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44% of Twitter Users Have Never Tweeted

samzenpus posted about 3 months ago | from the 140-characters-to-go dept.

Twitter 121

First time accepted submitter RileyWalz (3614865) writes "Twopcharts (a third party website that records and monitors activity on Twitter) is reporting that about 44 percent of all 947 million accounts on Twitter have never posted a single tweet. Of the 550 million users who have tweeted before, 43 percent posted their last tweet over a year ago. And only about 13.3 percent have tweeted in the last 30 days. This could be a sign of many users just signing up and forgetting about their account, or they just prefer reading other's posts. Twitter is not commenting on this data, saying that they do not talk about third-party information related to its service."

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121 comments

Probably typical (5, Insightful)

Chrisq (894406) | about 3 months ago | (#46745249)

Most will have signed up, thought it crap, and never returned. Most people don't delete dead accounts and counting them as "users" is as false as counting someone as driving a Toyota if they once took a test drive.

Re:Probably typical (4, Insightful)

buchner.johannes (1139593) | about 3 months ago | (#46745259)

No, what it means is that the majority of accounts are bots, created to increase follower-numbers.

Re:Probably typical (5, Informative)

Johann Lau (1040920) | about 3 months ago | (#46745277)

No, it means both.

Re:Probably typical (4, Interesting)

penix1 (722987) | about 3 months ago | (#46745307)

And a third group people are totally forgetting.... Parents and students where the schools has said it will use Twitter to tell them of emergencies. They get the account solely to receive these notices.

Re:Probably typical (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46745483)

Who the fuck is stupid enough to agree to something like this? Why not a phone number for personal emergencies or email for broadcast stuff, hell even a plain old SMS would work better.

Re:Probably typical (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46745637)

Who the fuck is stupid enough to agree to something like this? Why not a phone number for personal emergencies or email for broadcast stuff, hell even a plain old SMS would work better.

A 20-year old can be a parent these days.

I think that says enough about why or how social media ever fucking got on the emergency options list. There are a lot of young people out there that communicate no other way, nor have they ever had a need to.

Reminds me a lot of the old AOL days when people thought that shit was the "internet" where everyone searched by keyword.

Re:Probably typical (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46745733)

These systems are not meant for personal emergencies. They are meant for situations that have to go out to the whole school population at once. Like weather closing/delays, or that a there is bear prowling the playground, recess is canceled (yes, I really did get a message like this once).

Re:Probably typical (1)

Bacon Bits (926911) | about 3 months ago | (#46745885)

The school district I work at uses a messaging system which is capable of sending phone calls (pre-recorded or computer generated voice), email, SMS, and twitter. We also contact the local news agencies if the emergency requires it (school closures, etc.). We also use it for attendance calls for students with unexcused absences or tardies. Parents are signed up for phone calls (required at time of registration) and email (if given) by default, but they have to opt in for SMS.

We still have parents who don't know about school emergencies.

Re:Probably typical (1)

egranlund (1827406) | about 3 months ago | (#46746863)

hell even a plain old SMS would work better.

If you set it up properly, you can have twitter send you an SMS whenever a specific users tweets.

Re:Probably typical (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46745667)

My daughter's school uses a phone call and text for emergencies, but several of the teachers have Twitter feeds for classroom updates or homework reminders. That's why I signed up.

Re:Probably typical (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46748021)

He is correct. Both. Ive had an account for around 4 years, I follow maybe 3 people and log in one or 2 times per year when there is news. I dont think I have ever posted anything.

Re:Probably typical (1)

cyberchondriac (456626) | about 3 months ago | (#46748335)

I've had an account for a few years now (under my real name, darn it), and have posted all of two or three times; the only reason I joined was for a contest.. and I won. (I got a free Kymera wand out of the deal, totally worth it)
Other than that, I just don't see much call for it.

In other news... (4, Insightful)

Joce640k (829181) | about 3 months ago | (#46745349)

In other news: 44% of Slashdot readers have never posted a single comment.

