Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Russian GLONASS Down For 12 Hours

timothy posted about 6 months ago | from the high-level-intrigue dept.

Bug 148

An anonymous reader writes "In an unprecedented total disruption of a fully operational GNSS constellation, all satellites in the Russian GLONASS broadcast corrupt information for 11 hours, from just past midnight until noon Russian time (UTC+4), on April 2 (or 5 p.m. on April 1 to 4 a.m. April 2, U.S. Eastern time). This rendered the system completely unusable to all worldwide GLONASS receivers."

cancel ×

148 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Ukrainian hackers? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46648171)

Just sayin'.

Re:Ukrainian hackers? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46648267)

More likely NSA or CIA.

Re:Ukrainian hackers? (5, Interesting)

CeasedCaring (1527717) | about 6 months ago | (#46648541)

Actually, it was last weeks NCIS:LA "Zero Days", which aired 3/25/14, and involved the NCIS techies corrupting GLONASS to divert a missile aimed at San Francisco. See TVRage [tvrage.com]

Re:Ukrainian hackers? (2)

beelsebob (529313) | about 6 months ago | (#46649115)

Unlikely... More likely it's them checking their (not announced) scrambling works, ready for an invasion.

Re:Ukrainian hackers? (3, Funny)

rvw (755107) | about 6 months ago | (#46649141)

Just sayin'.

Or Russian Wodka. It would give them a good excuse to take over Ukraine by accident - sorry wrong turn!

sanctions? (2)

turkeydance (1266624) | about 6 months ago | (#46648175)

maybe.

How does this affect dual-system chipsets? (5, Interesting)

ZorinLynx (31751) | about 6 months ago | (#46648211)

Newer phones have location chipsets that support both GPS and GLONASS. Do they figure out automatically that the GLONASS information is bad and switch to using GPS exclusively?

I've noticed much increased performance since I upgraded to a phone that uses both systems, especially in cities with a lot of tall buildings like NYC and Chicago.

Re:How does this affect dual-system chipsets? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46648251)

>tall buildings
more likely you get are getting a fix from nearby cell towers + wifi

GPS/GLONASS doesn't work without direct line of sight to the satellites.

Re:How does this affect dual-system chipsets? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46648353)

Near glass buildings you can get some extra erroneous readings ;)

Re:How does this affect dual-system chipsets? (1)

NatasRevol (731260) | about 6 months ago | (#46648563)

Yes, off by dozens of feet compared to the 11,000 miles the signal traveled.

Re:How does this affect dual-system chipsets? (2)

beelsebob (529313) | about 6 months ago | (#46649131)

Actually, the smarter receivers do still work with bounced signals involved.

Re:How does this affect dual-system chipsets? (5, Informative)

Guppy (12314) | about 6 months ago | (#46648345)

Newer phones have location chipsets that support both GPS and GLONASS. Do they figure out automatically that the GLONASS information is bad and switch to using GPS exclusively?

To promote their system, Russia decided to make new smartphones without GLONASS support illegal [gpsworld.com] in their country -- so major manufacturers added that capability to all their phones (since there is almost no additional cost to each unit, once the capability is designed into the chipset). Not sure about CDMA chipset, since there is no major CDMA networking in Russia.

Would be nice if we got Galileo GNSS and Beidou support too, but I'm not expecting it to happen unless they pull a similar stunt with their markets (well, China might).

   

Re:How does this affect dual-system chipsets? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46648639)

To promote their system, Russia decided to make new smartphones without GLONASS support illegal [gpsworld.com] in their country -- so major manufacturers added that capability to all their phones (since there is almost no additional cost to each unit, once the capability is designed into the chipset). Not sure about CDMA chipset, since there is no major CDMA networking in Russia.

Would be nice if we got Galileo GNSS and Beidou support too, but I'm not expecting it to happen unless they pull a similar stunt with their markets (well, China might).

Why do you call it a stunt? I think requiring some kind of global navigation capability is fairly common and quite reasonable (think emergency services). Why not require, at a minimum, the global navigation system your country controls for phones sold in your country?

Re:How does this affect dual-system chipsets? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46648805)

global positioning system

FTFY

Re:How does this affect dual-system chipsets? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46649421)

You actually can't buy a phone in the US that does not have a GPS locator built in for emergency purposes.

