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Google and Microsoft Both Want To Stop Dual-Boot Windows/Android Device

Soulskill posted about 5 months ago | from the partners-in-nope dept.

Google 153

An anonymous reader writes "The laptop has undergone many changes over the past decade. At various times, netbooks, ultrabooks, and Chromebooks have been en vogue. Over the past several months, we've seen signs of the next step in the laptop's evolution: Android/Windows dual-boot laptops. Several companies have built these machines already, including Asus and its upcoming Transformer Book Duet TD300. However, neither Google nor Microsoft seem to want such an unholy marriage of operating systems, and they've both pressured Asus to kill off the dual-boot product lines. Asus has now complied. 'Google has little incentive to approve dual-OS models, since that could help Microsoft move into mobile devices where Android is dominant. ... Microsoft has its own reasons for not wanting to share space on computers with Google, particularly on business-oriented desktop and laptop PCs that could give the Internet giant an entry point into a Microsoft stronghold. Computer makers that make dual-OS machines risk jeopardizing a flow of marketing funds from Microsoft that are an important economic force in the low-margin PC business.'"

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Forget the customer (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46486111)

So neither perspective or any reason has the customers interests in mind.

Re:Forget the customer (4, Insightful)

Njovich (553857) | about 5 months ago | (#46486187)

Quite the contrary, if the customer didn't want this, they wouldn't care about it.

Re:Forget the customer (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46486209)

But can they spell "anticompetitive behavior" ? Strong arming a vendor to drop an otherwise legal use of the product has no leg to stand on in court.

Re:Forget the customer (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46486289)

They sure as fuck can spell evil too.

Re:Forget the customer (1)

tepples (727027) | about 5 months ago | (#46487143)

How is it "an otherwise legal use of the product"? The Windows operating system and the Google Play Store application are copyrighted.

Re:Forget the customer (1)

Penguinisto (415985) | about 5 months ago | (#46487429)

How is it "an otherwise legal use of the product"? The Windows operating system and the Google Play Store application are copyrighted.

So is nearly every book in my little home library**, but I'll be damned if any publisher or author will tell me what shelf those books go on, or what books I can set any given book next to. Put it this way: If I want to set my Isaac Asimov novels next to my Robert Heinlein novels, I will. Any publisher who objects? Screw 'em; no court will enforce such a demand on me by either party.

For relevance, I can safely say that no software house will be able to successfully litigate against someone who successfully multi-boots any computing device they paid for. Therefore, by default it's quite legal.

** I have a few books of late 19th Century vintage, so it's safe to assume those to be public domain by now.

Re:Forget the customer (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46486309)

But are there more than a handful of customers who want this? I've always seen dual-booting as a very niche market, and to be honest, usually more of a pain than a benefit.

Re:Forget the customer (4, Insightful)

s.petry (762400) | about 5 months ago | (#46486633)

Whether it's a niche market or not makes no difference. Many of us dual boot systems because our jobs require us to have knowledge of numerous operating systems, and to stay abreast dual booting has been a cheap way of using hardware I purchased to learn and grow in knowledge. I know many people who use dual boot for the same reason. Whether it's a phone or a PC makes no difference. It's "my" hardware that "I" purchased with "my" money. In my case, my company also purchases hardware and dual boots for the same reason that I do.

Neither Google or Microsoft give away the hardware, so they should not be able to force customers to use their operating system. Obviously they should not be at risk of a device gets bricked by someone setting up dual boot or a 2nd OS, but that's not the same thing.

Re:Forget the customer (1)

mikael (484) | about 5 months ago | (#46488251)

It undermines the whole point of having a locked in operating system on the system and all the security features. Now you can poke and prod at one OS from the other. I like the idea - if one OS gets bricked by some update you received the minute you got off the plane, you can flip to the other one.

Re:Forget the customer (1)

lgw (121541) | about 5 months ago | (#46487891)

Let's remember who Google's customers are (hint: it's not the users). I think Google is specifically thinking of their customers in this move. It's the opposition from MS that baffles me.

Re:Forget the customer (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46488041)

MS has been trying to get out of allowing multi booting of PCs for years, now they have a case for it "but Google doesn't allow dual booting".

