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First Glow-In-the-Dark Road Debuts In Netherlands

samzenpus posted about 5 months ago | from the shine-on dept.

Transportation 187

An anonymous reader writes "A 500 meter (0.3 mile) stretch of road in the Netherlands has opened without the standard crop of streetlights lining its perimeter. The streetlights are believed to be unnecessary since the road markings were painted on with a mix of photo-luminescent powder, which absorbs sunlight during the day and radiates a portion of that energy back at night. Whether the modified road paint can withstand harsh weather or even provide sufficient lighting given insufficient exposure to sunlight during the day remains to be seen. The project was orchestrated by Studio Roosegaarde, which in the future plans to implement weather-sensitive road markings that would inform drivers when outside temperatures drop or rise above certain levels."

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waitwhat (5, Funny)

Johann Lau (1040920) | about 5 months ago | (#46744631)

I started imagining this Route 66 of the future where technology jumps out of the computer screen and becomes part of us.

You took too much, man...

Re:waitwhat (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46746021)

Wired is great at writing completely retarded shit.

Useless (5, Insightful)

PPH (736903) | about 5 months ago | (#46744645)

We already have retroreflective paints. Road markings and signs illuminated by headlights are clearly visible. On the other hand, some things (like animals and pedestrians) require some means of illumination at night. Streetlights are OK, but headlights are better. An animal or other obstruction will only appear as a shadow against a glowing roadway.

Re:Useless for Electricity shills (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46744693)

All the pictures in TFA show illumination from headlights.

Re:Useless for Electricity shills (4, Insightful)

DarwinSurvivor (1752106) | about 5 months ago | (#46744817)

All the "pictures" in TFA are computer renderings. For a road that, apparently, has already been painted you'd think they could have taken at least 1 photo of it.

Re:Useless for Electricity shills (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46745023)

The Dutch article (http://nos.nl/audio/634119-het-lijkt-alsof-je-door-een-sprookjesbos-rijdt.html) has a low-res picture of it. The thing looks like a video, but is actually an audio fragment, but the picture is an actual picture of the 500m stretch of road.

Re:Useless for Electricity shills (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46745241)

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/Bk4mNfMIEAAkefo.jpg [twimg.com]

I don't think it's actually in use yet. It's still being set up.

Re:Useless (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46744727)

While some uses of glow-in-the-dark paint are obviously hazardous (i.e. because there will be pedestrians crossing the road), this kind of tests is done on pieces of highway in the Netherlands. And there it's perfectly safe.

Or at least safe enough, as for animals it's easier / less scary to take one of the many ecoducts (a stretch of nature built as a bridge across roads).

Useless - rather make better headlamps (1)

invictusvoyd (3546069) | about 5 months ago | (#46744737)

On the other hand, some things (like animals and pedestrians) require some means of illumination at night.

Right. Also, this cant work on overcast days . I really don't see the point of it . I'd say they'd rather invest that effort on headlight technology

Re:Useless - rather make better headlamps (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46744929)

Right. Also, this cant work on overcast days . I really don't see the point of it . I'd say they'd rather invest that effort on headlight technology

If needed, it can be powered through electricity according to the Dutch news source.

Re:Useless - rather make better headlamps (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46745543)

On the other hand, some things (like animals and pedestrians) require some means of illumination at night.

Right. Also, this cant work on overcast days . I really don't see the point of it . I'd say they'd rather invest that effort on headlight technology

I was thinking about snow. This is northern Europe, so aren't there going to be times when the luminescent markings are buried under the snow?

Streetlights don't have a problem with that.

Unless it snows REALLY deep, anyway!

Re:Useless - rather make better headlamps (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46745709)

Snow is relatively rare in The Netherlands (a few days per year) and winter service on public roads is generally excellent.

Re:Useless (1, Insightful)

Joce640k (829181) | about 5 months ago | (#46744751)

On the other hand, some things (like animals and pedestrians) require some means of illumination at night.

I wonder how we ever managed to survive before electric light...

Oh, wait, humans can actually see by starlight alone.

You're not going to read a book or do rocket surgery but you can walk around outdoors without electric lights even when there's no moon. I've done plenty of hiking, etc. under a full moon.

Re:Useless (5, Insightful)

Travis Mansbridge (830557) | about 5 months ago | (#46744803)

Yes, but today we are talking about driving.