Truthfully, it's just so they can track your every fucking move. Pretty brilliant, really.

Re:How does this affect dual-system chipsets? (1)

radarskiy (2874255) | about 6 months ago | (#46651059)

-1, uninformative.

You didn't answer the question (what is the response of a dual-system receiver when one system is sending bad data), you just told the OP what he already stipulated (that the receiver is dual system).

Re:How does this affect dual-system chipsets? (2)

ackthpt (218170) | about 6 months ago | (#46648389)

I found they gave the impression things were going better with my GPSr, I synched with satellites quickly, but once in a while I'd have wild, like 1000+ foot inaccuracy. The issue would resolve after a day or so. The last time it happened I disabled GLONASS and haven't used it since. Having it does create a larger constellation to use, but only so long as they all work from the same page -- where they think they are.

Re:How does this affect dual-system chipsets? (1)

wiredlogic (135348) | about 6 months ago | (#46648927)

It isn't the fact that you have support for both but rather that newer receivers have have improved ability to pull the signals out from background noise and lock on faster.

Warning Shot (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46648217)

Anyone else think this is a shot across the Russian bow?
Demonstrating to the Russians that the US really does control space even if we have to bum rides to ISS at the moment?

KC

Re:Warning Shot (2)

NotDrWho (3543773) | about 6 months ago | (#46648289)

Careful when you shoot across bows. World Wars are easy to start, not always so easy to finish the way you want them to.

Re:Warning Shot (1)

oh_my_080980980 (773867) | about 6 months ago | (#46648343)

Over a GPS satellite? Not likely.

Re:Warning Shot (2)

TFlan91 (2615727) | about 6 months ago | (#46648369)

When all their guided missiles rely on said system? I'd call that a major breach of national security

Re:Warning Shot (2)

Advocatus Diaboli (1627651) | about 6 months ago | (#46648443)

Actually, most of their high value missiles use inertial navigation- just like those of every other country. Nobody trusts navigation satellites for anything more important than short and medium range cruise missiles.

Re:Warning Shot (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 6 months ago | (#46648937)

Gee, I feel better already.....

Re:Warning Shot (1)

WindBourne (631190) | about 6 months ago | (#46650251)

If you are a civilian that is close to an area, you should feel better. Less chance of civilian casualty.

Re:Warning Shot (1)

DrXym (126579) | about 6 months ago | (#46648949)

And presumably missiles are designed to failover to other forms of navigation if the GPS is being disrupted or at odds with other navigational hints the missile might be programmed with such as terrain contours.

Re:Warning Shot (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46649191)

Hmm - speaking of missles- 1 month after this:
http://www.aljazeera.com/news/europe/2014/03/russia-tests-long-range-missile-amid-tension-201434201326810535.html

Re:Warning Shot (1)

Amtrak (2430376) | about 6 months ago | (#46648479)

The scary thing about Russia is that they don't need guided missiles to burn the world. They have enough nuclear bombs that they can just point all of them in a general direction and assume at least some of them will hit there targets.

Re:Warning Shot (4, Funny)

kurkosdr (2378710) | about 6 months ago | (#46649013)

"hit there targets". Their, their, their, THEIR! Basic kingergarten-level knowledge. Damn idiocracy. 10 years from now, everyone will spell "right" as "rite" and posts complaining about it will get downvoted. Mark my words. (after all, most people already think "definitely" is spelled "definately", and can't tell the difference between "doing good" and "doing well")

Re:Warning Shot (0)

kurkosdr (2378710) | about 6 months ago | (#46649023)

*kindergarten-level (damn virtual keyboards)

Re:Warning Shot (1)

geekoid (135745) | about 6 months ago | (#46649339)

There is always an excuse when you make a mistake.
Should I respond to your error with a rant on spelling?

Re:Warning Shot (0)

kurkosdr (2378710) | about 6 months ago | (#46649541)

My spelling mistake was just a mistype on Samsung's stupid virtual keyboard. But if you confuse "there" with "their", it means that, for you, use of english is nothing more than parroting a bunch or sounds you 've heard in similar situations, and you don't have a clue about basic grammar. Cheers.