Re:In other news... (5, Funny)

Monsieur_F (531564) | about 3 months ago | (#46745383)

In other news: 82% of Slashdot readers have never read a single article.

Re:In other news... (0, Redundant)

peragrin (659227) | about 3 months ago | (#46745499)

In related news 90% of Slashdot Editors don't proofread the summaries before posting articles.

Re:In other news... (2)

grep -v '.*' * (780312) | about 3 months ago | (#46745551)

In other news: 82% of Slashdot readers have never read a single article.

And if you're using slashdot beta, that number drops to a low 101% of the comments.

Why that extra 1%? Why that's because the print function is also in beta and it loses comments before th

Re:In other news... (4, Funny)

marcello_dl (667940) | about 3 months ago | (#46745651)

In other news, 100% of facebook users have never booked a face.

Re:In other news... (1)

Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) | about 3 months ago | (#46746331)

With user IDs well into the millions here, some days I think everybody must post every day.

Re:In other news... (1)

mea2214 (935585) | about 3 months ago | (#46748567)

In other news: 55% of all statistics are made up.

Re:Probably typical (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46745365)

This exactly.

If you use a tool like who.unfollowed.me you'll quickly notice a trend that about 50% of the "people" who follow you are doing so only to either make you visit their website, or click on links in their stream, or they message you with spam links. These accounts quickly disappear or stop working after a few days, use photos stolen from other twitter users or from dating sites, and generally are "trash" followers.

The ones that haven't posted a thing are generally people who read-only, have more than one account and only post to one of them, or are brand/name camping so nobody else gets it.

In many cases, twitter showcases the problem with tying identity to a pseudonym. Those who regularlly use 3/4/5 character names often are screwed if we don't camp our names before others do, and some sites won't allow pseudonyms less than 6 or less than 8 characters.

I could see twitter going back to the identity verification in a more limited basis, if only to provide a monetization layer for paying for staff verification.
If a name is a "real name", pay a one time charge by credit/debit card with the same name on it. This would put a green verified box next to the user name. The blue box will continue to be used for identities that twitter staff have verified on their own.
If a name is a nickname, pesudo-name, or a business/brand, then the user must mail a business card showing both the brand, twitter handle and name used. This would put a different color icon (maybe violet) that signifies that this has been professionally identified, and clicking on it should show the business card.

All that the latter does is verify that the twitter account is associated with the brand and not the reverse of the user verifying their name.

What this does in the grand scheme of things is do what Livejournal was doing right, in making users pay for an extra feature that says that "this user cares about keeping this account" , Unlike livejournal, an annual maintenance fee is probably too much of a joke to do.

At any rate the problem is that half the accounts out there are made just to farm followers. They get registered and then they are camped on.

Re:Probably typical (1)

stderr_dk (902007) | about 3 months ago | (#46745785)

If a name is a "real name", pay a one time charge by credit/debit card with the same name on it. This would put a green verified box next to the user name. The blue box will continue to be used for identities that twitter staff have verified on their own.

How much longer do you think the twitter staff is going to verify accounts on their own, if they can get people to pay instead?

If your answer to that question is longer than the time it took you to read the question, you're kidding yourself.

If a name is a nickname, pesudo-name, or a business/brand, then the user must mail a business card showing both the brand, twitter handle and name used.This would put a different color icon (maybe violet) that signifies that this has been professionally identified, and clicking on it should show the business card.

All that the latter does is verify that the twitter account is associated with the brand and not the reverse of the user verifying their name.

No. All it does is verify that the user had enough money to get one business card printed and mailed to Twitter.

Re:Probably typical (4, Insightful)

ildon (413912) | about 3 months ago | (#46745595)

There's a third type of person who never tweets. One that essentially uses Twitter as an RSS feed, news aggregator, and/or joke-a-day (or joke-a-five-minutes) feed. They could still be considered "active" users, in that they use the service, but don't feel the need to post.