Re:Useless (3, Informative)

reboot246 (623534) | about 5 months ago | (#46745159)

You can drive when the moon is out, especially when there's a full moon. I've done it on lonely stretches of road. Just turn off the headlights and you can see pretty much everything you need to see. Of course you can't do it when there are other vehicles out and about.

Re:Useless (2)

Jody Bruchon (3404363) | about 5 months ago | (#46745581)

Parking lights are surprisingly bright too. Someone I know hit a deer that took out both headlights on a back country road, but the parking lights were still working. They drove home just fine on hazard blinkers.

Re:Useless (3, Interesting)

AmiMoJo (196126) | about 5 months ago | (#46745927)

There is a lot of important stuff you can't see by moonlight alone. Animals, for example, tend to evolve to be hard to see. At least with headlights there is a chance you will see the light reflecting from their eyes, or their shape against the background.

Re:Useless (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46746979)

on the other hand sensitivity of your eyes decreases when you blast the surroundings with bright light. Outside of the cone of light you don't see shit.

Re:Useless (2)

FalcDot (1224920) | about 5 months ago | (#46744905)

I believe that what he meant is that drivers "require some means of illumination at night" in order to spot "some things (like animals and pedestrians)" so that they don't run them over.

Re:Useless (4, Interesting)

rtb61 (674572) | about 5 months ago | (#46745415)

Meh, I driven down thousands of kilometres of unlighted roadway, even unpaved roads, dodging roos and wombats like most Europeans would dodge rabbits. Simply adjust road speed to conditions. Road side illumination should be generally restricted to built up areas and be more about restricting nefarious activities rather than traffic safety.

road side illumination (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46745945)

Road side illumination should be generally restricted to built up areas and be more about restricting nefarious activities rather than traffic safety.

Also, where ever practible, around on- and off-ramps.

I personally don't see the point in having lights on most highways given that cars carry around their own illumination, and going straight and changing lanes doesn't need too much effort without lamps. But given the shuffling about just before, and just after, ramps, it's worth spending the resources to improve safety.

For the rest of the length of most highways (even those through urban areas): meh.

Re:Useless (4, Insightful)

mjr167 (2477430) | about 5 months ago | (#46746253)

I'm not sure what this obsession with street lights is... We don't have street lights where I live and it's nice. We somehow manage to not run over children and animals, though the deer do occasionally hit cars. Stupid deer dashing out of the woods and running into cars... (cars never hit deer, the deer always hits the car).

As a result we can look up and see the sky at night and we don't have street lights shining into our houses in the middle of the night.

Re:Useless (1)

Arker (91948) | about 5 months ago | (#46746601)

"Road side illumination should be generally restricted to built up areas"

Very true.

But the article is set in Holland. There is absolutely nowhere in Holland that is not a built up area, and it's been that way for centuries, possibly millenia. So it makes sense they have a lot of street lights. They have relatively little crime and if glowing markings on the road can be made to work reliably in that climate (which I suspect may take some time) it might actually make things safer. Street lights can blind but a soft red glow off the road would not.

Re:Useless (2)

hankwang (413283) | about 5 months ago | (#46744927)

"you can walk around outdoors without electric lights even when there's no moon."

I doubt that you can do that comfortably if there are trees blocking the little star light that's available or if it's a bad road surface combined with you not wearing rugged boots.

Apart from that, especially women don't feel comfortable going around in dark places where they perceive that there can be rapists hiding in the dark.

Stealth Mode? (4, Interesting)

SuperKendall (25149) | about 5 months ago | (#46745057)

Oh, wait, humans can actually see by starlight alone.

Not if you have headlights on, are you supposed to turn them off when you hit this stretch of road? And park for about fifteen minutes to dark adapt?

Re:Useless (2)

dkf (304284) | about 5 months ago | (#46745161)

Oh, wait, humans can actually see by starlight alone.

Which works just fine when it is cloudy (like it is quite a lot in the Netherlands). Oh, wait...

Re:Useless (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46745767)

Oh, wait, humans can actually see by starlight alone.

But the light-pollution actually makes it harder to see stars.

Re:Useless (2)

LWATCDR (28044) | about 5 months ago | (#46746107)

Sure on a night with a full moon you may see just fine. On a night with no moon and when it is overcast good luck. Also I live in Florida and in some areas I have hiked in even if it no overcast and there is no moon you are in trouble because of of the tree canopy. Full moon on sugar sand trails you are golden. It is so bright that you can read by it.
Back to the roads. I have driven from Mobile AL to Jackson Ms at night in the winter and I can tell you that those roads are darker than dark and just nerve racking even at the legal speed limit.

