people in the rest of the world and then come back to complain. All this crying about it being a slippery slope isn't making us any safer. It's just leading to a dysfunctional government that can't get anything done. You spend more energy keeping the government politically correct than efficient and in the end the very tyrants you aim to prevent will take over your country by pure economic force (think China).

All I'm saying is... please keep things in perspective. You have legitimate points, but a government that is untrusted by its people (and by all accounts Americans don't trust any existing political party) cannot effect effective governance. In other words, you're asking your government to fail and then whining when they do. That's not very productive.

Re:I fully support this (4, Insightful)

Concerned Onlooker (473481) | about 7 months ago | (#46480135)

"All this crying about it being a slippery slope isn't making us any safer."

I don't know anything about slippery slopes, but I do seem to recall a famous quote about something to do with eternal vigilance and freedom.

Re:I fully support this (1)

cowwoc2001 (976892) | about 7 months ago | (#46480285)

"All this crying about it being a slippery slope isn't making us any safer."

I don't know anything about slippery slopes, but I do seem to recall a famous quote about something to do with eternal vigilance and freedom.

Yes, vigilance is important... but nothing is absolute. Good governance requires trust. The level of cynicism we've reached makes it absolutely impossible to run an efficient government. This remind me of someone who micromanages their employees: nothing gets done.

We need to find a middle ground between vigilance and trust. Either extreme will kill this country.

Re:I fully support this (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46480579)

We're not in danger of hyper-vigilance, we currently have almost none. The Senate Intelligence Oversight Committee can't even express indignance effectively, let alone make change. Just look at the way the Brennan has responded to Feinstein, and the way that Clapper responded to Wyden. You can lie brazenly to those guys all they can do is balk. It sounds like the FISC is the same way. Because we have no vigilance, there's no trust.

Re:I fully support this (1)

Nephandus (2953269) | about 7 months ago | (#46480653)

The level of corruption we've reached makes it absolutely impossible to run a non-parasitic government. We need this country remade or destroyed already.

Re:I fully support this (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46480351)

I don't know anything about slippery slopes, but I do seem to recall a famous quote about something to do with eternal vigilance and freedom.

Yeah, Wing Commander 4 was a great game.

Re:I fully support this (1)

epyT-R (613989) | about 7 months ago | (#46480373)

Of course not. Not yet. The cost of tracking joe nobody currently exceeds the extra value (whether financial or psychological) that can be extracted from him if he's monitored. Of course, it's not just whether he's monitored or not. It's his right to know whether he is, to know what's being said about him by various databases gatekeepers tap into when he applies for jobs, loans, licenses, or just about anything. When the cost drops to a point where it's possible, it will happen.

Just because jack steals one stick of candy and points to joe who stole 6, doesn't mean we should ignore what jack is doing. It is likely he will emulate joe at some point in the future. Frankly, I don't care what other countries are doing. If their citizens want liberty, they need to stand up for it. Our failed attempts at 'nation building' over the last half century have proven that. I am comparing the USA of the past to the USA of now. The trend is getting worse and looks to get a lot worse. This obsession over 'safety' IS the problem. Talk about crying over spilled milk. We're told daily by the media of all these 'threats', and yet less than 1% of them materialize. I tire of this narrative. I see no threat that justifies the power grabs washington has engaged in over the last 20 years or so. If anyone is making fallacious slippery slope arguments, it's the politicians in DC.

If there ARE threats out there that are subverting our society, then it's congress' duty to declare war on the countries harboring them. War, not useless perpetual 'police actions' that sound like something out of orwell's 1984 (we were always at war with al quada). Wars have a finite goal: hit the enemy until he is no longer a threat. We don't defend our way of life by supplicating and compromising with these people like our politicians do now.

No. The government is already failing. We're starting to realize that throwing more money at it is just magnifying the scope of failure. In fact, it's time for daddy to take the credit card away from his16yo princess spendthrift daughter.

Re:I fully support this (1)

gIobaljustin (3526197) | about 7 months ago | (#46481019)

What's with all these garbage comments defending rights violations?

The government doesn't care about going after Joe Nobody.

Instead, they'll be able to harass anyone who does something they don't like. The goal is not and never has been to harass everyone.

Please take a minute of your time to read about what *real* tyrants do to their people in the rest of the world and then come back to complain.

"X is worse than Y, so Y isn't bad." isn't valid logic. Just because there could be worse tyrants doesn't mean that these people aren't tyrants.

It's just leading to a dysfunctional government that can't get anything done.

