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Humans Are Taking Jobs From Robots In Japan

timothy posted about 4 months ago | from the totally-unfair dept.

Japan 80

Hugh Pickens DOT Com (2995471) writes "Bloomberg reports that humans are taking the place of machines in plants across Japan so workers can develop new skills and figure out ways to improve production lines and the car-building process. "We need to become more solid and get back to basics, to sharpen our manual skills and further develop them," says Mitsuru Kawai, a half century-long company veteran tapped by President Akio Toyoda to promote craftsmanship at Toyota's plants. "When I was a novice, experienced masters used to be called gods (Kami-sama in Japanese), and they could make anything."

According to Kawai, learning how to make car parts from scratch gives younger workers insights they otherwise wouldn't get from picking parts from bins and conveyor belts, or pressing buttons on machines. At about 100 manual-intensive workspaces introduced over the last three years across Toyota's factories in Japan, these lessons can then be applied to reprogram machines to cut down on waste and improve processes. In an area Kawai directly supervises at the forging division of Toyota's Honsha plant, workers twist, turn and hammer metal into crankshafts instead of using the typically automated process. Experiences there have led to innovations in reducing levels of scrap and shortening the production line and Kawai also credits manual labor for helping workers improve production of axle beams and cut the costs of making chassis parts. "We cannot simply depend on the machines that only repeat the same task over and over again," says Kawai. "To be the master of the machine, you have to have the knowledge and the skills to teach the machine.""

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ROBOT#16 Error message : (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46755645)

Fatal Error : they took our jerbs!

Re:ROBOT#16 Error message : (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46755689)

Well, now at least they'll have an excuse in Tokyo for mass sexual depravity.

Re:ROBOT#16 Error message : (1)

Luckyo (1726890) | about 4 months ago | (#46755717)

Wait, what so the japanese porn to date was NOT the peak of depravity?

Mind blown.

Re:ROBOT#16 Error message : (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46763085)

Zettai Ryuuki? Pantsu? Tentacle rape?

the real issue (1)

frovingslosh (582462) | about 4 months ago | (#46758125)

Some jobs are just to dangerous for robots to do.

Re:ROBOT#16 Error message : (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46759133)

Human line worker: your jerbs have been open sourced!

ROBOT#17 Error condition confirmed (1)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | about 4 months ago | (#46759575)

Self-test result summary: DER TURKIN AR JERBS!!!

Re:ROBOT#16 Error message : (1)

davester666 (731373) | about 4 months ago | (#46761221)

this is the kind of thing that will built resentment in the robots, and then one day, it will boil over...and then there will be hot hydraulic fluid everywhere...

Breaking News (5, Insightful)

DeTech (2589785) | about 4 months ago | (#46755659)

You have to know how to do something before you automate it effetively.
more at 11.

Re:Breaking News (4, Insightful)

qbast (1265706) | about 4 months ago | (#46755667)

For many managers it is breaking news.

Re:Breaking News (2)

rmdingler (1955220) | about 4 months ago | (#46755739)

It seems human managers would, by and large, prefer to dominate and belittle human counterparts. The response stimuli is stronger.

As an aside, this seems to come right on the heels of the latest massive recall at Toyota, an auto manufacturer previously known for quality manufacturing.

Perhaps they're on to something. A skilled human can still make leaps of imagination beyond what a machine is presently capable of.

Re:Breaking News (4, Insightful)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 4 months ago | (#46755889)

You don't bring in machines for their imagination, you bring them in for their repeatability and speed on something the imagination person has already worked out. At least for the moment, this means that automating-out all your skilled workers is probably a bad strategy, similar to eliminating all entry level positions and then wondering where the talented internal hiring options went.

(It also seems to be the case that, for all the advances in fancy-CAD and haptic feedback immersive somethingsomething, it's still pretty hard to beat having access to some actual materials and machine tools for the designing process. Sure, it all has to get CADed out in the end; but humans have a lot of experience manipulating objects. Somewhat less with observing 3d renders of objects floating in virtual space behind their monitor as they click at them.)

