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Titanium-Headed Golf Clubs Create Brush Fire Hazard In California

timothy posted about 7 months ago | from the match-point dept.

News 169

Hugh Pickens DOT Com (2995471) writes "Things to pack in your golf bag: clubs, balls, tees, beverages and a fire extinguisher. The NYT reports that scientists have determined that striking a rock while swinging a titanium club can create a shower of sparks that are hot enough, and last long enough, to start a brush fire. The finding, by researchers at the University of California, Irvine, clears up what fire officials in Southern California have seen as a mystery: the origin of two recent golf course fires in Irvine and Mission Viejo including one that burned 25 acres and injured a firefighter in 2010. "That was hard for anybody to believe," says Steve Concialdi, a captain with the Orange County Fire Authority. "We were thinking they were started by cigars or cigarettes." Most clubs come with stainless steel heads, but a significant number have recently been produced with a titanium alloy, which makes them lighter and easier to swing. The only problem is that, when struck against hard surfaces — like rocks or concrete — the impact with the rock abrades the titanium surface, producing small particles — up to about one-fiftieth of an inch in diameter — that burned for up to a second, at temperatures high enough to cause dry vegetation to ignite. Given the drought in California and the extreme fire danger, Concialdi says the fire department is asking golfers using titanium-coated clubs to move their balls away from rocks and dry vegetation and onto the irrigated fairways. He says while golfers may complain it's making the game easier, it's too risky to do otherwise this season. "Talk about a hazard," says Concialdi. "We are looking at a severe fire season because of the drought, and no one should take chances with titanium clubs on dry ground.""

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Fuck the NANNY STATE (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46562451)

I will use my clubs that I BOUGHT on the course that I PAID for membership. Where in the constitutian does it say I can't?
--
roman_mir

Just put out your fire asswad. (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46562461)

Otherwise, I'll 'stand my ground' on your ass.

Re:Just put out your fire asswad. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46563125)

Show me a contract where I agreed to do that in return for consideration's. Don't have it then I have NO obligation to do so.

This is just a tax in a thin disguise like when serfs had to work six days each week on the baron's land.

Try to enslave me and the only ground you'll have will be six feet deep and you'll be under neath it, communist asshole.
--
roman_mir

I call BS. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46562473)

It's a big leap to say 'titanium clubs may cause sparks' to 'they caused these 2 fires'.

Re:I call BS. (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46562557)

Seriously. That would mean something interesting happened while playing golf, which is just too far of a stretch.

Re:I call BS. (4, Insightful)

AmiMoJo (196126) | about 7 months ago | (#46562677)

May cause sparks when they hit a rock. I haven't noticed many rocks on the greens of golf courses, but I'm not a golfer. Also, if a shower of sparks came off your club and started a conflagration wouldn't you notice?

Re:I call BS. (1)

gnick (1211984) | about 7 months ago | (#46562755)

If I shelled out enough to buy titanium clubs, I'd sure as hell notice if I hit concrete with it when I swung. Maybe people are just too embarrassed to admit that they not only dinged up their expensive club, but also were there when some grass (presumably off the fairway and thus unwatered) spontaneously combusted.

Re:I call BS. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46562789)

Also, if a shower of sparks came off your club and started a conflagration wouldn't you notice?

I'd guess quite a few people would pretend not to. "Oh, that fire that caused $4 million damage? Haha, no idea what could have caused it, haha."

Re:I call BS. (5, Informative)

careysub (976506) | about 7 months ago | (#46562813)

May cause sparks when they hit a rock. I haven't noticed many rocks on the greens of golf courses, but I'm not a golfer. Also, if a shower of sparks came off your club and started a conflagration wouldn't you notice?

And of course, greens - being watered and cut regularly - don't burn. But roughs sure do. And that is where the two fires started - in the dry rough where there were most definitely rocks. The CBS news last night showed one of the actual locations where the brush fire started and, yes, it was full of rocks.

Re:I call BS. (1)

Paradise Pete (33184) | about 7 months ago | (#46563385)

But roughs sure do. And that is where the two fires started - in the dry rough where there were most definitely rocks.

The only club with titanium is the driver, and that's used on the tee only. Using it in the rough is extremely unusual. It's very unlikely that two different fires were set by someone (a) deciding to hit driver from the rock-strewn rough, (b) creating a spark, and (c) that spark starting a smoldering fire.