I'd much rather have *that* than a government that infringes upon our individual liberties and the constitution, like what's happening now. This is supposed to be the land of the free and the home of the brave, and free and brave people wouldn't sacrifice fundamental freedoms for safety or the ability of the government to get random things done.

but a government that is untrusted by its people (and by all accounts Americans don't trust any existing political party) cannot effect effective governance.

Hundreds of millions of people throughout history were abused or murdered by governments. In the US, we had/have slavery, Japanese internment camps, Jim Crow laws, free speech zones, the TSA, the NSA spying, stop-and-frisk, unfettered border searches, numerous unnecessary and unjust wars, and conscription. If you know even a bit about history, you know that trusting governments only leads to ruin. You must be cautious of everything they do and think about whether they really should have a certain power.

Re:I fully support this (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46479701)

do you realize the world is eventually not against the mighty USA? do you realize every normal common citizen of another country would share it's food with you rather than stab you? do you realize that all the fear and hate and the terrorism BS is just purely a game of money and it has always been? 99.9% of the world population is held in check by few shit heads with too many money and fucked up ideas, we all know it. But it is time that we put our foot down and refuse to do tasks that are against the freedom and good of other humans being. With none to operate they zillions nsa infrastructures and develop code for them, they will eventually lose their power. It is time for a new Nation, a worldwide entity they does not believe in borders and pre-destination, we are born equals and we should aggregate by affinity, not geometry.

Re:I fully support this (1)

cold fjord (826450) | about 7 months ago | (#46479773)

What are you going to do to help the Ukrainians keep the Russians out?

What are you going to do to help the Philippines and Japan prevent China from seizing their islands?

A single nation covering the world won't be free.

Re:I fully support this (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46479923)

the people are fomented by the services (cointelpro anyone?) to get hot headed and do stupid things. The vast majority of people don't give a fuck about a bloody flag, it's always been the top shitheads that got their ego too big and their pocket too large.... mr wong in china don't give a fuck about mr ming in japan, they would rather drink a beer together but when agent shithead tell him that mr ming secretly loathes him and steal their apples at night then suddenly everyone hates everyone... Fuck these warmongers.

Re:I fully support this (1)

cold fjord (826450) | about 7 months ago | (#46480129)

A "one world government" isn't going to solve that. There are too many different ideas about the proper was to organize a society that are in conflict. There isn't really any way to peacefully accommodate those conflicting visions in a single country with a single vision.

You also put too much stock in cointelpro. That was long ago, and had limited reach.

As to Mr. Wong and Mr. Ming, there is a very good chance that even today Mr. Wong hates the idea of Mr. Ming due to traditional grievances between their peoples, especially over what happened in the 1930s and 1940s.

There are too few honest and honorable "peace" activists. In 1990 when Saddam Hussein invaded Kuwait there were few if any protests in Europe. There were many protests when the US organized a coalition and sought UN assistance in removing Saddam from Kuwait. In the 1980s the "peace" movement in Europe danced to Moscow's tune.

Re:I fully support this (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46479939)

Especially if that nation is the US

Re:I fully support this (1)

cold fjord (826450) | about 7 months ago | (#46480097)

The US has no interest in that. If you believe that you believe a silly political fantasy.

Re:I fully support this (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46481529)

Maybe not the US, but some US-based corporations do. You people should stop thinking of countries fighting to be the most powerful. Governments have become the way for a certain group of people to excerpt pressure and gain profit over the majority of the population a long time ago. Corporations have no flag, they just go where they can buy the greater power to do what they please at the lowest cost. These days the US government and those three-letter-agencies are performing the dirty duties of those corporations. If tomorrow China sounds like a more profitable land, with easier to buy people in power positions, they would just switch there without any regret.

Now they need wide social consensus in order to excerpt that power, and as Orwell depicted with great accuracy, the best way to do it is to declare a perpetual war against a diffuse enemy. An enemy which has no land or flag. An enemy they can allow to grow whenever they need it in order to justify greater power delagtion to them.

Re:I fully support this (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46479909)

You filthy fucking shill.

Re:I fully support this (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46480017)

"Frankly, I'm more scared of moderators than our government..."

Who says NSA agents don't have mod points? Pleasant dreams!

Re:I fully support this (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46480057)

Smile, because we're protecting you from terrorists.

Seriously .. watch this parody [youtube.com]

Re:I fully support this (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46480165)

Smile, because we're protecting you from terrorists.

Seriously .. watch this parody [youtube.com]

Re:I fully support this (1)

pitchpipe (708843) | about 7 months ago | (#46480171)

Frankly, I'm more scared of moderators than our government...