Re:Probably typical (1)

Narcocide (102829) | about 3 months ago | (#46745741)

But, curiously enough, they're indistinguishable from the bots.

Re:Probably typical (1)

egranlund (1827406) | about 3 months ago | (#46746929)

But, curiously enough, they're indistinguishable from the bots.

Not really, as a bot by definition isn't a person.

People who sign up for Twitter and use it a as a news source or whatever are still getting something out of it.

Re:Probably typical (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46745887)

Behind every successful student, there is an orphaned twitter account.

Re:Probably typical (1)

Gonoff (88518) | about 3 months ago | (#46746041)

I use it this way and cannot see any other use for it.

Want to send me a message? Try email, SMS, skype.G+ and so on. Even Facebook.

Want to send me a picture - see above...

I see no other use for a 140 character max message than to replace the RSS feed

Re:Probably typical (1)

GuitarNeophyte (636993) | about 3 months ago | (#46747071)

this is completely me. I have three people I follow. 1) My wife. She logged in and followed herself on my account. 2) a band I like 3) DDO (D&D MMO) because it tells me when there are special deals, because I think that their normal prices are too high, but I enjoy the game. I never post. I just check every once in a while to see if they have posted anything interesting recently.

Re:What's the point? (2)

taiwanjohn (103839) | about 3 months ago | (#46747941)

Can someone explain to me in a sentence or two how and why Twitter is useful? I've had an account for many years, but every time I log in to check, it just looks like a mess. And yet there are millions of people who (apparently) think it's awesome, so I must be doing something wrong.

I would love to hear some examples of how others have found Twitter useful.

Re:What's the point? (1)

physcofish (923796) | about 3 months ago | (#46748455)

Shockingly, I have gotten better support from Samsung's twitter support account than their phone and email support.

Re:Probably typical (1)

hodet (620484) | about 3 months ago | (#46746413)

You mean those hot women that are following me are not real?!

Re:Probably typical (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46746445)

There are a lot of bots like that, no doubt. There are also many people like me who think twitter is stupid. I created an account to enter a contest to win a computer. You had to tweet some stupid thing. I didn't care; as nobody would be following my brand new account so I entered (and didn't win). I left the account there and sign on once every 6 months (just to be sure it stays alive) because I saw a lot of fake accounts causing people with well known names to have to use silly things like "TheRealDvorak" or "NotPatrick". I figure if twitter ever becomes "not stupid", I'll want to have my name for an ID and not let some jackass take it.

Re:Probably typical (1)

Big Hairy Ian (1155547) | about 3 months ago | (#46745319)

No it just means they are all following Nadine Dorries and can't get a tweet in edgewise!

Re:Probably typical (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46745409)

Why is this modded as "troll"? The points raised are valid. How many accounts have you lot created on the billion sites and how many are actually used?

Re:Probably typical (1)

Gunboat_Diplomat (3390511) | about 3 months ago | (#46745477)

Why is this modded as "troll"? The points raised are valid. How many accounts have you lot created on the billion sites and how many are actually used?

I don't think he deserved troll at all, but I do think he is mistaken. Not about the dead accounts, they obviously exists in great volume, but the assumption that these are counted in quoted user numbers. Almost all large online services, and third party statistic sites like Comscore, use "logged in at least once last month" as the metric for their user count. Where there is inflation in user numbers are when multi-service companies are making sure that users that intended to go to one service also "visits" another (looking at you Google+).

Re:Probably typical (4, Interesting)

shri (17709) | about 3 months ago | (#46745433)

Most people are consumers of tweets. They follow people, click through their links / updates etc. If you look at forums and other community media, you'll see that getting >10% of users to contribute is actually VERY good.

