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Do Games Know The Secret Of UI?

Hemos posted about 13 years ago | from the better-then-most-interfaces dept.

Games 256

A reader writes "There is a nice interview at the BBC talking about how computer games are the ones pushing the envelope. Particularly interesting is it doesn't just deal with the tech aspects, but goes into the user interface aspect as well." Having conversed with her on a number of occasions, I can attest to JC being smart. Good interview.

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fp (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2240067)

fp

Kernel Panic (1)

xcomputer_man (513295) | about 13 years ago | (#2240068)

Error parsing story: cyclic redundancy check

But... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2240071)

the real question is: Is she HOT?

Read the interview (0, Troll)

Hairy_Potter (219096) | about 13 years ago | (#2240102)

she looked hot in the picture, and she named her book "Joystick Nation", shemust be a nympho.

Re:But... (1)

Daniel Dvorkin (106857) | about 13 years ago | (#2240108)

... and the answer is, "Yes, she is." :)

I know the secret! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2240078)

it is a bowl of hot grits being poured down my pants.

The game is in the UI (2)

SilentChris (452960) | about 13 years ago | (#2240080)

My favorite UI of all time was FIFA 99 soccer for Windows. The UI was just a mismash of unlabelled icons, many of them not even resembling their action (To start a game, click an international flag. Huh?)

Part of the challenge of the game was figuring out the UI. :)

Re:The game is in the UI (1)

Agent Green (231202) | about 13 years ago | (#2240095)

Might just be Europe's revenge since we called it Soccer and not Football. :)

Re:The game is in the UI (1)

genkael (102983) | about 13 years ago | (#2240137)

RTFM

Slacker extrodinaire? (2)

Pope Slackman (13727) | about 13 years ago | (#2240225)

RTFM
GeneralKael -- Slacker Extraordinaire


Real slackers never RTFM.

C-X C-S

Spamming (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2240084)

is fun!

It's karma sluts like you that give AC's a bad name.

IF I EVER MEEPT YOU, I WILL KICK YOUR GOAT!

30-Jul-01 LAMONICA, FRANK

Shareholder 34,767

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144)

9-Jul-01 FAITH, RICKARD E

Shareholder 2,203

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $6,300.

6-Jul-01 OWEN, JENS

Former, Shareholder 44,802

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $138,438.

26-Jun-01 EVANS, ROBERT

Shareholder 26,438

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $84,337.

22-Jun-01 YOUNG, MICHAEL

Shareholder 5,468

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $16,404.

13-Jun-01 NEUMEISTER, ROBERT M

Director 0

LNUX Initial Direct Holdings Statement

7-Jun-01 REBACK, GARY L

Shareholder 189

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $850.00.

4-Jun-01 LOTZ, BARBARA J

Shareholder 52

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $225.00.

1-Jun-01 MASSEY FAMILY TRUST

Shareholder 161

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $607.00.

1-Jun-01 PAUL, BRIAN E

Shareholder 3,130

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $8,732.

1-Jun-01 DAUBAR, GERARD

Shareholder 900

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $3,888.

1-Jun-01 PETKANICS, DONNA

Shareholder 908

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $3,223.

1-Jun-01 SANDERS, ROBERT D

Shareholder 4,162

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $15,691.

31-May-01 KENNEDY, MICHAEL J

Shareholder 81

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $339.00.

30-May-01 SINDELAR, ERIC

Shareholder 1,407

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $6,000.

29-May-01 BONHAM, MARK

Shareholder 87

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $925.00.

25-May-01 LATTA FAMILY TRUST

Trust, Trustee 167

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $748.00.

24-May-01 LAMONICA, FRANK

Shareholder, Employee 12,885

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $55,367.

24-May-01 LAMONICA, FRANK & ARLEEN

Shareholder 15,734

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $67,616.

24-May-01 LAMONICA, ARLEEN

Shareholder 2,849

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $12,222.

22-May-01 PRENSKY, WOLF & RIVA

Shareholder 8,441

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $38,828.

21-May-01 EVANS, ROBERT

Shareholder 5,123

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $25,000.

17-May-01 WELLFLEET EQUITIES LLC

Shareholder 279

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $1,278.

17-May-01 CINER, EUGENE

Shareholder 279

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $1,278.

14-May-01 SCHILLER, RABBI MAYER

Secretary 352

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $1,609.

8-May-01 FAITH, RICKARD E

Shareholder 3,105

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $17,015.

4-May-01 FREET, PAUL

Shareholder 15,000

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $70,000.

2-May-01 FREET, PAUL

Shareholder 20,000

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $87,000.

12-Apr-01 SPARK PUBLIC RELATIONS LLC

Shareholder 643

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $17,834.

12-Apr-01 LISTWIN, DONALD J

Shareholder 558

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $1,574.

11-Apr-01 TRUDO, ALEXANDER DANIEL

Shareholder 651,549

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $1,300,000.

10-Apr-01 FREET, PAUL

Shareholder 20,000

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $50,000.

9-Apr-01 FREET, PAUL

Shareholder 20,000

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $45,000.

6-Apr-01 AUGUSTIN, LARRY M

Director, Chief Executive Officer * 10,000

LNUX Gave as Gift.

Value of $20,312.

3-Apr-01 ANDREESSEN LIVING TRUST

Shareholder 1,000

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $2,210.

2-Apr-01 BIG KALA TRUST

Trust, Trustee 651,549

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $1,900,000.

29-Mar-01 BUTLER, DANEN THOMAS

Shareholder 200,477

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $600,000.

29-Mar-01 TRUDO, ALEXANDER DANIEL

Shareholder 200,477

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $600,000.

29-Mar-01 STEUR, DAVID S

Shareholder 115

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $341.00.

23-Mar-01 AUGUSTIN, LARRY M

Chief Executive Officer, Director 26,000

LNUX Sold at $3.50/Share.

Proceeds of $91,000.

21-Mar-01 AUGUSTIN, LARRY M

Chief Executive Officer, Director 14,700

LNUX Sold at $3.00/Share.

Proceeds of $44,100.

20-Mar-01 AUGUSTIN, LARRY M

Chief Executive Officer, Director 30,000

LNUX Sold at $3.14/Share.

Proceeds of $94,200.

15-Mar-01 AUGUSTIN, LARRY M

Chief Executive Officer, Director 41,500

LNUX Sold at $3.25/Share.

Proceeds of $134,875.

14-Mar-01 ZWICKER, IAN

Shareholder 10,000

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $34,380.

13-Mar-01 AUGUSTIN, LARRY M

Chief Executive Officer, Director 50,000

LNUX Sold at $3.38/Share.

Proceeds of $169,000.

13-Mar-01 AUGUSTIN, LARRY M

President, Director, Chief Executive Officer 400,000

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $1,600,000.

12-Mar-01 AUGUSTIN, LARRY M

Chief Executive Officer, Director 400,000

LNUX Acquired Shares via Exercise of Options at $0.02/Share.

Paper gain of $1,192,000 at a fair market value of $3.00/share on 12-Mar-01.

6-Mar-01 SUMITOMO CORPORATION

Shareholder 59,068

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $240,634.

6-Mar-01 PRESIDIO VENTURE PARTNERS LLC

Shareholder 59,068

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $240,406.

5-Mar-01 SEGRE, DAVID J

Shareholder 109

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $395.00.

2-Mar-01 AUGUSTIN, LARRY M

Chief Executive Officer, Director 250,500

LNUX Sold at $3.66/Share.

Proceeds of $916,830.

1-Mar-01 DAUBAR, GERARD

Shareholder 900

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $6,721.

1-Mar-01 BLOCK, PHILIP D III

Shareholder 239

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $2,091.

1-Mar-01 AUGUSTIN, LARRY M

Chief Executive Officer, Director * 150,000

LNUX Sold at $3.63/Share.

Proceeds of $544,500.

28-Feb-01 BROWNELL, ROBERT

Shareholder 329

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $1,233.

27-Feb-01 PRESIDIO VENTURES PARTNER

Shareholder 200,000

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $1,000,000.

27-Feb-01 SUMITOMO CORPORATION

Shareholder 200,000

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $1,000,000.

26-Feb-01 AUGUSTIN, LARRY M

President, Director, Chief Executive Officer 134,000

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $703,500.

26-Feb-01 MENDOZA, KATHY S & THOMAS F

Shareholder 201,812

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $1,031,986.

23-Feb-01 AUGUSTIN, LARRY M

President, Director, Chief Executive Officer 41,000

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $215,238.

21-Feb-01 FLINT, ELIZABETH R

Shareholder 82

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $595.00.

20-Feb-01 PARNES, MARK

Affiliated Person 4

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $32.00.

15-Feb-01 LEGAL, COMMUNITY AGAINST VIOLENCE

Shareholder 39

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $329.00.

13-Feb-01 FRENCH, RICHARD L

Senior Vice President-OSDN 0

LNUX Initial Direct Holdings Statement

12-Feb-01 PET KAVICS = GERSPENSCHALGER FAMILY TRUST

Trust, Trustee 82

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $686.00.

6-Feb-01 SYNNEX INFOR TECH INC

Shareholder 31,280

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $290,318.

2-Feb-01 SILVER STAR DEV LTD

Shareholder 31,068

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $296,699.

30-Jan-01 INTEL CORP

Shareholder 108,741

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $996,024.

29-Jan-01 INTEL CORP

Shareholder 120,000

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $960,468.

26-Jan-01 SHORE CL UNITRUST

Trust, Trustee 2,800

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $269,500.

26-Jan-01 INTEL CORP

Shareholder 70,000

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $531,097.

25-Jan-01 INTEL CORP

Shareholder 88,500

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $710,345.

24-Jan-01 INTEL CORP

Shareholder 170,000

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $1,364,539.

23-Jan-01 INTEL CORP

Shareholder 145,000

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $1,062,807.

22-Jan-01 INTEL CORP

Shareholder 110,000

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $782,485.

22-Jan-01 VAUGHN, ISAAC

Shareholder 79

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $585.00.

19-Jan-01 GOOD, SARAH

Shareholder, Affiliated Person 80

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $583.00.

19-Jan-01 INTEL CORP

Shareholder 57,500

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $424,063.

18-Jan-01 INTEL CORP

Shareholder 137,000

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $980,153.

17-Jan-01 CRAIG, ALEXANDER J

Shareholder 4,952

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $44,568.

11-Jan-01 SACCANI, DANIEL R

Shareholder 3,500

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $28,378.

4-Jan-01 INTEL CORP

Shareholder 87,000

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $723,257.

2-Jan-01 FELDMAN, ROBERT P

Shareholder 143

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $1,162.

24-Dec-00 RUSSO, ROBERT

Affiliated Person 10,000

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $81,869.

22-Dec-00 TWICKLER, BRUCE A

President 5,000

LNUX Exercised Options at $0.06/Share and Sold at $10.13/Share.

Proceeds of $50,350.

21-Dec-00 TWICKLER, BRUCE A

President 10,000

LNUX Exercised Options at $0.06/Share and Sold at $8.13/Share.

Proceeds of $80,700.

21-Dec-00 AUSTIN, ALAN K

Director 189

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $1,607.

20-Dec-00 BORO, LAUREN I

Shareholder 1,554

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $15,090.

20-Dec-00 BELL, SUZANNE Y

Shareholder 69

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $565.00.

19-Dec-00 TWICKLER, BRUCE A

President 15,000

LNUX Exercised Options at Average of $0.06/Share and Sold at $10.04/Share.

Proceeds of $149,770.

18-Dec-00 RUSSO, ROBERT

Affiliated Person 5,000

LNUX Sold at $12.00/Share.

Proceeds of $60,000.

18-Dec-00 TWICKLER, BRUCE A

President 15,000

LNUX Exercised Options at $0.06/Share and Sold at $10.50/Share.

Proceeds of $156,600.

15-Dec-00 RUSSO, ROBERT

Affiliated Person 10,000

LNUX Sold at $11.43/Share.

Proceeds of $114,300.

14-Dec-00 DEFILIPPS, THOMAS C

Shareholder 92

LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).

Estimated proceeds of $1,179.