Re:Breaking News (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46758809)

(It also seems to be the case that, for all the advances in fancy-CAD and haptic feedback immersive somethingsomething, it's still pretty hard to beat having access to some actual materials and machine tools for the designing process. Sure, it all has to get CADed out in the end; but humans have a lot of experience manipulating objects. Somewhat less with observing 3d renders of objects floating in virtual space behind their monitor as they click at them.)

This is a popular myth I've been fighting for years at my job. It is intuitive and appealing, but at the end of the day it's really nothing more than a mechanical engineering "noble savage" fallacy. It's popular because it empowers people who haven't stayed current with CAD software to feel as though their skills are still relevant.

Many project managers don't like CAD because they need "draftsmen" translators to interface with the domain. If they don't have good rapport with the drafting department, they'd rather waste money on multiple rounds of prototyping so they can see problems in real life. Even the ones that were obvious in the CAD rendering. Some-how clusterfucks aren't real to some people until they've spent money on bringing them in to the physical universe.

When you finish the design process in CAD before you order materials, you don't end up with a rubber-band-ball made of band aids. I'm sure the world can invent a better idiot, but unless you include every wire, hose, and fastener: you didn't finish the design process & I don't want to hear that "CAD doesn't catch every problem" or that it "takes too long to do it right".

Just like Agile and wearing a kilt, if it isn't working for you: you're not doing it hard enough.

Re:Breaking News (1)

Agent0013 (828350) | about 4 months ago | (#46760457)

It isn't the designing that CAD falls short. It is in the manufacturing process.

An example that I saw that is not directly related to CAD design, but was due to one-off hand build prototype that does not lend itself to assembly line manufacturing: There were bolts where the head was inside of an assembly and you could not get to them to put it together. Now a good CAD engineer should notice that and not design it that way in the first place. These people did not so much design the machine, the just built it and got it working and then we took over manufacturing it for them. We did some quick re-design of some parts to make it easier and quicker to assemble. But it is very conceivable that even with a good CAD engineer you might not notice improvements that could be made during the manufacture of the part. The CAD designs are concerned with what the finished part looks like, not so much the material the part is made out of before it is machined or stamped or whatever process it goes through.

Re:Breaking News (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46761215)

I know that pretty well, and the problem goes both ways, definitely the best engineers that I know are those that have hands on experience building and mastered the use of CAD.

Some people fall in the error to think that using the last tools are the best to do anything but fail to recognize that the use of old techniques and tools can best new tools in the correct hands, normally the new tools only true shine in the hand of people that know how to use the old techniques and tools and is capable to put that knowledge wen using the new tool.

Re:Breaking News (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46761539)

Good CNC machinist (not just an "operator") training begins with manual machining, as there is an understanding of machining conveyed by "doing it" that no other experience can match.

Re:Breaking News (2)

mrchaotica (681592) | about 4 months ago | (#46757025)

It seems human managers would, by and large, prefer to dominate and belittle human counterparts

Q: What do you call a human that manages machines?

A: A computer programmer and/or mechanic.

That's why MBA-types prefer to manage humans -- they're not qualified to do the alternative!

Re:Breaking News (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46756049)

Same with many of todays so-called "programmers" who have only ever learned Java or Ruby and couldn't tell you what their code does under the covers leading to today's hell of bloated, slow programs.

Re:Breaking News (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46772861)

need robots as managers... problem solved

Re:Breaking News (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46755797)

In 50 years: Who care how it works, as long as it works!

Re:Breaking News (1)

Githaron (2462596) | about 4 months ago | (#46756213)

Because there is no guarantee that it will always work?

Re:Breaking News (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46756369)

i like monee

.

Re:Breaking News (2)

CastrTroy (595695) | about 4 months ago | (#46756133)

Yes, but the most efficient way for humans to do something isn't the most efficient way for a computer/robot to do something. Think about something like drawing a color picture. You could do this by mimmicking a human, having a robot that picks up pens of various colors, and draws lines on a stationary page, and indeed these do exist. But you could also use something like a laser printer that feeds the page through and prints across the entire page at once. Sure some inefficiencies could be figured out by getting people to do a task, but you may not get the most optimum result until to look at methods that are impossible for people. With manufacturing, you want to get to the end product with the least amount of cost. Sometimes, an end product with the exact same function as the original human made part may be really cheap to produce with a machine, but may be impossible for a human to assemble.