Re:Probably typical (3, Interesting)

hodet (620484) | about 3 months ago | (#46746395)

You don't need to tweet for twitter to be useful. Many people follow others or use it to keep on top of things. For example, if there is a minor earthquake somewhere there is no better place to really find out what happened quickly than twitter. "Holy crap, #EARTHQUAKE, shook the building for 30 seconds"

Re:Probably typical (1)

bluefoxlucid (723572) | about 3 months ago | (#46746433)

OMG TWITTER IS DYING!

Re:Probably typical (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46746485)

This is where I'm at.

I signed up to save my name there, played around with it a little bit, and found it to be a completely crap system, unless you're an attention whore or a company advertising. I am neither, hence my account remains unused.

Re:Probably typical (2)

mlts (1038732) | about 3 months ago | (#46746725)

You can count me in that category. I signed up way back in 2008 because after getting out of college, prospective employers would demand if I had a FB/MySpace/Twitter account, and if not, the interview was up, as the HR rep felt that it was mandatory for anyone in IT to have social networking accounts to be considered up to date in skills.

So, I created a Twitter account, followed EMC and a few other names, and called it done... it did make the bean counters happy because they thought I was "with it".

Re:Probably typical (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46746961)

Most will have signed up, thought it crap, and never returned. Most people don't delete dead accounts and counting them as "users" is as false as counting someone as driving a Toyota if they once took a test drive.

I am one of those. Signed up for an acoount. Thought it was a stupid waste of my time and never used it.

Re:Probably typical (1)

ron_ivi (607351) | about 3 months ago | (#46748239)

I've done this on Twitter (signed up, thought it crap, forgot my password, never returned(as that same account)) at least a dozen times.

Same with Facebook. I have one throwaway facebook account for just about every damn application or website that makes me "log in / sign up using facebook" - and in each case I promptly forget my username and password and never log in again.

I imagine that's more typical than those companies care to admit.

Fakes (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46745267)

Most of these accounts are fake. Just made to boost the popularity of celebrities/politicians so they look like they are more popular.

Re:Fakes (1)

invictusvoyd (3546069) | about 3 months ago | (#46745303)

Twitter and microblogging in general have limited use. I dont think anyone would be interested in knowing what you ate for breakfast today . For example ,the only twitter feed I see some sense in following is probably "Richard Stallman" ( the fact that I dont follow it is another thing . ) . So to think of it , twitter is meant to have more "followers" .. The stats are kinda predictable ..

Fakes (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46745401)

Doesn't mean people don't THINK others don't want to know what they ate for breakfast... You'd be surprised at the garbage I've seen posted on both FB and Twitter.

Re:Fakes (1)

invictusvoyd (3546069) | about 3 months ago | (#46745475)

yeah garbage man .. they just dont know what BIG data is.. and they dont care .. Ignorance is bliss . AFAIK big data is a form of evil feeding on the ignorant ..

Re:Fakes (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46745631)

yeah garbage man .. they just dont know what BIG data is.. and they dont care .. Ignorance is bliss . AFAIK big data is a form of evil feeding on the ignorant ..

more like a form of the ignorant spreading their butt cheeks and saying OH RAVAGE ME EVIL FUCK ME HARD RIGHT NOW! and then acting surprsied again and again when they're exploited.

and then there's the naive bedwetters who call that "blaming the victim". you can't trust gov't and corporations. for fuck sake how many examples does it take? "victims" my ass. they're enablers. dangle the slightest promise of convenience in front of their nose and they'll sign up for ANYTHING.

Re:Fakes (1)

Jason Levine (196982) | about 3 months ago | (#46746045)

I'm a big user of Twitter and, yes, have even been known to post photos of my food from time to time. (Most times, the photo is used to illustrate a specific point, not just "Having my usual oatmeal.")

That being said, there are some trends on Twitter that make even me shake my head. To name two, there's the "sock" photos where guys post photos of themselves wearing nothing but a sock. (No, not on their feet.) Ostensibly, this is to raise money to fight testicular cancer, but you'll never see me posting a photo of this. The second one is "After Sex Selfies." Again, not something I'll ever engage in. (Any bets on how long it takes until some idiot tries to get "During Sex Selfies" to go viral?)