14-Dec-00 ZEHR, GREGG E

Vice President, Engineering * 20,500

LNUX Sold at $11.29/Share.

Proceeds of $231,445.

14-Dec-00 RUSSO, ROBERT

Affiliated Person 5,000
LNUX Sold at $11.25/Share.
Proceeds of $56,250.
14-Dec-00 RUSSO, ROBERT
Affiliated Person 10,000
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $114,368.
14-Dec-00 TWICKLER, BRUCE A
President 5,000
LNUX Exercised Options at $0.06/Share and Sold at $11.63/Share.
Proceeds of $57,850.
13-Dec-00 RUSSO, ROBERT
Affiliated Person 10,000
LNUX Sold at $14.54/Share.
Proceeds of $145,400.
13-Dec-00 ZEHR, GREGG E
Vice President, Engineering * 4,500
LNUX Sold at $14.22/Share.
Proceeds of $63,990.
13-Dec-00 ZEHR GREG TRUST
Trust, Trustee 50,000
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $700,000.
13-Dec-00 TWICKLER, BRUCE A
Affiliated Person 50,000
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $700,000.
13-Dec-00 RUSSO, ROBERT
Affiliated Person 10,000
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $145,429.
13-Dec-00 TWICKLER, BRUCE A
President 12,798
LNUX Exercised Options at $0.06/Share and Sold at $12.60/Share.
Proceeds of $160,487.
13-Dec-00 TWICKLER, BRUCE A
President 10,000
LNUX Sold at $13.93/Share.
Proceeds of $139,300.
12-Dec-00 INTEL CORP
Shareholder 250,000
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $2,589,075.
12-Dec-00 SHORE, DANIEL K
Vice President, Operations 10,000
LNUX Sold at $9.75/Share.
Proceeds of $97,500.
11-Dec-00 SORE, DANIEL R
Officer 20,000
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $186,562.
11-Dec-00 SCHULL, TODD B
Chief Financial Officer 55,000
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $534,000.
11-Dec-00 INTEL CORP
Shareholder 110,000
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $1,027,268.
11-Dec-00 GOODRICH, JOHN B
Shareholder 167
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $1,324.
11-Dec-00 SHORE, DANIEL K
Vice President, Operations 10,000
LNUX Sold at $9.33/Share.
Proceeds of $93,300.
11-Dec-00 SCHULL, TODD B
Chief Financial Officer 55,000
LNUX Sold at $9.72/Share.
Proceeds of $534,600.
8-Dec-00 SCHULL, TODD B
Chief Financial Officer 10,000
LNUX Sold at $1.00/Share.
Proceeds of $10,000.
8-Dec-00 VIRNIG, KENNETH J
Shareholder 16,000
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $128,000.
8-Dec-00 INTEL CORP
Shareholder 190,000
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $1,441,720.
8-Dec-00 SCHULL, TODD B
Chief Financial Officer 15,000
LNUX Sold at $7.27/Share.
Proceeds of $109,050.
8-Dec-00 SCHULL, TODD B
Chief Financial Officer 25,000
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $190,000.
7-Dec-00 SCHULL, TODD B
Chief Financial Officer 12,000
LNUX Sold at $7.06/Share.
Proceeds of $84,720.
7-Dec-00 INTEL CORP
Shareholder 200,000
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $1,399,380.
7-Dec-00 SCHULL, TODD B
Chief Financial Officer 12,000
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $85,000.
6-Dec-00 SHORE, DANIEL K
Vice President, Operations 28,000
LNUX Gave as Gift.
Value of $222,250.
6-Dec-00 ALTER, AARON
Shareholder 87
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $690.00.
6-Dec-00 BRANTZ MAYOR TRUST
Trust, Trustee 2,939
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $23,512.
6-Dec-00 GRECO, LISA M
Shareholder 1,000
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $13,000.
5-Dec-00 SHORE, DANIEL K
Vice President, Operations 22,500
LNUX Sold at $8.93/Share.
Proceeds of $200,925.
5-Dec-00 RUSSO, ROBERT
Affiliated Person 20,000
LNUX Sold at $8.43/Share.
Proceeds of $168,600.
5-Dec-00 INTEL CORP
Shareholder 92,000
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $805,000.
5-Dec-00 SHORE, DAVID R
Vice President 22,500
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $185,427.
5-Dec-00 RUSSO, ROBERT
Affiliated Person 20,000
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $169,054.
4-Dec-00 BARCLAY, MICHAEL
Shareholder 87
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $729.00.
4-Dec-00 SHORE, DANIEL K
Vice President, Operations 22,500
LNUX Sold at $8.24/Share.
Proceeds of $185,400.
4-Dec-00 INTEL CORP
Shareholder 90,000
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $757,341.
4-Dec-00 SHORE, DANIEL K
Vice President, Operations 22,500
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $185,427.
4-Dec-00 RUSSO, ROBERT
Affiliated Person 10,000
LNUX Sold at $8.19/Share.
Proceeds of $81,900.
1-Dec-00 INTEL CORP
Shareholder 100,000
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $878,200.
1-Dec-00 KLEIN, THOMAS C
Shareholder 55
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $456.00.
30-Nov-00 INTEL CORP
Shareholder 90,000
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $719,532.
30-Nov-00 RUSSO, ROBERT
Affiliated Person 19,792
LNUX Acquired Shares via Exercise of Options at $6.00/Share.
Paper gain of $43,295 at a fair market value of $8.19/share on 30-Nov-00.
30-Nov-00 SCHULL, TODD B
Chief Financial Officer 47,944
LNUX Acquired Shares via Exercise of Options at $0.50/Share.
Paper gain of $368,570 at a fair market value of $8.19/share on 30-Nov-00.
29-Nov-00 INTEL CORP
Shareholder 103,000
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $896,028.
21-Nov-00 VANYO, BRUCE
Shareholder 877
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $9,811.
20-Nov-00 LADRA, MICHAEL
Shareholder 504
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $5,166.
17-Nov-00 GOETZ, JAMES J
Shareholder 1,884
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $24,492.
9-Nov-00 MOORE, JASON T
Shareholder 50,000
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $806,000.
3-Nov-00 INTEL CORP
Shareholder 60,500
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $1,846,563.
3-Nov-00 INTEL CORP
Shareholder 60,500
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $1,846,562.
1-Nov-00 TRUSTEES OF DAVIDSON COLLEGE
Shareholder 8,740
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $255,645.
31-Oct-00 MOORE, JASON T
Shareholder 1,000
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $48,438.
31-Oct-00 COSPER, KIT
Shareholder 12,500
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $331,231.
31-Oct-00 KNIGHTSBRIDGE VENTURE CAPITAL IV LP
Shareholder 58,270
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $1,544,155.
30-Oct-00 RUSSO, ROBERT
Affiliated Person 19,792
LNUX Acquired Shares via Exercise of Options at $6.00/Share.
Paper gain of $373,574 at a fair market value of $24.88/share on 30-Oct-00.
30-Oct-00 KILLAM, DAVID
Shareholder 37
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $1,110.
26-Oct-00 DAVIS, PAUL
Director, Secretary 382
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $10,623.
26-Oct-00 HUSICK FAMILY TRUST
Trust, Trustee 234
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $6,592.
25-Oct-00 CHAPLICK, TREVOR
Shareholder 191
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $6,762.
24-Oct-00 AUSTIN, ALAN K
Director 824
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $29,767.
24-Oct-00 INTEL CORP
Shareholder 125,000
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $4,475,650.
24-Oct-00 DAVIS, KIMBERLY
Shareholder 5,700
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $201,987.
24-Oct-00 INTEL CORP
Shareholder 125,000
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $4,475,625.
23-Oct-00 INTEL CORP
Shareholder 62,000
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $2,147,376.
23-Oct-00 BUSH FOUNDATION
Shareholder 29,135
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $445,075.
23-Oct-00 VLG INVESTMENTS 1998
Shareholder 279
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $10,445.
20-Oct-00 KOZEL, EDWARD R
Shareholder 1,115
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $40,418.
20-Oct-00 INTEL CORP
Shareholder 152,500
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $5,467,659.
19-Oct-00 INTEL CORP
Shareholder 160,000
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $5,618,128.
19-Oct-00 GILL, FRANK & MARY
Shareholder 1,115
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $40,418.
18-Oct-00 ODONNELL, LIZ
Shareholder 252
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $8,489.
18-Oct-00 INTEL CORP
Shareholder 175,500
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $5,687,185.
17-Oct-00 INTEL CORP
Shareholder 75,000
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $2,456,123.
16-Oct-00 INTEL CORP
Shareholder 255,000
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $8,709,219.
13-Oct-00 COSPER, KIT
Shareholder 2,500
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $83,500.
13-Oct-00 DREW, JOHN L
Shareholder 1,115
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $37,213.
13-Oct-00 KELLER, DONALD M
Shareholder 2,822
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $94,467.
13-Oct-00 VANLIGLEN, GLEN R
Shareholder 486
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $15,870.
13-Oct-00 INTEL CORP
Shareholder 160,000
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $5,403,120.
12-Oct-00 MCKINNEY FAMILY TRUST
Trust, Trustee 1,115
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $36,033.
11-Oct-00 ESTRIN, JUDITH L
Shareholder 279
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $9,765.
10-Oct-00 VLG INVESTMENTS 1998
Shareholder 922
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $32,691.
7-Oct-00 DAUBAR, GERARD
Shareholder 1,000
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $48,437.
6-Oct-00 OCONNOR, ROBERT
Shareholder 37
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $1,785.
6-Oct-00 RUSSO, ROBERT
Affiliated Person 19,791
LNUX Acquired Shares via Exercise of Options at $6.00/Share.
Paper gain of $539,305 at a fair market value of $33.25/share on 6-Oct-00.
5-Oct-00 MCGOVERN, PATRICK J
Shareholder 4
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $166.00.
5-Oct-00 INTERNATIONAL DATA GROUP
Shareholder 19,354
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $826,214.
5-Oct-00 IDG VENTURES MANAGEMENT INC
Shareholder 23
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $997.00.
3-Oct-00 SMALLCAP WORLD FUND INC
Shareholder 390,000
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $18,817,500.
3-Oct-00 MCKINNEY FAMILY TRUST
Trust, Trustee 1,115
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $56,515.
3-Oct-00 REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CAL/ SHELLWATER & CO
Shareholder 92,231
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $4,022,312.
2-Oct-00 MOFFENBEIER, DAVID C
Shareholder 235
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $11,383.
1-Oct-00 SILVER STAR DEV LTD
Shareholder 129,534
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $5,000,000.
28-Sep-00 REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Shareholder 40,789
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $1,887,637.
28-Sep-00 SILICON, VALLEY BANCSHARES
Shareholder 1,394
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $62,382.
28-Sep-00 LUCENT TECHNOLOGIES MASTER PENSION TRUST
Trust, Trustee 24,998
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $1,083,312.
28-Sep-00 GROSSMAN, JERRY & BARBARA
Shareholder 1,884
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $84,309.
27-Sep-00 SOKOLSKY, DONNA
Shareholder 750
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $36,000.
27-Sep-00 HEMPEL, CHRISTINE HOLTEN
Shareholder 750
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $36,000.
27-Sep-00 BELL, SUZANNE Y
Shareholder 265
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $12,455.
26-Sep-00 TSAI, FENG-TZU
Shareholder 38,860
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $1,850,513.
25-Sep-00 FORD FOUNDATION
Shareholder 96,144
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $4,927,380.
25-Sep-00 CHENG, CHIU KAI
Shareholder 38,860
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $1,944,256.
25-Sep-00 SILVER STAR DEV LTD
Shareholder 129,534
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $5,000,000.
25-Sep-00 SHERMAN FAIRCHILD FOUNDATION
Shareholder 11,654
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $575,707.
25-Sep-00 GILL FRANK & MARY FAMILY TRUST
Trust, Trustee 1,115
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $55,750.
25-Sep-00 RENSSELAER POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE
Shareholder 17,481
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $863,561.
25-Sep-00 THE FORD FUNDATION
Shareholder 96,144
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $4,927,380.
25-Sep-00 SYNNEX INFOR TECH INC
Shareholder 116,580
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $5,892,257.
25-Sep-00 SIEBEL, LIVING TR
Shareholder 1,115
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $51,000.
25-Sep-00 FRAZEE, DAVID I
Shareholder 1,072
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $54,186.
22-Sep-00 TRUSTEES OF AMHERST COLLEGE
Shareholder 17,481
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $812,839.
22-Sep-00 LEEWAY & CO STATE STREET BANK TRUSTEE
Trust, Trustee 15,791
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $798,235.
20-Sep-00 KOZEL, EDWARD R
Shareholder 1,115
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $55,750.
20-Sep-00 MAYES, JOHN
Shareholder 1,115
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $55,750.
20-Sep-00 STONEBRAKER IRREVOCABLE TRUST
Trust, Trustee 1,117
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $58,503.
19-Sep-00 UNIVERSITY, OF CHICAGO
Shareholder 52,442
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $2,740,095.
19-Sep-00 DARTMOUTH COLLEGE TRUSTEES
Trust, Trustee 11,654
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $608,922.
19-Sep-00 GOODRICH, JOHN B
Shareholder 770
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $33,000.
19-Sep-00 LELAND, STANFORD JR UNIVERSITY
Shareholder 93,231
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $4,871,320.
19-Sep-00 UNIVERSITY, OF SOUTHERN CAL
Shareholder 34,962
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $1,826,765.
18-Sep-00 SEQUOIA, CAPITAL VIII
10% Beneficial Owner * 9,429
LNUX Other Disposition
18-Sep-00 REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MN
Shareholder 23,308
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $1,153,746.
18-Sep-00 LEONE, DOUGLAS M
Director, 10% Beneficial Owner * 85,725
LNUX Other Disposition
18-Sep-00 SEQUOIA, CAPITAL VIII
10% Beneficial Owner * 85,725
LNUX Other Disposition
18-Sep-00 SOLOMON, LARRY
Shareholder 235
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $11,251.
18-Sep-00 LEONE, DOUGLAS M
Director, 10% Beneficial Owner * 9,429
LNUX Other Disposition
16-Sep-00 CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE TECHNOLOGY
Shareholder 23,308
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $1,217,843.
15-Sep-00 DUKE UNIVERSITY EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT PLAN
Shareholder 11,654
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $576,622.
15-Sep-00 CONWAY FAMILY TRUST
