Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Survey Finds Nearly 50% In US Believe In Medical Conspiracy Theories

samzenpus posted about 7 months ago | from the that's-what-they-want-you-to-think dept.

Medicine 395

cold fjord writes in with some bad news for the people using water fluoridation to pacify the public and install a new world government. "About half of American adults believe in at least one medical conspiracy theory, according to new survey results. (paywalled, first page viewable) Some conspiracy theories have much more traction than others ... three times as many people believe U.S. regulators prevent people from getting natural cures as believe that a U.S. spy agency infected a large number of African Americans with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). J. Eric Oliver, the study's lead author from University of Chicago, said people may believe in conspiracy theories because they're easier to understand than complex medical information. ... Some 49 percent of the survey participants agreed with at least one of the conspiracies. In fact, in addition to the 37 percent of respondents who fully agreed that U.S. regulators are suppressing access to natural cures, less than a third were willing to say they actively disagreed with the theory. — One of the conspiracy theories, that the U.S. created HIV, was created for an active disinformation campaign by the Soviet Union against the U.S. as a form of political warfare during the Cold War, and still gets repeated."

cancel ×

395 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Jenny McCarthy (4, Funny)

PopeRatzo (965947) | about 7 months ago | (#46529329)

That says it all.

Re:Jenny McCarthy (3, Funny)

ackthpt (218170) | about 7 months ago | (#46529417)

Stupidity is on the rise.

Seems there was a Far Side cartoon about imbeciles marching with an upside-down banner or such. It's pretty much what I expect to see some times "we r teh stoopids - and we voat"

Re:Jenny McCarthy (2)

PopeRatzo (965947) | about 7 months ago | (#46529567)

I learned recently that the wife of the quarterback of my beloved Chicago Bears is one of these anti-vaccine people, based on the notion that vaccines have "chemicals" in them. So they don't get their kids vaccinated, endangering the lives of others.

Here, if you really want to be scared, is an interview with noted genius Kristin Cavallari, explaining that the reason she doesn't get her kids vaccinated is because she's "read too many books".

No kidding, you've got to see this:

http://youtu.be/7WzE0qO7tzY?t=... [youtu.be]

Re:Jenny McCarthy (-1, Troll)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | about 7 months ago | (#46529727)

"So they don't get their kids vaccinated, endangering the lives of others."

I think in the scale of things, with all the real dangers in the world, it seems like you would have bigger things to worry about than that some people might want to excercise their freeedom of choice, even though you don't like it. Indeed, one really huge danger is that morons who think they are smart will vote to remove even more of our freedoms, with their idiocy.

You have absolutelty no right to tell others if they should get vaccinations. Plenty of people who don't get them are very, very smart people. Smarter in fact than you could ever imagine being, so take your "Ohz! I'z da smartta One! Anyone who doesn't get vaccinated iz da idiatz!" bullshit and shove it. Stupid people who think they are smart such as yourself are much more dangerous than regular stupid people,vaccinated or otherwise.

Re:Jenny McCarthy (1)

Algae_94 (2017070) | about 7 months ago | (#46529817)

Plenty of people who don't get them are very, very smart people.

You're going to have to give a citation on who these people are. All I've heard about is a bunch of celebrities.

I also question that they're "very, very smart" if they are willingly putting their children at risk of death by not vaccinating them. You are right that I can't tell them to get their children vaccinated, but they better not want any sort of help when their kid is horribly ill from a completely preventable disease.

Re:Jenny McCarthy (-1, Flamebait)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | about 7 months ago | (#46529889)

"I also question that they're "very, very smart" if they are willingly putting their children at risk of death by not vaccinating them."

The "very, very smart" people realize what a ridiculous claim it is that their children are likely to die if they don't get them vaccinated. Yes, it is true that the reason why it is such a small chance is because of vaccinations, but very smart people realize all of that, and then make their own choice. One very intelligent choice is to recognize this and opt not to vaccinate.

On a related note, where is the evidence that thousands and thousands of children are dying in droves due to not being vaccinated? Did Jenny's kids die and I missed it or something?

Re:Jenny McCarthy (5, Informative)

PopeRatzo (965947) | about 7 months ago | (#46530065)

Now who said anything about children "dying in droves due to not being vaccinated"? But there are some very troubling statistics. Like the outbreak in measles in NY, and polio being on the rise. Kids dying of whooping cough which hasn't happened for decades.

I don't know if you're old enough to remember polio. It was a disease that crippled thousands of young kids and because of vaccination was wiped out until these knuckleheads decided they didn't want to vaccinate their kids.

Here's an assignment. Look up "herd immunity". Read about it and come back here and tell us what you've learned. I know you want to be well-informed on this subject, and herd mentality is why refusing to vaccinate your kids is a hostile act toward the rest of us.

Re:Jenny McCarthy (4, Insightful)

Jason Levine (196982) | about 7 months ago | (#46530079)

Yes, it is true that the reason why it is such a small chance is because of vaccinations

The problem with this is that the anti-vaccination folks are essentially relying on herd immunity to stay healthy. Previously, when it was just kids who were too young to be vaccinated or people with medical reasons (allergies, immune system issues, etc), herd immunity had no trouble keeping them safe. Measles was all but wiped out in the US. A few people started skipping the vaccines due to one scare or another (e.g. Wakefield's "MMR causes autism" which despite being debunked repeatedly still gets quoted), but they were fine because herd immunity protected them as well. However, when too many people jump on the anti-vax bandwagon and skip vaccinations, herd immunity breaks down and you begin to get outbreaks. This is where we are now. Outbreaks of disease preventable illnesses popping up because some people listen to Jenny McCarthy railing about toxins (just before she gets botox injected into her), listening to some other celebrity, or listening to "some stuff I read on a natural cures website" instead of listening to someone with actual medical experience.

And when these diseases break out again, people will die [danamccaffery.com] . (Despite some anti-vaxxers - who obviously have never seen the diseases - claiming that whooping cough [wikipedia.org] and measles [wikipedia.org] not killing anyone.)

Re:Jenny McCarthy (1)

AlphaWolf_HK (692722) | about 7 months ago | (#46530091)

If they really were smart though they'd recognize that there really is no good reason not to vaccinate.

Symptoms like fever, cough, sneeze, etc are the result of immune reaction to a perceived pathogen, whether a real threat or not. Immunizations simulate a real infection, which causes those symptoms, but you don't actually get sick from it. There is zero connection between autism and vaccines.

The result of vaccination is to cause your immune system to produce antibodies that will cause an infection to die out before it becomes a threat. This is why vaccines prevent 90% of infections, and having everybody around you get sick is likely to result in you getting sick as well even if you're vaccinated. Sometimes your immune system produces these antibodies until you die, sometimes it stops after so many years so you need to do it over again.

Because you do have that extra protection, why on earth would you choose to forgo vaccination? Only either a moron or somebody without a fucking clue would choose otherwise; definitely a far cry from the "very smart people" you mention.

Re:Jenny McCarthy (2)

hermitdev (2792385) | about 7 months ago | (#46529877)

Sure, you have the right to tell people to not get vaccinations. I don't get all vaccinations my doctor prescribes, because as a healthy adult, some are stupid. I get my tetanus, rabies, measles (one time shot), that sort. I don't get a flu vaccine, not because I'm afraid of autism, but because they get it wrong most of the time. And the flu "vaccine" is just as likely to make you sick as it is to prevent it in the first place. Granted, the "vaccine" generally doesn't affect you "as bad", but you still get sick.

That said, Jenny McCarthy is fucking nuts in regards to things like Polio & MMR

Hell, we could be done with Polio vaccines if it wasn't for backwaters countries like Pakistan.

We eliminated smallpox worldwide via vaccines. If she think's they're a bad idea, maybe she'd be willing to volunteer to be exposed?

Re:Jenny McCarthy (0, Flamebait)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | about 7 months ago | (#46529919)

You pretty much just nailed exactly my thought process. The flu vaccine is an excellent example. It's almost an intelligence test. I can ask "did you get a flu shot" and if the answer is yes I can just about guarantee they are of moderate or less intelligence.

I don't care about Jenny McCarthy. Sure, she's not too bright, but anyone who listened to her and dies is probably just giving a nod to Darwin.

Re:Jenny McCarthy (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46529963)

Strange, I working in a University in a microbiology department no less and the department pays for the staff to have flu vaccines. I would suspect the staff know a damn sight more about vaccines that you do and I can guarantee they are probably a lot smarter than you too.