Re:I call BS. (1)

myth24601 (893486) | about 7 months ago | (#46563449)

Maybe people are starting to get Titanium iron now?

Re: I call BS. (1)

peragrin (659227) | about 7 months ago | (#46563525)

Then you aren't paying attention. I have a couple of fairway drivers designed to hit off grass instead of tees. These are angled to hit farther than an equivalent 1 or 2 iron.

Not everyone plays golf smart. If the ground was mostly flat they may go for distance over positioning. If I can't get on the green I play short. But many people will play range of potential shot first. Instead of landing best for the next.

Re:I call BS. (2)

Sockatume (732728) | about 7 months ago | (#46562837)

No more than you'd notice a smouldering cigarette in the long grass, no.

Re:I call BS. (5, Insightful)

Bacon Bits (926911) | about 7 months ago | (#46562881)

I'm not a golfer

Yes, obviously. There are no rocks on greens, but there are likely no titanium heads, either. That's where you use the putter. Putters need to have some weight to them since you don't swing them very hard.

You might swing hard with a titanium head club on the tee or on the fairway, but you're unlikely to encounter rocks there, either. You're also unlikely to encounter dry grass.

The problem is when golfers hit into deep rough, which can be far off from the fairway that you're intended to play from. Rough can be largely unmaintained. There can be fallen trees, tall grass, and rocks. It isn't irrigated, so it's likely to be as dry as wild grass. And, no, you may not see sparks on a bright summer day. Daylight in an open field on a clear is quite glaring. Even if you did see the sparks, you may not see any flame. The fire could smolder for hours as a tiny ember before finally flaring to life. That's why you're always told to cover a fire pit with sand before you leave it to ensure it's extinguished, remember?

Re:I call BS. (1)

H0p313ss (811249) | about 7 months ago | (#46563277)

Supporting argument, if you're swinging a golf club you're not looking at the ground to see what happened to the club, you're looking down the fairway to see what happened to the ball.

Re:I call BS. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46563103)

You wouldn't be using that amount of force on a green anyhow. Pebbles do often make their way onto teeing grounds from golfers spikes. I've seen sparks off my driver if I happen to catch the ball a little too high on the face (the bottom of my driver head hitting the aforementioned pebbles). I like when this happens.

Re:I call BS. (3, Informative)

Nidi62 (1525137) | about 7 months ago | (#46563213)

You can find rocks in the rough, or even off the hole completely, where grass is going to be much higher and much more likely to be dead and dry, particularly in a drought situation (and many golf courses out west go for a "deserty" look). And having read an article about this a few days ago, they found out that sparks from a titanium club hitting a rock burn at over 3000 degrees for over a second. Easily enough to ignite dry grass. It's not a shower of sparks either, all it takes is 2 or 3.

Re:I call BS. (4, Informative)

Charliemopps (1157495) | about 7 months ago | (#46563227)

The people noticed. Explained what happened and weren't believed. The authorities thought they'd dropped a cigar or something. Now they realize these people may have been telling the truth. I've done some metal working with Titanium alloy in the past. It throws VERY hot sparks. Aluminum hardly sparks at all, and when it does they aren't very hot and do not last long at all.

Also, most brush fires start UNDER the grass. There's a dry bed of grass beneeth the green gras above. The fire spreads under the grass and you very well may not notice it. It will kreep along until it hits a big fuel source. I could see someone hitting a ball out of the rough... then walking up to the cart or whatever and notice smoke back where you just walked away from and thinking "WTF?"

Re:I call BS. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46562815)

titanium clubs are drivers almost exclusively - and used only at the tee box - so this is highly unlikely !!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Re:I call BS. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46563369)

There are very good reasons to use a driver or long wood (which can also be titanium) from the rough. They tend to have more mass which helps minimize club deflection, and also helps push through tall grass better. This is a very common strategy.

Re:I call BS. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46562879)

It's a big leap to say 'titanium clubs may cause sparks' to 'they caused these 2 fires'.

They don't even know for sure that it caused those 2 fires, it could still be cigarettes, glass shards and lots of other things. Showing that it is theoretically possible does not prove that it was the actual cause.

Re:I call BS. (4, Informative)

careysub (976506) | about 7 months ago | (#46563145)

It's a big leap to say 'titanium clubs may cause sparks' to 'they caused these 2 fires'.