Too easy (4, Funny)

kruach aum (1934852) | about 3 months ago | (#46745271)

I wish the other 56% didn't either.

Re:Too easy (1)

Johann Lau (1040920) | about 3 months ago | (#46745281)

The 44% are the better (near) half of Twitter, keeping hope alive ^^

Re:Too easy (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 3 months ago | (#46745507)

Not (all) twits gonna tweet. It's actually something of a heartwarming discovery.

Re:Too easy (1)

savuporo (658486) | about 3 months ago | (#46749467)

If my calculations are correct, there is a 50/50 chance of a twit being a twat.

Not bad, actually (1)

jones_supa (887896) | about 3 months ago | (#46745295)

I bet there's a huge amount of dummy accounts in almost all websites. If you flip this around and look that 56% have said something, that's pretty good.

Re:Not bad, actually (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46745397)

I bet there's a huge amount of dummy accounts in almost all websites. If you flip this around and look that 56% have said something, that's pretty good.

Depending on what's meant by "dummy account," I estimate approximately 100% fall into that category. ;o)

BTW, how many twats would a Twitter twat tweet if a Twitter twat could tweet twats?

I wonder (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46745323)

What percentage of slashdot accounts have never commented? Probably much lower because of AC here, but I bet there are quite a few. For example, I think I made an account here one drunken night, but I have never used it.

Re:I wonder (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46745589)

I have three Slashdot accounts, an older one that I forgot, and the email account belonged to an old ISP and was no longer valid when I wanted to log in one day, so I can't reset the password. So I created this one, using my own domain's email address which I had established by then. Then I have another one which I created more recently, until I happened to remember this one. So that means three accounts, two of which haven't been used for years, if ever.

Re:I wonder (1)

matria (157464) | about 3 months ago | (#46745603)

Oops... I hadn't even noticed that I wasn't logged in when making the previous comment! My eyes are getting worse all the time.

Finding correlation where there is none (2)

Roxoff (539071) | about 3 months ago | (#46745335)

Somehow the report of '44% of twitter accounts have never been used' has been morphed by the reporter into '44% of twitter users have never posted'.

I know people with multiple Twitter accounts, separation between business and pleasure accounts... some just to follow others without sticking their nose above the parapet (and are never tweeted from), some for larks, some for business.

44% of Twitter accounts != 44% of Twitter users.

The original poster has read some report on the internet and inferred meaning where none could possibly exist. Shoddy, shoddy journalism.

Why lower the data? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46745377)

We could look at how many accounts are used actively (token pulls, OAuth, logins) and not just one aspect of using twitter to get a much better idea of how Twitter is used. Simply stating that accounts don't use a certain feature is... misleading at best.

What's next, "Most people on blogger don't write blogs?" Certainly some people are just readers. (Not to mention the plethora of remade accounts, duplicates, bots, placeholders, etc...)

And 99% never posted anything interesting (2)

Katatsumuri (1137173) | about 3 months ago | (#46745405)

This is okay. Twitter is labelled as a "microblogging" platform, but many people use it as a multicast IM, or just a newsfeed app. Not to mention the bots.

Re:And 99% never posted anything interesting (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 3 months ago | (#46745559)

I suspect that the okay-ness of this fact depends on whether you are a disinterested observer (in which case your points are valid and likely account for many silent users, along with some amount of abandoned accounts, squatters, etc.) or whether you are somebody at Twitter, who would probably prefer to keep their (laughable) early post-IPO value of something north of 30 billion dollars, rather than have further bad news after announcing in Febuary of this year that you'd lost half a billion dollars in the last year, and that your >P/E ratio [nasdaq.com] is kind of tepid.