Re:Jenny McCarthy (0, Troll)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | about 7 months ago | (#46530059)

Can they figure out how to create a Slashdot account and log in? Maybe you should get them to help you if they can!

Re:Jenny McCarthy (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46530015)

And the flu "vaccine" is just as likely to make you sick as it is to prevent it in the first place. Granted, the "vaccine" generally doesn't affect you "as bad", but you still get sick.

Can you give a reference for this claim? The CDC claims pretty low rates for adverse reactions (except for the understandable pain at the injection site at 64%).

http://www.cdc.gov/flu/professionals/vaccination/vaccine_safety.htm

Re:Jenny McCarthy (1)

plover (150551) | about 7 months ago | (#46529895)

It's called "herd immunity", and it's what keeps an infectious disease from becoming a pandemic. It kicks in when about 80% of the population is immune. If you want to live in our society and interact with us, fixing our cars, exchanging pieces of filthy paper money for cheap plastic goods, volunteering to work with kids, whatever you do, yes, you should not be putting the rest of us at risk.

There's still a concern about vaccination rates, because vaccines are less than 100% effective. Herd immunity can help keep the vaccinated-but-still-unprotected from getting the disease. As long no more than 20% of the population is unprotected, the rest of us should be OK. Of course, if you live in Stupidville, where half of the population is voluntarily unvaccinated, then you get to learn about a different concept: the mortality rate.

I wish that vaccines were 100% effective so we wouldn't have to worry about the stupids weeding only themselves out. It would let you be free to expose yourself to a killer disease, with no skin off my nose. But they're not perfect. We need high voluntary rates to keep most of us healthy.

Re:Jenny McCarthy (4, Insightful)

Jason Levine (196982) | about 7 months ago | (#46530127)

I completely agree but would only add that herd immunity also covers people with actual valid reasons for not vaccinating. These include medical issues like allergies or immune system problems or age (too young to get the vaccine). A six week old baby shouldn't die of Whooping Cough because some idiot thinks it's their "personal right" to be a disease carrier.

If not vaccinating meant that only you or your children would get sick, I'd say "it's your choice" (though I'd still argue for vaccinating being the better choice). However, when someone tries to claim that their actions (not vaccinating) that affect other people is their choice, I highly disagree. (I keep waiting for them to claim that it's their right to choose to drive drunk - railing against police enforcing driver sobriety and completely ignoring how many people are killed by drunk drivers.)

Re:Jenny McCarthy (1)

l0n3s0m3phr34k (2613107) | about 7 months ago | (#46529907)

If it's "their right", then it's the rest of the population's "right" to NOT allow the kids to be in the general population at schools. It's a very tricky situation, but it's not fair or safe to put the rest of the population at a HUGE risk (this is not hypothetical, there have now been outbreaks because of anti-vacers) because they don't understand science. This isn't just a personal stand for freedom...they are killing people via their choices. When "invoking my right of freedom" results in disease outbreaks and dead children, where to we as a free country draw the line?

Re:Jenny McCarthy (-1, Troll)

arth1 (260657) | about 7 months ago | (#46530037)

You're saying "disease outbreaks and dead children" as if it were an evil thing.
I happen to disagree, and think that a culling of herds by predators (including diseases) is a good thing in the long run. If herd members do things to improve their own odds, that's fine, but forcing others isn't. That pressure should come from the outside, not the inside, or the diversity will suffer and progress with it.

I posit that human evolution has already slowed down to a crawl in the first world, due to risk aversion and longer life spans. I expect that in a few generations, some third world population will have overtaken us, and will take over as top ape.

Re:Jenny McCarthy (0)

PopeRatzo (965947) | about 7 months ago | (#46530119)

You're saying "disease outbreaks and dead children" as if it were an evil thing

Libertarians, man. They're a hoot, ain't they?

That pressure should come from the outside, not the inside, or the diversity will suffer and progress with it.

And why should the pressure come from "the outside" and not "the inside"?

I posit that human evolution has already slowed down to a crawl in the first world, due to risk aversion and longer life spans.

"Hey, there's no evolution because I ain't seen none today!"

You are a funny fellow. I bet you're the life of your dorm.

Re:Jenny McCarthy (4, Insightful)

hermitdev (2792385) | about 7 months ago | (#46529793)

I love her (I've also a Bear's fan) argument that "We didn't used to have this problem". Yeah, we also used to die by 40. We also didn't even know what the hell cancer is. We also didn't smoke. We also didn't use to drive. We also didn't use to send our kids to school. We also didn't use to mandate our kids go to school. We also didn't use to send people to the moon. We also didn't use to stick our head up our ass because it makes us feel all warm and fuzzy.

Re:Jenny McCarthy (1, Insightful)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about 7 months ago | (#46529595)

Stupidity is on the rise.

Or cynicism. Just because a lot of crackpots believe something, that is no guarantee that it is not true. There was a conspiracy theory, dismissed by most rational people, that the government was monitoring our email and phone calls. Then it turned out to be true.

Some of these medical conspiracy theories may be true as well. The one about the CIA causing HIV is unlikely to be true, because it would required the government to have an unreasonably high level of competence. But the theory that the government is "suppressing access to natural cures" is very likely to be true. I certainly hope so, since under Obamacare, my tax dollars would otherwise be paying for these "natural cures", which are mostly superstitious nonsense.

Re:Jenny McCarthy (1)

Sique (173459) | about 7 months ago | (#46529687)

But the theory that the government is "suppressing access to natural cures" is very likely to be true.

Actually, that's very likely to be false. If they are "natural cures", everyone could get them, they wouldn't be medication in a legal sense and thus not regulated by the government.

Re:Jenny McCarthy (3, Insightful)

oscrivellodds (1124383) | about 7 months ago | (#46529765)

The feds have been suppressing weed for a long time. It's a natural cure, and as they say, it's da healin' of da nation!

Re:Jenny McCarthy (4, Insightful)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about 7 months ago | (#46529867)

Actually, that's very likely to be false. If they are "natural cures", everyone could get them

They can get them only if they can afford them. Under Obamacare, not every natural/alternative treatment is covered. In addition the government funds medical research that suppresses "natural cures" by exposing them as ineffective frauds. I really don't see why this is considered a "conspiracy theory", since it is something that the government is clearly doing, and doing in an open and transparent process.

Re:Jenny McCarthy (2)

dnavid (2842431) | about 7 months ago | (#46529787)

Or cynicism. Just because a lot of crackpots believe something, that is no guarantee that it is not true. There was a conspiracy theory, dismissed by most rational people, that the government was monitoring our email and phone calls. Then it turned out to be true.

Since there's a million conspiracy theories, some will end up being at least partially true by random chance. Even here its hard to give credit to the conspiracy nuts, because very few of them believed the government monitoring was specifically of the character revealed by the Snowden leaks.

I'm pretty sure if you try hard enough, you can find a Nostradamus quatrain that predicts the NSA monitoring. That doesn't add credibility to Nostradamus, it just means when that many monkeys bang on keyboards, eventually some of it will start to rhyme.

No amount of conspiracy nuts believing in something makes it true, and no amount makes it false. If they were always exactly wrong, we could use them as bizarro truth meters. What they are is nuts, and contain as much useful information as atmospheric noise.

Re:Jenny McCarthy (5, Interesting)

plover (150551) | about 7 months ago | (#46529911)

Q: You know what they call a "natural cure" that has been tested and found to work?

A: Medicine.

Re:Jenny McCarthy (1)

slashmydots (2189826) | about 7 months ago | (#46529583)

Jenny McCarthy doesn't exist! She's just a hologram! My friend send me an e-mail forwarded from his 2nd cousin's Xanga page that linked to an archived tripod page that linked to a Myspace account that had a Turkish video that PROVED her birth certificate is actually a fake printed on the back of a Lucky Charms cereal box. That's true! It's even on wikipedia. She's just there to discredit anti-vaxers and stuff lol.

By the way, you'd have to be stupid to not believe that drug companies actively seek non-cures to make more money. Curing allergies forever is $1000 one time let's say. If I take Zyrtec for 80 years, that's a lot more money. That's not a conspiracy, it's reality.

Re:Jenny McCarthy (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46529663)

This article and this site....

That says it all....

73.6% Of All Statistics Are Made Up (0)

ibneko (1080947) | about 7 months ago | (#46529337)

Numbers are so silly.