Shareholder, Non Affiliate 2,787
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $137,500.
15-Sep-00 STONEBRAKER LESLIE KAREN IRREV TRUST UA 10/16/95
Trust, Trustee 315
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $17,215.
15-Sep-00 GOTHIC CORP
Shareholder 17,481
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $864,905.
15-Sep-00 BANQUE, DE LUXEMBOURG
Shareholder 11,150
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $590,950.
15-Sep-00 MEYNIER, LAURENT
Shareholder 1,320
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $65,010.
14-Sep-00 WELLINGTON TRUST
Trust, Trustee 1,114
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $61,268.
14-Sep-00 STONEBRAKER, LESLIE K TR
Trust, Trustee 300
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $16,500.
14-Sep-00 FORD FOUNDATION
Shareholder 32,048
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $1,762,640.
14-Sep-00 COLUMBIA, UNIVERSITY
Trustee 40,789
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $2,245,944.
14-Sep-00 SIPPL, ROGER J
Shareholder 1,115
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $59,663.
14-Sep-00 HOLLIS TRUST
Trust, Trustee 1,114
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $61,270.
13-Sep-00 WOOD JOHNSON ROBERT FOUNDATION
Shareholder 40,789
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $2,202,606.
13-Sep-00 GAND H PARTNERS
Shareholder 942
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $48,749.
13-Sep-00 JENAB, ALI
Senior Vice President, General Manager, Systems Division 0
LNUX Initial Direct Holdings Statement
13-Sep-00 ENDOWMENT VENTURE PARTNERS III LP
Shareholder 40,789
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $2,202,606.
13-Sep-00 WALT DISNEY CO RETIREMENT MSTR TRUST
Shareholder 29,135
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $1,607,838.
13-Sep-00 IRONWOOD, CAPITAL
Shareholder, Non-Affiliate 2,230
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $115,403.
13-Sep-00 GOLDBY STEVEN & FLORENCE TRUST
Shareholder 1,394
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $72,140.
13-Sep-00 UNIVERSITY, OF NOTRE DAME
Shareholder 52,442
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $2,831,868.
12-Sep-00 KLEIN, THOMAS C
Shareholder 234
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $12,778.
12-Sep-00 COLUMBIA, UNIVERSITY
Trustee 40,789
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $2,223,001.
12-Sep-00 HASEL, ANDREW J
Shareholder 234
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $12,166.
12-Sep-00 HARBOURVEST PARTNERS V PARELLEL PARTNERSHIP FUND LP
Shareholder 44,951
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $2,472,395.
12-Sep-00 PRIVATE EQUITY TECHNOLOGY PARTNERS CV
Shareholder 11,654
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $639,975.
12-Sep-00 HARBOURVEST PARTNERS V PARELLEL PARTNERSHIP FUND LP
Shareholder 7,492
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $415,060.
12-Sep-00 MIT RETIREMENT PLAN
Shareholder 20,394
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $1,121,670.
12-Sep-00 REYES PARTNERSHIP IV
Shareholder 1,115
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $59,580.
12-Sep-00 HARVARD PRIVATE CAPITAL HOLDINGS INC
Shareholder 40,789
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $2,243,395.
12-Sep-00 VANDERBILT, UNIVERSITY
Shareholder 52,442
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $2,810,582.
12-Sep-00 BROCK, JAMES
Shareholder 118
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $6,284.
12-Sep-00 DORRIAN 1997 REVOCABLE TRUST
Trust, Trustee 1,394
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $76,670.
12-Sep-00 LEWIS, JOHN C
Shareholder 557
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $29,451.
12-Sep-00 SANTA, CLARA UNIVERSITY
Shareholder 11,654
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $618,008.
12-Sep-00 MILLER LIVING TRUST
Trust, Trustee 1,115
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $60,768.
12-Sep-00 MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
Shareholder 20,394
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $1,121,670.
12-Sep-00 GREENBERG, ERIC
Shareholder 471
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $25,052.
12-Sep-00 POULETTY, PHILIPPE J
Shareholder 2,230
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $119,305.
12-Sep-00 WILLIAMS, COLLEGE
Shareholder 5,827
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $323,610.
12-Sep-00 SEQUOVEST
Shareholder 11,654
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $640,970.
11-Sep-00 SEQUOIA, CAPITAL VIII
10% Beneficial Owner * 24,646
LNUX Other Disposition
11-Sep-00 SEQUOIA, CAPITAL VIII
10% Beneficial Owner * 128,587
LNUX Other Disposition
11-Sep-00 LEONE, DOUGLAS M
Director, 10% Beneficial Owner * 1,942,313
LNUX Other Disposition
11-Sep-00 LEONE, DOUGLAS M
Director, 10% Beneficial Owner * 128,587
LNUX Other Disposition
11-Sep-00 LEONE, DOUGLAS M
Director, 10% Beneficial Owner * 24,646
LNUX Other Disposition
11-Sep-00 LEONE, DOUGLAS M
Director, 10% Beneficial Owner 65,705
LNUX Acquired
11-Sep-00 SEQUOIA, CAPITAL VIII
10% Beneficial Owner 1,942,313
LNUX Other Disposition
7-Sep-00 SCOTT, TIMOTHY T
Shareholder 424
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $23,320.
7-Sep-00 ODONNELL, MICHAEL J
Shareholder 252
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $12,616.
6-Sep-00 MORRISSEY, MICHAEL
Shareholder 300
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $16,931.
6-Sep-00 SACCANI, DANIEL R
Shareholder 3,500
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $194,906.
6-Sep-00 MITZ, DANIEL R
Shareholder 191
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $10,800.
6-Sep-00 IRVINE JAMES FOUNDATION
Shareholder 34,962
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $1,949,873.
5-Sep-00 HAYNES, MARK A
Shareholder 382
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $23,016.
5-Sep-00 SCHULL, TODD B
Chief Financial Officer 15,000
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $910,000.
5-Sep-00 SHULMAN, RON E
Shareholder 531
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $31,594.
5-Sep-00 SCHULL, TODD B
Chief Financial Officer 14,485
LNUX Exercised Options at $0.50/Share and Sold at $60.90/Share.
Proceeds of $874,894.
5-Sep-00 ALLEN, JEFFRY R
Director, Board Member 36,300
LNUX Sold at $61.03/Share.
Proceeds of $2,215,389.
5-Sep-00 SCHULL, TODD B
Chief Financial Officer 515
LNUX Sold at $60.91/Share.
Proceeds of $31,369.
1-Sep-00 AUGUSTIN, LARRY M
President, Director, Chief Executive Officer 30,000
LNUX Sold at $61.04/Share.
Proceeds of $1,831,200.
1-Sep-00 EGGLETON, KEITH E
Shareholder 191
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $10,753.
1-Sep-00 JONES, LIVING TR
Shareholder 5,000
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $265,000.
1-Sep-00 SOLOMON, LARRY
Shareholder 235
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $14,100.
31-Aug-00 DEFILIPPS, THOMAS C
Shareholder 424
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $19,054.
31-Aug-00 ROTH, RONALD
Shareholder 382
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $20,469.
31-Aug-00 KIRKMAN, CATHERINE
Shareholder 37
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $1,921.
31-Aug-00 PETKANICS GERSTENSCHLAGER FAMILY TRUST
Trust, Trustee 382
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $20,628.
31-Aug-00 ZEHR, GREGG E
Vice President, Engineering 15,000
LNUX Sold at $53.15/Share.
Proceeds of $797,250.
31-Aug-00 LATTA FAMILY TRUST
Trust, Trustee 743
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $38,450.
31-Aug-00 RUSSO, ROBERT
Affiliated Person 5,792
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $310,221.
31-Aug-00 SPARKS, TIMOTHY J
Shareholder 451
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $23,869.
31-Aug-00 ZEHR GREG TRUST
Trust, Trustee 30,000
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $162,000.
31-Aug-00 ZEHR, GREGG E
Vice President, Engineering 15,000
LNUX Sold at $53.09/Share.
Proceeds of $796,350.
31-Aug-00 ESTRIN, JUDITH L
Shareholder 279
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $14,718.
31-Aug-00 FELDMAN, ROBERT P
Shareholder 664
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $34,412.
30-Aug-00 RUSSO, ROBERT
Affiliated Person 43,584
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $2,036,621.
30-Aug-00 AUGUSTIN, LARRY M
President, Director, Chief Executive Officer * 3,000
LNUX Sold at $48.45/Share.
Proceeds of $145,350.
30-Aug-00 AUGUSTIN, LARRY M
President, Director, Chief Executive Officer 30,000
LNUX Sold at $48.45/Share.
Proceeds of $1,453,500.
30-Aug-00 AUGUSTIN, LARRY M
President, Director, Chief Executive Officer 30,000
LNUX Sold at $51.19/Share.
Proceeds of $1,535,700.
30-Aug-00 GROSS, IRWIN R
Shareholder 37
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $1,924.
30-Aug-00 SHORE, DANIEL K
Vice President, Operations 25,000
LNUX Sold at $49.03/Share.
Proceeds of $1,225,750.
30-Aug-00 RUSSO, ROBERT
Affiliated Person 19,792
LNUX Acquired Shares via Exercise of Options at $6.00/Share.
Paper gain of $906,721 at a fair market value of $51.81/share on 30-Aug-00.
30-Aug-00 FELDMAN, BORIS
Shareholder 664
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $32,900.
30-Aug-00 GOLDBERG, SELWYN D
Shareholder 191
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $9,359.
30-Aug-00 RUSSO, ROBERT
Affiliated Person 43,584
LNUX Sold at $46.68 -- $46.84/Share.
Proceeds of $2,036,741.
30-Aug-00 HARBOURVEST PARTNERS V PARELLEL PARTNERSHIP FUND LP
Shareholder 7,492
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $514,060.
30-Aug-00 STONEBRAKER, LESLIE K TR
Trust, Trustee 500
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $23,375.
30-Aug-00 AUGUSTIN, LARRY M
President, Director, Chief Executive Officer 90,000
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $4,500,000.
30-Aug-00 HARBOURVEST PARTNERS V PARELLEL PARTNERSHIP FUND LP
Shareholder 44,951
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $2,472,395.
30-Aug-00 AUGUSTIN, ALICE K
Affiliated Person 3,000
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $145,341.
29-Aug-00 TWICKLER, BRUCE A
Divisional Officer, Senior Vice President International Sales 35,000
LNUX Sold at $40.38 -- $43.00/Share.
Proceeds of $1,453,200.
29-Aug-00 SHORE, DAVID R
Vice President 100,000
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $4,426,880.
29-Aug-00 SHORE, DANIEL K
Vice President, Operations 50,000
LNUX Sold at $44.27/Share.
Proceeds of $2,213,500.
29-Aug-00 TWICKLER, BRUCE A
Divisional Officer, Senior Vice President International Sales 5,000
LNUX Sold at $40.50/Share.
Proceeds of $202,500.
29-Aug-00 IRONWOOD, CAPITAL
Shareholder, Non-Affiliate 2,230
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $98,956.
29-Aug-00 BONHAM, MARK
Shareholder 340
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $14,482.
29-Aug-00 DREW, JOHN L
Shareholder 1,115
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $47,875.
29-Aug-00 HUMPHREYS, IVAN
Shareholder 403
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $16,121.
28-Aug-00 TWICKLER, BRUCE A
Affiliated Person 100,000
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $4,300,000.
28-Aug-00 RUSSO, ROBERT
Affiliated Person 100,000
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $449,982.
28-Aug-00 VLG INVESTMENTS 1999
Shareholder 9,068
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $385,514.
28-Aug-00 TWICKLER, BRUCE A
Divisional Officer, Senior Vice President International Sales 5,000
LNUX Sold at $43.75/Share.
Proceeds of $218,750.
28-Aug-00 GOGUEN, MICHAEL L
Shareholder 50,014
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $2,250,630.
28-Aug-00 LAMOND PIERRE R & CHRISTINE TRUST DTD 11/22/85
Trust, Trustee 28,245
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $1,271,014.
28-Aug-00 RUSSO, ROBERT
Affiliated Person 10,000
LNUX Sold at $45.00/Share.
Proceeds of $450,000.
28-Aug-00 TWICKLER, BRUCE A
Divisional Officer, Senior Vice President International Sales 15,000
LNUX Sold at $42.56 -- $43.00/Share.
Proceeds of $640,600.
28-Aug-00 LEE, DAVID C
Shareholder 300
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $12,761.
28-Aug-00 TWICKLER, BRUCE A
Divisional Officer, Senior Vice President International Sales 40,000
LNUX Sold at $43.13 -- $44.63/Share.
Proceeds of $1,764,600.
25-Aug-00 TESTA, TROY
Shareholder 1,000
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $44,000.
25-Aug-00 UNIVERSITY, OF SOUTHERN CAL
Shareholder 34,962
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $1,440,913.
25-Aug-00 WS INVESTMENT CO 98A
Shareholder 3,011
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $132,484.
25-Aug-00 SILICON GRAPHICS INC
Shareholder 400,000
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $18,400,000.
25-Aug-00 STANFORD, UNIVERSITY
Shareholder 109,488
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $4,817,472.
25-Aug-00 ANDERSON, JOHN
Shareholder 1,000
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $46,000.
25-Aug-00 MCCORD, JIM
Shareholder 71
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $3,200.
24-Aug-00 SUMMER IRREVOCABLE TRUST DTD 3/9/98
Trust, Trustee 10,704
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $460,272.
24-Aug-00 SUTO, JEFFREY Y
Non Affiliated Person 1,130
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $49,720.
24-Aug-00 NASSAU, CAPITAL
Shareholder 64,096
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $2,820,224.
24-Aug-00 ALCOA FOUNDATION
Shareholder 23,308
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $865,310.
24-Aug-00 CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE TECHNOLOGY
Shareholder 23,308
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $865,310.
24-Aug-00 TOMASETTA TRUST
Trust, Trustee 1,115
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $41,394.
24-Aug-00 REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CAL/ SHELLWATER & CO
Shareholder 93,231
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $4,053,940.
24-Aug-00 IRREVOCABLE WINTER TRUST
Shareholder 21,406
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $920,458.
24-Aug-00 IRREVOCABLE SPRING TRUST DTD 3/9/98
Trust, Trustee 10,704
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $460,272.
22-Aug-00 FAIRCHILD SHERMAN FOUNDATION
Shareholder 11,654
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $422,329.
22-Aug-00 RENSSELAER POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE
Shareholder 17,841
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $633,493.
22-Aug-00 NOWICH, UNIVERSITY
Shareholder 5,827
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $211,164.
22-Aug-00 RUSSO, ROBERT
Affiliated Person 39,584
LNUX Acquired Shares via Exercise of Options at $6.00/Share.
Paper gain of $1,187,520 at a fair market value of $36.00/share on 22-Aug-00.
22-Aug-00 MURDOCK, M J CHAR TR
Shareholder 29,135
LNUX Proposed Sale (Form 144).
Estimated proceeds of $1,055,823.