If you read TFA, and not just the TFS, you will discover that in both of the cases the golfers knew that their clubs had started the fires and said so!

They just weren't believed.

So this is no "theory" - it is simply confirmation of the cause already stated by the (unsuspecting and no doubt quite surprised) perpetrators.

So does this mean... (1)

Viol8 (599362) | about 7 months ago | (#46562485)

... that golf courses have finally stopped wasting water by watering grass every day? Thats always some good news I suppose for the state.

Re:So does this mean... (1)

Diss Champ (934796) | about 7 months ago | (#46562523)

No.

The summary says that the fairways are still irrigated. It is when the ball lands off the irrigated fairway that the problem is being reported. According to the summary, golfers are being asked to bring the ball back to the fairway to avoid starting fires if they hit the ball into the rough.

Re:So does this mean... (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46562581)

The solution is simple: let's ditch the titanium clubs and start making magnesium ones!

Re:So does this mean... (1)

gnupun (752725) | about 7 months ago | (#46562777)

Or coat the titanium clubs with steel or some other alloy that is less sparky...

Re:So does this mean... (3, Informative)

oscrivellodds (1124383) | about 7 months ago | (#46562809)

Only the poor would cover their titanium clubs with steel.

Real 1%ers will demand gold or platinum.

Re:So does this mean... (1)

serviscope_minor (664417) | about 7 months ago | (#46562819)

Steel is sparky.

Non sparking sools made for use in environments with potentually explosive gasses present tend to use brass or another copper alloy, typically known as bronze, but that's not terribly specific as almost any copper alloy except brass is called bronze. Mostly this works because iron (and titanium) are actually moderately reactive and if you can light them, they burn exceptionally hot.

Copper does not as it is substantially less reactive.

Re: So does this mean... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46562997)

Or ban golf

Re:So does this mean... (1)

operagost (62405) | about 7 months ago | (#46563131)

I don't play golf, and even I know you have to take a penalty stroke if you do that so there's a reason for their resistance.

double hazard in designated cow fart areas (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46562513)

talk about incentive to get to the clubhouse with fewer strokes? another WMD on credit corepirate nazi maudlin media crown royal dna composting accident article is overdue

First world problems.. (3, Funny)

vakond1 (986568) | about 7 months ago | (#46562519)

Can't really be more first world, can it?

Re:First world problems.. (1)

oodaloop (1229816) | about 7 months ago | (#46562535)

Forest fires are hardly first world problems. Now if someone complained their golf club was scratched after striking a rock and starting a fire, that's another story.

Re:First world problems.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46562587)

Forest fires started by titanium golf clubs are as first world problem as it gets. Somehow I don't think it's much of a concern in, say, Central African Republic, or Chad, or East Timor.

Re:First world problems.. (1)

ArsenneLupin (766289) | about 7 months ago | (#46562649)

Somehow I don't think it's much of a concern in, say, Central African Republic, or Chad, or East Timor.

Are you sure none of those luxury hotels (for Westerns) in these countries have golf courses next to them?

Re:First world problems.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46562971)

But nobody in the western world cares if some rich asshole burns down Africa.

Stop playing golf in a drought (5, Insightful)

vakond1 (986568) | about 7 months ago | (#46562597)

Yes, I agree that forest fires are a significant issue.. however, why can't they just stop playing golf when the state is hit by severe droughts? Not just the fire hazard, but a waste of irrigation water... I believe this is excess luxury which harms the environment.

Re:Stop playing golf in a drought (1)

BlackPignouf (1017012) | about 7 months ago | (#46562645)

+1

Dubai Desert Clasic (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46562895)

Yes, I agree that forest fires are a significant issue.. however, why can't they just stop playing golf when the state is hit by severe droughts? Not just the fire hazard, but a waste of irrigation water... I believe this is excess luxury which harms the environment.

You think the environmental issues of golf are bad in California? I challenge you to visit one of the golf courses in Dubai. Beautiful green fairways and water features in the middle of a blazing desert. It's scary to think just how enviromentally insane that place is.

Re: Dubai Desert Clasic (2)

vakond1 (986568) | about 7 months ago | (#46563021)

The fact that the situation is worse in Dubai doesn't mean that we shouldn't impose sane (temporary) restrictions in California. You don't actually need to go that far, Las Vegas isn't much better either... but still just as irrational.