Re:Warning Shot (0)

kurkosdr (2378710) | about 6 months ago | (#46649899)

To put it in layman's terms, if you have the SLIGHTEST clue about grammar and how sentences are formed, there is no way you can confuse "their" with "there". I, a non-native speaker (I am greek), do not confuse the two. So, confusing the two means that you 've learnt english as a bunch of sounds, and when you write you are trying to find words that fit the sounds. I have no problem with people writing "thought" as "thougt" or even with people writing "definitely" as "definately" (as long as they don't insist it's the correct spelling, like most do), but seeing people confuse "their" with "there" and "your" with "you 're" saddens me, because said people are parrots. There is no nice way to put it.

Re:Warning Shot (0)

kurkosdr (2378710) | about 6 months ago | (#46650365)

In even more layman's terms, there is a "special" category of mistakes, like confusing "their" with "there", "your" with "you 're" or "here" with "hear" that happens ONLY to people who consider language as a bunch of sounds (and not as a bunch of words and gramnar rules). We all mispell words, get tenses wrong and forget words (when we fail to apply the grammar rules properly), but people who make mistakes of the "special" category don't even know what grammar is.

Re:Warning Shot (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46650875)

Grow up, you are not the arbiter of the English language. You are derailing actual discussion of the thread subject and it is as bad as spam.

Re:Warning Shot (1)

Jeremi (14640) | about 6 months ago | (#46650737)

My spelling mistake was just a mistype on Samsung's stupid virtual keyboard. But if you confuse "there" with "their", it means that, for you, use of english is nothing more than parroting a bunch or sounds

ROFL.... "my mistake was the computer's fault, your mistake was a sign of your intellectual inadequacy".

Or perhaps the OP also has a virtual keyboard (or some other not-terribly-bright auto-correct mechanism) that auto-converted a slight misspelling of "their" (e.g. "ther") into "there" and wasn't noticed in time.

But don't let that stop you from telling the OP how superior your language skills are to his. You clearly are a prodigy, that's why you get to post to Slashdot.

Re:Warning Shot (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46649089)

Hey, neat, I was never aware that language is static and unchanging.

Re:Warning Shot (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46650469)

Glass houses, mate. I don't know if you're aware of it but proper grammar also requires that sentences begin with capital letters and end with periods. Additionally, beginning a sentence with "Ten" is considered to be better than "10".

Re:Warning Shot (1)

cavreader (1903280) | about 6 months ago | (#46649205)

Russia is not the only country capable of this type of action. After all how much precision is really necessary when you are dealing with nukes?

Re:Warning Shot (2)

Lumpy (12016) | about 6 months ago | (#46648487)

I suggest you read up how WW-I was started over nothing.

Re:Warning Shot (2, Informative)

Cobalt Jacket (611660) | about 6 months ago | (#46648845)

If you're suggesting that a single assassination was the reason for starting it, you may wish to go read some more about it. The major players had been itching for a fight for decades. It was essentially an attempt to resolve differences left from the Prussian wars of the 1860s-1870s, which set the stage for 120 years of a crapsack continent.

Re:Warning Shot (1)

Lumpy (12016) | about 6 months ago | (#46649031)

And the world right now is all peace and love?

Re:Warning Shot (1)

Cobalt Jacket (611660) | about 6 months ago | (#46649207)

Obviously not, but from the 1930-to-1955 period had between eighty and 100 million dead. Relatively speaking, things are safer.

Re:Warning Shot (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46650611)

1930-1955 is not World war 1, what exactly are you trying to point out that the events of two world wars are what caused world war 1?

So that means that the Vietnam war had a significant impact on the Civil war.

Re:Warning Shot (3, Informative)

geekoid (135745) | about 6 months ago | (#46649455)

It was. The chain of event that follow the assassination were a pretty rapid and unlikely chain of events to have happened without that assassination.

If you are curious, reading the account of what was happening the day the Archduke Franz Ferdinand was assassinated is a comedy of errors.

It's also highly unlikely the WWII would have happened without WWI, since there would not have been the poverty and economic status Hitler used to gain power.