* Indicates shares held indirectly (i.e. in a trust, by a spouse, etc.)

Re:Spamming (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2240222)

Crapflooders make baby Jesus cry. Be show some creativity and write an amusing troll instead.

No. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2240087)

You can go back to your homes now, there's nothing to see here.

Your BBC links (2, Insightful)

praedor (218403) | about 13 years ago | (#2240090)

You know, just about every damn time I try to connect to the BBC site via slashdot (including with this story) it doesn't work. There appears to be something REALLY dicked about a lot of DNS servers. I suggest that from now on, instead of linking to the bbc URL you guys use the IP address, which always works.


MOST of the time the BBC url is broken and gives an IMMEDIATE "unknown host" message. Type in the IP and viola! Instant connection.

Re:Your BBC links (1)

EpsCylonB (307640) | about 13 years ago | (#2240290)

That is strange, I live in the uk and never have a problem. However I can never access the cnn website without hitting refresh about 5 times.

It wouldn't bother me so much, but cnn run commericials (this is blue, this is blue, this is blue) here presumably to set themselves up as a credible alternative news site for europeans (who mostly use the bbc) to get their news. Except your website doesn't fucking work cnn.

Re:Your BBC links (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2240300)

how about you just add a DNS server that works i have never had a problem ..

Re:Your BBC links (3, Funny)

Remote (140616) | about 13 years ago | (#2240302)

I suggest that from now on, instead of linking to the bbc URL you guys use the IP address, which always works.

You aren't the guy who wrote Code Red I, are you? Keep in mind ./ stories are archived, so if an IP changes after some time, boom, the link is dead.

Now, the DNS thing: sometimes adding a "www" after the "http://" does the trick for me (not with BBC but with a few other sites). I think this is easier than figuring out and typing an IP.

Slashdot is fucked (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2240091)

Please note: Search is down at the moment while we update our database, so don't bother trying. In the meantime, you may wish to search Slashdot through Google:Stories Comments Users All Authors CmdrTaco sengan krow HeUnique Hemos Nik Nathan Roblimo pudge timothy CowboyNeal Cliff SlashTeam michael jimjag JonKatz jamie All Topics Be Caldera Comdex Debian Digital The Gimp Encryption GNUStep The Internet Links Movies The Almighty Buck News Handhelds Star Wars Prequels Sun Microsystems United States X Christmas Cheer Linux Apple Java Microsoft Red Hat Software Spam Quake Internet Explorer Netscape Enlightenment CDA GNU is Not Unix Intel ePlus America Online KDE BSD The Courts Slashdot.org Wine Technology Games Bug Television Unix GNOME Corel It's funny. Laugh. Science All Topics IBM Hardware Amiga Silicon Graphics Compaq Music AMD SuSE Quickies Perl Education Linux Mandrake Apache The Media VA Linuxcare Graphics Censorship Mozilla Patents Programming Beanies Privacy Toys Space Transmeta Announcements Linux Business Upgrades TurboLinux Editorial Slashback Anime PHP Ximian User Journal All Sections Apache Articles Ask Slashdot Book Reviews BSD Developers Features Interviews Geeks in Space Science Your Rights OnlineHTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Fri, 31 Aug 2001 18:15:25 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 X-Powered-By: Slash 2.001000 Connection: close Transfer-Encoding: chunked Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1 OKThe server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.
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From Experience... (5, Insightful)

keesh (202812) | about 13 years ago | (#2240093)

Gamers want fancy interfaces. I know someone who's a huge fan of Civ, Alpha Centauri et al., but when I introduced him to FreeCiv his first comment was "the interface sucks". This isn't someone who's computer illiterate, either.

It seems that people want something different when playing a game. They don't want just their standard operating system look, they want fullscreen fancy eyecandy, even when that's not the nicest option.

You can even see this in game editors -- AFAIK, WorldCraft is the only editor even close to the standard OS style...

Whether it's because the whole screen should look SciFi / Fantasy / Whatever, or simply because users want something different, game interfaces have to be different from usual programs.

games aren't the only thing that uses 100% CPU. (3, Insightful)

garcia (6573) | about 13 years ago | (#2240094)

remember there are other applications (other than just the military and games as she mentioned) that use most of the CPU (RC5, Netscape ;))

this really has little to do w/UI. It has to do w/what she feels is important in the industry at this time (cell phones that are connected).

It's true that games love faster CPUs but it is also true that it is probably possible to make much faster/better games in the standard constraints that we already have but people don't care to do that anymore (remember 64k games that looked cool as hell or even 4mb games?)

Sending your picture in front of the Eiffel tower to your kids on your cell phone is less important than decreasing the bloat!

Re:games aren't the only thing that uses 100% CPU. (2)

keesh (202812) | about 13 years ago | (#2240171)

Sure, a red splodge on the screen looks nice, but nothing beats a corpse which has been hacked in half and is full of bullets. It's the multiplayer thing -- it's soooooo much more satisfying to get realistic gibs than a few dots.

So even though games are playable on a z80 (yes, there is at least one 3d engine on a ti86 calculator), there isn't the same splat effect.

Re:games aren't the only thing that uses 100% CPU. (4, Insightful)

Midnight Thunder (17205) | about 13 years ago | (#2240174)

Another point that should be mentioned is that with faster processors new types of applications become accessible to consumers. Imagine trying to edit your home video on your computer, or trying to do other creative work, on a computer four years ago and it would not have been possible.

The way I see it, is that while games push the envelope, faster processors make new kinds of applications available and the interest in those applications also help people want faster computers.

We all use word-processors and spread-sheets but there also a lot of people who also want to be creative with their computers.

Re:games aren't the only thing that uses 100% CPU. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2240176)

we wanted to create a 3d dynamic rpg (I mean a REAL world with everything, singleplayer) .. we had the engine and everything (something like operation:flashpoint), but the test ran with 0.5fps on a dual K7 1.4ghz with 2gb of ram and a geforce 3.. you just can't create a huge realistic world with todays computers.. :(

Re:games aren't the only thing that uses 100% CPU. (1)

digerata (516939) | about 13 years ago | (#2240277)

Yeah she was very single minded in that point. She forgot about Operating Systems. Just compare the system requirements between MS Win 3.1 and MS W2K.

Re:games aren't the only thing that uses 100% CPU. (2)

Pope Slackman (13727) | about 13 years ago | (#2240295)

It's true that games love faster CPUs but it is also true that it is probably possible to make much faster/better games in the standard constraints that we already have but people don't care to do that anymore (remember 64k games that looked cool as hell or even 4mb games?)

IIRC, the size of the QuakeIII engine is only a couple meg, and the data files are some 400 meg.
The only way in this case to reduce so-called "bloat" is to sacrifice quality of models, textures, effects, etc.
Sure, oldskool games are tons of fun, but why should modern game developers be encouraged to use artificial constraints?
Games are for fun - visual quality and playability are much more important than efficiency.