Re:73.6% Of All Statistics Are Made Up (1)

flyneye (84093) | about 7 months ago | (#46529675)

Yup, one of the S words. Statistics; one of the worlds I think of when a confidence scheme is happening. Study (noun) is another one of those words.
Put them both together and you will find the fuel for conspiracy theories. Just add an outrageous hospital bill, an inept intern and the usual detatched ambivalence any member of the public would find at most any medical institution and a pinch of actual occasional corruption, apply the names of any big money involved or just plain old fashioned corrupt government. It isn't hard to see where the theories come from. Whats hard is; to figure out what percentage of which theory(ies are) is truth, not if there is a true one or ones. Even fairy tales and fables are based on some event or activity, there is no spontaneous generation of human behavior.
Its all been done before, now just a question of who, what, where and when.
Just as big an impediment to human progress are the denialists, whom, I suppose wear tin foil underwear. When faced with that which they prefer not to believe, usually resort to denial, down- play, and defer to majority mantra rather than self driven thought, investigation and appropriate action. The equivalent of donning a blindfold to drive the freeway. After all , if they all go the same way, the damage will be minimal and they can always blame the others. But the reward is; never having to deal with the unpleasant.
So, damned if you do and damned if you dont.
Time for a beer...

The Cure? Good Luck (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46529339)

Could you imagine how many jobs would be lost if they released the cure for cancer?

Thats bad business

Re:The Cure? Good Luck (2)

flyneye (84093) | about 7 months ago | (#46529761)

Can you imagine how many researchers could go on to OTHER pressing problems instead of succumbing to the usual dimwitted cliche , you just dropped?
Deep intense regulation of Medical companies, complete with special taxes and loss of IP protection for leaving the country or for having foreign facilities which could escape regulation, would be a nice start to setting this whole mess and others straight.
No offence to other countries, but if we cant make them do the right thing, theres no point in calling them anyones asset. Medicine wouldnt be held back by doing this. Medicine IS held back, as you pointed out by the current gard.

Re:The Cure? Good Luck (1)

hermitdev (2792385) | about 7 months ago | (#46529891)

I would posit: not many. Cancer is the leading cause today. One might call it a ticking DNA time bomb. Who's to say there isn't another lurking?

Besides, even if cancer can be cured, can you cure other self-inflicted "diseases"?

Re:The Cure? Good Luck (2)

Jarik C-Bol (894741) | about 7 months ago | (#46530031)

Can you imagine what it would take for the medical bureaucracy that can't seem to find its own ass with two hands, a stethoscope and a flashlight to pull off suppressing a working cure? My main argument against 'Conspiracy Theories' is that most large organizations are so incompetent at doing there actual jobs, they in no way have the level of skill, organization and attention to detail required to make any decent conspiracy work for any length of time that can be measured without resorting to planck units.

Statistical Lies (2)

pubwvj (1045960) | about 7 months ago | (#46529345)

Statistically speaking some conspiracies are true.

Took me a bit to find this (4, Interesting)

rsilvergun (571051) | about 7 months ago | (#46529359)

Operation Whitecoat [wikipedia.org] it was called. If you were a Conscientious Objector you did this instead of shooting people.

There's lots and lots of conspiracies out there. All a conspiracy means is that two or more people get together to do something. Banking is rife with them. So is the software industry (and the hardware, anyone remember when flat panels suddenly got cheap? Conspiracy among vendors to keep prices high...).

Yes, there are crack pots out there. But that doesn't mean organized groups of people aren't doing bad things...

Re:Took me a bit to find this (1)

rahvin112 (446269) | about 7 months ago | (#46529439)

Hundreds of Black soldiers at Tuskegee during WWII were deliberately infected with Syphilis and then not told and deliberately not treated as an experiment to understand the long term impacts of Syphilis. There is also evidence that the CIA facilitated the smuggling and sale of crack cocaine in black neighborhoods to finance covert projects during the 80's.

Given that it's not hard to understand why there are conspiracy theories involving this.

Re:Took me a bit to find this (4, Informative)

ShadowRangerRIT (1301549) | about 7 months ago | (#46529611)

They weren't deliberately infected, they weren't soldiers, (they were sharecroppers, and they were provided with free medical cares, meals and burial insurance as compensation), and for the first decade of the study, there was no verified cure for syphilis [wikipedia.org] (the efficacy of penicillin wasn't verified until the 1940s; the study began in 1932). It's hard to blame the architects of the study for studying an incurable disease to chart its progress, though obviously their successors lacked any moral compass.

The facts of the Tuskegee syphilis experiment were bad enough, but you're making it seem even worse. This is the part of the problem. Actual malfeasance gets exaggerated even further; it changes from failure to take action (treat patients like they should have) to deliberate malevolence (intentionally infecting patients). If you reinterpret the world as one in which everything is explained by deliberate malice, of course you'll believe in conspiracy theories.

Sadly, in this particular case, despite being completely off base about Tuskegee, there were in fact acts of active evil perpetrated in Guatemala [wikipedia.org] . Unlike Tuskegee, the experiments weren't on U.S. citizens, only lasted three years, not forty, and the subjects were treated for the conditions they were infected with (though some still died). Doesn't excuse it, but again, it's not a good basis for proving the existence of long term, actively malevolent policies.

Re:Took me a bit to find this (1)

AK Marc (707885) | about 7 months ago | (#46529997)

They weren't deliberately infected, they weren't soldiers,

Everyone knows the Tuskegee Blacks were in the military. They were airmen.

(they were sharecroppers, and they were provided with free medical cares,

What good is "medical care" when there's a deliberate lie about the care?

Re:Took me a bit to find this (4, Informative)

ShadowRangerRIT (1301549) | about 7 months ago | (#46530141)

They weren't deliberately infected, they weren't soldiers,

Everyone knows the Tuskegee Blacks were in the military. They were airmen.

You're confusing the Tuskegee airmen [wikipedia.org] with the Tuskegee syphilis experiments. They have nothing in common besides being trained (the airmen) and conducted (the experiments) in proximity to Tuskegee, AL. Tuskegee is an almost exclusively Black/African American city, so most things that are associated with Tuskegee are also associated with black people.

(they were sharecroppers, and they were provided with free medical cares,

What good is "medical care" when there's a deliberate lie about the care?

If you read another sentence or two, you'd note that there was no verified treatment for syphilis for the first decade of the experiments. Providing palliative care to those with incurable diseases is a net good; there are legitimate philosophical arguments over how much information a doctor should provide when the information cannot be understood or acted upon in a meaningful way.

Clearly this was unethical, but recall, this was Jim Crow era. A lot of people considered black people sub-human. Sure, the doctors didn't tell them they had syphilis. But the South made it nigh impossible for them to vote, hold elected office, get a meaningful education, buy property, use public services, receive a fair trial, etc. We were kind of awful in general; the Tuskegee experiments weren't that much more awful when compared to everything else we did.

Re:Took me a bit to find this (1)

tmosley (996283) | about 7 months ago | (#46529643)

Those are just crazy conspiracy theories, and if you believe anything like that then you are a terrorist who hates freedom.

More and more, we find that conspiracy theories become conspiracy facts. Our government has destroyed its credibility, and as a result, it is no longer a stretch to apply ANY horrible action to their list of monstrous deeds. The next global empire could learn from these failings. But they won't.

Re:Took me a bit to find this (4, Informative)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about 7 months ago | (#46529791)

Hundreds of Black soldiers at Tuskegee during WWII were deliberately infected with Syphilis

No they weren't. What acutally happened [wikipedia.org] is bad enough. You don't have to embellish it with made up nonsense. No one was deliberately infected. They were just left untreated. They were mostly sharecroppers (farmers). They were not soldiers. The study began in 1932, nearly a decade before WWII. At the time, penicillin was still experimental, and not used to treat syphilis. There was no effective treatment before antibiotics became available after 1943, so at least when the study was conceived, it was not quite as unethical as it appears in hindsight, since there weren't a lot of good treatment options at the time anyway. Leaving the subjects untreated until 1972 was, of course, appallingly unethical.

Re:Took me a bit to find this (0)

AK Marc (707885) | about 7 months ago | (#46530003)

They were not soldiers.

Then why do so many call them the Tuskegee Airmen?

Re:Took me a bit to find this (1)

flyneye (84093) | about 7 months ago | (#46529941)

I think theyve learned from their mistakes and now conduct cheap research on the general public with no regard to race, religion or political affiliation.
The CIA funds themselves. No tax dollars there. So you can imagine when Geo.Bush Sr. went to fund his boys, he set them up with a no brainer. Set up the Coke trade and control South Am. politics, make money and oh, yeah, need some customers, plentiful , stupid and predisposed to.....