Re:Dubai Desert Clasic (2)

pspahn (1175617) | about 7 months ago | (#46563073)

Not that it compares, but I always found this [goo.gl] rather humorous.

Re:Stop playing golf in a drought (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46562983)

Might as well ask "why can't the rich stop being assholes?".

Re:Stop playing golf in a drought (1)

pspahn (1175617) | about 7 months ago | (#46563041)

Honestly, everything in moderation.

I've played some public golf courses that are adjacent to airports and rail lines and would otherwise be used for more sprawl or more industry. I like that there are places that provide refuge for birds and small mammals and one can go pay $12 and play a game for a few hours.

I don't play golf that much, in fact I haven't played at all in several years, but it's still a decent game and use of space ... in moderation.

I've only flown over Phoenix, but seriously, that is excessive as are many lush courses that scream opulence and waste of resources. If a town wanted to have a public course, I'm all for it. Most of the rest are simply excessive.

Re:Stop playing golf in a drought (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46563045)

Why do people continue to live in a damn desert?

Re:Stop playing golf in a drought (1, Insightful)

operagost (62405) | about 7 months ago | (#46563161)

Electricity rates are skyrocketing. Why can't the President set his thermostat lower than 75 degrees in the winter?

Who decides what is too luxurious? The politburo?

Re:First world problems.. (1)

CastrTroy (595695) | about 7 months ago | (#46562663)

I don't play golf, but titanium clubs sounds like the pinnacle of solutions to a problem that doesn't exist. Does using titanium really make the club that much lighter that one would get a significant head speed increase? Are the properties of the metal such that it makes the ball "bounce" off the club that much better? Most people who play golf have very little problem with hitting the ball far, but have a much bigger problem with accuracy. Titanium most likely won't fix the problem. I've one ever played one 9 hole round in my life, but from my experience, you can do a lot better by trying to make short accurate shots than trying to squeeze an extra 50 yards out of your drive, and ending up in the bush half the time.

Re:First world problems.. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46562719)

I can't vouch for the effectiveness of titanium over any other metal in golf clubs but from experience (being a 9 handicapper) that distance definitely matters. Most of it comes out of better technique than technology however.

Back on topic though, the sparks I've seen coming off golf clubs don't appear, in my humble opinion, to look like they last long enough to start fires, but I'm from the UK so I don't often see the drought being spoken of.

How about we crack down on people dropping cigar and cigarette stubs instead. They actually ARE on fire.

Re:First world problems.. (1)

tsqr (808554) | about 7 months ago | (#46563127)

I don't play golf, but titanium clubs sounds like the pinnacle of solutions to a problem that doesn't exist. Does using titanium really make the club that much lighter that one would get a significant head speed increase?

No, that isn't the point. All driver clubheads are pretty much the same weight (per golf rules). Since titanium is lighter in weight than steel, an equivalent weight of titanium gives you a larger clubhead, which is the goal.

Re:First world problems.. (1)

CastrTroy (595695) | about 7 months ago | (#46563307)

Shouldn't the size of the club head also be accounted for in the rules? I know it's not, but isn't that something that should be addressed? I guess you couldn't make it too big, or air resistance on the club head would start to become a noticeable factor, but there should be very specific limits on what the size and shape of the club head should be. To me it seems like tennis and golf forgot to update their rule books with changes in technology, and hence, the sports have completely changed from what they once were.

Re:First world problems.. (1)

tsqr (808554) | about 7 months ago | (#46563527)

Shouldn't the size of the club head also be accounted for in the rules? I know it's not, but isn't that something that should be addressed?

Well, actually it is accounted for in the rules [randa.org] . Keep in mind, drivers originally had heads made from wood, which is why they're sometimes referred to as "woods" regardless of the material they're made of.

Re:First world problems.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46563495)

I think many golfers are similar to triathletes, folks with large disposable income looking for whatever "edge" they can. I've seen plenty of average athletes on $10,000 tri bikes that will shave 2 seconds per mile, but if they actually put more effort into proper training they could do much more than that on a less expensive bike. However, to those people, time is a luxury and money comes easy.

If you think this is bad... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46562567)

If you think this is bad, you should see what happened to the last guy who waded into the watar hazard with my cesium club heads.

Re:If you think this is bad... (0)

oscrivellodds (1124383) | about 7 months ago | (#46562599)

I think you mean sodium.