Sending your picture in front of the Eiffel tower to your kids on your cell phone is less important than decreasing the bloat!

Maybe to you, but the average consumer cares more about gadgets (like cameras) than knowing the firmware on their phone takes only 4k.

C-X C-S

"I can attest to JC being smart" (5, Funny)

ObligatoryUserName (126027) | about 13 years ago | (#2240104)

Hemos knows Jesus? Maybe he can let us know which distribution The Lord uses, and if he prefers vi or emacs - then we can decide for ourselves if he's smart or not.

Re:"I can attest to JC being smart" (1)

lupercalia (310569) | about 13 years ago | (#2240143)

This gives a whole new meaning to the phrase "Religious Wars".

Re:"I can attest to JC being smart" (-1)

Jesus Christ (154953) | about 13 years ago | (#2240240)

As I've stated countless times, I use Windows Notepad. Next time, check my FAQ in Appendix B of your favorite Bible distribution.

Re:"I can attest to JC being smart" (1)

CodingFiend (236675) | about 13 years ago | (#2240301)

Apparently Jesus uses either DR-DOS or OS/2 [bbspot.com] .

Slashdot has the perfect example (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2240110)

of how not to run a search engine

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Fri, 31 Aug 2001 18:15:25 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 X-Powered-By: Slash 2.001000 Connection: close Transfer-Encoding: chunked Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1

OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

Apache/1.3.20 Server at slashdot.org Port 80

Slashdot screwing around with the untested Slashcode 2.001 Maybe it should be called milestone 2.

Slashdot search is screwed (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2240123)

Please note: Search is down at the moment while we update our database, so don't bother trying. In the meantime, you may wish to search Slashdot through Google:

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Fri, 31 Aug 2001 18:15:25 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 X-Powered-By: Slash 2.001000 Connection: close Transfer-Encoding: chunked Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1

OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

Apache/1.3.20 Server at slashdot.org Port 80

And Slashcode 2 is supposed to be better?!?
Oh boy I can't wait for Slashcode 3 I can see it now. Direct you over to ZDnet cause articles don't work.

Re:Slashdot search is screwed (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2240257)

&ltbeating side of computer&gt stupid troll, be. more. funny![*]

* yes, admittedly, slashdot is about to collapse under the load of buggy anti-troll measures, and it's always funny to kick the gang in the nuts about this, but it's getting kinda old (read: Taco & your idiot crew, stop trying to fight the trolls and fix the bugs!)

Nothing pushes a computer like games. (3, Insightful)

sheetsda (230887) | about 13 years ago | (#2240130)

The only thing that will push a computer to its limits is a game. No one admits it but no one needs a new computer to do a spreadsheet programme or Word document.

*sigh* This is what I tried to tell my uncle last weekend when he shelled out way too much money for a 1.4 GHz P4 with a Geforce2 and 128 megs of RAM to run Microsoft Windows/Office. He believes buying a top of the line system now will save him from having to buy another one in a couple years. Ha! Good luck. Lusers just won't listen.

Re:Nothing pushes a computer like games. (2)

mikeage (119105) | about 13 years ago | (#2240147)

sigh* This is what I tried to tell my uncle last weekend when he shelled out way too much money for a 1.4 GHz P4 with a Geforce2 and 128 megs of RAM to run Microsoft Windows/Office
Having 128 meg of ram won't prevent him from having to buy a new machine tomorrow if he wants to run office well ;). But you're right... 500, 600 Mhz with 256 meg of ram and an 8 meg (16 if you want to be fancy) video card will run almost all non-game, non-DVD home applications quite nicely.

Re:Nothing pushes a computer like games. (1)

GreenBugsBunny (160180) | about 13 years ago | (#2240299)

Wow! what kind of non-game, non-DVD home applications are you running?

My home PC seems to keep up quite nicely: Pentium 233MHz, 2MB video card, 64MB RAM. It's dual booted: RedHat 7.1, Windows 2000 Pro, and has never had any problems. It even runs a good handful of games just fine (The Sims, You don't know jack 4/5)

There is no need for a huge powerhouse PC for almost all non-game, non-DVD home applications to run quite nicely

Re:Nothing pushes a computer like games. (2)

CaseyB (1105) | about 13 years ago | (#2240338)

My home PC seems to keep up quite nicely: Pentium 233MHz, 2MB video card, 64MB RAM.

There is no need for a huge powerhouse PC for almost all non-game, non-DVD home applications to run quite nicely

That "huge powerhouse" he described is the lowest-end new machine you can buy. Try to buy a new machine like yours -- you'll be paying MORE, because the parts are antique and aren't stocked in many places.

Re:Nothing pushes a computer like games. (-1)

core10k (196263) | about 13 years ago | (#2240165)

.4 GHz P4 with a Geforce2 and 128 megs of RAM

Hate to break it to you, but that isn't anywhere *NEAR* top of the line.

Re:Nothing pushes a computer like games. (3, Informative)

Nos. (179609) | about 13 years ago | (#2240230)

A few years ago, as a summer job, I was offering my expertise in helping people purchase a computer.


The first question I always asked was "What do you want to do with your computer." This gave me a starting point. If it was gaming, the machine was always a more powerful machine than the folks who were looking to do word processing and internet access (we're talking mid-90's here).


I remember one guy being quite shy about saying that he wanted to play games, I had to admit that I did a lot of gaming before he would. As a result he ended up being very happy with his machine, and as I recall, he didn't have to put a dime into that machine for over a year!

If that is true then.... (1)

daveym (258550) | about 13 years ago | (#2240254)

...why is my office-issued dell p3-700-128meg-o-ram p.o.s. currently on its knees trying to expand my dataset?

Oh forgot, Winowze 2k is prolly leaving me 400k for actual work.

Nevertheless, my point is, there are tons of non-game applications out there that can use every mflop or mb of ram.....I sure would love a fast athlon box wik 1 gig mem.

The real difference is, how many legit applications need a fast processor, tons of memory AND a blazingly fast 3-d graphics card? Not many---and most of those have to be rendering 3-d graphics.

I guess there are always real-time simulated colonoscopies.

This isn't technically true... (5, Insightful)

mblase (200735) | about 13 years ago | (#2240318)

...since every iteration of the Microsoft or Apple OS requires more RAM, a faster processor, and more colors on the monitor, I think it's more accurate to say that no one needs a new computer to do a spreadsheet program or Word document, provided they don't want to use the latest version.

And besides, there's more to a computer than just the processor and graphics card. I've got a three-year-old PowerMac clone sitting at home, and I can't hardly use it for anything new. It does its job fine, but all its hardware is legacy -- DIMMs, SCSI, and serial ports while everything else is moving to SDRAM, FireWire, and USB. This phenomenon exists in the PC world as well, just to a lesser degree. If I want to upgrade my machine, it's ironic that it will cost me more money than if I had a brand-new one with USB and SDRAM on the motherboard.

In other words, then: it also costs me more to make my machine compatible with a Palm handheld, a digital camera, a joystick, or a new printer, I need to spend the money to upgrade it first. If I want to do anything like digital video, I have to upgrade it a lot. Even downloaded Flash multimedia ran slow until I upgraded the processor, and I sure can't add an MP3 jukebox without a substantial hard drive upgrade (2 gigs doesn't go as far as it used to).

Games push the envelope harder than anything else in the consumer industry, true. But it's hardly the only thing. There's more to consumer PCs these days than video games and word processing, and it's all more demanding than it used to be.

Slashdot overload (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2240139)

Please note: Search is down at the moment while we update our database, so don't bother trying. In the meantime, you may wish to search Slashdot through Google:
Stories Comments Users
All Authors CmdrTaco sengan krow HeUnique Hemos Nik Nathan Roblimo pudge timothy CowboyNeal Cliff SlashTeam michael jimjag JonKatz jamie All Topics Be Caldera Comdex Debian Digital The Gimp Encryption GNUStep The Internet Links Movies The Almighty Buck News Handhelds Star Wars Prequels Sun Microsystems United States X Christmas Cheer Linux Apple Java Microsoft Red Hat Software Spam Quake Internet Explorer Netscape Enlightenment CDA GNU is Not Unix Intel ePlus America Online KDE BSD The Courts Slashdot.org Wine Technology Games Bug Television Unix GNOME Corel It's funny. Laugh. Science All Topics IBM Hardware Amiga Silicon Graphics Compaq Music AMD SuSE Quickies Perl Education Linux Mandrake Apache The Media VA Linuxcare Graphics Censorship Mozilla Patents Programming Beanies Privacy Toys Space Transmeta Announcements Linux Business Upgrades TurboLinux Editorial Slashback Anime PHP Ximian User Journal All Sections Apache Articles Ask Slashdot Book Reviews BSD Developers Features Interviews Geeks in Space Science Your Rights Online
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OK
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More information about this error may be available in the server error log.
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UI, but not graphic design (1)

mughi (32874) | about 13 years ago | (#2240144)

Well, I thought it was an OK interview, just a little light. And the main gist of her UI comments were more towards feature presentation and interaction, not graphic design and artwork (as other posters have taken it).

Whatever (2, Insightful)

swagr (244747) | about 13 years ago | (#2240145)

What Hertz SHOULD have said is that games are the only commercial applications used by the masses that maximize CPU useage ...

Yes, I'm sure no one has ever maxed a CPU for hours or days on end modelling fluid dynamics, or physical optics, or encoding mpegs, or ...

Re:Whatever (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2240247)

Or compiling XFree86 and Mozilla in the same day.. Oye!

I can just see it... (5, Funny)

Brownstar (139242) | about 13 years ago | (#2240146)

What a game would do is immediately give you those three features and then as you progressed and became a more powerful character it would give you more features

Mr. Clippy: I'm sorry, you're not experienced enough to change text colors yet. Try underlining it for now!

Re:I can just see it... (1)

ethereal (13958) | about 13 years ago | (#2240188)

Well, the advantage of games is that they don't put you in situations where you have to do something that you don't know how to do yet. So it would be more like:

Mr. Clippy: I'm sorry, but John doesn't know how to underline text yet. Can you get one of his co-workers to do it?

Boss: Damn.

Re:I can just see it... (2, Insightful)

Brownstar (139242) | about 13 years ago | (#2240275)

You don't play RPG's very often do you. I can think of plenty of times that at a particular point in a game I needed to do something (but my character didn't have enough experience to do it) to continue with the game.

Re:I can just see it... (1)

ethereal (13958) | about 13 years ago | (#2240307)

I play RPGs, but usually I'm involved enough in all the mini-games and side quests that by the time I get back to the main quest, I've usually leveled up even more than I was supposed to. So usually, the beginning of the game is tough for me but by the end it's easy because I've leveled up too much.

It would be nice if games would have a better way to tell you that you need to level up more before going into a certain situation - when that happens to me I usually die a few times before I get the idea that maybe I should explore somewhere else for a while :)

Re:I can just see it... (1)

antientropic (447787) | about 13 years ago | (#2240220)

Mr. Clippy: I'm sorry, you're not experienced enough to change text colors yet. Try underlining it for now!

When will I be able to import my Baldur's Gate character into Word?

Re:I can just see it... (3, Funny)

SuiteSisterMary (123932) | about 13 years ago | (#2240330)

When will I be able to import my Baldur's Gate character into Word?
Mr Clippy: I'm sorry, you're not experienced enough to change text colors yet. Try underlining it for now!

Etheria the Wizard: Fool! You do not understand the powers with which you are meddling! Do you not realize the consequences of unleashing such colours upon your document?!

Games pushing hardware is great ... (4, Interesting)

Daniel Dvorkin (106857) | about 13 years ago | (#2240154)

... I mean, I'm all for faster CPU's, more RAM, better video cards, higher bandwidth, etc.

But I don't see games pushing the UI envelope in a way that's useful to most user tasks. Sure, game developers put an enormous amount of effort into creating detailed, realistic virtual environments, and that's great -- for games. But attempts to introduce such elements into OS's in general, and into general-purpose applications like word processors, graphics programs, and browsers, will lead only to clutter and bloatware. You don't need realistic lighting and fog effects when you're writing a letter ...