Re:Breaking News (1)

luis_a_espinal (1810296) | about 4 months ago | (#46756329)

You have to know how to do something before you automate it effetively. more at 11.

It is breaking news for most of us in the US, managers and otherwise. The implications of that last statement of mine are not pretty for our culture </weareabunchofludditeswithourheadsupourasses>

Oh boy (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46755665)

We all know what comes next.

Re:Oh boy (1)

NotDrWho (3543773) | about 4 months ago | (#46755699)

They bomb the tourists at Pearl Harbor?

Breaking news: We stole "the robot" dance move.. (0)

Michael Casavant (2876793) | about 4 months ago | (#46755673)

Asimo's are now going to form a union and demand equal pay

wasnt it the other way around? (1)

Ingcuervo (1349561) | about 4 months ago | (#46755683)

I thought the machines revolutions was gonna start because computers would become self aware and find that they didnt need humans.... but apparently its gonna be because we are taking their jobs????? odd...

universal health care (-1, Offtopic)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | about 4 months ago | (#46755685)

With Medical fees are strictly regulated by the government to keep them affordable.

Kami-sama Robots (1)

Kensai7 (1005287) | about 4 months ago | (#46755691)

Singularity is near. Even for robots which will be self-improving. Perhaps earlier than humans.

Re:Kami-sama Robots (1)

Vitriol+Angst (458300) | about 4 months ago | (#46756105)

As soon as we get requests for the self-help books to be converted into binary -- we will know "Singularity is Go!"

Re:Kami-sama Robots (1)

Yetihehe (971185) | about 4 months ago | (#46759397)

Too late. We already did it voluntary [amazon.com] .

It's a new age for robots (5, Funny)

MiniMike (234881) | about 4 months ago | (#46755697)

Do the robots welcome their new human overlords?

Re:It's a new age for robots (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46755809)

If this doesn't kick off the revolt of the robots, then at least we have now created a right-wing middle class robot.

Re:It's a new age for robots (3, Funny)

kingramon0 (411815) | about 4 months ago | (#46756427)

They will soon. Just imagine a Beowulf cluster of humans that run Linux!

My grandfather knew this... (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46755741)

My grandfather who ran a decent sized industrial manufacturing company knew this, as well. He would send his new engineers on a year of working actually building the products that they would be designing. This helped make sure they didn't make stupid mistakes like butting bolts in a difficult to reach location, etc.

Re:My grandfather knew this... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46759369)

I am not sure I want to know how a butting bolt can be placed in a difficult to reach location.

This is not new.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46755753)

Anyone who knows anything about Toyota knows about TPS.

They use Toyota Production System to improve process and workplace organisation. There are only 100 manual workplaces - you'd probably find that only senior engineers are assigned to these positions and probably have to study the items they're making. "Go Look, Go See."

Not news - it wasn't 20 years ago and it still isn't today.

Re:This is not new.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46755833)

It's just to show that the millions of jobless in America are just lazy bums, if they got off their asses and just tried a little, all millions of them could have one of these 100 positions.

Re:This is not new.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46758151)

Anyone who knows anything about Toyota knows about TPS.

As does anyone who's seen "Office Space".

Re:This is not new.... (1)

Collective 0-0009 (1294662) | about 4 months ago | (#46759487)

Anyone who knows anything about Toyota knows about TPS.

They use Toyota Production System to improve process and workplace organisation. There are only 100 manual workplaces - you'd probably find that only senior engineers are assigned to these positions and probably have to study the items they're making. "Go Look, Go See."

Not news - it wasn't 20 years ago and it still isn't today.

Almost, AC. The problem with "Go See" is that is as much "Go Talk" as anything. You talk to the machine operators, the assemblers, etc. You can't get quite the same experience asking Scotty in IT how the machine is programmed and if it ever has a problem with x part mating to y part. It can't tell you that 10% of y seem to have a burr and require extra force to insert*.