Re:Useless (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46745007)

Reflective paints are fine if you're driving at very moderate speeds. If you're driving with higher speeds on a long stretch of highway with oncoming traffic that potentially blinds you and doesn't allow you to use your high beam, it really helps if you can see the road stretch out in front of you and not just the short stretch illuminated by your low beam. It also builds confidence that you're not missing an unexpected turn and end up besides the road. Confidence is very important in safe driving, people that are not confident about their current situation on the road tend to do all kinds of unexpected maneuvers that can end badly.

Of course, there are roadside reflectors that could do roughly the same job, but their usage is often very inconsistent and often they're too dirty to be of any use. Roadside reflectors are also hard to clean (every reflector needs to be cleaned individually), whereas those lines could be cleaned alongside with the rest of the road.

Re:Useless (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46745095)

Well , just paint the animals with reflective color, too. How hard is that ? C'mon man, some common sense.

Re:Useless (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46745275)

Idiot. You'll have to repaint them every time they moult or breed.

Genetically engineer them to glow in the dark [livescience.com] and they'll reproduce themselves.

Re:Useless (4, Insightful)

physicsphairy (720718) | about 5 months ago | (#46745223)

Maybe it's not the best for inner city roads, but on long highway stretches it would be awfully nice to be able to see the road far ahead. Especially on road with hills and curves, headlights do a fairly bad job of lighting up that reflective paint (other than what's immediately ahead) because often your car is not oriented so as to illuminate it.

Re:Useless (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46745273)

I thought we had vagrancy laws against pedestrians?

Re:Useless (4, Informative)

Woek (161635) | about 5 months ago | (#46745921)

First, this allows you to see how the road curves very far ahead, and without using the high beams. It works much better then reflective paint.

Second, this is not painted on the road, it is a special strip that is embedded in the road surface. They can also send a tiny bit of current through it to intensify the glow, which is especially useful in winters. It essentially cuts the energy requirement with a factor of a few million (a number which I just made up).

Disclaimer: I live in the Netherlands

Re:Useless (1)

Anne Thwacks (531696) | about 5 months ago | (#46746091)

In the UK, we have had "cats-eyes" since at least WW2. These are rubber blobs embedded in the road holding two glass beads that reflect your headlights back, showing the line down the centre of the road. On bigger roads, they are also used to mark the edge of the road, and on motorways, there are coloured ones (red/greeen) to show whether or not it is sensible to cross the line.

They seem to last about 20 years, and do the job brilliantly.

I have also seen "glow in the dark paint" before, but can't remember where (as in: which country), I think it was abandonned because it was not very good.

Re:Useless (1)

fridaynightsmoke (1589903) | about 5 months ago | (#46746677)

Much of the world has reflective road studs of one kind or another, and in the UK the foreign types (eg 3M's product) tend to get used now instead of the traditional Cat's Eye because they have better reflective performance, as well as lower costs. - http://www.sabre-roads.org.uk/... [sabre-roads.org.uk]

Re:Useless (4, Insightful)

AmiMoJo (196126) | about 5 months ago | (#46745951)

This paint isn't retroreflective, it actually emits light. Good to see the road layout as it enters a bend from some distance away, and the exit to the bend where you headlights aren't pointing.

Re:Useless (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46746377)

Not all roads are reflective. In most southern states, yep, the lines (especially the middle yellow one) is bright and shiny. In some northern states (I'm looking at you Alaska!), the middle yellow line is *not* reflective for HUGE stretches of the highway. When driving at night, you really are scared that the oncoming driver notices the faint regular-yellow-paint separator and stays on their side of the road.

Re:Useless (1)

FatAlb3rt (533682) | about 5 months ago | (#46746501)

We already have reflective paint.
We already have 256k.

Should be good enough for anybody.

Tasteless joke coming in 3..2...1 (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46744695)

These aren't the first, they've had glowing roads in Fukushima for nye on 3 years now!