Re:If you think this is bad... (3, Informative)

ArsenneLupin (766289) | about 7 months ago | (#46562667)

I think you mean sodium.

Cesium is correct [youtube.com] and actually works much better than sodium.

Re:If you think this is bad... (0)

oscrivellodds (1124383) | about 7 months ago | (#46562709)

Cesium is a liquid at 28.4C. You'd have a hard time hitting a ball with a liquid club.

Sodium is correct.

Re:If you think this is bad... (2)

careysub (976506) | about 7 months ago | (#46562915)

Atomic number sodium = 11.

Atomic number cesium = 55.

Can't we just compromise and pick an alkali metal close to 33?

That would be Rubidium at 37. It is also solid at room temperature (but would melt in the sun at 39C/103F) and also reacts violently with water. The higher the atomic number of the alkali metal the more violent the reaction. Sodium really isn't very impressive - a small piece doesn't really burn it just sizzles. Potassium (atomic number 19) burns though (and potassium does not melt until 63C/146F). Everything higher than potassium is likely to explode.

Re:If you think this is bad... (1)

oscrivellodds (1124383) | about 7 months ago | (#46562949)

39C is a common temperature out in the sun on a southern California golf course.

I think we've beaten this dead horse enough, haven't we?

Anyone for a.. (1)

tinkerton (199273) | about 7 months ago | (#46562573)

Magnesium club?

Disgsting Habit (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46562583)

Golf should be banned just like cigarettes. All of the fresh water wasted to keep the courses green, and now the horrible wildfires started by these selfish golfers. The government needs step in and make this "game of the 1%" illegal. At this point, it is clear that allowing people to golf is not just wasteful, it is morally wrong.

Re: Disgsting Habit (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46562661)

Along with all other fields that use real grass, and astroturf because that is a petroleum product, and dirt fields becuase that contributes toward global warming when compared to a forest.

Re: Disgsting Habit (1)

Jesse Johnston (3558491) | about 7 months ago | (#46562705)

as soon as they wrap up the finishing touches on the internet trolling ban, I'm sure you can ask your local congressman to look into it (if he/she isn't out golfing when you call.)

Golf, Now With Fire Hazards! (3, Funny)

xianzombie (123633) | about 7 months ago | (#46562603)

Play it as it lays! Water Trap, Sand Trap, Raging Inferno Trap. If you can reach it, play it!

Re:Golf, Now With Fire Hazards! (1)

DigiShaman (671371) | about 7 months ago | (#46563453)

Your game is ON FIRE baby!!!

I knew it (1)

PPH (736903) | about 7 months ago | (#46562607)

Man's discovery of fire and golf date back equally far.

Golf (1)

rossdee (243626) | about 7 months ago | (#46562613)

If you are hitting a rock with your club, you're doing it wrong.

Best solution (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Meoward (665631) | about 7 months ago | (#46562619)

Ban golf.

Total waste of (already precious) water and arable land. If we're lucky, every golf course will be consumed in flames.

( I would say it;s contributed nothing to society, but there is Caddyshack...)

Lemme see if I get this. (1, Insightful)

oscrivellodds (1124383) | about 7 months ago | (#46562625)

1) Golfer wacks ball + rocks with club.
2) Club produces sparks that burn for up to one second igniting surrounding brush.
3) Golfer ignores smoking brush and walks off after his ball.

Makes sense to me!

Re:Lemme see if I get this. (1)

geekmux (1040042) | about 7 months ago | (#46562843)

I think it goes more something like this:

1) Shitty golfer with far too much money whacks ball + rocks with titanium club.

2) Shitty golfer gets pissed and curses because he just put a scratch in his new $500 driver.

3) Shitty golfer storms off in a rage, ignoring the environment around him in search of the beer cart.

Sorry, but if you're going to invest the money into titanium hardware, learn to play the game well enough that you're not hitting rocks.

Re:Lemme see if I get this. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46562867)

nope, he speeds away in his electic golf cart. Walking doesn't appear to be encouraged in US golf!

Re:Lemme see if I get this. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46562901)

Right on. This is just another example of seeing how stupid and gullible the sheeple are, and what ridiculous 'orders' they will obey. So somehow the fires started and the golfers responsible didn't notice them? They just carried on walking around the course, and didn't see the flames behind them? What a joke.