Re:Warning Shot (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46648973)

Over nothing? Among the Central Powers there were several imperial nation-states in which some privileged ethnic, cultural, language or other national group held power over and even suppressed others. This was most obviously the case in Austria-Hungary which favoured Hungarians over various German, slavic and slavonic speakers, Austrian-Germans over west and south Slavs, and so forth, Roman Catholics over Protestants and Orthodox Christians, Muslims and so forth. The German Empire suppressed Polish and other slavic speakers, and had its own Protestant vs Catholic issues. The Russian Empire got involved to try to "protect" their linguistic kin via Pan-Slavism; and all hell broke lose. The Ottoman empire also favoured Turkic-language muslims and the Janissaries over pretty much everyone else -- Arabs, Persians and so on -- and joined the side of the other two nation-state empires after putting their disputes with Austria-Hungary and the German Empire aside.

So "over nothing" really means over home rule and independence in the Balkans and what are now Belarus, Finland Ukraine, Slovakia, the Czech Republic, Poland, Lithuania, Azerbaijan and Georgia vs colonial rule by various imperial powers who had controlled these areas successively for decades.

Treaties caused the war to escalate, and those coupled with the rivalries among the various European Colonial Powers especially in Africa.

Re:Warning shot (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46650065)

"Austria-Hungary which favoured Hungarians over various German, slavic and slavonic speakers"
You must be joking. The Hungarians were itching for independence from Austria during the years leading up to the war (and since 1848), their prime minister opposed the war, etc.

Re:Warning Shot (4, Insightful)

ackthpt (218170) | about 6 months ago | (#46648359)

Careful when you shoot across bows. World Wars are easy to start, not always so easy to finish the way you want them to.

I doubt the US would do it, if we did want to disable it for any reason, such as missile guidance, we wouldn't tip our hand so casually.

Re:Warning Shot (2)

Jmc23 (2353706) | about 6 months ago | (#46649637)

Where have you been for the past couple of decades? The US has gotten more blatant in it's actions. It is these very overt actions, without significant outcry from other countries, that is leading the other Big Powers to feel confident in making overt moves as well.

It will be interesting times ahead. The US used to get away with so much of it's foreign policy because of the mythic aura of the American-Dream that made it so palatable to poor developing countries. With the recent constant revelations of just how hypocritical the US is, and the fact they're running out of countries that they haven't fucked over, they're losing their carefully built image and status as "policer-of-the-free-world". It'll be fun to see just how far the bullies will go now that they realize there is no functional deterrent to their actions.

...unless you take out their gps...

Re:Warning Shot (1)

CreatureComfort (741652) | about 6 months ago | (#46649731)

You're right, we'd make it look like Chinese hackers did it...

Re:Warning Shot (1)

Advocatus Diaboli (1627651) | about 6 months ago | (#46648417)

Wishful thinking. Playing around with Russia in 2014 is very different from doing so with Iraq in 1991. You would have to be insane to do that and believe that they would not respond in kind or worse. More likely to the result of an internal update.

Re:Warning Shot (1)

Max_W (812974) | about 6 months ago | (#46648435)

Anyone else think this is a shot across the Russian bow? Demonstrating to the Russians that the US really does control space even if we have to bum rides to ISS at the moment?

Seriously? The US does not even control its inner cities. Have you been in Detroit, in Trenton, etc. lately?

Instead of such "Star Wars" the money could be better spent to tackle the severe social problems at home.

Re:Warning Shot (1, Interesting)

Lumpy (12016) | about 6 months ago | (#46648533)

"Seriously? The US does not even control its inner cities. Have you been in Detroit, in Trenton, etc. lately? "

If you dont think this is intentional then you are nuts. they know that these cities are out of control cesspools, and it is intentional they are still that way. We have the resources to clean them up and restore order easily, but you don't have a easily controlled scared populace when you do that. DC is a cesspool because it is more effective to have an element of fear to point at to help shove things down the public's throats. Like the PATRIOT act for example.

Re:Warning Shot (2)

geekoid (135745) | about 6 months ago | (#46649483)

Actually, it's easier to manipulate comfortable people who feel safe. When was the last time a government was overthrown because it's populace was secure and well fed?
The PATRIOT act was easy because of 9/11. Not becasue states won't take care of their cities.