*ducks

Nature (3, Funny)

tsa (15680) | about 5 months ago | (#46744701)

Most animals and plants who live alongside the roads will love this. Finally they can sleep in the dark!

take my tax dollars (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46744741)

this is awesome

eight hours isn't very long (3, Interesting)

SimonInOz (579741) | about 5 months ago | (#46744819)

I used to live in the Netherlands, and I can confirm winters are cold and dark. Days are not very bright either. So an eight hour life (yes, I RTFA) for these very cool glowing roads is not going to cut it - nights comprise 16 hours of darkness in midwinter.
It should work well in the summer, when days are brighter and nights shorter.

But I think a backup is required, destroying the whole point.

But it does look very cool, doesn't it?

Re:eight hours isn't very long (3, Insightful)

91degrees (207121) | about 5 months ago | (#46744881)

Most night driving is between sunset and midnight though. For the morning hours, this isn't going to help, but cars do still have headlights so we're no worse off than before.

Re:eight hours isn't very long (1)

geogob (569250) | about 5 months ago | (#46745059)

Yes. No one drives short before sunrise in winter.

Re:eight hours isn't very long (2)

91degrees (207121) | about 5 months ago | (#46745077)

That isn't what I said or even something that I remotely implied. Of course they do. So how will not having illuminated roads in the morning make this any worse for them than not having illuminated roads at all at any time?

And how would these not working in the morning make them less useful to those who drive late at night?

Re:eight hours isn't very long (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46744939)

The Dutch article mentioned that the paint can also be illuminated by passing electricity trough it, to cover the long, dark days. This "booster" system is also primarily running from solar power, probably using a battery but that's not explicitly mentioned.

Re:eight hours isn't very long (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about 5 months ago | (#46745257)

8 hours covers a lot of late night traffic. When it's dark from, say, 5pm to 7am, you can get to about midnight before the power is out. So what's left is the early morning traffic that's out of light, i.e. that has to deal with what we have already.

Still I'd consider it a boost in safety. The chance to be lost in the side ditch of the road with nobody coming by for hours is heaps lower at 6am compared to 1am.

Re:eight hours isn't very long (2)

El_Muerte_TDS (592157) | about 5 months ago | (#46745685)

Won't the lights of the cars passing by charge the lines a bit and thus extend the duration?

Re:eight hours isn't very long (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46746973)

Won't the lights of the cars passing by charge the lines a bit and thus extend the duration?

Only on roads with enough traffic to make the whole thing unnecessary.

Re:eight hours isn't very long (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46745959)

The solution for long winter nights is over a hundred years old: radium paint.
Makes "glow in the dark" sound more interesting, too.

Video of the road (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46744837)

Just found a video on dutch TV
http://nos.nl/video/634091-eerste-autoweg-met-glowing-lines.html

Re:Video of the road (2)

CdXiminez (807199) | about 5 months ago | (#46747175)

The man in the video mentions that, when daylight is insufficient to light up the lines, a tiny bit of electricity is used to make it glow.

Just use headlights (3, Insightful)

Gavagai80 (1275204) | about 5 months ago | (#46744843)

Those of us who don't live in cities have been driving fine at night without streetlights forever. No special paint needed. Cars have headlights.

Re:Just use headlights (3, Interesting)

Mashiki (184564) | about 5 months ago | (#46744907)

Those of us who don't live in cities have been driving fine at night without streetlights forever. No special paint needed. Cars have headlights.

I'm guessing you don't actually live anywhere that has serious wear and tear on their roads, otherwise you'd know that by the time half the winter is over that the paint is already worn down to the point where it's useless. And of course, if it's raining good luck on seeing those lines at all. Luckily HID lamps have helped with this, but don't get stuck driving on any Canadian highway anywhere between the months of: January(sometimes if it's really bad, this can hit as early as early November) through June when there is: Snow, rain, slush, mud, slop, dirt, or less than 50% sunlight.

And don't count on the shoulders to be a guide, because we don't really use them in most cases. Though if you're driving on a major highway like the 400 series(401,402,403,etc), some parts of the Trans-Canada, and a few other busy highways, we do have rumble strips.

Re:Just use headlights (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46745109)

Yup!

I live in Nova Scotia and frequently work night shifts. During this time of year (the so called "pothole season") the highway I take to work (NS Trunk 7 if curious) is both poorly lit and littered with rim bending potholes. Occasionally you get the combination of potholes, paint that is long faded, rain, and no moon.. it makes driving a real nightmare.