Re:Forget the customer (1)

RyuuzakiTetsuya (195424) | about 5 months ago | (#46486349)

If these guys had customers in mind, they wouldn't make a half baked half assed hybrid between windows and android.

Not that I'm slamming either, but, this makes about as much sense as a toaster refrigerator combo.

Re:Forget the customer (4, Funny)

roc97007 (608802) | about 5 months ago | (#46486389)

I dunno, I see it as a toaster meatloaf peeler combo. In an environment where your job required a meatloaf peeler (although you don't see the use) and what you personally really need is to toast some bread.

Ok, that sounded better in my head.

Re:Forget the customer (1)

Archangel Michael (180766) | about 5 months ago | (#46486431)

Actually, that made perfect sense. AND I thought it was funny. I have mod points, but wanted to let you know beyond +1 Funny or +1 Insightful

Thanks

Re:Forget the customer (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46486475)

What kind of job do you do that requires a meatloaf peeler? What kind of meatloaf do you have that needs peeling? I've eaten a lot of meatloaf in my day and I've never had to peel it first.

Re:Forget the customer (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46486881)

Half baked meatloaf, try to keep up.

Re:Forget the customer (3, Informative)

Penguinisto (415985) | about 5 months ago | (#46487463)

What kind of job do you do that requires a meatloaf peeler?

Among others, Oracle ASM disk management.

...next question?

Re:Forget the customer (1)

mspohr (589790) | about 5 months ago | (#46487525)

When you burn it in the oven, it needs to be peeled first.
Some people do this repeatedly so I imagine there is a market for a meatloaf peeler.

Re:Forget the customer (4, Funny)

FatdogHaiku (978357) | about 5 months ago | (#46486873)

If these guys had customers in mind, they wouldn't make a half baked half assed hybrid between windows and android.

Androws!

no no no, wait...

Windroid!

Re:Forget the customer (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46487165)

I would want it. Have you seen the convertibles like the Lenova Yoga 2 Pro? It's a nice ultrabook, and ok for sometimes use tablet. You can use it as a giant tablet if you have a surface, such as a lap or bed, to put it on. In tablet mode, you don't have a keyboard or mouse. The problem is that in tablet mode, it's a Windows 8 tablet, which doesn't have very many good apps. If I was in the mood to use it like a tablet, I would love to be able to boot it into Android, so that I get good apps, especially games. I can't afford a nice ultraportable and a separate android tablet. Android on the Yoga 2 would make it much nicer and more useful. Without Android, I use my Yoga in tablet mode a small percent of the time. With Android, I would have it in tablet mode at least 20% of the time.

Re:Forget the customer (1)

slapout (93640) | about 5 months ago | (#46487399)

It's more like having a refrigerator with a freezer.

Re:Forget the customer (2)

mikael (484) | about 5 months ago | (#46488263)

I'm thinking more of a dish washer with a built in spin dryer.

Re:Forget the customer (4, Insightful)

Skuld-Chan (302449) | about 5 months ago | (#46486835)

I really don't care about dual booting - in my experience the machine spends most of its time in one environment, and the one time you do switch its got a months worth of patches to install.

Re:Forget the customer (1)

tlhIngan (30335) | about 5 months ago | (#46487419)

I really don't care about dual booting - in my experience the machine spends most of its time in one environment, and the one time you do switch its got a months worth of patches to install.

Not a problem here. If you spend all your time in Windows that is, because you can bet the Android side won't get a lick of patches!

Re:Forget the customer (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46486983)

So neither perspective or any reason has the customers interests in mind.

It's time to die Goog; it's time to die.

Re:Forget the customer (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46487039)

Don't worry, the free market will sink this companies and create new ones who will care about the users, it always has.

Re:Forget the customer (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46487107)

To be honest, dual-boot has traditionally been a very bad user experience as each OS has different ideas about where user files should go, how permissions on the filesystem should work, etc. Each OS is so isolated from each other that getting your files across OSes is a total pain. Not to mention the fact that reboots are incredibly destructive to user state anyway - I have three or four OS installs on my desktop and I only bother using the Ubuntu install because it's the most balanced for my needs. I don't bother using apps that require a reboot into Windows anyway.