Re:Took me a bit to find this (3, Insightful)

wisnoskij (1206448) | about 7 months ago | (#46529511)

Even just restricting that to full blown government conspiracies. It is amazing the absolutely crazy things the government has been forced to admit to 40+ years after the fact. Stuff every bit as crazy as any of those conspiracy nuts come up with. And that is just the stuff that leaks out. If the government can keep huge completely illegal and immoral projects a secret for 40+ years, by then half the people involved at already dead, then who knows what never comes to light, or what is kept so off the official record that there could never be any proof.

Unfortunately, we know that the government is not completely unwilling to perform secret medical tests on their own unwitting and unconsenting civilians.

Re:Took me a bit to find this (0)

guantamanera (751262) | about 7 months ago | (#46529535)

Considering there is evidence that the goverment has done it before I somewhat believe is pausible. The USA goverment infected black people with syphilis [wikipedia.org] Then later on they moved their operation south and infected Guatemalans [wikipedia.org] and you may find many more here [wikipedia.org]

Operation Whitecoat [wikipedia.org] it was called. If you were a Conscientious Objector you did this instead of shooting people. There's lots and lots of conspiracies out there. All a conspiracy means is that two or more people get together to do something. Banking is rife with them. So is the software industry (and the hardware, anyone remember when flat panels suddenly got cheap? Conspiracy among vendors to keep prices high...). Yes, there are crack pots out there. But that doesn't mean organized groups of people aren't doing bad things...

Re:Took me a bit to find this (-1)

transporter_ii (986545) | about 7 months ago | (#46529563)

Yeah, tell Chiropractors there is no medical conspiracy. They sued the AMA for conspiring against them, and won!

http://www.yourmedicaldetectiv... [yourmedicaldetective.com]

In the past, medicine has fought battles to limit the practices of such professionals as homeopaths, naturopaths, osteopaths, podiatrists, optometrists, dentists, psychologists and chiropractors. In the case of osteopathy and chiropractic, there are distinct differences in the approach to healing and health when compared to medicine. The last thing that organized medicine wants is for their doctrine of drugs and surgery to be challenged.

Osteopaths allowed themselves to be absorbed by medicine--today there is little difference between an M.D. and a D.O. Chiropractic on the other hand, fought hard to be a separate and distinct profession.

Re:Took me a bit to find this (1)

Aighearach (97333) | about 7 months ago | (#46529565)

From wikipedia:

The volunteers were allowed to consult with outside sources, such as family and clergy members, before deciding to participate. The participants were required to sign consent forms after discussing the risks and treatments with a medical officer. Of the soldiers who were approached about participating, 20% declined. ...
No Whitecoats died during the test period. ... at least one subject claims to have serious health problems as a result of the experiments.

100% of non-morons KNOW there are such conspiracie (0)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | about 7 months ago | (#46529851)

Yes. Here is another one. What this whole thing comes down to, primariliy, is that most of the people who are saying: OMFG, your theory is a conspiracy theory! have no idea what a conspiracy is. If you do not believe in government conspiracy facts and you read Slashdot, you are none too bright. Here [wikipedia.org] is an example of a State run facility with documented facts of a conspiracy. The staff, who are State employees conspired to keep the facts about the deplorable conditions and outrageous treatment secret.

Anybody who knows anything about the War Against Americans knows that the US Government conspired to keep hemp out of the country at the behest of the textile industry. Now, I guess it's time to see who the first idiot will be to pop up and proudly announce their complete inability to Google with a citation required .

Re:Took me a bit to find this (1)

flyneye (84093) | about 7 months ago | (#46529881)

Somewhere car dealers are conspiring to unload a fucked up Hyundai on you.
Somewhere a store clerk is conspiring with a manager to replace your broken smart phone claim with a used phone from someone elses claim.
Somewhere a panel of experts is conspiring to get you to eat a sandwich with less than 2 % real meat in it, more than 50% soy and 10% sawdust and 38% lips, intestines, eyeballs and assholes.
Somewhere a politician is conspiring to tell you anything you want to hear, so he can do anything he wants to do.
Somewhere a couple guys have a good story to play off each other to get a couple girls off their bar stools and onto their penises.
But then again, there is a quorum of rich elite people who run the world and are concerned their empires will disappear with the planet if the population outpaces the food supply and they are using their assets to decrease the lifespans of the poor and needy, the unmotivated, the radical and the coy. Elvis secretly came across this by eating Twinkies laced with secret government mind expander and now with the tutelage of Richard Nixon and the doctors who keep them alive, they mean to open a fuel station that turns sunlight into diesel and save the world!

Nothing to see here. Move along citizens (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46529371)

Tuskegee [wikipedia.org]

Conspiracy or act of legislature? (5, Insightful)

GodInHell (258915) | about 7 months ago | (#46529379)

In fact, in addition to the 37 percent of respondents who fully agreed that U.S. regulators are suppressing access to natural cures, less than a third were willing to say they actively disagreed with the theory.

Marijuana is still illegal, right? I mean, it's it a conspiracy theory if I can point to the status and rules at issue?

What does it cure? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46529545)

Rather than just alleviate?

Re:What does it cure? (3, Insightful)

rubycodez (864176) | about 7 months ago | (#46529581)

does current treatment for AIDS cure, or just alleviate? does current treatment for genital herpes cure, or just alleviate?

Re:What does it cure? (1)

asylumx (881307) | about 7 months ago | (#46529693)

The problem is the OP didn't say "suppressing access to natural means of alleviating symptoms", instead he said "suppressing access to natural cures." So, we're talking about natural cures that are suppressed, and marijuana is not an example of one of those, as the GP pointed out. Questions about whether or not other treatments are cures are not relevant.

Re:What does it cure? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46529695)

Are the "natural cures" mentioned in the study really cures?

And there's a difference between "treatment" and "cure". Is the AIDS thing you mention a treatment or a cure? For genital herpes is it a treatment or a cure? Do you know that treatments only alleviate (like the actual AIDS and herpes medication advertise), and "natural cures" for these conditions don't even alleviate symptoms, let alone actually cure it like they promise?

Re:What does it cure? (1)

AK Marc (707885) | about 7 months ago | (#46530061)

Sometimes the "cure" is a lifetime of medication. Glaucoma can be "cured" that way the way many diseases are "cured" by terminal management of symptoms.

Re:Conspiracy or act of legislature? (-1)

Trogre (513942) | about 7 months ago | (#46529799)

Marijuana cures nothing, except perhaps intelligence.

They might believe it because it's true (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46529399)

Ever heard of the Tuskegee syphilis experiment [wikipedia.org] ? The U.S. Public Health Service concealed the diagnosis of syphilis from patients so they could study the disease, even after a standard cure was in common use.

Like the Tuskegee syphilis experiment? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46529401)

Sometimes conspiracies are easier to understand cuz they are true.

freaking DUH (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46529411)

how many new "Cures" crop up anymore with modern technology, everything is about Treatments anymore and whats muh Muntly payment. its pretty batshit obvious when the legalized dope dealer goes on tv and says the first one is on us.

What? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46529421)

I thought that infecting African-Americans with AIDS was done using homepathic medicine.

my thoughts on conspiracy's (4, Insightful)

the simurgh (1327825) | about 7 months ago | (#46529449)

"Lesson number one: trust no one. The minute God crapped out the third caveman, a conspiracy was hatched against one of them. Welcome to earth, watch your back no one else will.

Re:my thoughts on conspiracy's (4, Funny)

ScentCone (795499) | about 7 months ago | (#46529531)

my thoughts on conspiracy's

I'm still trying to figure out what the Trilateral Commission, the Rothschilds, the Masons, and George Soros hope to gain by tricking people into being so actively bad at understanding the difference between the plural and possessive uses of the apostrophe. There must be some money in it, somewhere.

Re:my thoughts on conspiracy's (4, Funny)

HornWumpus (783565) | about 7 months ago | (#46529661)

I think they stuff coal up the butts of grammar pedants and come back later harvesting diamonds.

Other 50% are uninformed (3, Interesting)

iamacat (583406) | about 7 months ago | (#46529455)

Red rice yeast is as effective as statins at lowering cholesterol, without liver side effects statin pills. Yet FDA bans sale of supplements calibrated to have enough active components.

Pot has helped millions to get measurable relieve from debilitating conditions. Yet federal government still considers it to be highly addictive and without medical value.

Countless food additives have been banned in most of the world outside US and most countries require clear labeling of genetically modified foods? Are our government scientists that much smarter?

FDA review process denies potentially life saving treatments for many years, even to people who are about to die without them anyway.