Re:Just use headlights (1)

Viol8 (599362) | about 5 months ago | (#46745435)

Most people don't live in a country with exceptional winter weather like that. For the relatively mild winters that northern europe gets and hence the reasonable state of the roads - headlights are fine.

Re:Just use headlights (1)

Gavagai80 (1275204) | about 5 months ago | (#46745611)

This is true, I live in California and the roads are good. Is the Netherlands that bad though?

Re:Just use headlights (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46745745)

The weather conditions in the Netherlands are actually quite moderate. It hardly ever gets below -10 degrees C or above 30 degrees C. Snow is quite rare (a couple of days per year). Rain is abundant, though. Road damage due to winter conditions happens occasionally, but road surfaces, including surface markings, typically last many winters (10+).

Re:Just use headlights (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46745817)

Uhh, we plow I-80 for 4 months of the year in Norcal, and we still have lane markings. Maybe you're doing it wrong.

Re:Just use headlights (1)

Anrego (830717) | about 5 months ago | (#46746465)

Meanwhile here in Atlantic Canada.. we're lucky to have a little asphalt between the potholes, let alone lane markings you can actually see at night/when it's raining.

And we totally are doing it wrong. Cheap paint, shoddy quick patch jobs that sometimes fail in the same day (I sat in a tim hortons looking out the window and watched in awe as a team poured some filler into a hole filled with water. The water was literally splashing out as they poured).

It's gotten so bad that it's actually a major news story here.

Re: Just use headlights (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46745327)

Yes, but now you can drive twice as fast without headlights while smoking weed!

wile e. coyote will love this (1)

kylemonger (686302) | about 5 months ago | (#46744845)

I'm reminded of the Road Runner cartoon where the Coyote paints a stripe that leads off the roadway and into a rock face. Let's hope no one in the Netherlands both enjoys our cartoons and has a mischievous streak.

Re:wile e. coyote will love this (5, Funny)

91degrees (207121) | about 5 months ago | (#46744983)

Thisis The Netherlands... I don't think they have rock faces. Or hills. Or topology generally.

Re:wile e. coyote will love this (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46745117)

They have some sort of topology. It's the distinction between above the ocean level, below the ocean level and still dry and below the ocean level and no longer dry ;).

Re:wile e. coyote will love this (2)

GrahamCox (741991) | about 5 months ago | (#46745211)

Or a mischievous streak.

video of the road (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46744847)

there is a video of the road on dutch television. video of the road [nos.nl]
It does look quite nice!

Re:video of the road (2)

Amouth (879122) | about 5 months ago | (#46745031)

Wish i had mod points, first useful example of the actual thing.

They do look quite nice, and i'd love to have them where i live, and if they can get rid of the light pollution by reducing the number of street lights i'd be all for them (and willing to pay extra for it too).

Personally i see more value in the temperature sensitive idea, i'd love to see coloration showing up on roads and bridges when the surface temps get down to freezing. Where i live we don't get a lot of snow and ice, but when we do it shuts the place down because people don't know how to spot, avoid, and/or handle it. Giving a visual indication that conditions are right for ice/black ice would be wonderful.

Re:video of the road (1)

iamweasel (1217570) | about 5 months ago | (#46745147)

The last three cars I've owned have temperature sensors and would make a noise and display a warning on the dash when the outside temperature fell to or below 4 degrees celsius.

The temperature sensor may fail, but the road markings etc. will also fade / wear out and most importantly be obscured when there is ice on the road. Overall I think the paint would look nice, but be expensive to maintain and simply be a unnecessary distraction.

Incidentally I feel that way about the bleeping and the warning my car gives when temperatures fall, but at least the temperature sensor is mostly a one-time cost, rather than something requiring annual upkeep from public funds.

Re:video of the road (2)

Amouth (879122) | about 5 months ago | (#46745463)

For the temperature, it depends on where you live. If they are covered with snow & Ice then it is obvious, and if the temp is below 0C then it's obvious. but where i live we have a lot of humid wind and bridges. This means you can have black ice when it is 40F or below. funny thing about black ice is it doesn't cover up the road, unless you can catch a glare off of it you can't tell it's there till you hit it.

I think it would be nice to have a color change at least on bridges to show that the surface is below freezing, to warn drivers that there is a strong possibility of black ice.

wouldn't work for most places, but would be really useful for where i live.