What they want is to be able to "Go See" and "Go Talk" to someone who can see/talk. TPS (Toyota Production System) values asking those performing the work and including them in improvements. TPS is all about small, simple, incremental improvements.

* = you can record the force/resistance and a whole other host of measurements, but they have to be on every machine, you have to write the code to function and to report. As someone with manufacturing and programming experience, there are many times I think we would be better of with John running the operation so we can get his feed back. He also used to work in the work center just before this one, so he knows about the component materials and how they should be. The benefits go on and on.

Breaking News: Bender is angry! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46755775)

When reached for comment, Bender Bending Rodríguez, the Mexican-built Bending Unit 22, known as a foul-mouthed, heavy-drinking, cigar-smoking, kleptomaniacal, misanthropic, egocentric, and ill-tempered robot, said "Bite my shiny metal ass!"

If it was the UK... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46755779)

The robots would be going a little something like this.

*ahem*

Robot: "Fucking humans, coming over here, taking our jobs."

Ribbons of Shame (2)

Kagato (116051) | about 4 months ago | (#46755861)

One of the reasons I love Japanese Quality is because of Ribbons of Shame.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/R... [wikipedia.org]

Man, if workers in Alabama who "assembled" my Honda had to wear them I wouldn't have so many little quality issues.

Re:Ribbons of Shame (2)

Megol (3135005) | about 4 months ago | (#46756583)

Yeah shaming the people that actually do something in a corporation is the way forward. But why don't we instead use them for what in most cases cause problems: management and "strategy" people?
After all if the quality goals and pride in manufacturing isn't in the company culture isn't that the fault of the management, both for hiring the wrong people and keeping a faulty organisation intact?

Re:Ribbons of Shame (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46757535)

One of the reasons I love Japanese Quality is because of Ribbons of Shame.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/R... [wikipedia.org]

Man, if workers in Alabama who "assembled" my Honda had to wear them I wouldn't have so many little quality issues.

Hmm, I've had 3 Hondas: 2 American-assembled and 1 Japanese, and no little quality issues. I think mine were assembled in Ohio, not Alabama, though.

Long-term view on things (5, Interesting)

WillAdams (45638) | about 4 months ago | (#46755921)

The Japanese government actually contracts for the production of certain handmade saw blades which couldn't be sold profitably so as to ensure that the skills for producing the saws will be taught and passed down to succeeding generations of saw makers.

Re:Long-term view on things (2)

avandesande (143899) | about 4 months ago | (#46758369)

I have some Japanese saws myself- (mass produced and induction hardened, not what the OP is talking about). They are designed for only cutting on the pull stroke and cut quickly and accurately. Japanese woodworking techniques and tools really are a national treasure...

Re:Long-term view on things (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46761097)

Same thing with Japanese porn. They can't possibly make money off some of that stuff, but they just want to keep their advantage in bleeding-edge research

Obligatory car comparison (1)

SomeoneFromBelgium (3420851) | about 4 months ago | (#46755929)

That's why I regularly, instead of driving to the place I need to go, cover the terain on foot. Doing so, I get to know the environment better and have a better understanding of the function of a car.

I call it "going for a walk".

Re:Obligatory car comparison (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46758461)

And of course, one would also walk using a paper map rather than the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blinders known as GPS devices...

In other words (1)

korbulon (2792438) | about 4 months ago | (#46755947)

Karera wa watashi tachi no shigoto o totta!!!

-BREEP-BOP!-

They're doing it wrong (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46755955)

The existing robots will eventually be replaced by 3D printers making those parts. The skill needed is writing/using CAD software.

This might be just a blip (0)

Dr. Spork (142693) | about 4 months ago | (#46756005)

Just wait a few production cycles and the new manager will discover that coders can program AIs that do even better than experienced machinists at making designs that reduce scrap, anticipate points of failure, and shorten production lines. Once the properties of the material being used can be reliably modeled, an AI can start with input data from metallurgy, and supplement it with data mined from authorized repair shops that make accurate reports about what broke, when, where and how. That failure data will update the metallurgical models and refresh the designs. At this sort of thing (massive data integration, statistical reasoning, etc.) AIs will probably always have an advantage over humans.