With this kind of track record, it's no wonder people are suspicious about other things. If a vaccine killed 10% of people compared to statistically saved lives, would YOU trust our government to admit to that?

Re:Other 50% are uninformed (5, Insightful)

hedgemage (934558) | about 7 months ago | (#46529539)

Cite sources please. Reputable journals only.

Problem is that the US has made it nearly impossible to research the effects of marijuana/THC so there is a real lack of good data. Facing this lack of evidence, too many people are stating outrageous claims that pot will do everything from cure the common cold to cancer and everything in between.

Re:Other 50% are uninformed (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46529807)

Trust your government and live by the Constitution and all shall be well, citizen. Anything bad we are doing is in your best interest to fight your worst nightmares, terrorism, child pornography and drugs (and communism).

avoid that red rice yeast (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46529587)

lowering cholesterol isn't good for you if you lower the good cholesterol. I don't blame you for falling into their trap.

Re:Other 50% are uninformed (1)

mjwx (966435) | about 7 months ago | (#46529631)

Red rice yeast is as effective as statins at lowering cholesterol, without liver side effects statin pills. Yet FDA bans sale of supplements calibrated to have enough active components.

If people who believe vitamin supplements work were included in this study, that number would be a hell of a lot higher than "nearly 50%".

Re:Other 50% are uninformed (1)

roc97007 (608802) | about 7 months ago | (#46529809)

Red rice yeast is as effective as statins at lowering cholesterol, without liver side effects statin pills. Yet FDA bans sale of supplements calibrated to have enough active components.

If people who believe vitamin supplements work were included in this study, that number would be a hell of a lot higher than "nearly 50%".

Psst. The FDA controls the import of Red Rice Yeast because it *contains a statin*. Any red rice yeast you can buy on the shelf has had the naturally occurring statin removed.

Re:Other 50% are uninformed (1)

mjwx (966435) | about 7 months ago | (#46529975)

Red rice yeast is as effective as statins at lowering cholesterol, without liver side effects statin pills. Yet FDA bans sale of supplements calibrated to have enough active components.

If people who believe vitamin supplements work were included in this study, that number would be a hell of a lot higher than "nearly 50%".

Psst. The FDA controls the import of Red Rice Yeast because it *contains a statin*. Any red rice yeast you can buy on the shelf has had the naturally occurring statin removed.

Erm... that does not mean vitamin supplements work, in fact your own post says the FDA prohibits substances that have an active ingredient powerful enough to have an effect.

It's like the morons who claim all gluten free foods are good for you whilst they ignore that polonium is gluten free.

If people understood the science behind nutrition, they'd see things like vitamin supplement as the scam they are. You get more vitamins out of fruit and vegetables then supplements with 3-4 times the dosage.

We are VERY VERY disappointed with YOU!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46529667)

Here is the real reason why they're running articles like this:

Below are just the first 5 pages worth of google search results for how PISSED pharma and public health (i.e. CDC,FDA down to your municipal public health department) are that

YOU ARE NOT ROLLING UP YOUR SLEEVES in droves just because they have something new to stick into your arm. They are VERY DISAPPOINTED WITH YOU.