Re:Forget the customer (2)

nurb432 (527695) | about 5 months ago | (#46487291)

As long as you dont have alternatives, the customer's interests come last. There is a line you dont want to cross when you start to lose customers, but that point hasn't been reached.

Re:Forget the customer (1)

xystren (522982) | about 5 months ago | (#46488065)

Yeah, just sell me the hardware and let my choose my OS or OSes. I Would be perfectly happy with that. If I want multiboot, I'm make my system multiboot. What is this crap about Microsoft/Google not wanting to share space with Google? WTF - it isn't even their hardware, it's the purchaser's hardware!

I think I have my next project, then? (1)

spiritplumber (1944222) | about 5 months ago | (#46486129)

I think I have my next project, then? Does anyone want to buy one of these?

Re:I think I have my next project, then? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46486439)

A partially emulated Android environment might be good enough. Compile the open part of the OS for x64, and use dynamic recompilation to run the closed Google services parts and apps. You could have an Android "window" on Windows desktop, and a full-screen mode that would work like the real thing. No need for dual-booting, either.

Re:I think I have my next project, then? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46486469)

Oh yeah, and I'm aware of the slow-ass Android emulator that comes with the dev kit. I get the feeling it wasn't build for speed, though, and you could probably do much better.

Re:I think I have my next project, then? (1)

tepples (727027) | about 5 months ago | (#46487163)

Compile the open part of the OS for x64, and use dynamic recompilation to run the closed Google services parts and apps.

But how would your emulator obtain a lawfully made copy of "the closed Google services parts" and any applications that happen not to be available through Amazon Appstore, through F-Droid, or as a loose .apk?

Okay, now I can say it. And be happy. (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46486139)

Fuck Google AND Microsoft.

Re:Okay, now I can say it. And be happy. (4, Funny)

jedidiah (1196) | about 5 months ago | (#46486147)

Always TWO Sith there are...

Re:Okay, now I can say it. And be happy. (2)

MightyMartian (840721) | about 5 months ago | (#46486399)

Where do Zuckerberg and Ellison fit into this Lucasian demonology?

Re:Okay, now I can say it. And be happy. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46486417)

Bounty Hunters. The Bounty is your wallet. No matter what you do, they will always get their bounty.

Re:Okay, now I can say it. And be happy. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46486569)

They're just douchebags in any demonology or alternate reality.

Re:Okay, now I can say it. And be happy. (2)

mindwhip (894744) | about 5 months ago | (#46486741)

Where do Zuckerberg and Ellison fit into this Lucasian demonology?

One is from Naboo and the other from the forest moon of Endor. I'll let you decide which is which...

Re:Okay, now I can say it. And be happy. (1)

oodaloop (1229816) | about 5 months ago | (#46487043)

Ah, but which is the master and which the apprentice?

nothing new... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46486173)

why not just spend the hour that it takes to set up your own linux/windows dual boot?

Re:nothing new... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46486249)

Then why not spend the 100ms that it takes to press Shift key at the beginning of a sentence?

Re:nothing new... (1)

sunderland56 (621843) | about 5 months ago | (#46486453)

If you're going to spend the time, why not configure your own virtual environment, where you can run both simultaneously?

Finally, a valid use for the Windows key: to switch your machine in and out of Windows!

All at your expense (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46486189)

Don't make any mistake about it anymore. Google has been falling into the old footsteps of 1990s Microsoft for some time. They're moving to close source anything of value, they're moving to prevent anyone who isn't on board with Google from making decent Android devices, and they're moving to prevent multi-boot.

Welcome to 1999. Google is evil.

Re:All at your expense (1)

ArcadeMan (2766669) | about 5 months ago | (#46486275)

And in the meantime, Apple had Boot Camp since early versions of OS X and are also providing the Windows drivers for their own computers.

Welcome to 2014. Apple are the good guys.