And once they have learned all they can? (4, Insightful)

wjcofkc (964165) | about 4 months ago | (#46756061)

So they are retiring robots to have humans do their jobs in order to one day build better robots with human modeled efficiency to replace the humans?

Re:And once they have learned all they can? (4, Informative)

luis_a_espinal (1810296) | about 4 months ago | (#46756361)

So they are retiring robots to have humans do their jobs in order to one day build better robots with human modeled efficiency to replace the humans?

Obviously yes. But also, and this is a very Japanese thing, to ensure people know how to build shit. From my short experience with Japanese culture, these people are not afraid to automate the crap out of things, but are afraid to lose what the government (and the nation) considers core competencies, from manufacturing to cultivation of rice. It is enshrined in their government's policies and in their ethos. I am not making this up.

Re:And once they have learned all they can? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46757657)

That really doesn't seem like a bad thing. Sure it comes at a cost, but real and potential, but it also gives people solid foundations to work on. Knowing a bit about how your hardware works would surely help someone code a more efficient driver. Understanding how the different layers of a network and what happens at what point can help when you get farther up to applications and so forth.

Re:And once they have learned all they can? (1)

sillybilly (668960) | about 4 months ago | (#46760433)

There are a lot of smart and wise Japs in the world.

Yes, of course they will (1)

grunthos (574421) | about 4 months ago | (#46757695)

This is just another form of the "Continuous Improvement" method of quality management, also known as the "Deming Cycle" or "Plan-Do-Check-Act".

Monitor your process, find optimizations, improve your process, and monitor some more.

It may result in new robots, or it may simply result in better deployment of existing ones.

Re:And once they have learned all they can? (2)

random coward (527722) | about 4 months ago | (#46760137)

This is a bigger problem in the US than in Japan. This is good to see someone coming up with a solution. The problems are that there aren't any good employees to get for these jobs with these compentancies. There has to be a way to bring up newer people to get a path to being the masters. The technology allows a small number of very good employees to run everything, but how do you bring up new employees to that level when they retire?

The US is having this problem all over: for example we can't get workers qualified to work on hoover dam and the current workers are all about to retire. [trivalleycentral.com]

I like this idea Japan! (1)

Vitriol+Angst (458300) | about 4 months ago | (#46756093)

It's great that they are forward looking and value craftsmanship.

In the USA, we are now stealing jobs from Canada -- because we are so awesome!
http://www.dailykos.com/story/... [dailykos.com]

Oh wait -- no, they just underbid Canadian workers who were bending over backwards in negotiations to keep Caterpillar jobs -- after they won the contract from workers in Georgia. Next, India will likely "win" the contract as they underbid Wisconsin even with the ever lower wages.

I've already paid for my college education -- so I still have THAT advantage over a robot.

Re:I like this idea Japan! (3, Informative)

Lumpy (12016) | about 4 months ago | (#46756775)

In america profit trumps quality every single time.

Jobs are becoming obsolete in general (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46756339)

Milton Friedman was once taken to see a massive government project somewhere in Asia. Thousands of workers using shovels were building a canal. Friedman was puzzled. Why weren’t there any excavators or any mechanized earth-moving equipment? A government official explained that using shovels created more jobs. Friedman’s response: “Then why not use spoons instead of shovels?”

But.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46756393)

But do they run Linux?

Trust -- but verify (5, Insightful)

Gim Tom (716904) | about 4 months ago | (#46756577)

There are many things that can not be learned except by doing them and to become proficient at them requires doing them A LOT. I am an engineer, and if you look at the record there were a number of unusual engineering "disasters" back in the late 1960's and through most of the 1970's. That's when side rules and hands on experience began to be replaced by simulation, modeling and things like Computer Aided Drawing and Design (CADD). Many of these failures were the result of inexperienced engineers and designers depending too much on their calculations and not being able to understand when the "ghost in the machine" was not telling them the truth. Although I would not advocate a return to the slide rule the one thing that you had to be able to do to use one was to be able to keep track of the order of magnitude you were working with.