Shingles Vaccine Uptake Disappointing - Medscape
Mar 5, 2014 - NEWS: Shingles Vaccine Uptake Disappointing. A quarter of all cases of shingles can cause ocular complications, vision loss, and pain, but ...
Shingles Vaccine Uptake Disappointing | Department of Population ...
pophealth.med.nyu.edu/.../shingles-vaccin...
NYU Langone Medical Center
Nov 27, 2013 - Although most adults 40 years and older are at risk for herpes zoster infection, also known as shingles, uptake of the vaccine (Zostavax) to ...
Shingles Vaccine Uptake Disappointing – Medscape | Herpes ...
herpeszostertreatmentnews.wordpress.com/.../shingles-vaccine-uptake-dis...
Nov 29, 2013 - Heya guys, I have been reading a great deal of shingles treatment recently and I have found some terrific advice. Check out the related links ...
Shingles Vaccine Uptake Disappointing – Medscape | Shingles ...
shinglesnewstoday.wordpress.com/.../shingles-vaccine-uptake-disappoint...
Nov 27, 2013 - Shingles Vaccine Uptake DisappointingMedscape”The risk of herpes zoster is increasing faster than the aging population,” said Elizabeth ...
Shingles Vaccine Uptake Disappointing | ViralNewsChart via ...
www.viralnewschart.com/ShowLink.aspx?linkId=20739283
Nov 27, 2013 - Medscape - A quarter of all cases of shingles can cause ocular complications vision loss and pain but they can.
Bluetongue vaccine uptake disappointing says Welsh Assembly - 23 ...
www.fwi.co.uk/.../bluetongue-vaccine-uptake-disappointing-says-welsh-...
Sep 23, 2008 - Rural affairs minister Elin Jones told a plenary session of the Welsh assembly on, 23 September, that she was very disappointed with the ...
Bluetongue vaccine uptake disappointing says Welsh Assembly
217.169.63.174/F4F/news/index.jhtml;jsessionid...?article_id...
Farmers have used only 24% of the 7.5m doses of bluetongue vaccine available in Wales.
Welsh Uptake of Bluetongue Vaccine 'Disappointing' - The Dairy Site
www.thedairysite.com/.../welsh-uptake-of-bluetongue-vaccine-disappoin...
Welsh Uptake of Bluetongue Vaccine 'Disappointing'. 24 September 2008. UK - Farmers across Wales came under fire this week from Welsh Assembly Rural ...
CDC shows disappointing 2011 flu vaccination data | Vaccine News ...
vaccinenewsdaily.com/.../320080-cdc-shows-disappointing-2011-flu-vac...
Sep 27, 2012 - CDC shows disappointing 2011 flu vaccination data ... women demonstrate the difficulty in recent attempts to increase overall vaccine uptake.
Page 2 of about 1,270,000 results (0.28 seconds)
Search Results
Disappointing 2011 flu vaccination rates - Skeptical Raptor
        www.skepticalraptor.com/.../disappointing-2011-flu-vaccination-rates/
        Sep 27, 2012 - Mostly, the numbers continue to be disappointing, even in groups ... to demonstrate the difficulty in increasing the vaccine uptake rate in the US.
        [PDF]
        Vaccination of health and social care workers against flu ... - Gov.uk
        https://www.gov.uk/.../13_09_25_-_Seasonal_flu_letter_o...
        Jobcentre Plus
        Sep 25, 2013 - We write to urge your active support to increase flu vaccine uptake among frontline health ... disappointingly low (45.6% in 2012/2013).
        Plea to get flu jab after disappointing uptake in Highlands ...
        www.strathspey-herald.co.uk/.../Plea-to-get-flu-jab-after-disappointing-u...
        Dec 2, 2013 - Scotland's Chief Medical Officer, Sir Harry Burns, made his plea as new figures were released for flu vaccination uptake since the campaign ...
        NHS England More information about the improved vaccination ...
        www.england.nhs.uk/.../improved-vaccination-programme...
        NHS England
        Read all our publications and resources regarding the rotavirus vaccination schedule ... Vaccine uptake in this group remains disappointingly low (45.6% in ...
        BBC News - Swansea measles epidemic: MMR vaccine take-up ...
        www.bbc.com/news/uk-wales-south-west-wales-21951876
        Health officials say they are very disappointed in the uptake of the MMR vaccine in an area at the centre of a measles epidemic. Public Health Wales said only ...
        BBC News - MMR first dose uptake in Wales hits new highs
        www.bbc.com/news/uk-wales-26436199
        Mar 4, 2014 - The uptake of the second dose, Public Health Wales (PHW) said, was 99% in some areas ... Dr Roberts added: "Excellent vaccine uptake in our younger children means we may not see .... Disappointing MMR jab take up.
        Flu Vaccine: How Did We Do? — History of Vaccines
        www.historyofvaccines.org/content/blog/flu-vaccine-how-did-we-do
        Jan 23, 2014 - Though this was about on par with national flu vaccine uptake, I was still disappointed with the low number. And so this year, with my ...
        Delayed flu plans will hit uptake unless GPs 'create miracles ...
        www.gponline.com/.../Delayed-flu-plans-will-hit-uptake-unless-GPs-crea...
        Jun 11, 2013 - The delay in publishing details of this year's influenza vaccination programme will damage ambitious efforts to boost vaccine uptake, the RCGP has said. ... NHS England said this was 'disappointing' and wants the NHS to ...
        Patients at risk as flu vaccine uptake drops to three-year low ...
        www.gponline.com/.../Patients-risk-flu-vaccine-uptake-drops-three-year-...
        Jan 27, 2014 - The NHS has been set the tough vaccination target of 75% uptake ... previously described last winter's uptake rates as 'disappointing' and set ...
        Public Health Wales Observatory | Vaccination uptake still not high ...
        www.wales.nhs.uk/sitesplus/922/news/27207
        May 14, 2013 - Vaccination uptake still not high enough to eliminate measles in Wales ... has now hit 1,094 cases – but vaccine uptake remains disappointiA
        Meningococcal vaccine uptake disappoints - New Zealand Herald
        www.nzherald.co.nz/wairarapa.../article.cfm?c...
        The New Zealand Herald
        Sep 13, 2004 - Fewer than half of all Maori children under 5 eligible for the meningococcal B vaccine have received their free immunisation. Just 40 per cent of ...
        Health in Wales | Vaccination uptake still not high enough to ...
        www.wales.nhs.uk News archive
        May 14, 2013 - Ninety-five per cent uptake across Wales would prevent further ... which has now hit 1,094 cases – but vaccine uptake remains disappointing.
        Study Finds Shingles Vaccine Effective, But Uptake Remains Low ...
        www.aafp.org/.../20130411her...
        American Academy of Family Physicians
        Apr 11, 2013 - Vaccine uptake was low overall, at 3.9 percent, and was lowest ... use remains disappointingly low, with particularly low vaccination rates in ...
        Building public health systems - Apha Confex
        https://apha.confex.com/apha/141am/webprogram/Session38917.html
        by J DeFrank - 2013
        Building public health systems' capacity to increase HPV vaccine coverage ... adolescents, but uptake of the vaccine in the United States remains disappointing.
        HPV Vaccine Uptake Lagging - MedPage Today
        www.medpagetoday.com/.../Vaccines/40695
        MedPage Today
        by Todd Neale
        Jul 25, 2013 - HPV Vaccine Uptake Lagging ... "Unfortunately, today, we have disappointing news," Frieden said on a conference call with reporters. "We're ...
        Health officials 'very disappointed' that most doctors and nurses ...
        www.sott.net/.../262990-Health-officials-very-disappointed-that-most-do...
        Jun 17, 2013 - Health officials said they were "very disappointed" with the figures, which ... uptake, only 45.6 per cent of health care workers were vaccinated ...
        HPV Vaccine Uptake Remains Low - HPV News
        www.hpvnews.org/index.php?...vaccine-uptake...vaccines...
        HPV Vaccine Uptake Remains Low ... Two HPV vaccines are available in the U.S, Merck's Gardasil and GSK's ... Why the disappointing number of HPV?
        Swansea measles epidemic: MMR vaccine take-up disappointment
        www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-south-west-wales-21951876
        Mar 27, 2013 - Health officials say they are very disappointed in the uptake of the MMR vaccine in an area at the centre of a measles epidemic. Public Health ...
        USA missing opportunities for HPV vaccination : The Lancet ...
        www.thelancet.com/journals/laninf/article/PIIS1473.../fulltext?...
        The Lancet
        Since the US Advisory Committee for Immunization Practices (ACIP) ... 11—12 years, year-on-year increases in vaccine uptake have been disappointingly small.
        [PDF]
        Increasing Influenza Vaccine Uptake A Comprehensive ... - DSpace
        dspace.library.uu.nl/bitstream/handle/.../looijmans.pdf...
        Utrecht University
      How to develop a program to increase influenza vaccine uptake among workers .... Therefore, one of the major reasons for the disappointing vaccine uptake in ...S
        Meningococcal vaccine uptake disappoints - New Zealand Herald
        www.nzherald.co.nz/wairarapa.../article.cfm?c...
        The New Zealand Herald
        Sep 13, 2004 - Fewer than half of all Maori children under 5 eligible for the meningococcal B vaccine have received their free immunisation. Just 40 per cent of ...
        Health in Wales | Vaccination uptake still not high enough to ...
        www.wales.nhs.uk News archive
        May 14, 2013 - Ninety-five per cent uptake across Wales would prevent further ... which has now hit 1,094 cases – but vaccine uptake remains disappointing.
        Study Finds Shingles Vaccine Effective, But Uptake Remains Low ...
        www.aafp.org/.../20130411her...
        American Academy of Family Physicians
        Apr 11, 2013 - Vaccine uptake was low overall, at 3.9 percent, and was lowest ... use remains disappointingly low, with particularly low vaccination rates in ...
        Building public health systems - Apha Confex
        https://apha.confex.com/apha/141am/webprogram/Session38917.html
        by J DeFrank - 2013
        Building public health systems' capacity to increase HPV vaccine coverage ... adolescents, but uptake of the vaccine in the United States remains disappointing.
        HPV Vaccine Uptake Lagging - MedPage Today
        www.medpagetoday.com/.../Vaccines/40695
        MedPage Today
        by Todd Neale
        Jul 25, 2013 - HPV Vaccine Uptake Lagging ... "Unfortunately, today, we have disappointing news," Frieden said on a conference call with reporters. "We're ...
        Health officials 'very disappointed' that most doctors and nurses ...
        www.sott.net/.../262990-Health-officials-very-disappointed-that-most-do...
        Jun 17, 2013 - Health officials said they were "very disappointed" with the figures, which ... uptake, only 45.6 per cent of health care workers were vaccinated ...
        HPV Vaccine Uptake Remains Low - HPV News
        www.hpvnews.org/index.php?...vaccine-uptake...vaccines...
        HPV Vaccine Uptake Remains Low ... Two HPV vaccines are available in the U.S, Merck's Gardasil and GSK's ... Why the disappointing number of HPV?
        Swansea measles epidemic: MMR vaccine take-up disappointment
        www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-south-west-wales-21951876
        Mar 27, 2013 - Health officials say they are very disappointed in the uptake of the MMR vaccine in an area at the centre of a measles epidemic. Public Health ...
        USA missing opportunities for HPV vaccination : The Lancet ...
        www.thelancet.com/journals/laninf/article/PIIS1473.../fulltext?...
        The Lancet
        Since the US Advisory Committee for Immunization Practices (ACIP) ... 11—12 years, year-on-year increases in vaccine uptake have been disappointingly small.
        [PDF]
        Increasing Influenza Vaccine Uptake A Comprehensive ... - DSpace
        dspace.library.uu.nl/bitstream/handle/.../looijmans.pdf...
        Utrecht University
        How to develop a program to increase influenza vaccine uptake among workers .... Therefore, one of the major reasons for the disappointing vaccine uptake in ...
Page 4 of about 1,270,000 results (0.67 seconds)
Search Results

        Clinical Applications of DNA Vaccines: Current Progress
        cid.oxfordjournals.org/content/53/3/296.full
        Clinical Infectious Diseases
        by B Ferraro - 2011 - Cited by 70 - Related articles
        However, the results of these early clinical trials were disappointing. ... of early DNA vaccines is hypothesized to stem, in part, from inefficient uptake of the ...
        LETTER: Don't question vaccine's safety - Nelson Star
        www.nelsonstar.com/opinion/letters/233777721.html
        Nov 29, 2013 - It is really disappointing that a nurse would be questioning the safety of ... among children as a direct result of diminished vaccine uptake.
        Preventing Cervical Cancer: New Resources To Advance the ...
        www.guttmacher.org/pubs/gpr/15/.../gpr150108.html
        Guttmacher Institute
        by S Barot - 2012 - Cited by 2 - Related articles
        Consequently, vaccination is most effective before any exposure to HPV. .... uptake of the vaccine has been disappointing—only 32% among females 13–17.14.
        New Bacterial Vaccines - Page 69 - Google Books Result
        books.google.com/books?isbn=0306478323
        Ronald W. Ellis, Bernard R. Brodeur - 2003 - Medical ... that would protect the vaccine components against digestion, promote uptake by ... activity in mice, although so far trials in humans have been disappointing.
        Health officials 'very disappointed' that most doctors and nurses ...
        www.independent.co.uk ... Health News
        The Independent
        by Charlie Cooper - in 22 Google+ circles
        Jun 17, 2013 - Health officials said they were “very disappointed” with the figures, which ... uptake, only 45.6 per cent of health care workers were vaccinated ...
        Cancer Vaccines - Page 33 - Google Books Result
        books.google.com/books?isbn=1573317594
        Ralph M. Steinman, Kenichiro Hasumi, Olivera J. Finn - 2009 - Medical
        Dendritic Cell-Based Vaccines for Pancreatic Cancer and Melanoma James J. Mul e ... (to uptake and present antigens from dying tumor cells to elicit potent, systemic, ... DC-based vaccine approaches, have been rather disappointing overall.
        [PDF]
        Uptake of the Human Papillomavirus Vaccine
        www.hu.ufsc.br/.../Uptake%20of...
        Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina
        and factors related to HPV vaccine uptake and report a quality ... included 189 girls aged 12 to 21 years with HPV vaccine uptake. ..... disappointing (Table 3).
        RACGP - Predictors of uptake of influenza vaccination – a survey of ...
        www.racgp.org.au/.../u...
        Royal Australian College of General Practitioners
        This survey aimed to determine the levels of uptake of influenza vaccine in pregnant ..... Although disappointing, these results are consistent with low rates of ...
        North West Evening Mail | News | Pregnant women in Cumbria and ...
        www.nwemail.co.uk/.../pregnant-women-in-c...
        NorthWest Evening Mail
        Oct 31, 2013 - The whooping cough vaccination for pregnant women was ... said: “It is disappointing to see the vaccination uptake in pregnant women decline ...
        Urgent Action Needed to Increase Human Papilloma Virus Vaccine ...
        aaaspolicyfellowships.org/.../urgent-action-needed-increase-human-papil...
        Vaccines to prevent infection by members of the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) ... released their Annual Report (Accelerating HPV Vaccine Uptake: urgency for ... As the report highlights, vaccine acceptance in the US has been disappointin