Eh..... (3, Informative)

mfwitten (1906728) | about 5 months ago | (#46486357)

* Apple has Boot Camp because they have to allow Dual Booting in order to lure in the majority of computer users—Windows users. They sure as hell aren't helping Linux users out.

* Apple introduced Boot Camp when they were still user-friendly—before they started constructing their walled guarden (located at 1984 Infinite Loop).

* Of course Apple provides the Windows drivers for Apple's own machines; every vendor that supports Windows has always had to do so.

Re:Eh..... (1)

ArcadeMan (2766669) | about 5 months ago | (#46486369)

Can't you use Boot Camp for Linux or any other operating system?

Re:Eh..... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46486495)

Nope.

Re:Eh..... (1)

mfwitten (1906728) | about 5 months ago | (#46486511)

Just because you can does not mean it's supported.

Guess what? It's not supported.

Re:Eh..... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46486807)

That's *exactly* like asking can you use Windows for Linux?

It makes no fucking sense.

Re:Eh..... (1)

tepples (727027) | about 5 months ago | (#46487183)

Let me rephrase: Does Boot Camp allow the user to install and boot GNU/Linux alongside the OS X that ships on the machine?

Re:Eh..... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46487371)

Yes. Nothing stops you from doing that, also there is no retarded Secure Boot setup.

Re:Eh..... (3, Interesting)

sunderland56 (621843) | about 5 months ago | (#46486537)

* Apple has Boot Camp because they have to allow Dual Booting in order to lure in the majority of computer users

Most users who want to use Windows software on a Mac will use some virtual solution like Parallels; then they can run Windows and MacOSX software at the same time, without waiting 5 minutes for a reboot.

Really, I think someone deep inside Apple did it as a prank. It is great fun to hang out at Starbucks, and watch the reaction of all the other MacBook users when they suddenly realize that you are running Windows.... on a MacBook.... heads have been known to explode.

* Of course Apple provides the Windows drivers for Apple's own machines; every vendor that supports Windows has always had to do so.

There are enough drivers built in to a standard Windows distribution to allow most common hardware to just run, no special vendor drivers needed.

Re:All at your expense (1)

Kremmy (793693) | about 5 months ago | (#46486367)

What was the cover charge on that one again?

It's really time to move to an honestly open computing model, so we can rely on long term supported systems that aren't being screwed with on a whim by people wearing business hats.

Re:All at your expense (3, Informative)

tlhIngan (30335) | about 5 months ago | (#46486379)

And in the meantime, Apple had Boot Camp since early versions of OS X and are also providing the Windows drivers for their own computers.

Welcome to 2014. Apple are the good guys.

And having installed Macs using Boot Camp, it's one of the slickest ways to install Windows. The tool basically creates a boot (DVD/USB/etc) with the drivers slipstreamed in and everything, so you install Windows and everything just works.

Previous versions of Boot Camp did require you to install the drivers after Windows, but modern versions slipstream them in, so after installing, everything is loaded. No need to hunt through Windows Update and websites downloading and installing drivers.

And no crapware, either. Only Apple can make installing Windows easy.

Re:All at your expense (1)

Algae_94 (2017070) | about 5 months ago | (#46487395)

Maybe I'm missing out on something here, but I find installing Windows to be extremely easy all around. It's been years since I've had to hunt down drivers after an install.

Re:All at your expense (1)

cbhacking (979169) | about 5 months ago | (#46487621)

Some people think still using 12-year-old OSes is a good idea.

"And having used Apple's AutoEngineStarterCrank, it's one of the slickest ways to start your car. Sure, early Apple cars required you to turn the crank by hand, but these days you just get out, plug the AutoEngineStartCrank into the front of the car, and it does the work for you!"

As "no crapware", somebody hasn't looked very closely at the Apple drivers... Feature-crippled and riddled with security vulnerabilities compared to the standard ones that Apple often keeps just barely incompatible with their otherwise-standard hardware. Report the latter problem and Apple might fix it in the version of BootCamp for the next OS X release. Unless that's any time soon, in which case you'll have to wait for the version after that. In my more cynical moments, I figure it's because Apple has a vested interest in making Windows appear insecure, so long as it can't easily be traced back to their hardware or software being the problem.

