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First Asteroid Discovered Sporting a Ring System

Unknown Lamer posted about 7 months ago | from the coolest-rock-in-the-belt dept.

Space 29

astroengine (1577233) writes "When you think of a celestial ring system, the beautiful ringed planet Saturn will likely jump to mind. But for the first time astronomers have discovered that ring systems aren't exclusive to planetary bodies — asteroids can have them too. Announced on Wednesday, astronomers using several observatories in South America, including the ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile, have discovered that distant asteroid Chariklo possesses two distinct rings. Chariklo, which is approximately 250 kilometers (155 miles) wide, is the largest space rock in a class of asteroids known as Centaurs that orbit between Saturn and Uranus in the outer solar system. 'We weren't looking for a ring and didn't think small bodies like Chariklo had them at all, so the discovery — and the amazing amount of detail we saw in the system — came as a complete surprise!' said lead researcher Felipe Braga-Ribas, of the Observatório Nacional and MCTI, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil."

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misspelled (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46586913)

I think you misspelled "planet".

Never forget Pluto!

Re:misspelled (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46586995)

imo pluto is not a planet

also google "fyodor slashdot sdem", fyodor is not the principled professional you make him out to be

Bah, glorious leader ... (0)

gstoddart (321705) | about 7 months ago | (#46586935)

Bah, it's just following the dictate to have haircuts like Kim Jong Un [mashable.com] .

And, yes, that's evidently a real requirement in North Korea now.

Re:Bah, glorious leader ... (1)

vux984 (928602) | about 7 months ago | (#46587171)

" though experts familiar with the country have said there's no evidence a new hairstyle rule has gone into effect."

From the article you linked to...

Sphincter (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46586949)

It circles around Uranus !

Re:Sphincter (1)

symbolset (646467) | about 7 months ago | (#46587265)

Apparently its orbit is a square.

Rings Around It (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46586989)

It's one thing to have rings around Uranus. It's another thing to have rings around your whole asteroid.

Re:Rings Around It (2)

Guppy06 (410832) | about 7 months ago | (#46588599)

Kidding aside, as I recall Uranus' ring system itself was discovered through an occultation like this.

Well... I figured gravity was a given. (3, Insightful)

Payden K. Pringle (3483599) | about 7 months ago | (#46586993)

>But for the first time astronomers have discovered that ring systems aren't exclusive to planetary bodies — asteroids can have them too.

I get the word "discovered" here, but... I wouldn't think that gravity is exclusive to planetary bodies. Anything with significant gravity can have a ring system under the right conditions.

Sensationalist article is sensationalist. But hey, it's slashdot.

Re:Well... I figured gravity was a given. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46587097)

When you take the time to look at concepts like the hill sphere and the roche sphere I can see where it would put the question of how sustainable would a ring system be for a small body given the larger neighbors that it has.
 
I imagine any reasonable cosmologist or astronomer would have said that it was certainly possible but only in a narrow lane of circumstances.
 
Live and learn.

Re:Well... I figured gravity was a given. (2)

Daniel Dvorkin (106857) | about 7 months ago | (#46587143)

Anything with significant gravity can have a ring system under the right conditions.

And up until now, we didn't know if those right conditions ever occurred for asteroids. Now we do. That certainly counts as a discovery.

Re:Well... I figured gravity was a given. (3, Insightful)

DerekLyons (302214) | about 7 months ago | (#46587349)

I get the word "discovered" here, but... I wouldn't think that gravity is exclusive to planetary bodies. Anything with significant gravity can have a ring system under the right conditions.

True. But the smaller and weaker the gravitational field is, or the more perturbed it is, the lower the chance for a ring system to form let alone remain stable. Not to mention, there's a huge difference between something being theoretically (if extraordinarily remotely) possible and actually observing said thing in the wild.

Re:Well... I figured gravity was a given. (2)

Irate Engineer (2814313) | about 7 months ago | (#46587511)

But it IS sensational science - it is a reported observation, fine.

Mind that the sciences do often need to think about PR for funding.

Of all the crap that gets posted on /., for this I say "Pretty cool, let them be sensational".

Beautiful looking asteroid! (4, Funny)

NotFamous (827147) | about 7 months ago | (#46587047)

Best to put a ring on it.

birds can't survive vacuum (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46588183)

So you can not put a bird on it.