Browsers are an area that deserve special mention. I've seen a few attempts to use game-type visual metaphors to turn cyberspace into something Gibsonian (anyone remember Hotsauce?) and the effect is always ugly, pointless, and slow. Make the hardware fast enough, of course, and "slow" will go away, but "ugly" and "pointless" will remain.

When I'm playing a game, I want to be immersed in a virtual world. When I'm writing, or designing graphics for a Web site, or pounding out code, or looking for information on some obscure subject, I want a clean, simple interface that makes it as easy as possible for me to get, create, or manipulate my data. And that's it.

Re:Games pushing hardware is great ... (2, Insightful)

mughi (32874) | about 13 years ago | (#2240237)

Good post, but...

When I'm playing a game, I want to be immersed in a virtual world. When I'm writing, or designing graphics for a Web site, or pounding out code, or looking for information on some obscure subject, I want a clean, simple interface that makes it as easy as possible for me to get, create, or manipulate my data. And that's it.

I'd have to disagree and say that the basic principle is the same. When I'm playing a game (Myth II for example), I want to focus on paying attention to the health of my units, where I want to get them to go, and not have to worry about the mechanics of actually achieving it. When I'm writing a document, I want to focus on my train of thought, what I'm trying to say, etc. and not have to worry about the mechanics of using the word processor. Different paradigm, but same UI goal.

I would say that many games I've played seem to have gotten this down well. Perhaps it's because of the focus where they know that no player is going to actually bother reading the manual, and the developers need to keep in mind the needs of a novice user just sitting down at the program for the first time.

The game 'tutorial' intro level and the wavy green lines in Word: both good steps along this path.

Re:Games pushing hardware is great ... (1)

Daniel Dvorkin (106857) | about 13 years ago | (#2240284)

Well, okay; a good game designer is probably someone who has a good overall feel for how people interact with computers, and can apply that talent to the design of general-purpose UI's. But the paradigms involved in killing monsters and writing letters are _so_ different that I don't see much direct connection between one and the other ... and of course if the industry starts thinking, "Game designs are good, we should put some of that goodness into our other products," it will inevitably manifest itself as direct (and utterly useless) transference of game UI elements into general-purpose apps, rather than trying to find some general principles of good human-computer interaction and applying those principles to designing applications of all kinds.

Re:Games pushing hardware is great ... (2, Insightful)

WinterSolstice (223271) | about 13 years ago | (#2240293)

Hey, what about those of us who would like to have lighting and fog effects when writing letters? I think it would be seriously cool if the next "Cease and Desist" letter I got had really cool real-time smoke.


I agree that an interface should be straight-forward, and simple. However, users LOVE eye candy. Just go look at Themes.org. We actually have users at my company who run PowerPoint on their desktops. They like having desktop wallpaper, and our policies prohibit it. They are willing to take the performance hit just for that useless bit of color.


As for me, I'll just sit back and enjoy my heavily tuned Enlightenment desktop that uses more RAM and CPU than my first 6 computers had, combined.


-WS

Re:Games pushing hardware is great ... (1)

taliver (174409) | about 13 years ago | (#2240294)

You don't need realistic lighting and fog effects when you're writing a letter ...


I'm going out on a limb here...


Let's say I'm writing a technical document with a lot of parts, using something like a CVS system to work with others. Now, maybe my system could keep up with changes that other people have committed, and begin showing the file through a fog, to let me know that something has been obscured.


The more changes committed, the thicker the fog. No real intelligence needed in the system, and if the user still wanted to work on it, he could. But a nice, nonintrusive way to alert people to changes that have occurred.

Re:Games pushing hardware is great ... (2, Insightful)

Daniel Dvorkin (106857) | about 13 years ago | (#2240321)

Sure, but in that case the fog is an abstract representation of something else happening -- whereas in a game, the purpose of fog effects is _actually to look like fog_. I think that may be _the_ fundamental difference between games and general-purpose apps, in fact. Games try to create a virtual world and put you into it; most other kinds of apps try to provide you with a useful metaphor through which you can manipulate the real world.

Re:Games pushing hardware is great ... (3, Insightful)

Brownstar (139242) | about 13 years ago | (#2240309)

I think you're confused as to what the user interface in a game is.

The special effects like fog and realistic lighting are part of what is being presented, you don't ever actually use it. The user interface is the menus, hand icon, etc...

One of the reason's why you may have mistaken that is because UIs in good games have gotten so seemless with the game its hard to tell the UI from the actual game (take Black & White for example).

No (2, Interesting)

Uttles (324447) | about 13 years ago | (#2240155)

I think this article is a little unrealistic. I agree that many games have exciting and interesting features which take time to develop and give you a sense of completion and understanding, but I don't believe this applies to other applications. Specifically it is this statement that I don't agree with:

What a game would do is immediately give you those three features and then as you progressed and became a more powerful character it would give you more features.

That's really cool in games, I love the accomplishment of attaining the highest level, but when I open MS Access I want to be able to jump right in and program modules rather than be greeted with a form creation wizard or what not. I'm the type of computer user (like most people here probably) who wants all the features I can get my hands on. Throw them all out me, and I'll determine what it is I need.

Re:No (1)

hansk (107187) | about 13 years ago | (#2240279)

Of course you disagree, you are obviously a power user. But, the majority of users are not. They typically don't need the quantity of features available or have them thrown immediately at them. That is why applications are beginning to provide adaptive UIs. As a user progresses in their learning or their needs increase, more features become available.

Also, I think it's important to see the opposite occur. As features are used less and less they get removed from the immediate UI. Placed on the back shelf so to say.

*BSD is dying (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2240159)

*BSD is dying

Yet another crippling bombshell hit the beleaguered *BSD community when last month IDC confirmed that *BSD accounts for less than a fraction of 1 percent of ll servers. Coming on the heels of the latest Netcraft survey which plainly states that *BSD has lost more market share, this news serves to reinforce what we've known all along. *BSD is collapsing in complete disarray, as further exemplified by failing dead last [sysadminmag.com] in the recent Sys Admin comprehensive networking test.

You don't need to be a Kreskin [amdest.com] to predict *BSD's future. The hand writing is on the wall: *BSD faces a bleak future. In fact there won't be any future at all for *BSD because *BSD is dying. Things are looking very bad for *BSD. As many of us are already aware, *BSD continues to lose market share. Red ink flows like a river of blood. FreeBSD is the most endangered of them all.

Let's keep to the facts and look at the numbers.

OpenBSD leader Theo states that there are 7000 users of OpenBSD. How many users of NetBSD are there? Let's see. The number of OpenBSD versus NetBSD posts on Usenet is roughly in ratio of 5 to 1. Therefore there are about 7000/5 = 1400 NetBSD users. BSD/OS posts on Usenet are about half of the volume of NetBSD posts. Therefore there are about 700 users of BSD/OS. A recent article put FreeBSD at about 80 percent of the *BSD market. Therefore there are (7000+1400+700)*4 = 36400 FreeBSD users. This is consistent with the number of FreeBSD Usenet posts.

Due to the troubles of Walnut Creek, abysmal sales and so on, FreeBSD went out of business and was taken over by BSDI who sell another troubled OS. Now BSDI is also dead, its corpse turned over to another charnel house.

All major surveys show that *BSD has steadily declined in market share. *BSD is very sick nd its long term survival prospects are very dim. If *BSD is to survive at all it will be among OS hobbyist dabblers. *BSD continues to decay. Nothing short of a miracle could save it at this point in time. For all practical purposes, *BSD is dead.

*BSD is dying

MySQL apparently sucks (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2240160)

Please note: Search is down at the moment while we update our database, so don't bother trying. In the meantime, you may wish to search Slashdot through Google:

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Fri, 31 Aug 2001 18:15:25 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 X-Powered-By: Slash 2.001000 Connection: close Transfer-Encoding: chunked Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1

OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.
More information about this error may be available in the server error log.
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incremental disclosure and game UI (5, Insightful)

tim_maroney (239442) | about 13 years ago | (#2240166)

Incremental disclosure with sticky adaptation, the single UI principle discussed in the interview, has been well known in the design community since the 1980's.

Just because Microsoft doesn't make good use of the principle doesn't mean that it's a gift from gaming to the rest of the world.

In most other ways, games are UI nightmares. They're difficult by design. Applying their principles to other domains would be a giant step backwards. Non-entertainment systems should be easy by design, rather than conjuring obstacles for the thrill of overcoming them.

Fans of UNIX will, of course, disagree. The popularity of archaic command-line interfaces in the UNIX subculture could perhaps be understood as a consequence of gamer-like behavior among hobbyists and tinkerers.

Tim

Re:incremental disclosure and game UI (1)

ethereal (13958) | about 13 years ago | (#2240207)

Just because Microsoft doesn't make good use of the principle doesn't mean that it's a gift from gaming to the rest of the world.

Well, they did try "smart menus" that didn't show you commands that you didn't use too often, but IIRC a lot of people thought those were pretty annoying.

Re:incremental disclosure and game UI (1)

jbmadsen (95191) | about 13 years ago | (#2240326)


Fans of UNIX will, of course, disagree. The popularity of archaic command-line interfaces in the UNIX subculture could perhaps be understood as a consequence of gamer-like behavior among hobbyists and tinkerers.


You forgot to mention the efficiency of the CLI when it is used by someone with decent typing speed (and accuracy) and some experience with it. There are many functions that take less time to type then to do through a GUI. Point-and-click is nice for some things, but it doesn't solve everything. Do you open a character table and click at the characters with your mouse when you write postings here? Sometimes using your keyboard is just faster and easier.

Re:incremental disclosure and game UI (4, Interesting)

kabir (35200) | about 13 years ago | (#2240353)

Fans of UNIX will, of course, disagree. The popularity of archaic command-line interfaces in the UNIX subculture could perhaps be understood as a consequence of gamer-like behavior among hobbyists and tinkerers.

I wouldn't have thought that the popularity of "archaic command-line interfaces" had anything to do with their being cryptic, or figuring them out being entertaining... it seems to me that those sorts of interfaces are popular because they tend to be extremely powerful. My personal experience of interfaces has shown the general trend where GUIs tend to be less powerful/flexable than command line interfaces. Though I freely admit that my opinions are colored by many years of UNIX usage, so I'm not really all that objective.

Solving the "problem" of an interface, while somewhat rewarding, isn't exactly an experience I go looking for. I've dealt with this both with command line UIs and GUIs - crappy is crappy either way - and it's never fun. I think it's just that command-line UIs tend to be a bit more featureful than GUIs simply because there is less aversion to complexity, probably because people expect a command-line to be more complex. I generally consider the command-line being more cryptic to be the price I pay for greater power and flexability.

Or I could just be so used to UNIX everything else seems a little weird ;)

Re:incremental disclosure and game UI (1)

jmauro (32523) | about 13 years ago | (#2240354)


Fans of UNIX will, of course, disagree. The popularity of archaic command-line interfaces in the UNIX subculture could perhaps be understood as a consequence of gamer-like behavior among hobbyists and tinkerers.


But if you look at how someone uses a command line thay proceed in the same way as sticky adaptation. Learning and using the basic commands and then adding more complex options and commands as they learn more. Besides, with things like Word Processors and CLI you want all the functionality there from day one. You don't want to have to go though a tutorial every time you start a new doc, get a new machine, or reformat.

Re:incremental disclosure and game UI (2)

Mr. Slippery (47854) | about 13 years ago | (#2240370)

Non-entertainment systems should be easy by design, rather than conjuring obstacles for the thrill of overcoming them...The popularity of archaic command-line interfaces in the UNIX subculture could perhaps be understood as a consequence of gamer-like behavior among hobbyists and tinkerers.

Nonsense. The CLI is easy - for some things.

It all depends on the task you want to perform. "rm -r *.o" is closer telling my faithful servant to "remove all object files from here on down" than is "click on Start - mouse over Search - click on For Files Or Folders - fill in .o in the appropriate field - click through several levels to specify the appropriate target to Look In - click on Search Now - click on Edit - click on Select All - click on Edit - click on Cut - click on Yes." A GUI is a lousy way to instruct a servant.