Re:Lemme see if I get this. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46562941)

The golfer in question probably doesn't notice the smoke due to the small dustcloud he created upon hitting the dry ground and leaves before the dust has settled.

Re:Lemme see if I get this. (3, Insightful)

Sockatume (732728) | about 7 months ago | (#46562947)

You can "ignite" the bush without immediately creating obvious smoke and fire. People cause brush fires by stubbing out cigarettes for the same reason, they think "the ground I stubbed this out on is not currently obviously aflame, therefore I'm good".

Re:Lemme see if I get this. (2)

VortexCortex (1117377) | about 7 months ago | (#46563075)

1) Golfer wacks ball + rocks with club.
2) Club produces sparks that burn for up to one second igniting surrounding brush.
3) Golfer ignores smoking brush and walks off after his ball.

Makes sense to me!

The brush tends to smolder for a good long while before it becomes an inferno. Just light a corner of a leaf with a spark or red hot iron, and toss it on a pile of leaves (in a controlled environment, fire pit, etc.). It may burn itself out, but the spark that causes an inferno may come from many leaves or grasses that burn nearly completely out, before touching off the next one. It could be hours before any smoke or flame is noticeable from just a few meters away.

They claim not to have found a cigarette butt culprit, but absence of evidence doesn't prove a claim. Perhaps the fires were caused by folks who lost their glasses, and the sun shone through them just so. Maybe micro-lighting AKA static arc. I've seen crackling sparks when dumping very dry sand, dirt or flour. If you're not careful you can blow a whole grain silo up with nothing more than a bit of agitation, it's a fuel-air bomb. Some really hot dry dirt and grasses blowing around could cause a spark. I've seen lightning in Arizona dust storms. They've got sand storms with lightning in the Middle East, hell, even Mars has 'em.

Not saying that's what caused it, just that there are plenty of possibilities. Could even be aliens, or time travelers who's appearance altered history and so they're preserving their time-line best they can by starting the fires that should have happened. Hard to tell.

Re:Lemme see if I get this. (2)

H0p313ss (811249) | about 7 months ago | (#46563291)

1) Golfer wacks ball + rocks with club.
2) Club produces sparks that burn for up to one second igniting surrounding brush.
3) Golfer ignores smoking brush and walks off after his ball.

Makes sense to me!

According the the article:

Steve Concialdi, a captain with the Orange County Fire Authority, in Irvine, said that in both incidents, golfers using 3-irons with titanium-alloy heads had said they hit the ground and created sparks that started the fires.

So you're 2 out of 3.

I'll add one (1)

invictusvoyd (3546069) | about 7 months ago | (#46562633)

Bear Gryllis titanium club to my survival kit. Makes for a fine weapon too .. err .. what's golf ?

Re:I'll add one (1)

u38cg (607297) | about 7 months ago | (#46563615)

With a titanium club, golf is whatever the fuck you want it to be...

Class Warfare Continues (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46562655)

Only 20 comments in and it's all about punishing the rich. Yes, golf courses consume a lot of water. Yes, there is a lot of chemical fertilizer runoff from golf courses getting into the public water systems and poisoning our children. Yes, we have people dying in wildfires caused by the ultra-rich golfers' exotic alloy clubs. But, these people have a right to play golf, just like they have a right to pay themselves millions on the backs of their exploited slaves. The founding fathers wanted it this way. LIBERTY!

FREEEEEDOOOOOOMMMMMMMM!!!

Wait a minute- the ground was rocky! (2, Funny)

oscrivellodds (1124383) | about 7 months ago | (#46562665)

These weren't 1%ers. These were poor people playing on public courses. They SHOULD be banned!

easier? (3, Insightful)

pahles (701275) | about 7 months ago | (#46562673)

'He says while golfers may complain it's making the game easier' So they are using lighter clubs to make it easier, then complain they have to move the ball to the fairway?

Re:easier? (2)

rogerrabit (2885897) | about 7 months ago | (#46562985)

"Lighter club"... seems appropriate!

Hey.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46562707)

It's California, what do you expect? I'm sure this is some ploy to regulate and extort money from citizens.

If you hit a rock with a lawnmower, it can throw sparks too.

OH MY GOD, if your hubcap scrapes the curb, it can cause sparks!!

Best off just stay inside. LOL

Obvious solution (1)

the_saint1138 (1353335) | about 7 months ago | (#46562817)

Since golfers don't want to make the game easier by moving the ball, a better solution would be to make the game harder.