For a site that requires sign-up to do all but the most crippled reading/following (do they do public RSS, such that you could 'follow' without an account? Barely matters since the public mostly doesn't and their design makes just-sign-up-with-us easier for most non-geeks than getting RSS up and running, especially across devices), 56% participation is actually higher than I'd expect, and certainly far from shockingly low. It's just that any pretense of being worth more than the scrap value of their office furniture is largely based on optimistic subscriber numbers, so I suspect that they are Not Happy about somebody talking about it. If some analyst comes out with "Percentage of twitter accounts that are actually bots" tomorrow, I imagine they'd be less happy still.

Out of curiosity, how are the numbers for other so (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46745427)

Further proof that Google+ is dead in the OH WAIT, THAT SAID TWITTER? /s

Moste people (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46745495)

I have a newspaper subscription but I never post in it. Most people are passive in when they use a service.
Most people that are in a IRC chatroom are quiet but they are there out of habit and nothing else.

How is this a news article?
Having an "account" does not mean anything. Every letter I use here can be its own account on slashdot. Does slashdot got alot of new "users"?

Re:Moste people (1)

Andrewkov (140579) | about 3 months ago | (#46745833)

Yep, this has been true of every web service I've been involved with, all the way back to the BBS days. 90% of users are consumers and only about 10% actually contribute anything. Twitters numbers look pretty good, actually.

but... but... butt.... (0)

Virtucon (127420) | about 3 months ago | (#46745501)

I only signed up to see the tweet from Kim saying she had to buy two airplane seats because she couldn't get her fat ass into the seat or when her sister had to pay extra baggage fees for that melon on top of her head since it was considered a carry-on item.

self-knowledge (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46745531)

"This could be a sign of many users just signing up and forgetting about their account, or they just prefer reading other's posts."

Having the self-knowledge to know that -as most people- don't have something so interesting to communicate in the -so public- Twitter way (we still have email for the rest).
I am Greek - everything that needs to be said has already been said by my great ancestors! (o.k., o.k., i am leaving now...)

This is nothing when compared... (4, Insightful)

ctrl-alt-canc (977108) | about 3 months ago | (#46745537)

...to the fact that about 85% of world population does not use Twitter!

Slashdot (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46745545)

And luckily 99% of Slashdot-users have not Slashdotted either...

Use it for Nagios (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46745599)

Twitter is much faster and more reliable than text messages, and the ISP's don't bundle up the Tweets and make you wait an hour before they arrive like they've done repeatedly for SMS. That cost me a *job* because the IT guys refused to let me clear the constant 300 messages a day of Nagios alerts and kept saying "just pay attention to the important ones", which they could not define. So when I was on call, I'd have to pore through bursts of a hundred messages to try and figure out if any mattered, and by that time my boss (who would *never get off his damn email*) had already read the alerts and jumped in. Coupled with the "every message from the same phone->text system had a new contact number with it", and it was ridiculous.

Twitter was *very* helpful for dealing with this.

Re:Use it for Nagios (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46745697)

If only there were some way of writing software to filter out recurrent unimportant messages... ome sort of... glue language with good text processing capability... does anyone have any pearls of wisdom?

Re:Use it for Nagios (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46746807)

I'm sure we got a few gems here and there too.

Re:Use it for Nagios (1)

BitZtream (692029) | about 3 months ago | (#46746459)

Hate to break it to you, but you didn't deserve the job.

Your nagios config was broken, and if you were using some SMS service that batched the messages, your choice of providers was broken.

How did your boss get the alert ... oh thats right ... by using a reliable message delivery platform instead of an unreliable one.

Read your post again, and continue to re-read it until you understand why it 'cost you a job'

That's shockingly high. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46745683)

I would think the vast majority of people just used Twitter to read other people's shit. Although maybe a lot of people make one or two posts before finding the whole thing utterly tiresome and never logging in again, which would be the category I'm in.

Re:That's shockingly high. (1)

corezz (1603659) | about 3 months ago | (#46746149)

And of that 99.9999%, 100% thing they are posting something of value.