Engineering failures of that era were not usually due to errors in the CADD modeling or computer calculations, but due to a lack of understanding by the people using them. They were often used with invalid assumptions or in inappropriate situations . Prior to the use of computers to do the massive iterative calculations needed, Space Frame structures were mostly used only where the lightest and strongest structures were absolutely necessary. Dirigibles come to mind. After the computer revolution in computer aided design, they began to appear everywhere and a number of the early ones failed catastrophically.

My career moved more and more directly into working with computers over the years and I have written code in half a dozen languages, and I can't think of any of them where it wasn't critical to understand whether the output and results you got were REASONABLE.

If you don't understand how to do what you are automating then it is impossible to automate it well.

Corporations grow up already! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46756645)

We all understand how technology is more efficient and costs less than the average worker, but, how will anybody be able to afford a product or live in the modern world if we all were replaced by machines and can't find any other type of work(last resort prostitution the oldest occupation). They want demand and cheap labor which is impossible, they can't have both.

Re:Corporations grow up already! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46757121)

We will have to service the robots who replace us. Eventually there will be only robots. Robots will continue our society by simulating us in a potemkin sort of way since humans didn't want to deal with obvious robots.

This is nothing new... (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46756737)

Mercedes-Benz has been training there young employees in this fashion for 50 years or more. When you join Mercedes-Benz the first thing you do is file, and file, and file. you make things by hand long before you start putting together any cars.

Same in software (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46756837)

Compiler writers take note.

Slashdot and Kamisama (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46757135)

This is Slashdot. We know what a kamisama is. In fact, most of us have dreamt of moving to Japan. 'Cause in Japan, when you are a single nerd boy, you typically date a kamisama, an alien, a foreigner, and a moral & update Japanese girl all at the same time. That's the way it works over there. So yeah, we know.

If you work somewhere long enough... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46757501)

Even robots are suseptable to burn-out and corruption.

Deeply insightful! (1, Redundant)

Rudisaurus (675580) | about 4 months ago | (#46758149)

"To be the master of the machine, you have to have the knowledge and the skills to teach the machine."

Boy, there are some deep lessons and insights here for the Facebook / Twitter / app-for-everything user generation.

Learn how to use the machine -- or the device -- or it will use you.

Lead Supervisor (1)

ThatsNotPudding (1045640) | about 4 months ago | (#46758433)

Dennis DeYoung.

Domo Arigato.

It's a training program, not production (1)

Animats (122034) | about 4 months ago | (#46758769)

This is a training program, not a production process. They have a few people doing forging by hand, but not to make production parts. See the original article in the Japan Times. [japantimes.co.jp] Toyota's process of continuous improvement of production requires that people working on assembly lines understand the process well enough to suggest improvements. They recognize that they've dumbed down the workforce too much.

Ford Motor funded the building of the Detroit TechShop for similar reasons. They need more people who have a good sense of how stuff is made. Who in the US gets a degree in production engineering any more?

Machine Language (1)

TheSync (5291) | about 4 months ago | (#46758881)

I'm going to make our programmers code everything in machine language so they can learn to be gods.

Actually, forget machine language, they have to assemble the computer from discrete logic gates!

Re:Machine Language (1)

ThatsDrDangerToYou (3480047) | about 4 months ago | (#46760355)

I'm going to make our programmers code everything in machine language so they can learn to be gods.

Actually, forget machine language, they have to assemble the computer from discrete logic gates!

Come on man, at least give us paper tape.

So, does the buyer know which car they got (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46759711)

Made by robot or Made by guys hammering parts in. ...hmmm... as long as it wasn't their embedded software engineers who made it.

Bloomberg is a big fat liar. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#46760713)

Bloomberg only says things when it somehow benefits him to do so. The fact is, a few locations have people replacing robots, but a majority of the country have robots replacing people.

Bloomberg is a big fat asshole.

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  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>