Re:Warning Shot (4, Insightful)

schnell (163007) | about 6 months ago | (#46650849)

If you dont think this is intentional then you are nuts

Of course it's intentional but not for the reason you think. The reason that Detroit, Trenton and (at least previously) DC were/are cesspools is because of the evil force known as democracy. The residents of those cities and states voted for crap politicians who drove their respective areas into the ground economically. Nobody from outside imposed Marion Barry or Kwame Kilpatrick onto their cities, and nobody had to nefariously conspire to make them suck, they did that perfectly well on their own. Externalities can hurt a city or state, but to get it into Detroit territory you have to actively keep making it worse on your own - and the residents of those areas have nobody but their own votes to thank for it.

Seriously... not EVERYTHING is a gubmint conspiracy. Sometimes it's just stupid people electing terrible leaders, and that's the downside of democracy that comes along with all the other good stuff. Ask the people of Venezuela how electing people who promise free goodies works out in the long run.

Re:Warning Shot (1)

NatasRevol (731260) | about 6 months ago | (#46648601)

There's no money in that.

Re:Warning Shot (1)

geekoid (135745) | about 6 months ago | (#46649499)

The cities are part of a state and the state responsibility. The military is a federal organization.
The government of Michigan is letting those people down, not the feds.

Down? Or encrypted? (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46648249)

The system shutting down while still broadcasting "gibberish" seems awfully inconvenient. Sure they just didn't switch to encrypted transmissions?

Re:Down? Or encrypted? (2)

sjwt (161428) | about 6 months ago | (#46648495)

Im not up on GLONASS but don't most GPS systems broadcast in a range of service levels, you can only decrypt that access level you pay for, and countries reserve the top level for their military.

Re:Down? Or encrypted? (3, Informative)

meadowsoft (831583) | about 6 months ago | (#46648685)

It is called selective availability. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Selective_availability#Selective_availability My undergraduate thesis involved how to couple intertial senors using a Kalman filter to compensate for SA in GPS signals. Two years after my project concluded, the US disabled SA in GPS. I doubt that this recent "outage" was related to similar SA in GLONASS. Rather, perhaps it was indeed an encrypted transmission, or was based on a second independent synchronization signal only available to military assets used to put the scrambled transmissions back in the right order.

Re:Down? Or encrypted? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46648871)

GPS has citizen band and military bands. The military bands are, of course, encrypted and not intended for civilian use. It stands to reason that GLONASS or any GNSS system probably behaves similarly. You wouldn't want your military using an easily jammed or spoofed, unencrypted location signal, would you?

Re:Down? Or encrypted? (2)

guzzirider (551141) | about 6 months ago | (#46649699)

Most likely encrypted.
They, (The Russians) are massing troupes, maybe by historical Russian standards, a small mass.
It would make sense that they would test whatever secure military mode that is built into the system.
12 hours is not an a huge amount of time, but is could be enough to operationally test most of the hardware that is deployed on the 'frontier'.

Apparently just corrupt ephemeris data (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46650387)

It wasn't the timing data that was bad, it was the ephemeris. Which is computed periodically by the ground controllers and just repeated by the satellite.

Modern satellites can operate for quite a while without updates, by using a pre-programmed series of predicted ephemerides. But that doesn't protect them from a corrupted update.

Apparently what happened was a bad upload, and they had to wait for the satellites to complete an orbit (12 hours) and come back in view of the control station to receive a corrected upload.

Down or Scrambled (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46648277)

Did not mean to cross the Ukrainian border, satnav was broken.

Soviet fail (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46648315)

Death to Putin, death to Russia; long live Ukraine etc.

Late April Fools Joke (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46648331)

Someone was trying to pull a late April Fools joke on Russians!

Re:Late April Fools Joke (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46648373)

Edit: It WAS April 1st, in the USA, when this went down. (Well, the night of April 1st.)

I don't miss them. (3, Insightful)

ackthpt (218170) | about 6 months ago | (#46648351)

I used them along with the US GPS satellites, until a couple months back, but found I was having some serious accuracy issues. Disabling them resolved the issue and I haven't used them since. GPSr unit: Garmin Oregon 600

Re:I don't miss them. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46650963)

Right, because you were using two different systems and your device was not smart enough to deal with discrepancies. Disabling GPS would have accomplished the same thing.