I propose a 2 stroke penalty for any forest fires started during the swing.

Re:Obvious solution (1)

oscrivellodds (1124383) | about 7 months ago | (#46562839)

What about brush fires?

Re:Obvious solution (4, Funny)

the_saint1138 (1353335) | about 7 months ago | (#46562903)

Brush fires are only a 1 stroke penalty, but they have to play again from the same spot.

Yuo faIl It! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46562823)

Re:Yuo faIl It! (1)

oscrivellodds (1124383) | about 7 months ago | (#46562833)

uh, OK!

Aluminum (1)

wisnoskij (1206448) | about 7 months ago | (#46562907)

They are certainly only using Titanium for its name. Its particular attributes are not going to add anything to a golf game. Titanium is used for its unmagnetic nature, and its stability even under high temperatures. If you want light, then use Aluminum, or some hollow system.

Re:Aluminum (0)

oscrivellodds (1124383) | about 7 months ago | (#46562957)

"Titanium is used for its unmagnetic nature..."

So the earth's magnetic field won't mess up your swing?

"... and its stability even under high temperatures."

And your club won't get damaged in the ensuing conflagration?

Re:Aluminum (1)

Gibgezr (2025238) | about 7 months ago | (#46563089)

No, the metal and composite heads are already made hollow. Titanium has a better strength vs. weight ratio than most other materials they could use. Its alloys also have useful "hardness" and "ductility" (elongation) properties when making heads for golf clubs.

So no, it's not used for its name, it's used for its performance.

Re:Aluminum (4, Informative)

wisnoskij (1206448) | about 7 months ago | (#46563349)

Titanium does not have any special strength vs weight. It is slightly below Steel and slightly above aluminium. But at the end of the day they are all basically the same. We make aircraft out of aluminium, because the same weight of steel would be too thin and we make steel girders out of steel because the same thing with aluminium would be too big; And we use Titanium when heat might be a problem, in general. Using reasonable alloys, their strength/weight is similar.

And 99% of metal hardness is in the heat treating. You can make steel into elastic, or rigid as diamonds.

Re:Aluminum (2)

careysub (976506) | about 7 months ago | (#46563195)

It would be interesting to see a real engineering analysis of the effect of different metals on golf performance (a driving machine would provide real data). But in the case of titanium actually providing some sort of advantage to the golfer this could be mostly preserved by simply putting a thin stainless steel facing on the striking surface. And this would preserve what is no doubt the real advantage of these clubs - generating sales for the manufacturer and retail chain.

Re:Aluminum (1)

tsqr (808554) | about 7 months ago | (#46563221)

Aluminum is not a great choice for a golf club head due to its poor fatigue properties -- it would tend to get very brittle after repeatedly pounding at golf balls. Plus, though Ti is about 70% heavier than Al, it has twice the tensile strength. Aluminum does make a pretty good golf club shaft, though.

Re:Aluminum (1)

wisnoskij (1206448) | about 7 months ago | (#46563287)

Well it is all thickness, As long as the metal is heat treated right, and not too thin I do not think you would encounter any problems. They make aircraft out of both.

Fore (1, Funny)

puddingebola (2036796) | about 7 months ago | (#46563025)

Fore! FIRE!

turn it off (1)

nten (709128) | about 7 months ago | (#46563567)

and walk away

up to about one-fiftieth of an inch in diameter (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46563315)

So around 0,05mm?

Re:up to about one-fiftieth of an inch in diameter (1)

ArcadeMan (2766669) | about 7 months ago | (#46563441)

1/50 in = 0.02 in = 0.508 mm.

Brush Fire Hazard? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46563351)

Wouldn't the real question be: "Who left all those brushes laying about?"
Must have been a very sandy golf course, if everybody brought hir own brush.

Severe drought, but irrigated fairways (1)

neo-mkrey (948389) | about 7 months ago | (#46563371)

So the severe drought only applies to the 99%, right?

Most Reactive Metal (2)

the eric conspiracy (20178) | about 7 months ago | (#46563513)

Titanium would be the one for this. It's the most reactive metal, the only thing known to burn in pure nitrogen.

Under normal conditions it doesn't burn because it forms a tough oxide layer by rapidly reacting with water vapor in the air. But do something to expose a lot of bare metal and yes it will get interesting.

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