On the other hand, for things I want to do myself, using the machine as a magic typewriter or paintbrush rather than as a servant, a GUI is the better choice; a verbal interface would be a lousy way to control a magic paintbrush. (Though it would be useful in some types of line and block drawings.)

Quick! Kill the MARTIANS! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2240184)

Slashdot has been Invaded by Martians! Only YOU Can Save The World!


o o
/ \
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\ ______/
/ \
| [@][@] | __________________
| ^^ |_/ \
| VVVVVV <_ I LOVE YOU ALL. |
\_______/ \ HONEST... /
* | | \________________/
/ ___/ \____
|| / \
|| | | *** | |
|| | |* *| |
|| | | *** | |
\\ | | | |
\\ | |_____| |
\\ VVV _[_]_ VVV
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/______|______\
LAMENESS FILTER

This Martian is Copyright © 2001 keesh. You may redistribute it under the terms of the GNU General Public License version 2 or later.

Hello fellow crapflooder! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2240215)

I kiss you!

Slashdot has been Invaded by Martians!
o o
/ \
| |
\ ______/
/ \
| [@][@] | __________________
| ^^ |_/ \
| VVVVVV <_ I LOVE YOU ALL. |
\_______/ \ HONEST... /
* | | \________________/
/ ___/ \____
|| / \
|| | | *** | |
|| | |* *| |
|| | | *** | |
\\ | | | |
\\ | |_____| |
\\ VVV _[_]_ VVV
\\ / \
\\__/| | |
| | |
| | |
| | |
__/ | \__
/______|______\
LAMENESS FILTER

This Martian is Copyright © 2001 keesh. You may redistribute it under the terms of the GNU General Public License version 2 or later.

Wiggle Room (2, Insightful)

Foggy Tristan (220356) | about 13 years ago | (#2240201)

I'd disagree that games necessarily are better for UI development, it's just that games have a lot more wiggle room in terms of bad user interface. A game like Leisure Suit Larry can get away with not having standard looking buttons, and a game like Myst III: Exile can get away with not having standard looking icons.

It doesn't mean however that games can have bad UIs. The eGames sample I stupidly picked up has one of the worst interfaces possible, and most of the games are individually difficult to manage.

And finally, it's worth pointing out there's no standard UI for a laser blaster. ("The cross-sight must be in red, with a slightly thicker line near the center...")

Re:Wiggle Room (1)

mughi (32874) | about 13 years ago | (#2240250)

But what you are speaking of is more 'graphic design' than 'user interface'. There's a lot more to it than just pretty pixels, and that functionality is what she mentions.

being smart? (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2240205)


hemos,

do you think you're doing us a favor by attesting to this woman's smartness? or are you just surprised that a woman Could be smart, so you thought you would mention it. Being smart might get you to the head of the class, but it takes more than that to impress me...

this is not flamebait. consider Hemos' words carefully, and why they're out of place...

Re:being smart? (1)

recursiv (324497) | about 13 years ago | (#2240246)

indeed. that does sound rather odd.

Hertz (2)

Animats (122034) | about 13 years ago | (#2240221)

J.C. Hertz's book "Joystick Nation", is excellent. Especially the part where she visits the automated Nintendo warehouse and meets the "wave planner", who orchestrates shortages of games to build demand. Her day job is at the New York Times, where she covers electronic entertainment.

"Kai's Power Tools" [metacreations.com] had a game-like interface. Users started out with a few simple tools. After demonstrating competence using the basic tools, users advanced to the next level and more tools became available. This was hated. Rumors that Kai was going to redo the user interface for Photoshop resulted in a sizable protest to Adobe.

Game user interfaces work because you can't do much. Move and shoot works well. Nothing else does.

In any application (2)

Pope (17780) | about 13 years ago | (#2240223)

the better the UI, the quicker it'll "disappear."
This is of course the essence of great UI design: it should be quick to learn, fairly obivous (note lack of word 'intuitive' :) and have some ability to grow with the power user/reveal more advanced features.

I think most game builders are too busy trying to be different from their competitors than to confer with each other on standardizing their interfaces. I could be wrong: I don't play a whole lot of video games, but GoldenEye and Perfect Dark had fairly simlar UIs, adjusted of course for different functions withing the game.

Game-like UI could be useful.... (2)

Doctor_D (6980) | about 13 years ago | (#2240228)

I wouldn't mind seeing a game-like UI for stuff like Office and crap like that. I would turn the option on for most users. Of course myself, I'd rather have everything there, so it exists when I need it.

Of course I can see people doing stuff along the lines of Final Fantasy.. Click there, open this pop-up box, type that, twist this and belch and volia you have the ultimate resume wizzard. But you can only get this after 90 hours of churing out presentations, databases (wannabe), spreadsheets and documents. I can almost see the spam that would create in an office environment.

I guess what I'm getting at, there are users that know enough to use some of the advanced features, but don't need them for everything. How can you enable these features without running a typical M$ gauntlet. (i.e. trying to update IE2.0 on a fresh NT install, yet the new version of IE requires a new service pack, but you can't get the new service pack 'cause the page to download it won't open in IE2.0)

Shhh, it's a secret (2, Funny)

The Slashdolt (518657) | about 13 years ago | (#2240231)

Hemos, Don't worry, games don't know the secret of U and I. And I will keep my promise not to say anything. So don't worry my little soldier boy :-).

Kisses

True True (3, Interesting)

BrookHarty (9119) | about 13 years ago | (#2240233)

The only thing that will push a computer to its limits is a game. No one admits it but no one needs a new computer to do a spreadsheet programme or Word document.

The problem with the industry is nobody admits jack shit. Marketing folks seem to think everyone wants to buy airline tickets, but we all know pr0n built the Internet.

No one wants to get a trailer on their mobile phone. What people want to do is take a picture of themselves and their spouse in front of the Eiffel Tower and send that image to their teenage daughter back in England

Over in Japan, the most popular thing for 3G phones are entertainment (Pr0n and Instant messaging). One game, you can chat with an IA women and try to see how far you can push it before she gets mad.

For consumers its Entertainment, music, pr0n or video games. Business customers might pay 5x the price for the service, but you have 100x average consumers.

Come to think about it, I bets thats why they sell so many vibrating batteries.

Pushing the oxymoronic UI envelope (5, Insightful)

KFury (19522) | about 13 years ago | (#2240251)

There's a lot to be said for consistancy in UI. While games introduce some daring new metaphors and interaction models, it doesn't do a whole lot of good when each iteration forces you to relearn several of the skills you already learned (this, by the way, is also my beef with Mac OS X. People learn how to use a finder and you make them use a totally new one!)

On the simplest level it's things like the 'inverted mouse' problem in FPS games, but whenever a hot game developer figures out a cool way to convey manipulation of another custom game feature, it detracts from the learning curve.

It's a shame that 'pushing the envelope' and 'consistancy of design' are orthogonal terms. It would be great of the game designers got together and admitted that they're each trying to make the better game, but that establishing consistant design patterns for interactivity can increase the playability of all games, and let the struggle be with the puzzles, and not the interface.

Really about UI? (0)

rootmonkey (457887) | about 13 years ago | (#2240256)

I read the article and liked it, but I thought it was more about why technology advances and how it is up to people to indicate to the designers what they want from technology. I think the article focused on games because generally gamers know what they want, i.e. a good game, a pretty game, a game with a good ui. As for technology in general its kind of like lets throw this out there and see how the public reacts, they're just guessing, nothing to really drive technology's future. We have the technology we just have to figure out what we want to do with it. I know I don't need my toaster running Java and hooked up to the internet but that might not stop someone from trying to sell it to me.

wow (0)

Atrophis (103390) | about 13 years ago | (#2240258)

After reading the review, and seeing her picture, i have to say that this girl is hawt! ;^)

I think it kind of depends on the complexity... (1)

mystery_bowler (472698) | about 13 years ago | (#2240260)

of whatever it is you are turning into a game. Flight sims, for instance, have very complex interfaces because of the complexity involved with making a flight sim realistic. Many RPGs have complex interfaces because of the depth the game designers tried to pack into the game. Action games, by nature, are meant to be simplistic and visceral. Hence, the interface for playing Unreal Tournament or Quake III is pretty straightforward and doesn't distract much from the excitement of the game play. So you can't just assume an interface is bad just because it's complex.

But most of all, I think the majority of games are aimed at younger adults and children, so the interfaces must be simple, else the game becomes frustrating and the exact opposite of what is desireable in a game: not fun. And don't forget that a game is usually limited in scope, so the interface is specific to the presentation of that game. Creating a friendly, intuitive UI for a multi-purpose OS is more difficult that it sounds.

Truth be told, though, I think today's desktop environments have pretty good interfaces. It might just be my being used to this style of interface, but I feel like I transition between Windows machines, Macs, X and KDE pretty well. We might not be at the epitome of user-friendly UI yet, but I don't think it's that bad.

Unreal UI (3, Interesting)

supabeast! (84658) | about 13 years ago | (#2240262)

The Unreal Tournament UI certainly pushed game UIs to a new level, with easy to access, well organized drop down menus. . If I had more time I would probably hack up enlightenment to make it work like that. Trbies 2 did a great job with taking the UT and Tribes interfaces and merging them in tabbed pages and pulldowns to produce one of the best, albeit somewhat complicated (Due only to all the cool features of the game.) menus anyone has ever made for anything.

EverQuest is another great example of game UI development. Their UI was damned lame at first, but over time has become fully customizable in regards to positioning, size, colors and transparency, all created from the input of hundreds of thousands of users.

What I really would like to see is a merging of the UT/Tribes style interface with EverQuest customizability, along with all of the keyboard manipulation provided in Maya, and of course, easy to design and implement themes.

If anyone wants any help designing a gui, feel free to shoot me a message...

Re:Unreal UI (1)

gss (86275) | about 13 years ago | (#2240371)

I actually found the Unreal UI to be much the same as Windows or any other typical window manager. The Quake 3 interface, or more specifically the Team Arena interface is a lot nicer.

good example (1)

Telastyn (206146) | about 13 years ago | (#2240271)

is the forthcoming Master of Orion 3 (moo3). Almost half of the Dev Diaries I've read for this game detail not the game, or it's play, but how to efficiently pack 100 screens into a usable interface that won't confuse newbies.

Gamespy [gamespy.com] had a diary with screenshots.

The UI for my new webcam looks eerily similar to the side buttons.

Interacting/UI, etc. (2)

ackthpt (218170) | about 13 years ago | (#2240278)

Pardon me a moment while I strap myself into by Nerd-o-Tronic Virtual World Interaction Suit (bet you don't see Slashdot in 3D!) and get a fist full of gyros, get a lock on my corneas and prepare to go totally human with this 2D screen and keyboard...


Interaction with games or other software has always had fine people like JC trying to figure out how to build a better interface or control, as far back as electronic drafting boards or Sirius Joyport. Weird controls have come and gone to make the game "real" (steering wheels, vibrating chairs, better joy sticks, etc.) and eventually we find ourselves looking at new games or software which still rely on keyboards (one of the most infuriating devices for action games if you type like I do (9 thumbs and one hunt-and-peck finger)) or any of a series of non-standard devices. Probably the closest we came to one standard for input was back in the hay-days of Atari 2600 and C64 computers. (Yet, arcade games had buttons slap dashed around consoles which made Defender nearly impossible for me to pay, yet my hand-to-eye let me rule in Pacman)


The article doesn't delve much into why we keep flopping all over and re-discovering bad interfaces and controls, 20 years after these things became mainstream. Probably has less to do with the designer and consultant than it has with the actual market force of millions of buyers who never gave a thought beyond the package graphics.


So call me a skeptic.

Russia says US is dangerous for coders (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2240304)

Russia tells computer experts to stay home
By Reuters
August 31, 2001, 11:25 a.m. PT
MOSCOW--Russia warned its computer experts Friday of the dangers of visiting the United States after a Russian software designer was arrested there for violating a controversial new law.