Intentional (1)

DarthVain (724186) | about 6 months ago | (#46648401)

Until very recently the US would intentionally degrade the GPS signal to all but military traffic (all the time). Considering the major military actions going on in the Ukraine by Russia one could suppose this is actually the case, particularly if perhaps the Ukraine military also uses the same system... I would not be terribly surprised if this is the case. The US did the same when they invaded Iraq.

Unless the gibberish it was transmitting was: 4, 8, 15, 16, 23 and 42. Then someone needs to press a damn button!

Re:Intentional (3, Informative)

CajunArson (465943) | about 6 months ago | (#46648511)

If by "very recently" you mean 14 years ago (literally in the 20th century) that selective availability was turned off.....

As for your other points:
1. The U.S. did not degrade any civilian GPS when they invaded Iraq.

2. If you honestly think the Ukranians are beholden to GLONASS... which doesn't even work for the Russians a large portion of the time.. and are somehow too stupid to buy commercial GPS products that are made in Taiwan and used by the rest of the world, then I have a bridge to sell you.
Hell, even the Russians use GPS (quietly) even though they tout GLONASS because nationalism.

Re:Intentional (1)

meadowsoft (831583) | about 6 months ago | (#46648725)

From Wikipedia again:

"...it happened in 2000 once the U.S. military developed a new system that provides the ability to deny GPS (and other navigation services) to hostile forces in a specific area of crisis without affecting the rest of the world or its own military systems."

Perhaps the US is using such a system actively in the Ukraine region.

Re:Intentional (1)

geekoid (135745) | about 6 months ago | (#46649531)

No link, just a quote. tsk. tsk.

Anyway, how to you disable a radio signal being broad cast to a 1/4 of the world to a small subsection?

Anyways, 2000 was 14 years ago and literally in the 20th century, like the poster said.

In post-Soviet Russia when you pull out GPS (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46648457)

YOU get lost.

that explains the US military shuttle record (1)

ducman (107063) | about 6 months ago | (#46648499)

Now we know why that US DOD mini shuttle was up for so long, recently. It was hacking into the Russian satellites.

Go Team! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46648523)

Obama may be "weak", but GLONASS is weaker :)

mod uAp (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46648559)

You inse8sitive clod!? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46648675)

aaproximately 90% developers

Solar Flare Arrived Yesterday (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46648677)

Perhaps it was the solar flare eruption's arrival yesterday that caused a problem.

Here doggy! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46648727)

In related news, Putins dog is lost somewhere in the Urals.

I saw this episode.. (1)

modi123 (750470) | about 6 months ago | (#46648759)

How is this possible?! NCIS:LA's Eric totally fixed the zero day in GLONASS on episode 5x18! During a gun battle on a roof no less!

Cause (1)

Charliemopps (1157495) | about 6 months ago | (#46648807)

“Bad ephemerides were uploaded to satellites. Those bad ephemerides became active at 1:00 am Moscow time,” reported one knowledgeable source.

It still could have be the US, who knows.

Re:Cause (1)

swb (14022) | about 6 months ago | (#46649241)

Maybe a little warning to Ivan that despite their recent upgrades in kit, Uncle Sam is still in the game.

So much speculation... (5, Interesting)

Flytrap (939609) | about 6 months ago | (#46648827)

So much speculation from people who do not appear to have even read the article.

FTA: “Bad ephemerides were uploaded to satellites. Those bad ephemerides became active at 1:00 am Moscow time... a GLONASS fix could not take effect until each satellite in turn passed back over control stations in the Northern Hemisphere to be reset, thus taking nearly 12 hours.”

The article concludes that the outage was probably due to a human error which "...could conceivably occur with GPS, Galileo, or BeiDou" and advises consumers not to rely on only one system.

My [completely uninformed and speculative] guess is that the Russians probably rushed a software update to meet some military deadline and it backfired on them - now Putin's troops amassed along the Ukrainian boarder may have to do without whatever feature they were trying to quickly enable.

Re:So much speculation... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46649231)

who, in particular, updated these bad ephemeris data and/or what was their source? this is not stated in the article.