And on facebook... (1)

damn_registrars (1103043) | about 3 months ago | (#46745703)

99.9999% have never posted anything of any value.

Re:And on facebook... (1)

Virtucon (127420) | about 3 months ago | (#46745761)

I'd think there's enough consensus out there to say that there's never been anything of value on Facebook.

Re:And on facebook... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46745823)

99.9999% have never posted anything of any value.

That number seems a bit low...

It's a good service (2)

jones_supa (887896) | about 3 months ago | (#46745803)

Many people think that Twitter is some hipster bullshit, and I was somewhat in the same boat before. But when I slapped a Twitter client to the side of my desktop and subscribed to a bunch of cool tech guys and some news agencies, I really started to enjoy the stuff. The perfect way to stay updated to world events in easily digestible small capsules. Also much better platform to discuss nerdy stuff than Facebook.

Now only waiting for the angry AC to call me a Twitter shill.

Re:It's a good service (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46745837)

It's not that you're a Twitter shill, just that you're dull enough to feel you've been informed about anything in 140 characters. And your work and leisure activities lack any intellectual component, so you do not need to remain uninterrupted for more than a few minutes at a time. So, yeah... that.

Re:It's a good service (1)

jones_supa (887896) | about 3 months ago | (#46745891)

Hooray. Got the my nasty AC reply and my original comment is also modded down. This place is starting to look like Reddit: if you don't go with the hive mind, you will be beaten down.

Re:It's a good service (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46746175)

Hey, that's still better than /r/politics. There you will be modded down if you don't sound angry enough when you post.

Re:It's a good service (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46746561)

This place has been a filthy hive mind for years. Don't hate on Apple and love Google? Modded down. Aren't absurdly libertarian? Modded down. Don't love Tesla cars more than your own children? Down.

Re:It's a good service (1)

dave1791 (315728) | about 3 months ago | (#46747179)

Slashdot was the place to get modded down for going against the hive mind, before Reddit made getting modded down for going against the hive mind cool.

Re:It's a good service (1)

matria (157464) | about 3 months ago | (#46745907)

I'm certainly notified of any interesting developments in fields I'm interested in and follow, with links provided so I can follow up if I want to. It has to a large degree replaces newsgroups and mailing lists in those areas. I occasionally even "tweet" any new things I've done in those same areas, and have a handful (78 as of last check) of reasonably dedicated followers. While it's by no means a replacement for various blogs and forums I frequent, it's a good notifier that there's something interesting going on. Also helps when at conventions I want to find out which pub everybody in the other hotel is going to for the evening ;)

Re:It's a good service (1)

mspohr (589790) | about 3 months ago | (#46747777)

I have never "tweeted" but I do follow a few blogs, individuals, events, etc.
The twitter feed itself doesn't provide much information but the links are usually valuable.

90% of Slashdot users will leave when beta becomes (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46745827)

Like on this particular article. If you click on this article from slashdot classic, you are always redirected to Beta. We don't want beta Dice! Listen to your users! Forcing it on people is only going to cause a mass exodus from slashdot!

Re:90% of Slashdot users will leave when beta beco (1)

jones_supa (887896) | about 3 months ago | (#46746053)

Additionally, it's been in public testing for over a half year already. Kind of sad how Dice has kept us long time in a continuous stress of the gloomy shadow of Beta over us. I wonder how long this continues.

Here's why I did so. (4, Interesting)

Simulant (528590) | about 3 months ago | (#46745865)

I signed up and never posted simply to use twitter credentials on other web sites.

Re:Here's why I did so. (1)

thoth (7907) | about 3 months ago | (#46747441)

I did something similar. I signed up for the twitter account in order to follow a handful of others, and get event results (not all of which I am interested in). Of some use is an education account I follow for occasional tips learning a foreign language.

I think twitter is great for "one to many" information dissemination.

I have 2 twitter accounts... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46745873)

Never posted a single message.