Last July, Dmitry Sklyarov became the first person to be arrested on charges of selling technology designed to circumvent a 1998 U.S. copyright protection law. Formally arraigned Thursday, he faces up to 25 years in jail if convicted.

"We want to point out to all Russian specialists cooperating with U.S. firms in computer programming and software design that, whatever the outcome of Sklyarov's case, they may fall under the jurisdiction of the 1998 Act on the territory of the United States," the Foreign Ministry said in a statement.

The Digital Millennium Copyright Act, which upholds copyright protection in computer and electronic programs, has sparked controversy among legal experts, although many U.S. businesses favor it.

Sklyarov, 26, spent 21 days in prison before being freed on bail amid noisy protests by advocates of free speech and other supporters. He pleaded not guilty.

The Russian programmer has written a program enabling people using Adobe Systems' eBook software to copy and print digital books or transfer them to other computers.

He was arrested while visiting a hackers' convention in the United States.

Lots to learn. (1)

unsung (10704) | about 13 years ago | (#2240308)

What a game would do is immediately give you those three features and then as you progressed and became a more powerful character it would give you more features.

Being an avid gamer and delving into UI for my work, I'd have to agree with this statement. Games have to offer extremely rich environments ... cram almost all of the info into a screen. Not an easy task. All features are there from the get go, but the most often used, the most basic features are also easier to remember and perform. I'm not saying that any one game has the perfect UI, just that they are forced to attack the problem from a different angle... the game, Black & White, for example, has a gestural interface... How does this affect the normal graphics paradigm? Which has more importance? Is it easier/faster to remember/perform clicking an onscreen button or draw a circle with the pointer? There a lot that we can learn from.

Often, programs try to accomplish basic features by hiding them (Advanced/Beginner menus) or making the program smarter and smarter (thereby more and more useless). These tend to annoy the advanced users because then they have to spend an extra hour to customize it and turn everything off.

If nothing else, game UI's are focused (4, Insightful)

Junks Jerzey (54586) | about 13 years ago | (#2240310)

Most game UIs are written with custom code, not huge object-oriented libraries. And they tend to be very usable and snappy on what amounts to low-end hardware (thinking of game consoles here). Compare this to any method of creating a UI for your favorite OS, whatever it may be. It is an order of magnitude easier to write a game-like UI from scratch than it is to learn to use any of the various UI toolkits, even if you already know those toolkits.

Along those lines, I am continually amazed when Windows XP (or the even a new KDE or whatever) requires significantly more CPU power than the previous version. Does handling clicks on widgets _really_ take that much processing power? We just blindly assume "oh yeah, context sensitive help, that's _gotta_ be expensive." But c'mon, these things could have been lightning fast on the Commodore 64.

Black and White (1)

xiangpeng (324117) | about 13 years ago | (#2240312)

Those guys at LionHead studios once said that they hated to use icons, and thereforce, most of the interactions the user does in the game is thru mouse click, drags and gestures.

Speaking of gestures, it is used in Opera too :)

user-defined incremental UI... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2240314)

...THAT is something I would like to see more of: A simple mode for Grandma or quick, careless work, and more advanced modes for when you want to do more. It is around, but thinly spread.

Bottom line: why should I have to 'prove' to the computer that I am smart enough to handle the Expert Mode. Let me fire it up and make an ass out of myself if I want!

Getting rid of the network bottleneck? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2240315)

So all the computer makers are now praying for everyone to get high bandwidth with high-speed connections so that the computer then again becomes the bottleneck.

I just don't see us ever getting enough bandwidth so that the CPU becomes the bottle neck again... The CPU is quite capable of handling the load of graphics display. Once there is enough bandwidth, it probably makes more sense to distribute the graphics engine into a big ass farm of servers and just send the images... How much does it take to send live TV image.. about 6MB/sec max?

Why Open Source / Linux sucks ; (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2240323)

The terms "opensource" and "Linux" are nothing but buzzwords created by the jews to promote free-software, when in fact they are without a doubt profiting highly from this so-called "free" software.

The terms "opensource" and "Linux" are nothing but buzzwords created by the jews to promote free-software, when in fact they are without a doubt profiting highly from this so-called "free" software..

The terms "opensource" and "Linux" are nothing but buzzwords created by the jews to promote free-software, when in fact they are without a doubt profiting highly from this so-called "free" software...

The terms "opensource" and "Linux" are nothing but buzzwords created by the jews to promote free-software, when in fact they are without a doubt profiting highly from this so-called "free" software....

The terms "opensource" and "Linux" are nothing but buzzwords created by the jews to promote free-software, when in fact they are without a doubt profiting highly from this so-called "free" software.....

The terms "opensource" and "Linux" are nothing but buzzwords created by the jews to promote free-software, when in fact they are without a doubt profiting highly from this so-called "free" software......

The terms "opensource" and "Linux" are nothing but buzzwords created by the jews to promote free-software, when in fact they are without a doubt profiting highly from this so-called "free" software.......

The terms "opensource" and "Linux" are nothing but buzzwords created by the jews to promote free-software, when in fact they are without a doubt profiting highly from this so-called "free" software........

www.anandtech.com: Windows 2000 IIS (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2240327)

Only if it wasn't for the fact that according to netracft: "The site www.anandtech.com is running Microsoft-IIS/5.0 on Windows 2000". I wonder if it is patched against CR.

Perfect UI (2, Insightful)

mcelli (518034) | about 13 years ago | (#2240333)

In response to the title of this post: Games do have the secret to the UI because they are single task programs. Saying a game has the perfect UI is like saying a Toaster has the perfect UI. I think that the number one rule of a UI is the less you can do, the easier it is to do it.

The article brings up some good points about making things more real, but personally, it's no more real to me now that it was in the days of Coleco Vision. Final Fantasy X doesn't make me feel any more like I'm "in the game" than Final Fantasy I did. Graphics and presentation have obviously gotten better, but that's only made games nicer to look at, and hasn't made them any more real for me.

I'd like to hear people's comments on whether or not these graphics bring a sense of realism. I equate it to the change from say twm to GNOME/KDE, it's prettier, but it's not any more "real".

new title for this chick,... (1)

ebbv (34786) | about 13 years ago | (#2240336)


captain obvious.

i and everyone i know has always known everything she says. who doesn't realize that games are the bleeding edge of software? hermits who live deep in the yukon nature reserves?

jeebus..
...dave

Adaptive UI Question - reply with your answer (1)

Uttles (324447) | about 13 years ago | (#2240343)

OK, so some people seem to think adaptive UI is the way to go, and some think it's a bad idea, so let me present this scenario: In one of the newer versions of Microsoft Office they implemented a feature which hides the commands on the drop down menus that you don't use very often. When you click on, say, "Tools" only the first few options are displayed, and the last option is two arrows pointing downward that when selected expand the menu and show everything. What do you all think, is this worthwhile or does it just annoy you? Do you want to see more of it?

I personally hate it. Give me all the options, give me the power to do many, many things. Sure I may end up using only 10 or so on a regular basis, but the point is that when I do need that rare tool I want to be able to get it without a hassle.

BS (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2240352)

Games barely know the secret og GAMES.

Microsodft verboten das Red Hat (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2240358)

"Das Ziel von DeviceMaster besteht im Minimieren der Verwaltungs- sowie proprietären Kosten von remote bereitgestellten Systemen und Geräten", sagte Lee Stagni, Präsident und COO von Comtrol. "Es ist die Lösung für den industrieweiten Bedarf an intelligenter Gerätekonnektivität und Remoteverwaltung. Indem wir unseren Kunden eine Open Source-Umgebung anbieten, geben wir Entwicklern die Möglichkeit, sowohl den Applikations- als auch Betriebssystemcode an verschiedene gerätespezifische Applikationen anzupassen."


Die DeviceMaster-Familie der kostengünstigen und soliden Mikrocomputer stellt eine leistungsstarke Plattform zum Durchführen von applikationsspezifischen Tasks dar. In LAN- oder Internetverbindungen macht die Flexibilitat des DeviceMaster-Mikrocomputers remote platzierte Server zur lokalen Embedded-Steuerung überflüssig. Gleichzeitig können die Benutzer Applikationen für remote Geräte hosten und ausführen. Darüber hinaus werden automatisierte Wartung und Supportfunktionen aktiviert. Weitere Informationen finden Sie unter http://www.devicemaster.com


"Das Verwalten der stets wachsenden Nachfrage nach Post-PC Computing-Appliances in unserer immer mehr vernetzten Welt ist eine der größten Herausforderungen, denen sich Embedded-Entwickler in der Zukunft gegenüber sehen", sagte Michael Tiemann, CTO von Red Hat. "Die Verfügbarkeit von Red Hat eCos für die DeviceMaster-Appliance bringt die Embedded-Gemeinschaft der offenen, standard-basierten remoten Geräteverwaltung näher."


Zu den Highlights der DeviceMaster-Produkte zählt Folgendes:



Netzwerkfähige Konfigurationen für 1 bis 32 serielle Geräte pro DeviceMaster.
10/100Base-T-Netzwerkkonnektivität mit integriertem Ethernet-Schalter, der "hub-lose" Downstream-Konnektivität bereitstellt.
Kompatibilität der Applikationssoftware mit nativen COM- oder TTY-Ports sowie remote TCP-Socketsverbindungen.
Voll funktionsfähiger Embedded Web Server, SMTP E-Mail-Agent und SNMP-Überwachung.
Programmierbare Verarbeitungsplattform mit On-board Flash und Arbeitsspeicher.
"Watchdog"-Software und Schaltkreise zum Zurücksetzen.
Internet-Eingabehilfen und Funktionen zur Remoteverwaltung.
Entwicklungstools und Support für Applikationssoftware
Red Hat, Inc.


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Red Hat unterstützt diese Plattform mit End-to-End Professional Services, die folgendes enthalten: Professional Consulting, Engineering Services, Enterprise Support Services und Global Learning Services. Red Hat Network ist der führende Interet-basierte Service, der den Einsatz und die Verwaltung dieser Produkte und Services vereinfacht und integriert. Zusätzliche Informationen über Red Hat erhalten Sie unter http://www.redhat.de


Red Hat hat seinen Hauptsitz im Research Triangle Park, N.C. und verfügt über Niederlassungen in der ganzen Welt. Investoranfragen beantwortet Gabriel Szulik bei Red Hat unter der Telefonnummer +1-919-547-0012.


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ZUKUNFTSBEZOGENE ERKLÄRUNGEN


Zukunftsbezogene Erklärungen in dieser Pressemitteilung werden gemäß der Safe-Harbor Bestimmung in Absatz 21E des Wertpapiergesetzes von 1934 abgegeben. Investoren werden gewarnt, dass es sich bei Darstellungen in dieser Pressemitteilung nicht um streng historische Darstellungen handelt. Darin enthalten sind, ohne Einschränkung, Pläne und Ziele der Unternehmensleitung für zukünftige Projekte und die Einschätzung von Marktfaktoren durch die Unternehmensleitung, die mit Risiken und Unsicherheiten behaftet sind. Diese Risiken und Unsicherheiten beinhalten ohne Einschränkung: Produktplanung und Funktionsfähigkeit dieser Produkte, die Fähigkeit von Red Hat, Benutzer für redhat.com zu gewinnen; die Tatsache, dass es nicht sicher ist, ob E-Learning ein wirkungsvolles Schulungswerkzeug darstellt; das Vertrauen auf strategische Geschäftsbeziehungen, Wertentwicklung, die Möglichkeit, den Linux Kernel und andere Software weiterzuentwickeln; das Vertrauen auf strategische Partnerschaften, Wachstumsmanagement, das mögliche Auftreten von unentdeckten Softwarefehlern, das Risiko von Wirtschaftsflauten im allgemeinen und speziell in Red Hats Branche, das Risiko von Wettbewerb und Preisbildungsdruck, die Rentabilität des Internets und andere Risiken, entsprechend den Ausführungen in Red Hats Unterlagen bei der Börsenaufsichtsbehörde. Auf Kopien dieser Unterlagen kann über die Website der Börsenaufsichtsbehörde unter http://www.sec.gov zugegriffen werden./P

No (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2240361)

(nt)
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