        PHC-08-2014: Vaccine development for poverty-related and ...
        ec.europa.eu/research/.../2251-phc-08-2014.html
        European Commission
        Dec 11, 2013 - Disappointing results of recent clinical trials point to bottlenecks in ... regarding the uptake and implementation of a new vaccine in low, middle ...
        [PDF]
        Health Benefits of Universal Influenza Vaccination Strategy
        origem.info/FIC/pdf/Viboud_Miller_HealthBenefits_PLoS08.pdf
        by C Viboud - 2008 - Cited by 6 - Related articles
        viruses, vaccine uptake in seniors was not associated with a decline in influenza-related mortality ([2,3]; Figure. 1). These disappointing experiences can.
        Notification about seasonal influenza vaccination: what is the best ...
        www.thepcrj.org/journ/view_article.php?article_id=943
        Jul 26, 2012 - Influenza vaccines are generally considered to be safe, and are ... now given the disappointing uptake of vaccines during the recent H1N1 ...
        The vast majority of doctors refuse the flu shot: another wilful myth ...
        reasonablehank.com/.../the-vast-majority-of-doctors-refuse-the-flu-shot-...
        Nov 4, 2012 - ... a piece of misinformation about influenza vaccine uptake amongst doctors, ... We have found a disappointingly low immunisation rate among ...
        [Reasons for having oneself vaccinated against HPV: implications ...
        www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/...
        National Center for Biotechnology Information
        by HM van Keulen - 2013
        In both cohorts, the following factors were related to HPV vaccination: perceived ... reasons behind the disappointing participation in the HPV vaccination programme. In order to increase HPV vaccination uptake, future communication should ...
        uptake noun - Cambridge Dictionary - Cambridge University Press
        dictionary.cambridge.org/.../u...
        Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary
        uptake noun - definition, audio pronunciation, synonyms and more for uptake ... the rate or act of accepting something: There is a 90 percent uptake of vaccination in this country. Uptake of places on the training course has been disappointing.
        Vaccination of health and social care workers against flu 2013-2014 ...
        www.rcoa.ac.uk ... News and Statements
        Royal College of Anaesthetists
        Nov 13, 2013 - However, vaccine uptake in frontline health care workers over the last few years has remained disappointingly low (45.6% in 2012/2013).
        Measles propaganda in Swansea attempting to increase poisonous ...
        theunhivedmind.com/wordpress2/?p=19561
        Mar 27, 2013 - Measles Swansea epidemic MMR vaccine take up disappointment ... say they are very disappointed in the uptake of the MMR vaccine in an ...
        Katie Couric promotes dangerous fear mongering with show on the ...
        blogs.plos.org/.../katie-couric-promotes-dangerous-fear-m...
        PLOS
        by Seth Mnookin - in 3,539 Google+ circles
        Dec 3, 2013 - Here's the teaser for tomorrow's show on the HPV vaccine: The HPV vaccine is considered ... This is so disappointing. I have a pretty low bar for ...
        Dendreon drops on disappointing Provenge sales - PMLiVE
        www.pmlive.com/.../dendreon_shares_fall_disappointing_provenge_sale...
        Feb 28, 2012 - Growth of prostate cancer vaccine lower than expected ... One of the key issues for Dendreon is to increase the uptake of Provenge in the US ...

Re:We are VERY VERY disappointed with YOU!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46529741)

TL;DR. From now on, please remember that sometimes, less is more.

Re:Other 50% are uninformed (1)

roc97007 (608802) | about 7 months ago | (#46529803)

Hang on, Red rice yeast is as effective as statins at lowering cholesterol, because red rice yeast contains a statin [wikipedia.org] . Lovastatin, in fact, which is a naturally occuring statin as opposed to a synthetic. (Some people think this is a good thing; personally I have a bad reaction to all statins, including lovastatin.)

You should add Thiomersal [wikipedia.org] to the mix. The US is lagging behind a bit in that area. (Still in flu shots, and in animal vaccines.)

Re:Other 50% are uninformed (2)

Jim Sadler (3430529) | about 7 months ago | (#46529913)

And in an unregulated industry how do you determine if your red rice yeast is authentic or the right strain? We can't even get real olive oil in grocery stores as most brands contain almost zero olive oil. So far the health food industry is a total scam with no assurance at all of any element of fairness or honesty.

"conspiracy theory" is loaded language (4, Interesting)

globaljustin (574257) | about 7 months ago | (#46529459)

Researchers messed up from the start using the "conspiracy theory" contextualization.

Operation Northwoods [wikipedia.org] would certainly **sound** like a conspiracy theory, a US gov't plan investigating the use of false-flag actions on US population to manufacture consent, but follow the link to the official documents, declassified, proving the plan existed

Or how about The Gulf of Tonkin Incident [wikipedia.org] which was a **all fake** and used to justify Vietnam intervention. Again...follow the link...the documents are declassified and it's true.

Today's conspiracy "theory" is tomorrows class action settlement!

By using the "conspiracy theory" contextualization, the researchers then biased **what theories they chose** and to go deeper **which variation of the theory to use**

ex: Flouride. Some say flouride in the water table is for dumping toxic chemicals to cause their Pineal Gland to calcify...others don't think it's so devious...just a way to make money off of industrial waste (selling something uneccesary on decades-long contracts w/ governments) not actually ***hurt people***

from TFA, here's the **versions** of various theories they chose:

They include the theory that the government knows cell phones cause cancer but does nothing about it, that genetically modified organisms are being used to shrink the world's population, that routine vaccinations cause autism and that water fluoridation is a way for companies to dump dangerous chemicals into the environment.

Notice that ****corporate conspiracies**** are not mentioned!!!

The health care industry profits from **artificial scarcity**...and lobbying to get unsafe, easily abusable drugs approved by the FDA over objections (see: Rudy Guilianni's early career as an attorney ;)

Artificial Scarcity & corporate cronyism is not a "conspiracy theory"...in fact, if you toss out the craziness, just about all "conspiracy theories" can be explained by unscrupulous people doing criminal behavior on a large scale.

It is understandable ... (1)

MacTO (1161105) | about 7 months ago | (#46529485)

It is understandable when people see something that they don't like, then proceed to create an opinion without informing themselves in even the most basic manner.

people getting wise, let's discredit them (1)

frovingslosh (582462) | about 7 months ago | (#46529487)

When people start getting wise to something, one way to discredit them is to just label their understanding of the problem as a "conspiracy". Clearly then they are just the lunatic fringe, and can still be called the lunatic fringe even after they become the majority.

Conspiracy?? Yes? Well consider this then: (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46529517)

Big pharma is already moaning over the fact that most people don't unquestioningly
roll up their sleeves for their bullshit anymore ... I've read their papers .. "Uuuh uuuh
vaccine uptake is disappointing .. uuuh uuuh non-compliant patients .. uuuh uuuuh
people are not buying our shit ....". They write PAPERS on this and on ways to turn
the tide (though without success, which is why they feel they need to put out crap like
this). There is not a whole lot of surprise element for them in this. This is more part of
  their reaction to it

So what's this article all about??
Another paid for article to paint people who go along with every bullshit they put out
as nuts and kookoo?? Lol .. do you think people get paid by slashdot with mod points?
(Though I wouldn't be surprised if they actually sold them to their advertiser's shills).