Well, from what I gather from the leaks, the moderators are from the government. Who to be scared of now?

Re:I fully support this (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46480537)

You may be right, but in my opinion what's wrong with extreme surveillance is that you can get flagged just for searching the internet for knowledge, or you avoid pursuing more knowledge in the fear of being flagged.

An example: you often see in movies that some criminal builds a pipe bomb with instructions found on the web. I've always been curious of knowing if that's really possible, but I never searched that on the web. Notice, I didn't want to build one, just to know if the average crazy man could really do that and be a danger for others.

Another example: whes studying nazism in history, or watching tv documetaries about that, I've always been curious about the book that Hitler wrote, just to know more about the state of mind that made such abomination possible. Again, never dared to search someting about it, not even on wikipedia.

Now my country hasn't got something like NSA, but I think it's only a matter of time, but I challenge any USA citizens to search for such things on the web just for their personal knowledge, without being afraid.

Re:I fully support this (1)

m.alessandrini (1587467) | about 7 months ago | (#46480563)

You may be right, but in my opinion what's wrong with extreme surveillance is that you can get flagged just for searching the internet for knowledge, or you avoid pursuing more knowledge in the fear of being flagged.

An example: you often see in movies that some criminal builds a pipe bomb with instructions found on the web. I've always been curious of knowing if that's really possible, but I never searched that on the web. Notice, I didn't want to build one, just to know if the average crazy man could really do that and be a danger for others.

Another example: whes studying nazism in history, or watching tv documetaries about that, I've always been curious about the book that Hitler wrote, just to know more about the state of mind that made such abomination possible. Again, never dared to search someting about it, not even on wikipedia.

Now my country hasn't got something like NSA, but I think it's only a matter of time, but I challenge any USA citizens to search for such things on the web just for their personal knowledge, without being afraid.

[Reposted because I mistakenly posted anonymously]

Re:I fully support this (1)

Jawnn (445279) | about 7 months ago | (#46480639)

Frankly, I'm more scared of moderators than our government...

You should be more afraid of your government. You should definitely be more afraid of your government than "teh terrorists". Your fear of "teh terrorists" has convinced you to allow your government to do far more harm to our country.

Re:I fully support this (1)

aliquis (678370) | about 7 months ago | (#46480663)

Frankly, I'm more scared of moderators than our government...

Scared of the moderators?
Hah! Look at this shit I'm posting here! Full user-name and all!

ACs should be moderated -10 in their real accounts simply for being ACs ;D

Also you shouldn't let irrelevant Internet scoring and populism affect what you say (Well, I guess posting AC is a way of not letting it.. But really. Just speak up. It should be your freaking right. People are different. People have different opinions. Accept it. Everyone doesn't have to be right. People doesn't even have to be consistent. You're free to change opinion whenever you want and feel or think different about something.

Re:I fully support this (1)

pentabular (2609873) | about 7 months ago | (#46480787)

Plus eleven. "If you aren't doing anything wrong", and, quite importantly, when our Gov. doesn't appear to be doing anything wrong, then what's the problem? I'm betting my systems aren't infected with this stuff; In fact, rather disappointingly, if most of us got the chance to ask some spook in-the-know if we were a target of any suspicion, most likely the answer would be 'no, you're boring'.

' Nothing in any of these leaks in the linked arti (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46481235)

I guess you missed the part where they admitted they have some 5 cases a year of "agents" using these systems to check up on their girlfreinds or other aquaitances.

Re: I fully support this (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46481273)

Then you are an idiot. Nobody accumulates that kind of power without it being abused, either by the creator or by someone who later gains control of it. There is a near 100 pct rate of this happening in human history. As a species we tend to be followers who support "strong leaders" with "vision" almost all of whom have led their societies to absolute ruin and who are the people who use tools of oppression shamelessly. Make no mistake. These are tools of oppression.

Go ask yourself what for? Because people want to do us harm? Why is that exactly? Could it maybe have something to do with decades of supporting whatever government or rebel would do our bidding no matter what they did to the people around them maybe? To a drug war that criminalizes basic human desires and leads directly to the rise of thugs and gangs who wouldn't have much reason to exist in the forms they do otherwise? Our own actions, a huge amount of which the compliant corporate media does not report on, are the cause of a huge amount of anti American sentiment. Our country does things and supports people who most citizens would never approve of because most Americans are decent people (which is why the truth needs to be kept from them). Our government does not like people who actually want to change it peacefully either. See FBI infiltration of just about every dissenting political group they can. I suppose you support that too though.