Re:All at your expense (1)

Richard_at_work (517087) | about 5 months ago | (#46486383)

Except Apples drivers for Windows are really bad, not fully featured and they regularly deprecate versions of Windows on their kit for no reasons - for instance Windows 8 on 2006 Quad Core Mac Pros with 16GB ram, or indeed any 64bit install of Windows on that hardware will cause Bootcamp to say "nope", despite it working perfectly well.

Re:All at your expense (1)

cbhacking (979169) | about 5 months ago | (#46487545)

Seriously crappy drivers, mind you (I've found trivial EoP-to-kernel-from standard-user bugs in them), but at least they exist...

Confederacy of Dunces (2)

mfwitten (1906728) | about 5 months ago | (#46486195)

"When a true genius appears in the world, you may know him by this sign, that the dunces are all in confederacy against him." —Jonathan Swift

Re:Confederacy of Dunces (1)

TechyImmigrant (175943) | about 5 months ago | (#46486745)

good quote, crappy book.

What does the consumer want? (1)

MeNeXT (200840) | about 5 months ago | (#46486197)

Personally I don't care what OS I use as long as I can accomplish the task at hand. I find all OS's missing some functionality. Some do it deliberately and others are missing the developers and/or resources. Android is my preferred mobile platform and OSX is my referred desktop platform. As it stands now both will lose from this choice since I may go for the Air instead of a combo.

Typical (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46486217)

Greed vs Greed, and the consumer loses.

NeXTSTEP? (1)

The Grim Reefer (1162755) | about 5 months ago | (#46486221)

we've seen signs of the next step in the laptop's evolution

Who would want a dual boot a laptop with an OS that has been dead for almost 20 years?

NeXTstep Mavericks (1)

tepples (727027) | about 5 months ago | (#46487231)

NeXTstep is alive and well; it's just called OS X now. Mac users can use Boot Camp to switch between OS X and Windows. I don't know how well it'd work with Android/x86 though.

But... but... but... (2)

sootman (158191) | about 5 months ago | (#46486227)

Open! Right? [twitter.com]

Re:But... but... but... (1)

cheesybagel (670288) | about 5 months ago | (#46486365)

I think they shouldn't forbid vendors from going this route. But it seems like a major waste of money. Its always going to be more expensive than either a Chromebook or a Windows netbook.

The major problem it has is it needs to pay the Microsoft tax to exist. That is no way to displace Microsoft from the market.

Re:But... but... but... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46486483)

More like "but who will get paid for the patent licensing if it's both a Windows and Android device?"

A pox on... (1)

roc97007 (608802) | about 5 months ago | (#46486293)

Well, you know.

I hope they keep it up! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46486299)

with such stupid fighting, people may be willing to try real opensource operating systems. I switched my father to a LTS Ubuntu distro and even my technophobe mom only asked how i got windows to look so different when she went to use it. Neither had any complaints when it came to usability for their typical computing activities.

I can't freely switch between Android and Windows? (0)

Kremmy (793693) | about 5 months ago | (#46486317)

Alrighty kids, now go back to your sandboxes and let the big boys do the real work on the Linux systems.

Re:I can't freely switch between Android and Windo (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46486361)

Alrighty kids, now go back to your sandboxes and let the big boys do the real work on the Linux systems.

Do let us all know when you have solved basic issues like drivers for printers, scanners,
sync with mobile devices, etc.

Because unless and until you have done that, your silly little Linux toy is useless for
those of us who need computers to get work done.

Re:I can't freely switch between Android and Windo (2)

Kremmy (793693) | about 5 months ago | (#46486593)

Which would be totally true, if all those services you're relying on to make all those devices useful weren't running on racks of Linux servers.

Re:I can't freely switch between Android and Windo (1)

pr0fessor (1940368) | about 5 months ago | (#46486739)

Why are you trying to sync your mobile toy with my LAMP!?!?