Re:video of the road (1)

iamweasel (1217570) | about 5 months ago | (#46746027)

I do live in a place where black ice occurs frequently. I also think most people driving around here are aware of the temperature and, with any experience, the driving conditions in that weather.

There are of course places where black ice occurs far more frequently that elsewhere, and yes, maybe in those places paint on the road surface could be more noticeable than a simple warning sign.

There was a corner near where my parent's live, which would form black ice very regularly. I would shout "black ice!" to people approaching by bike / motorbike when going to school, but almost everyone not aware of the tendency on that curve would wipe out anyway. Cars would skid until they found traction. A dangerous place to be walking around at times of the year.

For this to be (cost-)effective the places where black ice forms regularly would need to be recognized, cataloged and then painted on a regular schedule. Should this happen, then maybe this could be workable. Too many places with paint and it would offer no benefit since it would just be ignored, and most of the time a better solution would be to renovate those places such that black ice shouldn't form there anyway. As the paint was depicted in the article, as a continuous sea of snowflakes, it would only serve as a distraction making the road surface "too busy", possibly just distracting enough that you wouldn't notice something you really should have (like a kid walking to school.)

Freezing rain as a cause for black ice causes it to be everywhere and I think anyone traveling on a continuous sheet of ice is pretty much aware of it.

There might be a point for a application of the paint in some places where you cannot engineer black ice from forming, but as a ubiquitous road surface temperature gauge, not so much.

Re:video of the road (-1, Flamebait)

Anne Thwacks (531696) | about 5 months ago | (#46746123)

when it is 40F or below

This is Europe. It can't be below 40F because we use centigrade/Celcius.

Re:video of the road (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46745165)

Now that most cars give a warning when they sense that ground temperature is close to freezing, I am not sure it is all that useful anymore.

Maybe that's intresting trivia to you... (3, Interesting)

bickerdyke (670000) | about 5 months ago | (#46744853)

...but the "Autobahn" in Germany never had any kind of electrical lighting (besides retroreflecting paint for the road markings) and even at night large parts of it are considered save enough to not have speed limits - even at night!

Re:Maybe that's intresting trivia to you... (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46745141)

There is no speed limit for some roads, but there are still general rules about how fast you are allowed to drive (adjusting your speed to the conditions of the road, weather, etc.). You have to be able to stop in the part of the road that you can see for example, which excludes cruising along at high speeds with insufficient lights for your speed.

Re:Maybe that's intresting trivia to you... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46745889)

I'm quite sure that the German population doesn't agree with you. They'll easily drive 100mph in full darkness running on the assumption that anything that's on the Autobahn will have lights as well and should be easy enough to spot from that.

Re:Maybe that's intresting trivia to you... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46745177)

Many urban and semi-urban Autobahns have some lighting at night, especially around interchanges.

deneme (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46744915)

teekkürler saolun plastik dorama [unalpenyapi.com] olarak her zaman takip ediyoruz

Glowing roads... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46744945)

Inspired by Tron!

Re:Glowing roads... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46744951)

I bet turning 90 degrees while driving 80mph is really challenging.

UK has had LED version for years (2)

hazeii (5702) | about 5 months ago | (#46744977)

Here in the southern UK we've had solar LED road studs for years - they are used on some A roads and mark line dividers, road edges and turn-offs in place of the usual cats-eyes. Work pretty well too (though I find them a bit 'stroby', like some vehicle brake lights).

Re:UK has had LED version for years (2)

fellip_nectar (777092) | about 5 months ago | (#46745107)

Yep, I remember the first ones installed near where I live were removed because they allegedly caused accidents due to drivers being distracted by them, because unlike regular cats' eyes, they're visible in the rear view mirror.

I don't like cat eyes of either type (1)

Viol8 (599362) | about 5 months ago | (#46745447)

Mainly because they don't work as well as is claimed. Having a couple of dots of light every few metres isn't nearly as clear as having glowing road lines. I suppose however in their favour the eyes last much longer.

Another issue however with cats eyes is the effect they have on tyres. Its conveniently never mentioned by the govn but driving over hard lumps of metal in the road - even if they do squash down a bit - at high speed over the years when changing lanes will wear out your tyres faster and can I suspect even cause failures if the tyre is already on the verge of going.

Re:I don't like cat eyes of either type (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46745839)

Yes, of course if your tyres are unsafe due to excessive wear, a cats eye (or a discarded beer can, or a small rock) could cause one to suddenly fail.