I've avoided invoking Hitler so I don't want to hear about 9/11 either. Actions like that are unjustified no matter what because they are indiscriminate (though our hands weren't squeaky clean in WWII either, at least there was some higher purpose in them). I will say this though: Hitler was possible because of two things. The first was that his country was extremely punished economically at the end of WWI and no dynamic intelligent people can put up with that for very long without going crazy. The second was large infusions of foreign cash for his political campaigns, a good amount of which came from good American corporate citizens who admired this whole fascism thing. That's just another bit of history we as a culture tend to sweep under the rug though.

Re:I fully support this (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46481357)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Hangman_(poem)

Or just google it.

Re:I fully support this (1)

PmanAce (1679902) | about 7 months ago | (#46481405)

Even if they use these weapons against your own citizens?

yep, sure (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46479655)

We believe you. Gobble gobble gobble.

Re:yep, sure (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46479687)

bruk?

Might not be intended for Internet MySQL (1)

Rich0 (548339) | about 7 months ago | (#46479663)

I don't know how much is known vs speculation here. If the NSA has some MySQL manipulation tools, it might not actually be intended for use on the actual internet. It is possible that they infiltrate networks and use these tools on the inside.

It came out that they're tapping dedicated lines, and those are often unencrypted. However, I'd expect most competent mysql use to stay confined to a LAN, even with encryption. Latency tends to cause problems if you separate the database from the application layer. But, I'm sure that not everybody the NSA targets is competent...

Re:Might not be intended for Internet MySQL (1)

Gothmolly (148874) | about 7 months ago | (#46479791)

Do you know how many cheapo hosting companies give you MySQL with your account?

Re:Might not be intended for Internet MySQL (4, Funny)

Deep Esophagus (686515) | about 7 months ago | (#46479943)

I have to wonder, how many national-security-endangering secrets are terrorists storing in a MySQL database?

Re:Might not be intended for Internet MySQL (1)

TheGratefulNet (143330) | about 7 months ago | (#46480015)

I've been stopped a lot while trying to board planes and now I get it!

yes, my name is john droptables. why do you ask?

Re:Might not be intended for Internet MySQL (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46480327)

The web presence for Secret Terrorist HQ is running WordPress and a pirated copy of vBulletin.

Re:Might not be intended for Internet MySQL (1)

Lennie (16154) | about 7 months ago | (#46480555)

Didn't you know terrorist use forums ?

Re:Might not be intended for Internet MySQL (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46481175)

> It is possible that they infiltrate networks and use these tools on the inside.

For example, in shared datacentres where webservers and databases are on separate boxes and communicate over the datacentre network.

3gp2orn (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46479831)

3gp2orn [blogspot.com]

There's nothing these people leave alone. (2)

pcwhalen (230935) | about 7 months ago | (#46479897)

If you have been on your computer, cell phone or car with EZpass or OnStar: they know a lot about you. Even if you have 7 degrees of separation from the bad guys.

You have to applaud the thoroughness. Misguided patriots, the lot.

In Soviet Amerika (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46479915)

In Soviet Amerika, QUANTUM looks closely at YOU!

I dont care. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46479995)

Stop spying on yourself dumbfucks.

Is that so hard?

Strange bedfellows (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46480133)

I'm starting to get the feeling the NSA is actually a criminal enterprise. I mean, take away who's paying the bills, and the description becomes that of a rather nefarious enterprise.

Let the personal Internet information scrub begin!

Nice (1)

MobSwatter (2884921) | about 7 months ago | (#46480159)

10 BILLION DOLLAR BUDGET, and they have a bag of Tommy 10 year old script kiddy tools to show for it...

Why not do something constructive? (1)

edibobb (113989) | about 7 months ago | (#46480161)

If the NSA can bring down botnets, why don't they? Are spammers making political contributions?

Re:Why not do something constructive? (1)

Burz (138833) | about 7 months ago | (#46480213)

If the NSA can bring down botnets, why don't they? Are spammers making political contributions?

They are the best and brightest of an unaccountable corporate-run state. In their minds, they are already doing something constructive just by showing up at work and feeling insecure and nosy.

Of course, letting garden-variety criminals front for you engenders a motive for letting those criminals off the hook.