Re:So much speculation... (1)

geekoid (135745) | about 6 months ago | (#46649545)

It was probably as reported, but was around during the cold war, so part of me still wonders. IT's an irrational part of my, but then a childhood full of fear of nuclear hell leaves a mark.

Re:So much speculation... (1)

TythosEternal (1472429) | about 6 months ago | (#46650995)

The "...could conceivably occur with GPS, Galileo, or BeiDou" part of the article isn't entirely true, though. Galileo is not operational (only four satellites have been launched, all proof-of-concepts), for starters. Beidou is a mixed constellation for which half the coverage doesn't have the access issues of a pure-MEO constellation. A GPS satellite could conceivably have the same problem, but it's easily corrected because GPS is supported by a network of ground stations with global coverage--corrected ephemerides can be uploaded virtually at a moment's notice.

The specific issue with GLONASS (bad ephemerides) would be easily corrected with a better ground network. As it is, you can only upload the appropriate data when they are over a limited, high-latitude portion of the earth. It's very much a single point-of-failure issue, which one can interpret as either a poor design decision or a by-product of pride / stubbornness (which, in engineering design, are frequently one and the same). It's a good reminder that, despite good scientific and technological underpinnings, the Russian space program still suffers from underdeveloped support and very limited global / international cooperation (not to mention testing and quality assurance issues).

shut off during war (1)

peter303 (12292) | about 6 months ago | (#46648841)

So no one else could it. Might have been something to do with Ukraine issue.

Ingress (4, Funny)

Timothy Hartman (2905293) | about 6 months ago | (#46648855)

My heart goes out to the Russian Resistance team for their downtime.

Looks like the NSA sent sent the Russians a messag (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46648875)

That would certainly put a major shock into Russian national security. Especially since I believe that deliberate tampering in space, either through scripts sent from earth.

Russian time? (2)

blackm0k (2589601) | about 6 months ago | (#46649109)

The editors realize that Russia spans 9 time zones right? I think they meant to say Moscow Time. Can you imagine if an article was posted referring to American Time as a time zone?

What's Random Gibberish? (2)

hhawk (26580) | about 6 months ago | (#46649177)

One person's gibberish is another's encrypted data. Perhaps Russia was testing a encrypted "secure" mode that would switch to in time on conflict, such as an invasion or something like that.

If Russia only had access to GPS ... (1)

yayoubetcha (893774) | about 6 months ago | (#46649443)

Too bad US GPS satellites don't travel over Russia and its territories, eh?. It must have been chaos!

This could be prep to the Russian attack. (1)

sageres (561626) | about 6 months ago | (#46649503)

Is it possible that GLONASS went into fully encrypted mode? Sort of like GPS did partially during the first Gulf War? It is made for the Russian military, you know. Perhaps they are about ready to invade the Ukraine.... ;-(

In Soviet Russa.... (1)

bobbied (2522392) | about 6 months ago | (#46649691)

Following GLONASS directions on your Garmin gets you lost....

Fully Operational (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46649839)

Somebody thought it was a fully ARMED and OPERATIONAL battle station!

In Soviet Russia (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46650209)

Satellite lose YOU!

Yay unexplained acronymns! (1)

TangoMargarine (1617195) | about 6 months ago | (#46650213)

For those of us who don't have any idea what GNSS or GLONASS stand for...it would really be nice to tell us what the hell this article is actually about.

GNSS = global navigation satellite system
GLONASS = "acronym for Globalnaya navigatsionnaya sputnikovaya sistema or Global Navigation Satellite System, is a space-based satellite navigation system operated by the Russian Aerospace Defence Forces. It provides an alternative to Global Positioning System (GPS) and is the only alternative navigational system in operation with global coverage and of comparable precision."

Oh, so it's GPS. See how easy that was?

Not only that... (2)

Bohnanza (523456) | about 6 months ago | (#46650217)

Glasnost seems to be dead too.

Oops (2)

Jeremi (14640) | about 6 months ago | (#46650615)

"In an unprecedented total disruption of a fully operational GNSS constellation, all satellites in the Russian GLONASS broadcast corrupt information for 11 hours [...] This rendered the system completely unusable to all worldwide GLONASS receivers."

Ok! Ok! I must have, I must have put a decimal point in the wrong place or something. Shit. I always do that. I always mess up some mundane detail.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>