Can you guess what the correct thing to do about that is?

Well you're not an American so perhaps you can - buy new tyres when the old ones are worn.

Re:I don't like cat eyes of either type (1)

Viol8 (599362) | about 5 months ago | (#46746073)

Yes, very good. Except discarded beer cans and rocks arn't usually found every 2 metres on a motorway that you do 70mph on.

This will just cause more accidents (1)

iamweasel (1217570) | about 5 months ago | (#46745017)

I guess that with this paint one is able to see the edges of the road more clearly, but I don't think that was ever a big problem with "just" retroreflective markings.

I think, that the light from these new markings will only blind you from things just beside the road (think pedestrians, cyclists and animals) which you would probably see better with just the headlights without something shining in your face. I mean try to see what's behind someone holding a flashlight in the dark. More light from the road surface will just prevent you from seeing the darker contrasts. That's why street lighting is installed above, not on the sides of the road, or on the road itself!

Some people also insist they see better when driving in the dark with their fog lights on... Yeah, you'll see the road surface right in front of the car better, but the extra light from the road just in front will only blind you from things further away, taking away your chance to react to something unexpected further down the road.

I think these markings are no replacement for street lighting and will simply just cause more accidents. For savings, it would be better just to turn off the street lighting and leave the existing markings as they were.

There is a distinct because-we-can factor (1)

Jos Geluk (3521957) | about 5 months ago | (#46745085)

Keep in mind that this guy is an artist first and foremost. The point of the glowing stripes is as much about how cool it looks, as it is about road safety.

Netherlands made many genuine road design advances (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46745111)

but this isn't one of them...

If you want to emulate the impressive road safety and convenience of roads in the Netherlands, copy the good stuff, not the hyped stuff [aviewfromt...lepath.com] .

A simpler solution (2)

BetterThanCaesar (625636) | about 5 months ago | (#46745213)

A simpler solution would be to just let all the genetically engineered, glow-in-the-dark lab animals out in the wild. The roadkill will light up the roads.

I can see it now (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46745297)

Tourists who have no idea, who came to amsterdam to take shrooms, and they step out at night and see glowing roads and think they're totally tripping...

Weather (1)

Triv (181010) | about 5 months ago | (#46745309)

Forgive a potentially stupid question, but how is this going to work with snow on the ground?

Re:Weather (2)

zwarte piet (1023413) | about 5 months ago | (#46745355)

Hahaha, snow in Netherlands. Doesn't happen very often and when temperatures approach freezing they put salt on the roads before there even is that 1cm of snow. I know, terribly overorganized.....

Re:Weather (1)

careysub (976506) | about 5 months ago | (#46746679)

A snow covered road is unsafe to drive on for the general public (no 4-wheel drive and no snow tires/chains) - so removing the snow is generally a very high priority (plows and salt). The times when snow is covering the strip will be rare.

Japan was first. (0)

some old guy (674482) | about 5 months ago | (#46745421)

I believe there are many roads in the Fukishima area that glow a pretty blue-green.

Cloudy days no problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46745467)

I dunno if it's in TFA (who reads it). But if it's cloudy the paint will be loaded by electricity I heard in the Dutch morning news Wakker Nederland.

old news and incorrect (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46745731)

the special thing about the paint that if they put a small current trough it it actually starts emitting light so having dark days doesnt matter anymore

Light Pollution (1, Interesting)

barakn (641218) | about 5 months ago | (#46746093)

Seeing as how all of the light is directed upward, this adds to light pollution, which some people blame a lot of problems on: http://darkskyinitiative.org/ [darkskyinitiative.org]

mod doWN (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46746645)

fly...don't fear Am protesting FreeBSD used to noises out of the and, after initial

Negative Review of this Idea from a Pro-Dutch Blog (1)

careysub (976506) | about 5 months ago | (#46746741)

This blog extolling Dutch road design innovation [aviewfromt...lepath.com] is nonetheless quite dismissive of the "glowing paint" idea, and mentions the use of glass bead retroreflectors (as in the UK) as a much better idea. It makes a good case.

I have a better idea (1)

RogueWarrior65 (678876) | about 5 months ago | (#46747133)

Instead of using luminescent paint for the lines, why can't we imbed piezoelectric crystals into the tarmac that would generate light from the mass of the vehicle. That way you'd see this glow where the cars are.

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