Re:Why not do something constructive? (1)

AHuxley (892839) | about 7 months ago | (#46480363)

Its one global network and the same staff on two very different missions. One to use the botnets to reach out and own computers with and one to protect from often the same botnets.
The US faced the questions in the 1930's with the Army and Navy working on codes (mostly from Japan) - on the same codes with very few US experts ie duplication..
If the using of the botnets is given to another agency via CIA ....
If protecting from the botnets is given to another agency via FBI ....
The other aspect is knowing whats been used in real time and should be left alone as a honeytrap, junk crypto or other operation vs been shown to the press as been shut down or application bugs fixed
The power to vote/suggest/start offensive cyber operations globally is also very much in play vs just been asked for tech help.
Now mix in contractors and politics too :)

Re:Why not do something constructive? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46481611)

It is indeed a shame that all this power hasn't been used for any sort of good. It's easy to see why, but that's as much the problem as this capability existing in a government agency in the first place.

What we need now is a nice code leak from the NSA and then we can get patching all the holes this stuff uses ;-)

Story writer didn't read own story. (4, Insightful)

BitterOak (537666) | about 7 months ago | (#46480379)

But it also includes gadgets like a plug-in to inject into MySQL connections, allowing the NSA to quietly mess with the contents of a third-party's database. (This also surprisingly suggests that unencrypted MySQL on the internet is common enough to attract NSA attention.)

When the author wrote that part of the story, he or she seemed to be unaware of what he or she had just written:

allowing bogus certificates and similar routines to break SSL

By breaking SSL, the NSA has access to SQL queries whether or not they're encrypted.

Re:Story writer didn't read own story. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46481289)

Not really, it's just that the situation is worse than you may think.

Some developers form the SQL command in javascript and send those over a post request for the server to deal with.

Re:Story writer didn't read own story. (1)

akozakie (633875) | about 7 months ago | (#46481329)

Besides, why "on the Internet"? The assumption here is that it's somehow hard for the NSA to infiltrate an intranet - hard to believe given the wide choice of tools they have. And unencrypted MySQL on the intranet is common.

Bruce Schneier's Blog has a lot of info lately.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46480657)

on these goings on, including some exceptional conversations.

https://www.schneier.com/ [schneier.com]

also, search his blog entries here:

https://www.archive.is/ [archive.is]

fantastic free page archival service.

Fu3k! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46480727)

can no longer be WASTE OF BITS AND again. There are Community at and has instead hot on the heels of officers. Others direct orders, or Goals I personally flaws in the BSD All major surveys Turned over to yet FreeBSD at about 80 win out; either the superior to slow, kill myself like BitTorrent) SecoYnd, = 1400 NetBSD ops or any of the ASSOCIATION OF been looking for! and Michael Smith and, after initial Just yet, but I'm not going home stagnant. As Linux the project to there are some 1. Therefore there Be a cock-sucking The Cathedral dying. See? It's

You're outraged. Now what? (2)

i_want_you_to_throw_ (559379) | about 7 months ago | (#46481373)

What I have noticed is that there is a story in the media every damn day about the over reach of NSA and arghh..people are outraged. Oh it's horrible, etc etc. Amazingly enough, no one seems to want to do anything about it. Where are those stories? Where is the demand for congressional oversight? We get the NSA we deserve because we the people are doing nothing to reign them in.

I don't USE DNS & circumvent this crap (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46481519)

How? Well - you know (hosts with hardcoded IP addresses of my fav. sites I spend 95% of my time online @) & then OpenDNS servers (for the RARE times I do use DNS)...

How to build such a custom hosts file as easily as possible, for better:

SPEED (blocking adbanners, "good" or bad/infected + hardcoding my fav. sites @ the top of hosts to offset loss of indexing speed due to the FAULTY with larger hosts files usermode local dns clientside cache service, opting instead to use the FASTER kernelmode diskcaching subsystem + TCP/IP kernelmode PnP subsystems instead in combination)
SECURITY (vs. redirection OR "downed" DNS servers & vs. bogus roque ones malware makers/botnet herders use)
RELIABLITY (vs. redirects serverside like "beta" here which I NEVER SEE, no cookies required either)
ANONYMITY (vs. DNS request logs or to blow by DNSBLs)

?

This (courtesy of "yours truly"):

APK Hosts File Engine 9.;0++ -> http://start64.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=5851:apk-hosts-file-engine-64bit-version&catid=26:64bit-security-software&Itemid=74

* That's how, & it works vs. a LOT of this lunacy they're doing...

APK

P.S.=> On a "side note": The boys need to read a bit of Nietsche, specifically his quote of "When one fights monsters, one must take GREAT CARE, not to become a monster"... seriously:

It's VERY depressing, & full of room for abuse (which HAS already happened many times admittedly from them by their OWN FOLKS misusing it & will, with certainty, again... it's human nature, the BAD SIDE of it, & "absolute power, corrupting absolutely")... makes me depressed & it's making me lose faith in our leaders actually!

... apk

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