Like Linux? Get an HP printer and scanner. (1)

tepples (727027) | about 5 months ago | (#46487271)

Do let us all know when you have solved basic issues like drivers for printers, scanners

The printer and scanner on my HP OfficeJet 4500 work well with Ubuntu, and any PC running Chrome can act as a proxy for printing from an Android device.

sync with mobile devices

True, GNU/Linux has had trouble communicating with Android over MTP. But Android Debug Bridge works, as does setting up a Samba share on your GNU/Linux PC and accessing it with Rhythm Software File Manager for Android.

Re:I can't freely switch between Android and Windo (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46487387)

You're stuck in 1999 mate, now days I have more problems trying to get the silly proprietary printer drivers and associated crapware working on Windows than I do getting the same printer to work in Linux.

Re:I can't freely switch between Android and Windo (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46487669)

I'd argue that all of the things you mentioned are not only possible, but work better in Linux. You just have to avoid devices that don't support Linux. Whodathunkit, right? If you buy crap hardware that only works in one environment, it won't work outside that environment!

I honestly don't mind your shitty attitude, though. It means one less uneducated asshole using my OS of choice and pretending it's the OSes fault that their awful printers, scanners, and handhelds don't sync with it. Next you'll start blaming others for Apple's hostile policies, too.

Re:I can't freely switch between Android and Windo (1)

jellomizer (103300) | about 5 months ago | (#46486667)

All sounds good, until you need to lug around either a heavy bulky laptop or spend a lot of money for a light one, with the enough battery so you can go around with a full work station for real work. When you are web browsing and running simple apps most of the time. You are better of getting a cheap tablet or chromebook with a Data Plan and have your Linux running on a server where you can access for nearly anywhere.

So if you are going to access your server from a low end thin client. What should your core OS be?

Price of a data plan (1)

tepples (727027) | about 5 months ago | (#46487313)

until you need to lug around either a heavy bulky laptop or spend a lot of money for a light one

I learned on Scroogled.com a couple weeks ago that 10" Windows laptops are back in production.

You are better of getting a cheap tablet or chromebook with a Data Plan and have your Linux running on a server where you can access for nearly anywhere.

If you're going to just use a Chromebook as an X11 or VNC terminal for a GNU/Linux VPS, how much does a data plan for that cost over the 48-month expected service life of a laptop? And how well does 3D graphics (e.g. Blender) tunnel over such a connection?

Let us know... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46487733)

...when you can hold a job for longer than 3 months at a time.

Dual boot is a bad idea anyway (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46486405)

It's a tacit admission that both operating systems fail at doing what you want.

Blue Stacks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46486407)

I run many Android apps on Blue Stacks now. ( http://www.bluestacks.com/ )

Yes, it's in Beta, and yes you need a supported video card (most Intel HD Graphics seems to work), but if you have all that, it lets you run many Android apps on a Windows or Macintosh.

Bluestacks seems to be marketed towards games (angry birds, fruit ninjas, etc), but I use it for all sorts of things. For example, Bluestacks allows me to use my USB webcam to direct deposit checks to my bank account using my bank's mobile android app from my desktop PC. Sure, I could use a smart phone or tablet, but with a big screen and real keyboard, there are some real advantages to running apps on a laptop or desktop, IMHO.

WinDroid: Guaranteed to be a shitty experience (1)

rsborg (111459) | about 5 months ago | (#46486465)

If you think it's a bad experience when you have a single OS (plus first-party apps) vendor, and a separate manufacturer (e.g.: my Lenovo and it's bevy of task-tray items), try it now with two fully supported OSs out of the box.

While I agree that it sucks that Google and Microsoft both are trying to defeat this initiative, I can also say with a 95% certainty that even if the both condoned it, it would still be a really bad experience.

Google's hypocrisy with android being "Open" is what's really exposed here - in honesty, both Microsoft and Google are as bad as Apple in desiring closed platforms. It's just that Apple seems better at delivering said platform.

Silly me .... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46486467)

... I thought they were concerned with security?

Note to OEMs, ODMs: (1)

rainer_d (115765) | about 5 months ago | (#46486485)

If your product relies on a 3rd-party to actually attract customers (and/or make a profit), your business model is flawed and you're doomed.
.

Antitrust much? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46486617)

So both Google and Microsoft are afraid of the competition this would provide.

So they are both anti-competitive.