Anybody here who actually goes and researchs this topic probably wont be back
  to this site (and probably delete their DICE profile should they even have it in disgust).
Except maybe to point out the kind of shit that's put out by the paid4 dice advertising whores.

Think of it this way... only a few months ago you would never have believe what
kind of immense and lawless bullshit NSA is pulling on you ... (and now with "TURBINE"
  and other projects they're kicking it into even higher gear by automating it to compromise
millions of machines in the shortest time they can).

Now you know all about so now you're all exasperated, outraged and yapping all about it ...
but again if it had been pointed out to you only a little while before Snowden you would have
gone 'Uuuuh what a kooky rednecky CONSPEARACY THEEORY'.

Consider this:

IF the NSA is pulling all this shit on you .. what do you think the FDA and the CDC are
getting away with?? How much do you really think you know what's going on??

I wonder is there a way to filter the topics for what's really relevant
like the stuff I work with that actually gets me paid every day??

Mwuhaha!! (1)

gstoddart (321705) | about 7 months ago | (#46529549)

I see my conspiracy to make people believe in conspiracies is proceeding according to plan ...

Re:Mwuhaha!! (1)

n6kuy (172098) | about 7 months ago | (#46529861)

Yes, but we know that it's really a conspiracy to make people believe that people believe in conspiracies.

paranoid, delusional, nuts. and with lots of guns. (1)

h00manist (800926) | about 7 months ago | (#46529553)

50% of the population suffer from some level of paranoia and delusion, we have a public health issue.
With the amount of marketing, PR and publicity (aka lies and false stories) everyone is bombarded with, it's hard for the average person not to go nuts. added to that, quite a few true stories are just so twisted it becomes hard to believe in.
Yes, we have a public health issue with too many people losing their mind. plus, many of them have lots of guns.
A large section of the population has mental issues and guns. Yep, that could be bad.

Big Pharma (1)

DaMattster (977781) | about 7 months ago | (#46529569)

I believe they conspire with physicians to not emphasize cures. There is no long term profit in a cure.

well they have to some thing with the 1000% markup (1)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | about 7 months ago | (#46529577)

well they have to some thing with the 1000% markup

it's a low fucking bar (1)

epine (68316) | about 7 months ago | (#46529585)

Underling pulls some stupid shit. Boss gets word, but it's political suicide to divulge the mess. Voila! A conspiracy is born.

Where It Comes From - (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46529589)

Living in a locale with a high level of religious participation I can say with a high degree of certainty that it's the church, and baptists in particular, that spread these conspiracies around the most, and that the religious are the ones most likely to believe them. Before gaining mainstream acceptance the proliferation of vaccine hysteria and the vaccine-autism link, among other theories, were almost entirely the product of churches here spreading misinformation. Black churches are also known for spreading conspiracies revolving around HIV, among them that the virus was artificially created and given to African Americans as well as Africans in order to destroy their race. (However, churchgoers seem just as likely to accept that HIV is 'natural' inasmuch as God created it to punish homosexuals and the promiscuous.)

Religious institutions here have long had a contentious relationship with the sciences, and the very poor state of scientific research today is not helping science as an institution retain its credibility. However a line in the sand needs to be drawn. If churches are going to willfully spread misinformation that leads to low incidences of inoculation, irresponsible behavior, and disease outbreaks, then they should be held responsible for the consequences. For the first time in half a century, measles is making a comeback. Teen pregnancy rates and STD transmission rates are the highest in areas that exclusively teach abstinence-only sex education. People are becoming suspicious not only of scientists and the intellectual elite, but of doctors, physicians, surgeons - it's not difficult to see where this will lead.

There's a certain irony that there is now a causal link between Christianity and the spread of plagues, especially ones that cause rashes and boils.

conspiracy is irrelevant... (2)

harvey the nerd (582806) | about 7 months ago | (#46529599)

but there are a lot of cheaper, better therapies that are ignored or attacked by pharmaceutical, medical interests, whether natural substances or generic drugs used off label. The FDA essentially promotes expensive, less effective, often dangerous therapies that are officially blessed. I've saved $40,000+ a month recognizing this situation the last several years, with better research and results in my family when the doctors themselves said no real hope several years ago.

Tuskegee syphilis experiment, Guatemala syphilis e (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46529621)

At least these two conspiracies are true:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuskegee_syphilis_experiment
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guatemala_syphilis_experiment

Vocabulary Tar-pit (4, Interesting)

Tablizer (95088) | about 7 months ago | (#46529665)

"Conspiracy" is a vague word. In an industry as large and complex as medical care, I can almost guarantee that underhanded manipulation is going on, and have heard about such directly from acquaintances who worked or are working in it.

Whether one can label underhanded manipulation a "conspiracy" is tricky one. Multiple people of power work together to manipulate for selfish reasons. But often they use "gray lies" so that they have a fall-back argument such as "It's a matter of interpretation".

I'd generally call such "coordinated bullshit" and reserve "conspiracy" for outright coordinated lies or clear-cut criminal acts.

The largest volume of BS in the world is done at the grey borders of "truth", not so much dead people in car trunks or planted microscope slides. If you want to clean up corruption and BS, then going after manipulation of grey areas is probably the biggest bang for the buck.

The word "conspiracy" has kind of been diluted similar to how we use "robbed" to mean "burglarized". "Robbed" technically usually means you were approached and threatened in person by the thief. Taking your TV while you are on vacation doesn't count. That's "burglarized", not "robbed". But humans like to add drama to their speech such that the embellishment causes a kind of "severity deflation" of meaning over time. Thus "robbed" grew weaker in perceived meaning.

And 50% have below average IQ (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46529677)

Proof evident (some latin mumbo-jumbo here)

49% of the population believes the government lies (1)

BradMajors (995624) | about 7 months ago | (#46529705)

The survey shows that 49% of the population believes the government lies. When in fact, more like 90% of the population believes the government lies to us. The problem is we are not sure when the government is telling the truth.

Medical costs in the US (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46529905)

are the only real conspiracy theory in the medical industry:
http://www.pbs.org/newshour/ru... [pbs.org]

We are hard-wired ... (1)

PPH (736903) | about 7 months ago | (#46529945)

... to seek patterns in what are random events.

What is actually at work in many cases is the invisible hand [wikipedia.org] of the marketplace. It doesn't take a bunch of industrialists plotting in smoke-filled rooms. The overall structure of the market and underlying regulations is set up to push things in the direction of higher profits for the major players.

There's more profit in proprietary drugs. And the much of the FDA staff is involved with processing the trial results and paperwork. Everyone just works in their self interest.

Conspiracy Theories Are A Conspiracy... (1)

zenlessyank (748553) | about 7 months ago | (#46529969)

We need tinfoil Egyptian pyramids to hide under!!!

Not a conspiracy theory (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46529981)

"37 percent of respondents fully agreed that U.S. regulators are suppressing access to natural cures."

Is that really a conspiracy theory? What about medical marijuana?

Not a conspiracy theory (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46530013)

"37 percent of respondents fully agreed that U.S. regulators are suppressing access to natural cures."

Last time I checked, U.S. regulators were still suppressing access to marijuana, which is arguably a "natural cure" for several ailments.

Conspiracy Theorists going out of business (1)

tompaulco (629533) | about 7 months ago | (#46530057)

I've got a friend who has always been well known (in our circle) for his conspiracy theories. Over the last 5 or 6 years, though, he hasn't been able to come up with anything outlandish enough, off the wall enough, invasive enough, impossible enough.Every time he comes up with something new he thinks the government is doing, all we can say is "Yep, they even admitted it on $NationalNewsNetwork last week."

Actually not as bad as I had feared (1)

damn_registrars (1103043) | about 7 months ago | (#46530101)

I hear various connotations of the conspiracy of the government (or other agents such as collaborations between big pharma and the AMA) preventing people from accessing treatments to protect the profits they get from expensive drugs all the time. Frankly considering how often people allege that I am the crazy one for not believing in it, I really expected the percentage of people buying into that conspiracy would be much higher.

Hell, that survey reports that conspiracy to be accepted at only around 37%. Last I heard more than 37% of the GOP believes President Obama was born on Mars to Atheist Muslim Hippie Fascist Leftist Anarchist Extremists.
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?