No kidding (2)

ilsaloving (1534307) | about 3 months ago | (#46745913)

And when I see (usually in the news) posts from other twitters, it makes me wish the other 46% would do the same.

There is very little you can constructively say in just 140 characters. Twitter is great for only very specific scenarios such as status reports, quick facts, quick questions or witty one-liners.

Everything else is just inanity from people who think the more exclamation marks you use at the end of a sentence, the more seriously you should take their statement.

The sole reason I set up an account was so I could follow a couple of local restaurants because they post useful things like their daily specials. And that ST:TNG S8 guy. Too bad he stopped writing new plot synopses.

Re:No kidding (1)

msblack (191749) | about 3 months ago | (#46748273)

Don't you mean the other 56%?

Good old times (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46745925)

Anyone remember the good old days before Facebook, Instagram and Twitter? When you had to take a photo of your dinner, then get the film developed, then go around to all your friends' houses to show them the picture of your dinner?
No?
Me neither.

Short comments please. (1)

Alain Williams (2972) | about 3 months ago | (#46746087)

Will everyone commenting to this please do so in at most 140 characters. Thank you.

Et Ceteri (1)

kajong0007 (3558601) | about 3 months ago | (#46746169)

And I wish more of the remaining 56% would follow suit...

Business model impact... (1)

SkiTee94 (2984671) | about 3 months ago | (#46746341)

The number of dormant accounts isn't terribly surprising to anyone that's run a site with users (although its likely much higher than Twitter would like broadly known). The bigger concern is really how the high number of fake / zombie accounts on Twitter impact's it's business model. Advertisers pay for clicks/follows and in talking to advertisers I hear a frustration with the not insignificant amount of paid 'traffic' coming from bots/fake accounts that simply troll the site clicking links and 'following' people. Twitter needs to get much better at separating the 'real' users from the noise... and there's a LOT of noise. To an advertiser that's like finding out a bunch of those magazines you advertised in based on X number of subscribers were just shipped straight to the landfill...

What aboout topcharts? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46746345)

"Twopcharts (a third party website that records and monitors activity on Twitter)

So do they work for the NSA, or are they just a wanabe?

What Twitter IS Good For (2)

CMYKjunkie (1594319) | about 3 months ago | (#46747203)

Since I am the nerd of the family (I'm sure many of you can appreciate that), family always asks me: should I get on Twitter? My answer is "probably not" because it is really terrible as a person-to-person communication platform. 140 char limit will do that to you.

I use Twitter and it does have some uses, and I tell the family and friends that it's useful for...

* Breaking news (it's like a wire-service for the masses);

* Closely following a product/celebrity/athlete/event/sport;

* Posting a short question on a specific topic via #;

* Posting or finding witticisms and satire;

* Posting or finding a status report (not viable to foster a discussion by any means); and

* Finding spam, click-bait, impersonators of real people, bots, pr0n, and completely inaccurate information.

I mainly use Twitter myself to follow athletes in the NFL (primarily my team, Green Bay) and the three forms of motorsport I watch: NASCAR, Formula 1, and IndyCar. I really like Twitter during one of these sporting events because posters can give you more detail/insight into the event or people involved than just the TV or radio broadcasters (Example: sideline/pit reporters or members of a team participating in the event who can tweet during the event.)

IMHO though, the spam/bots/clickbait is out of control and detracts from the platform.

Twitter sounds like a lame idea (1)

GodfatherofSoul (174979) | about 3 months ago | (#46747893)

I could care less about "oh pasta here is so good" tweets from some celeb. I'm in that 44% and I set up an account just to hold my name.

Count me among the 44% (1)

msblack (191749) | about 3 months ago | (#46748259)

I signed up for Twitter as soon as it went public to preserve my name. However, I have yet to issue a single Tweet and only follow less than a handful of people I selected years ago. If I ever see the value of Twitter, I might tweet one day.

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