Isn't that what our antit-trust laws are about?

Re:Antitrust much? (1)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | about 5 months ago | (#46486941)

Silly rabbit, the US hasn't used anti-trust law enforcement since Reagan.

Divide et impera (1)

houghi (78078) | about 5 months ago | (#46486631)

That is Latin for Devide and conquor.

no. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46487697)

It's "Divide" you illiterate scrotum.

Dual boot is stupid (0)

symbolset (646467) | about 5 months ago | (#46486757)

Nobody wants this.

Re:Dual boot is stupid (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46487863)

Ah yes. I don't like it, so obviously nobody wants it. The mating cry of the shill and the fanboy.

android-x86.org? (1)

maotsan (1222666) | about 5 months ago | (#46486821)

I am suddenly struck by the urge to dual boot on my 8.1 laptop. Is Android-x86 prefect and wonderful?

Information just wants to *SIGNAL DROP* (1)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | about 5 months ago | (#46486907)

Information just wants to be free.

Or at least 1/20th the cost we get overcharged for substandard service in the US while real First World nations get real Internet, real dual boot, and real security.

You can always dual boot the other way and not "tell" the Win side about the removable 2 TB SDD you have.

XP non-up-dateable (1)

Msdose (867833) | about 5 months ago | (#46487069)

I want to install android on my XP box so I can still surf the net on android and use my XP programs walled off from the net.

Trusted? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46487179)

Wouldn't dual boot interfere with the level of control these two companies want over devices in their ecosystem? Such as: with a chromebook you usually go into nasty developer mode to run something else. Warning! Warning! Hit a key in 30 seconds, otherwise we will bring you back into the fold! I am sure Windows expects the same thing. Enjoy your puny Win8 tablet but don't you dare install Fedora on it! Why would you do that, don't you want the protection of our Trusted software? Good luck logging into that VPN...

I actually don't have a problem with this. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46487623)

I own a PC I built myself that is running Windows 7, and I have a Samsung Galaxy S4 running an Android 4.2 custom ROM, and I think the market is already competitive enough. Don't like a Windows phone? Get an Android. Don't like android tablets or laptops? Get a Microsoft Surface, or the like. Each company has their own way of doing things, and I think that it is fair to say "We want a device that is as efficient and functional as possible, while being as inexpensive as possible, and we want you to do it better than everyone else." I think it is unfair to say "Now we want you to design your hardware to be able to run your competitor's OS." That is going too far.

@ s.petry who was talking about dual booting saving them money in their job. You know why your job exists in the first place? Because there are different companies that have created separate, yet popular ways of doing things. Because of this separateness, your knowledge of both OSes is valuable because you can do business with either. How efficiently you obtain that knowledge is your responsibility, but the separateness is universal; the companies should not be expected to make an exception for you just because your job requires it. You want knowledge of both OSes? Then buy both devices, or try to tinker with one device until you can dual boot. But I don't blame the companies for not wanting hardware that makes it as easy as falling off a log. This is actually a catch 22; did you consider that the very device you want to make your job easier is the same device that can make your job obsolete?

When a company is competitive, we get functional devices and they get money and market share. Having a device that can dual boot would be even more functional for the end user, but potentially suicidal for the company. I like Google's services. I don't want them to commit suicide. Sure I might have a cool dual boot device for a while, but what happens when that device dies? No more Google means no more cool next gen Android devices to look forward too, not as well supported as today's devices are anyway.

They don't need to stop it. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46487665)

Nobody will buy it except a very small niche group. Dual booting is too much hassle for most people.

Less competition (1)

Hentes (2461350) | about 5 months ago | (#46487693)

Seems like neither Google nor Microsoft wants to compete with the other, so they partitioned the PC market with Google getting the mobile part and Microsoft the desktop. Business as usual.

Chrysanthi Lykousi (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46487701)

Isn't Android based on Linux? Why don't we run GNU/Linux or GNU/Hurd on our phones? Why do we need Google and Android?

The road to irrelevance (1)

WaffleMonster (969671) | about 5 months ago | (#46488183)

Begins with fucking over your customers for selfish reasons.

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