Asteroids do not "sport" rings. They rock them. (1)

uCallHimDrJ0NES (2546640) | about 7 months ago | (#46587141)

Tut-tut. Grammar counts!

OK, new categories (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46587269)

So, Pluto became a "dwarf planet" due to several factors including size, not clearing its orbit, etc. Maybe we now need another category - "giant asteroid" or "ringed asteroid" or some such to denote these "almost a dwarf planet but with rings like a damn giant planet" guys?

Ring? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46587325)

No tide?

Natural? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46587575)

What's to say it's a natural phenomenon. Perhaps it's an alien asteroid mining system. Especially considering they are "so sharply confined". Their explanation for that is "shepherd moons". Aliens.

The universe is fractal (1)

judoguy (534886) | about 7 months ago | (#46587627)

It pretty much seems to be an observable fact from trees to planetary bodies to particle physics. Dig deeper and the parts resemble the whole.

Re:The universe is fractal (3, Interesting)

Xtifr (1323) | about 7 months ago | (#46588021)

Dig deeper, and you soon hit the Planck length [wikipedia.org] , so, no. Really small things don't resemble larger things at all. That's why QM is so counter-intuitive. Heck, you don't even have to dig that deep to realize that an atom does not resemble the solar system, even though both have small things orbiting a large central mass.

For that matter, go the other way, and you hit the light-speed barrier, which has a huge effect on the way really big things work. The very large and the very small are both immensely different from each other and from things on what we consider a normal, human scale. Your notion is poetic, but contradicts most of the physics discovered since the early 20th c.

Actually electrons DON'T orbit. (2)

Ungrounded Lightning (62228) | about 7 months ago | (#46590511)

Heck, you don't even have to dig that deep to realize that an atom does not resemble the solar system, even though both have small things orbiting a large central mass.

Actually electrons DON'T orbit nuclei. What they do is more akin to being standing waves surrounding them. With the opposite charges on the electrons and the nuclei, if they orbited in the classical mechanics sense they'd continuously emit electromagnetic radiation and the orbit would quickly decay. This is part of what put physicists onto the track of quantum mechanics.

It's one of the big differences between the nanoscopic world where quantum mechanical effects become obviously far larger than the classical mechanics approximations they approach at large scales in incoherent bulk material.

Re:Actually electrons DON'T orbit. (1)

Xtifr (1323) | about 7 months ago | (#46605803)

Actually electrons DON'T orbit nuclei.

It's still referred to as an orbit, even if it doesn't resemble a classical orbit.

What they do is more akin to being standing waves surrounding them.

Except that, unlike what's usually referred to as a wave at that level, it has nothing to do with frequency. It's more of a probability wave. But it's still subject to the exclusion principle, which really complicates matters. Two electrons can't occupy the same location, but location itself is a tricky concept at that scale.

Anyway, all of that just goes to make my point. The very small (and the very large) are not like what we experience at the human scale. Reality is not fractal in that sense.

Volatiles! (1)

Applehu Akbar (2968043) | about 7 months ago | (#46587685)

Does a ring system tell us that this asteroid has volatile compounds on it? Developers may not have to go to the Oort Cloud for water after all.

Re:Volatiles! (1)

wonkey_monkey (2592601) | about 7 months ago | (#46588945)

Does a ring system tell us that this asteroid has volatile compounds on it?

Is there any reason it would?

Pics or gtfo (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46587755)

Sucks that there's no pictures except some stupid artist's depictions.

But I guess it's still kind of cool so maybe I'll drink a La Trappe Dubbel in honor of TRAPPIST and, uh, eat a Danish pastry in honor of Danish.
Actually I'm just hungry.

Exclusivity (1)

wonkey_monkey (2592601) | about 7 months ago | (#46588923)

ring systems aren't exclusive to planetary bodies — asteroids can have them too

Since the dividing line between "planet" and "asteroid" was drawn more-or-less arbitrarily by us humans, I wasn't expecting rings to be exclusive to planets in the first place.

Had to announce it (1)

Mal-2 (675116) | about 7 months ago | (#46590597)

They had to announce this for their own safety. If they hadn't, nobody else would have looked at it and they'd be dead in a week.

Detailed article on French newspaper Le Monde (1)

DavidMZ (3411229) | about 7 months ago | (#46590703)

via google translate: Le Monde [google.com]
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